Tag Archives for " Value "

TSE 1137: What Tool Should I Use For Video Conference Calls?

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The Sales Evangelist podcast features experts from all over the world, and Zoom helps us bridge the distance for video conference calls without added expense or travel. 

We use Zoom to power The Sales Evangelist Certified Sales Training, and it enables us to help sales reps and sales teams improve their skills, find the right customers, generate effective activities, establish successful strategies, build strong value, and close more deals.  

World travel

Zoom is a powerful video platform that makes it easy to communicate with people all over the world in a matter of minutes. It powers webinars, video conferencing, and video phone calls.

In the early days of The Sales Evangelist, we used Go To Meeting for our conferencing and demonstration needs. It was the Kleenex of the industry. 

Skype was available but it was mostly used for personal needs, like friends and family members looking to stay connected. Eventually, it was bought by Microsoft, and we tried using Skype Business for our podcast interviews. Though the audio quality was ok, the service frequently dropped calls. Additionally, because there was no way to record, I had to incorporate a third-party app to save our interviews. 

User-friendly

Around this time, a guest came on the show and shared his experience using Zoom. His company did all of its recording with Zoom and they liked that it integrated with a lot of other tools the company was already using. I was skeptical, but when I started my research, I discovered that a lot of other industry folks were using it as well. 

The audio quality was great and it didn’t generate a lot of background transformer-type noise. Other tools like Google Hangouts and join.me emerged, but they were clunky and complicated for the customer who was logging in. 

Selling points

Perhaps most importantly, Zoom was free to use. It didn’t have the same capabilities as the robust premium account, but I could log in and talk to someone for 45 minutes, or invite up to 100 different people to join me on a call. Eventually, I discovered I wanted access to the premium tools, and it was easy for me to transition to a paid account, as well as being cost-effective for a small business. 

Zoom offered high-quality HD video recording that I could record to my cloud account or use on my YouTube or social media channels. I could also connect it to Dropbox. 

It integrated easily with Slack, which made it easy for me to communicate internally with my team. Zoom also integrated seamlessly with Salesforce, Google Drive, Gmail, and Blackboard. In some cases, the connection requires Zapier, and in others, the tools connect directly. 

Sharing information

Zoom offers powerful educational capabilities as well. If I’m giving a demonstration, I can use the tools to underline or highlight important things, which gives the buyer complete interaction. Screenshare is an option, of course, and you can even use your cell phone. Screen shares work either plugged in or via wifi and Bluetooth. 

People buy after they recognize value. Engage your prospects by teaching them something they didn’t know before. Zoom allows you to accomplish that despite the fact that they are sitting in China and you’re in Milwaukee. 

Powerhouse

Zoom is a powerhouse that beats the pants off the big-name providers in the industry. If you’re planning to renew your GoToMeeting account, check out Zoom first. I’m not getting any money from them for doing this. I simply use Zoom daily and it’s perfect for the work that I do. 

Zoom Rooms allow you to gather multiple people on a screen, and the company is hosting a conference called Zoomtopia this October. Zoom is pushing the boundaries of connecting people, and the company continues growing. 

Even for the technologically-challenged people in our lives, Zoom works well because it’s user-friendly. 

“Video Conference Calls” episode resources

Check out Zoom.us for more information about video conferencing for your organization. 

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there. I’m fairly easy to connect with. Just comment on something about my podcast. Send me an email.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester. You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561) 578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

As a savvy seller, you’ll want to continue learning, and you can take advantage of a free 30-day trial, complete with a free audio book, on Audible. They have thousands of books to choose from and you can begin your free trial today. 

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. When you share your experiences with the show, others will read the reviews and give us a listen.

I truly appreciate you and appreciate your reviews and your subscription, and your willingness to tell your friends and anyone you know that’s in sales about the podcast.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

Bob Burg, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1128: Developing A Go-Giver Strategy!

 

Bob Burg, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistThe most financially profitable way to do business is to shift your focus from getting to giving, and by developing a Go-Giver strategy, you’ll constantly provide value and good things will begin to happen. 

Bob Burg is a salesman who has written a series of books about the Go-Giver, a parable about the principles behind the kind of success most sellers are hoping to achieve. Through encounters with a series of different people, the main character, Joe, discovers that his focus has been in the wrong place. 

Giving too much

Giving means providing value to others. Though it’s typically not possible to provide too much value, begin by determining whether your focus on providing value will set you up to be taken advantage of. There are plenty of people who are takers and who focus only on themselves. They feel entitled to take without giving anything back. 

If you’re providing value to someone like that, there’s a good chance things won’t work out.  Realize, though, that there’s no natural connection between being a go-giver and being taken advantage of. Understand, too, that if you’re being taken advantage of, it isn’t because you’re too nice; it’s because you’re allowing it to happen.

Being a go-giver doesn’t mean being a martyr or a doormat. It simply means your focus is on bringing value to the marketplace and to others. 

No one will buy from you because you need the money or you have a quota to meet. They’ll buy because they will be better off buying from you. 

Focus on value

The only reason people should buy from you is because they’ll be better off after they do. That truth allows the salesperson or entrepreneur to focus on bringing immense value to the marketplace and to the prospect’s life. When that happens, the prospect will prosper greatly. 

Money is simply an echo of value. Focus on the value rather than the money. Value comes first and the money you receive is a natural result of the value you provided. 

Human nature is self-interested. It allows us to create more human beings. 

Successful people deal in truth. They don’t deny inconvenient things, but rather they acknowledge truth and then work within it to make things better. 

Start by acknowledging and understanding self-interest. Then put it aside with the understanding that we’re better off dealing with others when we suspend our self-interest. The other person is only going to buy because of their own needs. 

Value without attachment

Although people often suggest you should give without expecting anything in return, Bob doesn’t exactly agree with that. Instead, give value without attachment to the result. We want people to expect good things. If you’re in business serving other people, you should expect to profit greatly because you’re bringing value to the marketplace. Just don’t be attached to that result. 

Give value because it’s who you are and what you do. When that happens you create a benevolent context for success. You develop great relationships with people who feel good about you. They know you, they like you, and they trust you, and they want to be part of your business. 

Develop an army of personal walking ambassadors who will refer business to you. 

Starting point

Imagine you decide at this point to change your ways. Start by asking who the people are in your network and what you can provide to them that will help them by bringing value to their lives. Then make a plan for meeting other people that you can develop know-like-and-trust relationships with. 

We’re human beings and we’re different types of people. The reason the Go-Giver took off is because it allows you to be yourself. You can be the person who wants to bring value to the marketplace. 

Most people choose a certain line of work because they believe in the mission. They believe in what they’re doing. We’re happy when we’re living congruently with our values. 

Go-Giver origins

Bob recalls his parents working to make people’s lives better. Then, when he started in sales, he found himself selling a product that offered great value, but he was focused largely on the sales process. Like Joe in the book, he was a seller who wasn’t living up to his potential. 

He returned from a non-selling appointment one day to hear advice from a guy in his organization. The typically-silent guy told him that if he wanted to make a lot of money in business, he should establish a target outside of making money. 

Target serving others, so that when you hit your target, you’ll get a reward in the form of money. Great salesmanship is about the other person and how he’ll benefit from your product or service. 

Economic downturn

Bob heard from a roofer during an economic crisis who recognized that his approach had been wrong. He was trying to save money during the downturn, but he realized that instead of trying to give the least he could for the money, he needed to focus on giving more value. 

It didn’t necessarily mean spending more, but rather creating a better experience. His business took off as a result. 

Technology has leveled off the playing field. We live in a commodity-based society which isn’t necessarily bad. It does mean that you must distinguish yourself. If you sell a widget that your customer can’t distinguish one from the other, it will always come down to price. If you sell on low price, you’re a commodity. If you sell on high value, you’re a resource. 

Communicating value

There are likely hundreds of way to communicate value, but Bob boils it down to five elements of value. 

  1. Excellence
  2. Consistency
  3. Attention
  4. Empathy
  5. Appreciation

To the degree that you can communicate these things to your customer, that’s the degree to which you take price and competition out of the picture. 

Begin with leadership, and with a leader who is totally committed to making this part of the culture. Anyone can lead from anywhere but culture trickles down from the top. If the leader invests in this and gets buy-in from other leaders, it becomes part of the culture. 

Bob Chapman of Barry-Wehmiller wrote a book called Everybody Matters in which he recalls running a profit-focused company. Though there is nothing wrong with profit, it must be sustainable, so it must be the result of the value you provide. Bob attended the wedding of his best friend’s daughter, and the father of the bride made a toast. He acknowledged that the groom was marrying a treasured daughter. Bob took that same concept to his business. 

Barry-Wehmiller has thousands of employees, all of whom are someone’s treasured sons and daughters. When the economic downturn emerged, rather than lay off any one employee, they came together as a company and traded work days. They stopped putting into the company savings account until the crisis was over. The corporate family came together in a crunch. 

Heart level

Herb Kelleher of Southwest Airlines understood the concept and he restructured the organization to focus first on allowing employees to thrive, learn, grow, and have fun. His team had a higher sense of purpose in their jobs. 

As a result, the team takes care of the customers and the customers take care of the shareholders. 

Until you know there’s a problem that needs to be fixed, you’ll never take the steps to address it. 

Be willing to shift your focus. 

When Bob’s business partner sends a sales letter, he makes an effort to take the “I,” “me,” and “we,” out of the letter. We’re self-interested human beings and we write in terms of how great we are and how great the product is. 

We aren’t denying self-interest. We’re acknowledging that you have to work at placing  your focus on others. 

“Developing A Go-Giver Strategy” episode resources

You can find Bob’s podcast, The Go-Giver Podcast, at his website. You can also grab samples chapters of his books before you buy them. Consider subscribing to his list to get a copy of a written resource called Endless Prospects

The Go-Giver way teaches you to build relationships with solid step-by-step information. 

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump. If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. 

Tools for sellers

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Enterprise Seller, Trong Nguyen

TSE 1126: How to Handle Major Challenges When Selling

Enterprise Seller, Trong Nguyen

The sales landscape is always changing but by gathering insights from other sellers we can determine how to handle major challenges when selling

Brandon Bruce is co-founder of Cirrus Insight and he’s going to address how to we can get out of our own zone, where we focus exclusively on ourselves and our companies and seek opportunities to interact with other people. 

Today’s episode is a reboot of episode 736, with great information about long-term strategy, providing value, and email outreach.

Evolving sales

The world of sales is constantly evolving. One of the challenges Brandon sees with sales right now is an unspoken push that exists. Because there are a bunch of companies at the growth stage, and a bunch of companies just starting out, there’s a tremendous amount of energy in the sales industry. 

There’s a premium on hitting numbers. Everyone is hustling and trying to find a way to build a better mousetrap. On the negative side, sellers might be hyperfocused on closing deals so that they forget to prioritize the personal connection. Because connections take time, and sales reps get antsy, we sometimes try to speed things along. 

We don’t want to close a deal next month; we want to close it this month. 

Brandon believes there’s a happy medium to be found. We must work to focus on building sustainable relationships even while we focus on making our numbers. 

Long-term success

Companies that focus too narrowly on numbers will likely struggle to achieve long-term customer success. The customers won’t stay as long because the deals were one-time kinds of relationships. It’s easier for customers to walk away when the customer doesn’t know us well. 

Brandon remembers buying a countertop, a one-time purchase, from a company that worked to develop a relationship with him. They were struggling to find exactly what he wanted until they discovered an unused countertop in a storage area. It was exactly what he needed, and it was something a previous customer decided against using. And the company sold it to him for 50 percent off. 

He calls it a great selling experience because they listened to his needs and they thought about how they could best help him. And even when they had a chance to make more money off the deal, they sold it to him at a great price. 

Even though he won’t be in the market for a countertop anytime soon, they created an evangelist in him. If anyone should ask where to buy a countertop, he’ll absolutely recommend that company. 

They closed a deal, they moved product, and they build a sustainable relationship. 

Evangelizing

We should probably remind ourselves to focus on doing the right thing, and sometimes allowing ourselves to take the easy option. We’re tempted to feel like we should push a little harder, but sometimes we can take the easy deal that leaves the customer feeling satisfied. 

Your customer will become an evangelist for your company. You might have missed a chance to get a little more from them, but because you gave them more, you’ll have the opportunity to earn more from them. 

Building customer relationships benefits your long-run philosophy. 

Raving fan

I joined an organization that gave its sellers to the book, Raving Fans, as part of its onboarding process. It helped us understand the value of customers who bought our solution and then stayed with us to upgrade and buy more later. 

It’s valuable to have a customer who likes your product and who will promote you on social media and leave you reviews. A raving fan might take you to their next three jobs, or mention you on their podcast. 

It has less to do with building a predictable sales machine and more to do with building a fan base who is passionate and who might do unpredictable things. 

Reaching out to prospects

It’s getting harder and harder to reach prospects, and sellers use a variety of tactics to do it. 

E-commerce has gotten huge, and statistics show that buyers have done a tremendous amount of research before they engage in the sales process. Despite that, there’s still room for a lot of outreach and prospecting. But how can we bridge that gap if we have buyers who are already doing a lot of the work themselves?

Begin by making it really easy for your customers to have a conversation. Brandon’s company puts its calendars on the website so that customers who want to schedule time with them can immediately see what is available. Once they schedule a time, it will automatically appear on the company’s calendar. It’s buyer-driven versus seller-driven.

Prospects come to them more often now asking for a demo. Meeting them part-way helps to bridge that gap. 

Another option they use is the ability to place bulky slides in a web portal and then provide a link to it instead of putting the slide in an email. It’s useful because they can click on it and view it online. They don’t have to worry about malware or about a bulky attachment loading too slowly. 

They also get real-time analytics about their slide deck: they know which slide people are most interested in, and where they abandon the slides. The team can then offer to follow up with a demo.

Meeting halfway

Brandon calls the process meeting halfway, which he said is how the best sales always happen. It’s a buyer saying, “I’m ready to buy,” and a seller saying, “We’re pretty interested in selling to you.” It creates a partnership where everyone brings something to the table. 

Persuade by sharing insights. Many people have a distaste for sales because they perceive it as a seller trying to trick a buyer in buying something he doesn’t need. But that’s not selling. That’s trickery. 

Sales is an art and not a science. It can’t be reduced to an algorithm, at least not yet, because it involves nuanced decisions as part of the relationship. In his own case, the company was looking to make a purchase, but the VP of marketing was skittish because the company wasn’t pushing for the sale at all. It left her with the sense that they don’t really want their business. 

The art results from trying to find the right amount of positive pressure to get the deal closed. It’s figuring out what your buyer needs and wants to hear, telling them, and moving the conversation forward. 

Email outreach

Email outreach is difficult and it has gotten harder over the lifetime of Brandon’s company. As with any trend in technology, as more and more people come on board with automation, there’s simply more volume. Those on the receiving end are overwhelmed by it, and it’s hard to overcome the spam filters. It’s difficult to break through. 

Short emails work the best; perhaps two or three lines long with single sentence paragraphs. It must be super easy to read at a glance because people don’t tend to read deep content. 

Clearly state what you do and provide a link or two. Make it very easy for the user to click and say, “I want to learn more.” They’re much simpler than the newsletter-type emails that are rich in image and video. Google and other filters often knock those out. It’s a simple, text-based email with an intriguing subject. 

Recognize that vanity metrics might get you a 100-percent open rate, but they don’t drive conversations, and conversations drive sales. 

Consider asking other people in your industry for feedback. Brandon likes to send ideas to other tech founders and ask if his ideas seem insane or totally off-base. Because it’s a very giving community, people often write back to offer thoughts and ideas. 

Keep the excitement

Sales will always be a hustle. It won’t ever be easy. It’s a nice idea to think that you can create some kind of machine that will keep the money rolling in, but it isn’t realistic. We must keep putting our heads down, hustling, and meeting the customers halfway. Make deals that are easy to say yes to and that leave your customers feeling confident about the decision. 

Let your audience know that doing business with you is easy. 

“How to Handle Major Challenges When Selling” episode resources

If you’d like to connect with Brandon, you can email him at brandon@cirrusinsight.com, or you can find him on LinkedIn

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump. If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. 

Tools for sellers

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

 

Corey Blake, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, BYU-Hawaii

TSE 1120: How To Build a Brand Online and Leverage it for Rapid Sales Growth

Corey Blake, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, BYU-Hawaii

Every sales professional and entrepreneur needs a profitable brand, and the key is to build a brand online and leverage it for rapid sales growth.

Corey Blake is the CEO at MWI, an international digital marketing agency. His background is in sales and business development and he has managed great sales teams over the years.

Validate your brand

When it comes to building a brand and then leveraging it for growth, you must begin by validating your brand. You basically want to turn off any sirens that the potential customer has about you as a seller.

We all know that a stigma exists around sellers, and you likely even experience it when someone gets on the phone with you to sell you something, despite the fact that you’re in sales yourself.

The biggest challenge often originates from the fact that we build great brands and we know we have value to offer, but we don’t know how to convince people to pay for it. How you validate your brand is critical in that process.

It’s simply legitimizing your brand, service, or product. You must find a third party or another way to validate it. You could share that your brand has been featured on certain sites or that you’ve been invited to certain events.

When you’re starting out, go to your customer. Offer to give a customer your product or service in exchange for their use of it. Explain that you think it will make his life better and that you’d like to ask for his testimonial.

Now you’ve got validation and social proof to use in your next sales conversation.

Personal confidence

Seeing someone use your product provides you, as the seller, a certain amount of confidence as well.

If you prefer, you can create great case studies or build a social media presence that includes amazing content. For MWI, for example, they can validate themselves as great content creators by creating great content.

As a bonus, TSE has used those product giveaways as an opportunity to gain feedback during our initial launches so we can figure out where we need to tweak our training or our products. It also helps us build a case study.

Through all of this, you’ll build your own excitement and you’ll develop even more confidence, which is the key to success. Begin your entrepreneur journey by selling yourself on the value you’re providing to the world.

Linking value

Once you’ve established confidence in your value, use your marketing to communicate it to your potential customers. It’s not enough to be sold on your own value, but you must find someone else who is sold on your value as well.

Find a publication that will tell its audience how legit you are.

Once you’ve built this validation, you’ll have an amazing ability to sell your product or service with exclusivity. You’ll find yourself in the driver’s seat and gives you leverage in your communication and makes your sale more exclusive.

If you establish exclusivity, you almost won’t have to sell your customers as much. You’ll simply have to educate them and move them along the sales process. Exclusivity is priceless.

Finding balance

No one wants to be perceived as the typical used car salesman. Don’t come across as gimmicky, selfish, or ignorant. Instead, strive for confident, competent, professional, and controlled. There’s a balance to it.

Assume your customer has never heard of your validation and mention it to him. Within the first 20 seconds, provide that validation to establish confidence and control. Find a way to organically share it without being perceived as cocky.

The alarms about whether you’re legit will shut down. Then you can offer the idea that you only work with a certain kind of brand, and that allows you to operate with a lot more control.

Close early, close often

Make sure you’re asking for the business. Develop specific strategies to close deals. Beautiful branding and validation won’t matter if you can’t close. Consistently think strategically about how you’ll move this sale to the place you want it.

Provide the customer with the right information and the right details so that she’ll be ready to close.

Closing amounts to more than the way you speak, the speed of your speech, and the tone of your voice. These things do constantly lead to close, but you have to figure out how to move to the specific points along the process.

Many sellers are fearful of the conversion side so they hold off too long. Or they get anxious and they ask for the sale way too soon. If you follow the process, that’s where you’ll see the difference.

Sales process

You can have all the right components in place, but without a repeatable sales process, you’ll struggle to support your sales. If your process isn’t organized in a way that leads to close at all times, you won’t succeed.

Determine how to leverage all the components you’ve gathered to move your customers toward a deal. Leverage your value, your validation, your exclusivity, and your communication to ask for the business.

Corey’s goal at the end of the sales process is to structure the process so that the _customer_ asks for the next steps without him having to sell it. That’s when you know you’ve hit the nail on the head.

Organizing your tools

Corey worked with James Carberry at Sweetfish Media to help him set up a process of validation. James already had significant validation because he had a large number of podcasts with great guests and he writes for large publications. They simply had to find a way to organize the validation.

In their case, all the tools were sitting there waiting to be used.

Focus on providing real value. Sell yourself on the value you’re providing to individuals and industry. When you love what you’re doing and you aren’t simply trying to make a buck, people will want to be part of that.

Good businesses are built on products that will make a difference. It doesn’t have to be an altruistic notion like ending world hunger. We would all benefit if we could go to work every day and provide value that you believe in to everyone else.

“Build a Brand Online and Leverage It for Rapid Sales Growth” episode resources

You can connect with Corey at Corey@mwi.com. Mention that you heard me on this podcast. You can also find him on LinkedIn @Corey Blake.

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump. If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

Tools for sellers

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Brian Robinson, Donald Kelly, Sales Malpractice

TSE 1084: Sales From The Street – “Sales Malpractice”

Brian Robinson, Donald Kelly, Sales MalpracticeWhen we convince ourselves that we have nothing more to learn, we fail to ask enough questions and we sometimes even commit sales malpractice.

Brian Robinson has been in sales for more than 20 years, but he said that he only thought he knew how to sell while he was in corporate America. He calls his plunge into entrepreneurialism the hardest thing he has ever done, and while it was successful, he said his eyes were opened when he entered the world of “you don’t sell, you don’t eat.”

Brian is the author of the book The Selling Formula, which codifies the steps he used to succeed in that venture.

Intentional questions

Many salespeople do the old “show up and throw up.” We’re so anxious to get to the presentation that we neglect to ask the very best questions we can ask to uncover the needs. We’re seeking sincere engagement from our prospect, so this is the most critical component.

Brian noticed that the best physicians diagnose illness with a list of carefully-crafted questions. That information became especially important when he worked for Johnson and Johnson selling internal devices for laparoscopy. Though the device was clinically superior to anything on the market, he wasn’t getting any responses for trial evaluations.

He knew the device was superior, so he combed through the features and benefits and put together a list of questions related to them. He structured them in a specific order and the wording of each was intentional as well.

Asking questions

He tested the questions, and within about 30 days his trial evaluations doubled because of that list of questions.

When word got out that he had produced those kinds of results, people started asking for his list of questions. He passed it along and found that when people followed the questions exactly, they got the exact same results: they doubled their results.

Brian grew fascinated with the whole idea of going deep on questions. He even developed a personal mantra that questions are the key to life.

Although it took several iterations for Brian to get the list and order of questions exactly right, he stuck with it and he achieved success. There’s still an opportunity to make it even better, but it’s working very consistently now.

Malpractice

Brian defines sales malpractice as providing a diagnosis before you really understand the underlying issues. You won’t be able to give your prospect the best possible answer, and until you’ve uncovered a need, you won’t be able to proceed to the sales conversation.

You have to earn the right to have that conversation. If you rush too quickly into the presentation, your sales presentation won’t be nearly what it could have been.

The key to all of it is how you create your questions.

Get started

Begin by making a spreadsheet with three columns. The first is your features, the second is the benefits related to the feature, and in the third column write down every question you can think of related to those features.

Then take an 80/20 approach. Of the questions you’ve written, which 20% of questions will elicit 80% of the most critical benefits of your product? Start with general fact-finding questions and move into those 80/20 in the most appropriate order to identify the needs.

Imagine you’re selling premade home-cooked meals. What are two benefits to that service?

One is that you’re saving about 60 minutes per meal on grocery shopping, food prep, and cooking time. The other is simplicity. Now generate questions from those benefits.

  • On a weekly basis, how many dinners do you cook for your family?
  • How much time does it typically take you to make dinner?
  • If all you had to do was move something from the freezer to the oven, how would that affect the frequency of your family meals?

Now order the questions from general fact-finding to more specific. Then place the most compelling ones at the top 20 percent of the questions you ask.

Emotional level

Get down to an emotional level. We unfortunately avoid this, often because we aren’t comfortable going that deep into our conversations. We also tend to approach these conversations with a transactional mindset instead of realizing these are human beings with deep emotional and physical needs.

Go the levels that can motivate us to change. We’re trying to make a difference as salespeople. Approach each situation with the mindset that you want to go deeper and ask heart-level questions.

Strive to be seen as a trusted advisor instead of as a sales rep. You’ll have a connection at the human level.

Selling the concept

If someone is willing to grab this idea and test it in their own sales conversations, the proof is in the doing. People have been shocked at the effectiveness of this practice because, shockingly, people don’t think this way.

Brian said he camped out on the questions because that’s where the gold is.

Sometimes management and metrics prompt us to rush the sales process. That causes us to focus on the wrong things. As a result, we end up working twice as hard with less impressive results.

Instead of focusing on outcomes, focus on being so connected to the prospect that the outcome will take care of itself.

We get comfortable where we are, so we live in ignorance. We are amazingly connected to our comfort level. We’re addicted to it. But in order to grow, you have to embrace struggle.

“Sales Malpractice” episode resources

You can get the first three chapters of Brian’s book, The Selling Formula, by going to brianrobinsonbook.com. He also has content associated with the book available at thesellingformula.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Dion Travagliante, Value, Sales Rep, Donald Kelly

TSE 1083: 3 Crucial Signs You Need to Add More Value

Dion Travagliante, Value, Sales Rep, Donald KellySometimes as sales reps we don’t bring enough value to the table and there are 3 crucial signs you need to add more value so you won’t be judged only on price.

Dion Travagliante runs Madison One Consulting, a consulting practice where he solves problems for SAS businesses. He said he loves the fact that sellers have latitude in their careers and he loves the chase of finding the potential customer and then uncovering the issue and working to solve it.

People have a preconceived notion that sales is just talking with no science, rhyme, or reason behind it, but he calls it a challenging world that you can train yourself to succeed in.

Commodity

Sellers often struggle to stand out against other competitors and they struggle against being viewed as simply a commodity. The key is to become the winner of the account.

Dion defines value as improvement in a client or prospect’s individual situation. That centers on solving problems. Any company that is selling something originated around the idea of solving someone else’s problem.

That means as a sales rep, you’re a steward of your company’s solution in the marketplace. That should free you to talk to anyone about the challenges they are facing.

Flip the script. There will always be people who perceive salespeople as slick operators who try to jam products down people’s throats. No one wants to have that persona.

Instead, approach every customer as someone with a pain point whose problem you’d like to solve. If you do, you’ll be better than 95 percent of the sellers out there because you’ll be thinking about someone else.

Watch for these 3 crucial signs you need to add more value.

1. Negotiating price

When you’re talking with a prospect and they start negotiating price during the sales cycle. Do not go down the rabbit hole of arguing price.

The worst position you can be in as a sales rep is negotiating against yourself. If the prospect wants to lower the price, it becomes a game of limbo: how low can you go? Instead of just acquiescing, you want to push back on that. They are telling you that they don’t see the inherent value in the price you’ve determined for your product.

You can never negotiate against your own price, but you can flip the script.

If, for example, a single client averages $60,000 and your product costs $20,000, the purchase pays for itself three times over. If your product can speed up the process, the relevant issue is how much money they’ll derive from using your solution.

If the person you’re dealing with is an intermediary and they insist on dropping the price, what they are saying is that they don’t feel confident taking this solution at this price point to the decision makers.

The quicker path is to lower the price. Instead, arm them with more things so they look like the hero when they show up to present it.

2. Seeking referrals

When your prospect asks you for a referral, what he’s really saying is that he’s interested in what you’re selling and he wants to continue down the path, but he wants external validation.

Mike Brooks, who calls himself Mr. Inside Sales, wrote a book called The Ultimate Book of Phone Scripts where he shares 500 scripts that you can use to address objections. He suggests acknowledging that you’d be happy to connect the customer with a host of satisfied customers but then asking what sticking points still exist.

They want someone else to verify that they should buy this because we’re all somewhat tribal in nature. Get out in front of it.

Your own self-limiting beliefs can prompt you to negotiate with a client instead of seeking to provide enough value to get them across the finish line.

Practice saying that phrase so that it becomes second-nature. Because 90 percent of decisions are made with the subconscious mind, you should train your mind to respond this way automatically.

Courage isn’t the absence of anxiety or fear; it’s acting in spite of it. The people who improve are those that put themselves in uncomfortable scenarios. Human beings learn by pain.

3. Status quo

When you’ve done the discovery call and you’re in the demo and the prospect says, “You know, I think we’re going to stay with our current solution,” that’s an indicator that you haven’t provided enough value. The prospect is telling you that it seems like a lot of work to transition to your option, so they are going to stay where they are.

They are telling you that you haven’t exhibited enough value to drive them to switch. Sales decisions are made emotionally and then justified logically.

Todd Caponi, in his book The Transparency Sale, talks about the psychology of sales and the fact that if your customer’s logic is preventing them from closing the deal, you need to stoke some emotional flames.

You must provide enough value to make switching worthwhile.

Best sales reps

The best sales reps try new things. They put themselves into difficult scenarios that allow them to learn. They also end up selling more.

Always think about the prospects and their solutions. Get out of your own way and help your prospect solve a problem and better his solution.

Ask pointed questions. Figure out the plight. You’ll come off as more genuine than if you toss around buzzwords.

“3 Crucial Signs You Need to Add More Value” episode resources

You can connect with Dion at madisononeinc.com and you can email him at dion@madisononeinc.com.

Grab a copy of the two books Dion recommended: The Ultimate Book of Phone Scripts by Mike Brooks and The Transparency Sale by Todd Caponi.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Sales Pitch, Sales Pitch, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1072: Why Your Perfect Pitch Is Not Working!

Sales Pitch, Sales Pitch, The Sales EvangelistMany sellers discover that their perfect pitch is not working because, as they work to build value, they are appealing to logic rather than emotion.

We’re devoting the whole month to a discussion about building value, and some of today’s information comes from the book The Transparency Sale written by Todd Caponey. Todd will visit with us on the podcast in the near future, but today we’ll talk about the decision-making process and the role our brains play.

Brain power

Every day, we engage in activities every day that are so routine that we don’t even think about them. When we drive to work, we put a seatbelt on without even thinking about it. When we back the car up, we put our arms over the seat beside us and then look backward.

You’re able to listen to this podcast while you’re driving because you don’t even have to think about driving.

Todd talks about three levels of the brain, which you may have heard of before. The reptilian part, the limbic part, and the neocortex.

The reptilian portion is the core or center, and it’s the oldest part of the brain. It prompts us to do things without thinking. It drives our instincts. It’s the part that prompts us to react to pain without thinking, and it’s part of our survival.

The limbic portion is more intricate and it helps deals with feelings and emotions. It helps us make decisions and motivates our behaviors.

The neo- or frontal cortex is the newest part of our brain and it’s associated with information and logic. It’s the largest part of the brain and it ties with math and reasoning and justification.

Sales standpoint

We typically show up to our prospect meetings with PowerPoint presentations, charts, spreadsheets, and graphs of all the amazing things our product or service can do. We show up prepared to sell to the customer’s neocortex — the logical part.

Remember, though, that the logic part of our brain isn’t where decisions are made. Decisions form in the middle portion of the brain, where our feelings and emotions reside.

You must help people make a decision emotionally, and then justify it logically. You can build value as a sales rep by using stories to tap into the emotion or pain that the prospect is experiencing.

Unless there is some kind of pain, your customer won’t make a decision.

Status quo

The reptilian part of our brain wants us to stay where we are. If nothing is harming us, why would we move? Leave things as they are.

Until someone points out the reason we need to make a change and appeals to our emotion, we’ll never see a need to move. If a seller use emotion to prompt the customer to move and then help him justify the move logically, he’ll be much more likely to make a change.

Tie the emotion and the logic together to help your prospects understand the need to make a change.

Making it work

I recently met a guy who sells water filtration systems in Florida. He begins by asking people whether people drink water, and many people say no because it tastes bad and it’s unclean and unhealthy.

He points out that taking a shower in the same water can be just as unhealthy because your skin is your body’s largest organ, which presents a pain point for his prospects.

The seller never mentions price or facts about his product. He focuses on the emotion of wanting to be healthy.

Do it with stories or by asking the buyer questions that tap into emotion.

Defining sales

I define sales as helping people persuade themselves to make a change. If we try to persuade them, their guard immediately goes up.

Great sellers leave the buyer in charge of the decision. If your demos are flopping or your presentations aren’t working, you’re probably focusing too much on logic. Don’t sell to the logical part of the brain. Sell to the emotional part.

“Perfect Pitch Is Not Working” episode resources

Grab a copy of the book The Transparency Sale written by Todd Caponey for more information about the role our brains play in the buying process.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Closing

TSE 1065: TSE Certified Sales Training Program – “Don’t Make The Closing an Event”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, ClosingSellers are understandably focused on the closing of any deal but it’s important that we keep things in perspective and don’t make the closing an event.

The truth is that every transaction has a beginning, a middle, and an end, but we often get so focused on the closing that we unnecessarily freak ourselves out.

This conversation comes from our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, our sales coaching program that helps sellers maximize their effectiveness.

Sales process

The sales process naturally builds toward a close where the client signs the deal and then everyone celebrates. Our challenge as sellers is to avoid the temptation to make the closing the entire focus of the sale.

Focus throughout the sale on building value. Initiate conversations that address your prospects’ challenges and difficulties. Realize that you’ll never get to the closing if you don’t effectively address the buyers’ objections.

Help the buyer feel confident in this deal by sharing stories that provide value and dispel your customers’ objections. Instead of waiting for your customer to offer his objections, bring them up on your own terms as a way of building trust.

Red flags won’t go away simply because you ignore them. They don’t typically diffuse themselves, and your decision to wait until the end of the process to address them could cost you your deal.

Growing problems

Like many other relationships in life, struggles between buyer and seller don’t naturally disappear over time. In fact, problems often get bigger and worse as we fail to address them.

A single demo for your client won’t magically offset all his concerns, so don’t wait until then to address his objections. If he has concerns about your product or service, it won’t likely matter how good your demo is: you won’t overcome his hesitation until you address the problems.

Addressing fears

Whether you’re selling water, computers, or houses, your buyer doesn’t want to part with his hard-earned cash until you’ve addressed his fears.

He may want a new house. He may even need a new house. But he has fears of his own:

  • What if he can’t afford this house?
  • What if an unforeseen issue comes up?
  • How much will hurricane insurance cost?

Help him minimize those risks and fears throughout the process. That way, when he gets to the end of the transaction, those fears won’t be an issue.

Prospecting

Hubspot reported recently that as many as 40 percent of salespeople don’t like prospecting and about 30 percent struggle with closings. As a result, we tend to make closings a big deal in our own heads because we’ve worked so hard to find a prospect and get to this point.

Instead of viewing it as a huge event, we should think of it as a natural byproduct of the sales process, and we should move the buyer smoothly through to conversion.

Conversion begins the moment I start building value for my prospect. If I focus on blind-side challenges and identifying key problems, I can address objections early and minimize the risk that my deal will fall apart.

My goal is to eliminate any reasonable doubt about whether I’m the right vendor for the prospect.

Pitching yourself

If you’re able to identify the companies your prospect is currently working with, you’ll be better able to pitch your own strengths against theirs. You can identify the competition’s weaknesses and use those to make your case.

Share stories about past clients who have left that company to work with you and explain why they made that choice.

Build one-on-one conversations into your process as often as possible so you can clarify any questions as they develop. Once you understand the big issues that will likely sabotage your deal, you can help everyone get to the same page.

Follow your demonstrations with an email outreach offering to address any new questions the prospect has.

Avoid pushing objections to the end of the process. Make objections and questions a constant part of your dialogue so that you minimize any risk toward the end of the deal.

Strive to create a smooth experience for your customer.

“Don’t Make The Closing an Event” episode resources

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Rob Kall, Cein, Quality of Sales Leads

TSE 1043: 5 Ways to Measure the Quality of your Leads, Pipeline, and Sales Talent

Rob Kall, Cein, Quality of Sales LeadsWhen you’re scaling an organization, it’s important that you’re able to measure the quality of your leads, pipeline, and sales talent. It important for business owners as well as sales reps, because simply adding people to the organization won’t necessarily result in more sales.

Today Rob Kall talks about the numbers that we might not be measuring and the importance of that data in helping your organization grow and improve.

Although they aren’t commonly measured, these data are the true drivers of your organization’s success.

Soft things

Many sales leaders believe that the solution to any sales struggle is to throw more bodies at it. Though that option may work sometimes, it comes at a cost.

Eventually, you’ll find that you aren’t getting that much more out of the machine despite the added personnel.

In response to that problem, Rob and his company spent a lot of time looking at how you can move to tangible measurements instead of making decisions based upon gut feelings.

They have identified 5 metrics to improve your company’s performance.

1. Lead quality

Leads are not created equal. If I have 1,000 leads and a 2 percent conversion to close, that’s a super easy way to measure.

But if I get a referral from my rich uncle, that’s probably a much easier sale than calling someone who has never heard of my business or product.

We fail to pay attention to these factors, but they are important. Unfortunately, they can also be difficult to determine.

Begin by creating a baseline.

If you find that of 1,000 leads you generated in the last period, you were able to generate 20 sales, you can measure a 2 percent conversion.

You can also evaluate your leads by industry and location.

Once you understand those conversions, you can identify the leads that are not likely to close and stop wasting your time on them.

2. Prospecting effectiveness

Prospecting results in a lot of “no” responses.

The only thing that really matters is engagement. As a rep, you must get a certain amount of engagement every day.

Some people do it with sheer numbers. Others send fewer contacts but they personalize the ones they do send.

Whichever approach you use, make notes every single time an activity results in something. When you do, you’ll begin to recognize patterns.

Your numbers might look great, but if the outcomes aren’t there, those numbers don’t mean as much.

3. True pipeline

Rob points to a concept he calls a critical deal.

Some companies do pipeline reviews on a weekly basis but others do it on a daily basis. It’s a chance to see how well deals are progressing.

Consider the following three factors:

  • Is it a big deal that matters? If it’s a $500 deal when typically your deals average $10,000, you probably shouldn’t even look at it. Is the significance there?
  • Is it a deal that is unlikely to close? Consider the probability.
  • Has something happened that would make you think it’s less likely to close? If you’ve had no communication with the customer or other indications that the deal may stall, consider those.

If these three factors aren’t there, you probably should focus on other deals. Move the critical deals forward and think about your deals in a structured way.

4. Product knowledge

On the rep side of the issue, reps must have product and industry knowledge. When you’re just starting out, you won’t have as much knowledge as those who have been there for years.

How well does this rep know the industry and the product? How does he compare to other reps?

Those with the best product knowledge won’t necessarily be the best performers. You can’t possibly know every single factor of the industry.

You simply must know enough to be credible. Those who haven’t reached that minimum threshold will struggle until they do.

Consider also closing ability or the ability to look at the last part of the deal.

When you get to the last stage of a deal, what happens? How often do you win? You’ll see patterns if you track this rate.

Does one rep have more of a killer instinct?

5. Engagement ability

If you are able to generate a lot of engagement, you’re probably a good communicator. You’re probably good at providing valuable information to the prospect.

Instead of measuring how the prospect responds to it, measure how much engagement the rep is able to generate.

Technology

The reality is that your sales team probably includes a few people who don’t have the right product knowledge and a few people that don’t have valuable leads.

You may have a few areas where your marketing team is spinning its wheels.

When you start addressing some of these shortcomings, you start to see amazing results.

By fixing the one thing that’s screwing you up, you unlock the potential for your sales organization.

Team mood

As a sales leader, you probably have a gut feeling about your team’s morale. You know whether they are optimistic or not.

When negativity is present, it will affect your team’s ability to sell. It will also affect your retention and your on-boarding.

Though no product is perfect, there are frequently just one or two things that are causing grief.

  • How do they feel about the materials they have?
  • How do they feel about coaching?
  • What kind of competitive pressures are they feeling?

You’ll likely identify multiple areas of improvement that will help your team perform better.

Limiting factors

Many limiting factors don’t simply add up. They multiply.

If you can improve it a little bit, even if you can’t perfect it, you’ll get results from that thing. If the rep doesn’t know the product, train him. If the team doesn’t feel good about the commission plan, explain it.

If your product isn’t ready for market, figure out what you can do to improve it.

“Measure the Quality of your Leads, Pipeline and Sales Talent” episode resources

Connect with Rob at cien.ai. It’s a reference to doing things 100 times. You can also connect with him personally on LinkedIn @RobertKall.

This episode is brought to you in part by our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, which teaches you to improve your sales skills, find more customers, build stronger value, and close more deals.

The next semester begins in April.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Ted Ryce, Donald Kelly, Value, Selling

TSE 1039: Sales From The Street – “Sell Value”

Ted Ryce, Donald Kelly, Value, SellingIf you struggle with sales and the challenges that go along with it, you aren’t alone, and today Ted Ryce shares how he overcame his own struggles and how you can overcome sales plateaus.

Ted has been a health and fitness professional for the past 17 years in Miami Beach. He has worked with tons of celebrities, CEOs, multi-million dollar companies and personalities like Richard Branson and Robert Downey, Jr. He now has a health, fitness, and personal development podcast called Legendary Life Podcast.

Ted figured out early on that he actually is a salesperson. Sales never came easy for him and so today, he shares with us the challenges he faced and how he overcame them so you can learn from his experience.

Don’t undersell yourself

Ted poured a lot of effort and resources into the fitness industry, and though it helped, he hit a plateau where he wasn’t getting more clients. For the money he invested, he expected to have a mile-long waiting list.

He was in desperate need of new clients when a guy expressed interest in training with him. Ted saw it as a chance to grow his client list and raise his prices.

Looking back, he realizes that because he didn’t have confidence in his business or his cost, he didn’t justify the cost to his prospect.

Determine your value, and stick to it.

Differentiate yourself

Once you play the price game, everyone loses, including other people in your industry. You have to differentiate yourself and have a reason for charging as much as you do. You must explain it so that the prospect can understand the cost.

Have a reason for charging more, not coming from a place of being awesome but in a way the prospect can understand.

In Ted’s case, he realized there would always be people who would work for less money, so he started to highlight how his training was different.

He offered a holistic approach that included sleep and other physical and health challenges, and he specialized in injuries. He also had a background of working with CEOs, so he marketed himself accordingly.

Sell what the client wants

Don’t sell yourself or what you want to sell. Sell exactly what the client wants.

Ted worked to determine exactly what his clients needed, and then he sold them exactly that instead of selling what he wanted to sell.

He also made peace with the idea that some customers would need something different than what he was selling, so he would be willing to refer them out.

Match what you do with what someone else needs.

Reach more people

Once you’ve narrowed your message, find ways to reach the people who can benefit from your product or service. This is a great way of selling yourself without selling yourself.

Go out there and do more presentations. Do a podcast. Eventually, they will look at you as a leader in your industry.

People will apply the things you’re sharing, and if it helps them succeed, they will view you as a subject-matter expert.
Take things step by step. Stay at it. Take lessons and courses. Listen to podcasts. Stay on course to make consistent improvements. In 3-6 months time, you’re going to see major changes.

Stay consistent, keep at it, and don’t give up.

“Sell Value” episode resources

You can connect with Ted on the Legendary Life Podcast, and check out the Be The Change group.

This episode is brought to you in part by our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, which teaches you to improve your sales skills, find more customers, build stronger value, and close more deals.

The next semester begins in April.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Story Telling, Donald Kelly, Sales Training

TSE 1035: TSE Certified Sales Training Program – “Story Selling”

Story Telling, Donald Kelly, Sales TrainingStories provide a powerful opportunity to connect with your prospects, and story selling can push you across the line and even make you more successful than the competition.

They can even help you overcome a less superior product because people respond to good stories.

Stories as a lifeline

Good stories can separate you from your competition.

I’m putting together a workshop right designed to help business owners understand the power of stories in the selling process. Many of them are trying to land big contracts without great stories.

I call this process edutaining, and it differentiates those who do it well. After all, anyone can talk about their product or service. Not everyone can explain how it solve problems for clients. Not everyone can give specific examples of the difference their product or service made.

Your prospect wants to hear why it matters. He doesn’t care about your software or widget; he cares about what it can do for him.

Focus on “why”

I’m helping a client build a huge presentation for a corporation her company has done business with in the past. She’ll be educating these buyers about her company and its offerings. As she prepares, she’s trying to determine what exactly she should say.

We’re working to provide the “whys” of her company instead of focusing on the “what.” Rather than address what they do, what they offer, and what they can create, she’ll focus on why they’ve done those things.

  • Why did you start the company?
  • What makes you passionate about solving this issue?
  • Why do clients seek your products?

When she told me the story of why she started the company, she came to life and her excitement pulled me in. She told me about her first client and the series of events that launched the whole company, and she pulled me in.

It didn’t matter to me that she had been in business for 15 years.

The buyers

Think about your buyers.

Spend time thinking of examples of the ways you help your customers solve problems. Ask yourself what your buyers are most concerned about.

Think back to an experience when you helped a client solve an important problem or prevent a crisis for their own customers. Then, weave that into your presentation.

In the case of this client, her company had suffered a bad experience because of a product delay, and she was concerned about how to handle the situation. To take the fear out of the incident, she decided to tell a story that directly addressed it.

She acknowledged that her organization isn’t perfect, and then she addressed how they had fixed the mistakes that happened in the past. She emphasized her company’s desire to never make the same mistake twice.

“Story Selling” episode resources

The TSE Certified Sales Training Program addresses how to provide value to your buyers. We discuss the importance of teaching and educating them using stories, and you can be part of it.

This episode is brought to you in part by our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, which teaches you to improve your sales skills, find more customers, build stronger value, and close more deals.

The next semester begins in April.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Jonathan Dale, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Pricing

TSE 1034: Sales From The Street – “How Low Can You Go?”

Jonathan Dale, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, PricingSalespeople often adopt a commodity selling mindset instead of a value-based mindset, which leaves them making less money than they could have made. They find themselves asking, “how low can you go?

Jonathan Dale works with RS&I, a nationwide company with nine branches throughout the United States. They have become the largest distributor and sales agent of dish networks. Anyone wanting the ability to resell dish networks must go through RS&I to do so.

They also own HughesNet, one of the largest satellite internet providers.

Jonathan manages the Vivint portfolio. As a sales leader, he teaches sales reps how to keep the sales process simple by breaking it down.

Jonathan has had so many different experiences with both sellers and partners. It brings a whole other level of complexity to his role as a sales leader.

Focus on value

He remembers knocking on doors to sell home security systems for a company called Pinnacle. It is where he learned the ‘Art of the Sale.’ Although he didn’t particularly love it, he admits that he did learn from it.

The following year, after several failures, he fully understood the sales process and realized he was a salesperson. It required taking a step back and looking at sales in a whole new way.

Jonathan believes that salespeople commonly place a stigma on sales, or have a mindset about it, that prevents them from being successful.

It is a mindset that they have to sell based on price.

Jonathan’s biggest struggle when training new reps in the home security industry is teaching them to become more of a value salesperson versus a commodity sales rep.

He wants them to pitch the overall value of the service rather than diluting the service.

Let the customer decide what the spending habits will be.

The opportunity for a sales rep to make the most money is when the customer is comfortable with where he wants to be.  Often times, as sales reps, we want to fit each customer into the same size box.

Yet, at the end of the day, if we try to force that fit, we lose money. Forcing our clients into a package that they do not need only leads to chargebacks.

Don’t compete on price

Jonathan works with over 350 different retailers that take Vivint as a secondary, tertiary, and even fourth line sale. It is a struggle to get them to understand that he doesn’t want them to compete on price.

Instead, he wants them to have a conversation about the value of the service and let the customer decide if the product fits their needs.

Sales reps, however, are prone to touting the price because it seems easier.

Jonathan made an interesting transition two years ago which was actually detrimental for a few months.

He moved from home security sales – a totally valuable sale – to satellite sales which was more of a commodity. He realized he was losing money because he wasn’t committed to the value of the product.

Often times, sales reps want to take the path of least resistance – the easier sale. If you can provide the customer with benefits, instead of simply selling features, you create value in your product. By allowing the customer to then determine his spending habits, your earning potential is maximized.

Don’t lead with your own wallet

When I sold training classes for $10K a class, the most money I had ever had in the bank at one time was $3,000. It made no sense to me. I just couldn’t understand why someone would spend that much money. As a result, it definitely limited my ability to sell.

I needed to realize that my clients would get a huge return on that $10K investment – that there was a value to what I offered.

We don’t know their spending habits or capabilities.

Instead, believe that your product is the best in the industry regardless of what the competitors offer. Know that your prospects will pay for it because it is the best product available.

Keep it simple

Keep it simple, silly!  K.I.S.S is an acronym that Jonathan keeps in mind when he teaches the retail process to his sales reps.

Look at the product in total.

Do not ‘product spew,’ meaning, do not lecture your prospects on every single detail of the product because that is not what they need.

Instead, sell the benefit of the product.

Increase the value of the product by explaining the ways it can serve the customer.

When the question of price arises, turn it back around and ask the customer what he feels it is worth.  If all went well – if the sales rep has created significant value in his presentation – the customer will be pleasantly surprised when presented with the cost because he has placed an even higher value on it.

Commodity selling means to provide the customer with the necessary scenarios to imagine for himself the benefit of your service.

Know that value should exceed cost

Everyone wants to know what’s in it for them. They want to know the biggest return they can get on any investment. As sales reps, keep that in mind. The sales pitch has to continually revolve around it.

When the customer can see the value – when he understands what is in it for him –  he will buy.

At a recent door-to-door conference, Jonathan was looking for a new accountant when he approached an accountant booth a few rows away from his own booth. They told him everything he wanted to hear. Without even knowing the cost, Jonathan was ready to sign because he immediately understood the value they offered. It was a no-brainer.

In the end, the new accountant service was more expensive than the old service he had been using, but to Jonathan, the value exceeded the cost.

Keep up with the evolving world of sales

As a sales leader, Jonathan spends a lot of time on the road. He ‘gets down in the trenches’ with his sales teams to introduce new ideas and to show them how to make changes that, despite sometimes being more difficult at first, will bring in more money in the long run.

He sets the example for his team.

In sales, we sometimes get into a comfortable rut regardless of results. We can’t afford, however, to continue down a road that does not deliver results.

The sales industry is continually evolving and changing. New ideas and new processes are constantly created. You have to study and keep up with the times.

Have fun as well. The sales process can be a fun way to learn about how people think. Figure out how people think and use it to your advantage. Be forward thinking in your sales approach.

“How Low Can You Go?” episode resources

The best way to reach Jonathan is via email at Jon.dale@rsiinc.com.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. If you put in a lot of hard work in 2018 but weren’t able to close many of your deals, we can help you fix that. We have a new semester beginning in April and it would be an honor to have you join. Visit thesalesevangelist.com/CST.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Confidence, Salespeople

TSE 1012: You Are Important As Well!!!

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Confidence, SalespeopleIf you find yourself hesitant to tell people that you work in sales because you think anyone can do it, today we’re discussing the fact that You are Important as Well!!

The year was 2011. I was a recent college graduate working for the first company in my professional career. I was attending a fine dining networking event when I ran into an old friend.

The old friend, it turns out, had decided to take on Wall Street after graduation and was now the head of finance for a multinational company in Miami. It sounded like he was doing great.

“Hey! Donald! It’s great to see you! What are you doing these days?!”

I clammed up because I didn’t want to tell him that I was in sales for a medical company. I was ashamed of saying I was a sales rep because, early on, it felt to me like anyone could do sales. [0:00]

Change your mindset

It took me awhile to realize that not just anyone can do well in sales. And I want to help you change your mindset, too. I want you to understand that you are important as well!

Many professional careers – medical, law, finance – require college degrees. They are critical jobs with important tasks.

Sales, however, doesn’t carry the glamour it once did. Many of us don’t even wear a suit to work anymore. Rather, it is believed that anyone who can “sell” can get a job in sales. We sit behind a computer and make phone calls … we are pushy people, bottom feeders, and we lack the ability to do anything else. [03:19]

That is how I used to feel. Now I know better.

Money

In sales, we have an unlimited level of income. After executives, sellers earn the highest incomes.

  • As a salesperson, it is your job to bring money into the organization.
  • Money is the lifeblood of any company, even for non-profits.
  • Finance, HR, tech, even the CEO – none of them can do their job without money.
  • The company cannot grow without money.

Every department needs money but only sales can deliver it. [04:38]

Certain jobs, like sales, are an asset to any company. Other positions – ones that earn a paycheck every week without bringing money into the firm – are liabilities. [06:21]

Salespeople are so important to the bottom line. The information we have is needed in board meetings because everyone wants to know what the sales pipeline looks like.  They need to know. [06:52]

Education

Sales can be an easier field to get started in because it doesn’t require a lot of technical training.

It is why I do this podcast. It is why I offer training and how I am able to help companies, and their sales teams, do better.

Understanding individuals, understanding the industry, and understanding the sales process is all part of training. It increases our education.

Schools are now spending time and effort to offer sales training as a degree because they recognize the power of the sales role. They recognize how critical sales is to any organization.

The prestigious capabilities of sales is returning and it is exciting. [07:33]

Believe in yourself

I am ashamed sometimes for ever doubting myself but I learned from it. I learned and I improved and I was able to perform better as a result. Now I understand what I am truly capable of bringing to an organization and I understand how valuable I am.

Have the strong and firm knowledge and belief that you are important. Listening to this podcast, for example, shows that you have taken an interest in learning something new. Improving yourself improves the entire profession. [09:19]

I was fortunate enough the other day to be thanked by a regular listener who credits this podcast with helping him succeed. He took some of the things he has learned from our guests and from the books we’ve recommended and is currently enjoying a sales incentive trip for doing so well in 2018. [10:00]

Recognize that you are important.

You are a professional sales rep with a skill that many people do not have. Work for a company that validates your contributions and offers a product or service that you feel strongly about.

Keep learning and keep growing. Earn that unlimited income.

I want you to be successful and to find more ideal customers. Build stronger value, close more deals. Do more each and every day. [10:56]

“You are Important as Well!!” episode resources

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Prospect.io is offering three months at half-price.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pauline Muffin Grayson, Donald Kelly, Ration Your Passion, HGTV

TSE 1009: Sales From The Street: “Don’t Ration Your Passion”

Pauline Muffin Grayson, Donald Kelly, Ration Your Passion, HGTVPauline “Muffin” Grayson is a graphic designer who believes we shouldn’t let anything get in the way of our passion, and she has a single message for us: Don’t ration your passion.

Pauline has a degree in fine arts. After school, she stumbled into freelancing and surface pattern design; the design for gift wrap and greeting cards. You may know her from her designs on  petitelemon.com and Shutterfly.com.

Pursue your passion

Pauline describes passion as doing something you absolutely love without letting anything else get in the way. For Pauline, that is design. She says she is just not happy unless she is doing it. It is who she is as an individual.

Yet sometimes, societal expectations seem to limit us from pursuing our passions.

I remember telling people that I was in sales and getting the distinct impression from them that they assumed it was only because I couldn’t find anything better to do. I wasn’t living up to their expectations despite that I was doing what I truly loved to do.

Pauline can relate.  As a stay-at-home mom, many people wrongly assume she chose to do so because she couldn’t do anything else.

Pauline is passionate about being a mom, but she is also passionate about design. So she found a way to do both. It makes her a better mom and a better designer as a result.

Many people abandon their passion because they fail to set goals. As a young girl on a dairy farm in Idaho, Pauline learned that hard work pays dividends.

She says she is not the best designer out there but believes that her hard work and her goal to continually improve is what sets her apart.

Don’t be afraid to try

Fear is often not even based in fact. We worry about what might happen and create a false reality as a result. It is helpful to have someone to discuss your goals and aspirations with; someone who can keep you grounded and on course.  

Set goals high but also set reasonable timelines to reach them.

Pauline recalls a time when she met the owner of Betty’s Beds, someone she really wanted to work with. Fast forward a year after their initial encounter and Pauline never heard back from the owner. But rather than letting it go, or being afraid to reach out, Pauline sent them an email.

They have been working together now for some time and Pauline has seen her designs on blogs, magazines, and HGTV.

Don’t give up

Pauline could have concluded from the year-long gap in communication that the owner simply didn’t want to work with her. Instead, she chose to understand and empathize that they are busy with their work and their families, or that maybe the timing wasn’t right, etc.

Pauline chose to share and offer value and it paid off.

From doing this podcast, for example, I’ve been introduced to many more people and opportunities than I ever would have if I hadn’t put myself out there. You have to get out and share.

Do what you love and put it out there for people to see.

Finding your passion

Pauline always had an interest in art but as a young girl on a dairy farm, all she really knew was that she liked to draw. It wasn’t until high school, with the encouragement from her art teacher, that she started taking art classes. Soon afterward, she attended a business conference where she heard a graphic designer speak.

The spark was lit. She knew that was what she wanted to do.

She remembers being awful in so many of her classes. It just didn’t click until her very last class in college but she worked at it and eventually figured it out.

She began working as a freelancer, designing gift bags for Target, after being laid off from her first office job when the company was bought out.

With the confidence she gained from seeing her products on display in a huge retail setting, Pauline started a blog to post more items that she had designed. It was there that she got the call from Petite Lemon and Shutterfly.

Put yourself out there. Don’t worry about whether it will be liked by everyone or not.

Do what you love.

“The work you do while you procrastinate is probably the work you should be doing for the rest of your life.”  

To Pauline, that is the best piece of advice because that ‘other thing’ that you choose to do may just be your passion.

Find a way to do what you love. Be happy!

“Don’t Ration your Passion” episode resources

You can reach Pauline “Muffin” Grayson at muffingraysondesign on Instagram or through her website at www.muffingrayson.com. You can also find her on Pinterest and LinkedIn.

Pauline "Muffin" Grayson, Passion, The Sales Evangelist

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

They are offering a 14-day free trial, and half off your subscription when you use the code Donald at checkout.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast  so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Instagram, Jaeden Schafer, New Sales Leads,

TSE 996: Getting New Leads Through Instagram

Instagram, Jaeden Schafer, New Sales Leads,Behind the scenes at The Sales Evangelist, we’re working to increase organic engagement and interact with our audience, and we’ve discovered a powerful way to develop new leads through Instagram.

According to Jaeden Schafer, Instagram typically accounts for about 10 percent more organic engagement than Facebook, so it’s a great place to gain a new audience and develop new leads.

Who can benefit?

When Instagram initially launched, its goal was to share nice looking pictures. If you’re following that original idea, your company will likely benefit from it.

But what if you’re a refrigeration repair company? How do you post compelling pictures of refrigerators? Posting photos of refrigerators all day won’t really prompt much growth.

So if, for example, you own a refrigeration company in Miami, post pictures of the area you serve with information about the services you provide. Target people who are the customer persona you’re trying to attract.

It basically just needs to be pretty.

Mistakes on Instagram

Many people will offer the same tips for setting up an Instagram account:

  • Choose good photos
  • Find out what your customers want

Then they expect people to just show up.

If the engagement doesn’t happen, they just let the page die, which is the worst possible thing you can do on social media. Since social media is about social proof, outdated accounts are worthless.

When people want to buy something online, they often check online to make sure that the social media accounts are updated. If they aren’t, they might assume you’ll be unresponsive.

Plan to post at least once a week if you want to appear actively engaged. If you’re trying to grow, you should post every day.

If you find yourself thinking that you don’t have the team or the resources to post every single day, remember that there are tools available to help you.

Later.com is a scheduling tool that will let you schedule 30 posts for free. You can schedule a new post every day that will keep you active and growing.

Bulkly is a social media automation tool for marketers and entrepreneurs who want to save time scheduling updates. The folks at Bulkly have created an extensive guide to help you post more consistently, create engaging content that generates new followers, and schedule your Instagram posts to automate your process. If it seems like a good fit, Bulkly offers a 7-day free trial to get you started.

Instagram tactics

Though Instagram is a great place to find new leads, sellers will also want to move those leads from interested to purchasing.

Avoid letting your account just sit. Instead, use your account to find new leads. You can do that with targeted Instagram ads or automation. Better yet, use your account to like and comment on people’s posts that are in your target audience.

Consider the food truck business that launched an Instagram page and then shared images of the food it would serve. On launch day, the owners went to its main competitors’ page and they liked and followed 1,000 of their followers. They repeated that activity every two days for a different food truck.

It grabbed attention because those people would see the business name on their phone as someone who liked their photos and followed their accounts.

It’s a phenomenal strategy, especially for companies that are just starting.

Transition

For B2B companies, it’s important to understand how the transition will look after you follow new prospects on Instagram. How do you move them to your website or prompt them to download something?

When a user sees that you liked some of his photos and followed him, then he’ll likely click on your account name to check out your Instagram account. Your account bio will act a little like a splash page or a sales pitch.

Make sure your bio includes your website, and make sure it really clearly outlines what you do and what your call-to-action is. Direct them to your website or your podcast.

Image quality

For sales reps who might be wondering what kind of content to post, let’s use an example of The Sales Evangelist to talk about what that might look like.

For a service-based business, people tend to limit their thinking about the kind of images to post. Choose high-quality images that look really good.

If you don’t have a high-quality camera, it’s ok.

Start with websites that offer free, copyright-free images, like unsplash.com. Type in your keyword and find hundreds of high-quality photos related to your niche. High-quality photos will make your account look very professional.

Include your own “flavor” that meshes with the way you pitch, but make sure that the people who follow your account feel like they are getting some kind of value out of it.

Some organizations use inspirational quotes or even tips such as how to care for your a/c unit. Choose information that will give something back to your audience.

You can use entire blog posts as an Instagram caption.

In short, be there, post information your customers want, and do it consistently.

Videos

Videos have a much higher likelihood of going viral. Jaeden reports that an account he manages might get 400-700 likes, while a video on the same account might get 1,000-14,000 views.

As a result, videos are a really good way to grow your business because videos are more engaging.

Also, though, if the video includes you talking and sharing information, it builds a relationship with your customers because they get to experience your personality in a way that they wouldn’t in a photo. It creates trust.

Stories

Many people go to Instagram just for the stories. If you can create a story that captures people’s attention, it’s a huge new piece of real estate.

When you have a new promotion or a new post, consider using your story to encourage followers to check out your new post. You can promote a podcast, a sale, a deal, or whatever you want people to know.

Once you have 10,000 followers on Instagram, you can put links in your story so people can just swipe up on the story to access your links. That’s when stories become super powerful because it’s a free ad that you can push to everyone who follows you.

Hashtags

Hashtags can be incredibly beneficial or they can be useless, depending on how you use them. Instagram allows up to 30 hashtags per photo, and users should take advantage of all 30 of them to be super specific about the content in the photo.

The platform’s artificial intelligence scans photos to see what are in them, and if you use a big list of random hashtags, your photo won’t perform well. The value of hashtags is that if someone clicks on one, they go to a hashtag page that shows all the images that used that hashtag.

For smaller businesses, use longer hashtags that have fewer people using them, ideally 20,000 to 100,000 uses.  Be super specific in your hashtags and use those that fit the size of your business.

Success story

Jaeden had great success with a luxury travel company. He set up unique accounts for different geographic locations: one for Maldives resorts, Bora Bora resorts, Greek resorts, and so on.

Each bio directed users back to the main page.

He said it was an easy way to tap into a saturated market that is often expensive to advertise in. Within a month, they were getting about 20 percent of their traffic from Instagram.

If you don’t have time to go and follow 1,000 users on a single day, consider using tools like Ninjagram or Jarvee to automate your Instagram efforts. You put your account into it and then select your competitors, and the tool does the work for you.

“New Leads Through Instagram” episode resources

Connect with Jaeden at Fiund.com with any questions you may have or to get additional advice or tips.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Inbound Leads, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Prospect.io

TSE 927: Don’t Be Too Desperate

Inbound Leads, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Prospect.ioSales can be a little bit like dating in high school. When relationships go south, it’s tempting to try to hang on. The other person won’t answer your phone calls. It’s like you never existed. The same thing sometimes happens with inbound leads, and in both cases, remember this: don’t be too desperate.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’ll discuss how you can address the loss of inbound leads, and why you must operate by one rule: don’t be too desperate.

We discussed last week the importance of treating every lead as though it’s the best one we have. Avoid skipping steps, and treat that lead as though it’s as important as all the others.

We summed it up this way: When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.

Follow-up gone wrong

When a lead suddenly goes cold, it’s tempting to second-guess what went wrong, and you can use that curiosity to drive your follow-up efforts. Make sure you have multiple follow-ups in your process.

There’s a fine line, though. Be sure you recognize the distinction between follow-up and stalker-type behavior.

If you’re allowing your concern for the prospect to drive your efforts, you’ll avoid crossing that line. If you’re focused on delivering value, you’ll be better able to focus on things that are relevant to your prospect.

  • What did he download from your site?
  • Can you determine from his own website what challenge he might be trying to overcome?
  • Look at his LinkedIn profile and engage with him there.
  • Determine what kind of content he’s sharing with his audience to see where his focus is right now.
  • What content can you provide based upon the information you gathered?
  • What question can you ask about that content that will encourage him to respond?

I’m sharing value without appearing desperate. I’m providing information based upon what he needs.

Time to let go

Once you’ve done your due diligence and your follow up and you’ve completed your flow process, it might be time to let go.

If you let it go, and if it’s meant to be, it will come back. When you nurture the prospect well, there’s a good chance he’ll come back when he’s ready to buy.

If we have given the resources and provided the information and he still isn’t interested, then we have to focus our attention on the prospects who are ready to buy.

Nurturing well

All of our followup efforts should include a drip campaign that connects with prospects who haven’t yet committed to our product or services.

If we have a specific procedure to follow, we’ll remind the prospect that we exist while he determines what decision is best for him.

When he decides to make a purchase, he’ll remember how well you treated him because you built a relationship. You didn’t simply chase him; you addressed his needs.

Sales is a longterm game, and buyers don’t generally want to deal with desperate sellers.

Don’t simply follow up. Follow up effectively.

“Don’t Be Too Desperate” episode resources

I am a strong believer that prospect.io is a powerful sales automation platform for the outbound side.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

This episode is also brought to you byMaximizer CRM. If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Coffee Shop Meeting, Starbucks, Dunkin Donuts, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 882: The Coffee Shop “Meeting Trap”

Coffee Shop Meeting, Starbucks, Dunkin Donuts, The Sales Evangelist

Imagine being invited to coffee by someone who wants to hear more about what you’re doing. You arrive at the coffee shop, spot him, wave him over, and buy him a drink. After 30 seconds of talking about your project, he launches into a sales pitch. You realize you’ve been snared in the coffee shop meeting trap.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we discuss the negative consequences of misleading sales methods, and why the coffee shop meeting trap may hurt you more than it helps.

It happened to me a lot when I was a new seller, and I quickly discovered that I disliked it. We’re going to address why you shouldn’t do it.

You’ll be perceived as dishonest.

This kind of activity amounts to bait-and-switch. If I show up to meet with you about my podcast, but you turn it into a sales pitch, it makes you seem untrustworthy.

Because buyers are more prepared, they do their research before they connect with people. If you develop a reputation for this kind of behavior, people will begin to sniff it out and they’ll avoid meeting with you altogether.

Even if it lands you one successful sale, you’ll likely experience fallout in the future.

You’ll stand out for the wrong reason.

Bait-and-switch isn’t a new concept. People are aware of it and they’ll recognize it immediately.

My belief has always been that you should do the opposite of what everyone else is doing if you want to be successful.

You’ll burn bridges.

You should always respect people’s time.

If you mislead me into spending an hour of my day with you, without accounting for the travel time to meet with you, you wasted a portion of my day.

If you mislead me into spending time with you, I’m probably going to make a podcast about you.

There’s a better option.

Your ultimate goal should be to foster a relationship.

Look at the person’s LinkedIn and figure out what business he’s in. Figure out how you can provide value to him. Connect him with a potential customer, or write blog content about his company so that your own audience will learn more about him.

In this case, find a way to provide value to the person you’re hoping to connect with. If you know of someone who might make an ideal customer, research to find out whether you’re right.

Once you’ve discovered that the two are a good match, connect them.

In my case, I might begin with a phone conversation about what the prospect could talk about on a podcast. Once we’ve determined that, I’d invite him to appear on the podcast, which helps him.

Perhaps, as a result of the podcast, he’ll want to do something to help me.

Look for opportunities to collaborate.

Be genuine. Begin with a 5-minute conversation that allows you to get to know the other person. Seek to become friends and build lasting connections.

Do the things you know work: nurture the relationship, connect with the prospect, and bring value first.

If you seek to bring value first, you’ll create more opportunity for a lasting relationship.

We tell you these things because we want you to find more ideal customers, build stronger value, close more deals, and do big things.

“Meeting Trap” episode resources

This episode was brought to you by our friends at Wiley, publishers of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. It’s a blueprint for sellers based upon years of research about the things buyers hate.

We’re so convinced that you’ll love the book that we’re providing a free excerpt to our listeners here. We also have a free SlideShare available to help you become a sales leader.

Check out The Sales Evangelizers on Facebook, where a community of people shares their struggles and their experiences with selling.

Also check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

Value, What is Value, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 867: What Is Value?

Value, What is Value, The Sales Evangelist

Sales professionals sometimes talk so much about value that it becomes meaningless. We toss it around like a buzzword instead of sincerely seeking to provide value. What is value, and how can you become better at using value more effectively?

Today on The Sales Evangelist, we’ll define value and discuss how you can make it work for you as a sales professional.

What is value?

Value has both a noun and a verb form. When something is held to be worthy or important, it’s valuable. When we treat it as though it’s worthy or important, we’re valuing it.

Most sales professionals use the term value to refer to features or benefits. We discuss the features and benefits of our product or service and we connect the value to those aspects.

In many cases, though, the things we think are valuable aren’t the same things our customers value.

Figuring out value

Sales professionals must avoid misalignment of value. We must understand what our prospects value before we can provide value to them.

Stephen Covey’s book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People teaches that you must seek first to understand and then to be understood. Before I can expect a prospect to accept my phone calls and hear what I have to say, I must seek to understand his point of view.

How can I figure out what’s valuable?

Figure out the organization’s end goal. What is the organization trying to accomplish? What is the end result? What is the goal of the entity you’re trying to sell to?

If the end goal is to increase sales, to make money, to make great hires,  or to find great talent, know the individual goal will help you provide value.

Discover unconsidered needs

Sales professionals make themselves especially valuable when they become problem finders rather than just problem solvers.

When you help prospects identify needs they didn’t know they had, you become an extremely valuable member of the team. The book The Three Value Conversations calls them unconsidered needs.

Begin by asking current customers about benefits they have discovered since they started working with you. If they have discovered a way to use your product or service to help them solve a problem, other prospects may find the same benefits.

Read magazine articles and news articles to track new regulations that may present new challenges. If you can anticipate problems, you’ll become someone useful to your customers.

“What Is Value?” episode resources

Improve your ability to provide value with The Three Value Conversations and  The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

I continue recommending the book Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley because it is a buyer-based blueprint that can help you increase sales. We’ve made a free excerpt available to listeners because we believe it’s a truly valuable resource.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. Video Jungle offers top-notch, state-of-the-art advice about video.

If you found this information valuable, share it with others who can benefit from it. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

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Rom JB, Tutoring, Facebook Selling, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 841: Seek To Serve When Using Social Media

Rom JD, The Sales Evangelist, TutoringSocial media is here to stay. The faster sales professionals learn to use it, the better off they’ll be. The trick, according to Romual Jean-Baptiste, is to seek to serve when using social media.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, Rom explains how he uses social media, why he uses social media, and why you must incorporate it into your own sales process.

The truth, he said, is that we really have no choice in the matter. Everyone around us is using social media, and it’s a necessity that we evolve to it.

The more we resist it, the more of a disservice we’re doing to ourselves.

Identify your ideal customer.

Rom is a certified special educator whose company provides in-home tutoring for clients in New York City.

His ideal customer is a married working mom who is busy with her career, her family, and her social life. She uses social media extensively to interact with her friends, share things with her family, and ask questions.

Everything Rom does on social media is based around Lisa.

He completely surrounds himself with her life so he can understand how she sees the world. He joins women’s groups, reads content targeted at women like Lisa, and goes to live events and interacts with women like Lisa. He even tries to predict her favorite restaurants.

Rom said he constantly learns new things about Lisa because she is always evolving. As a result, his marketing and his use of social media must do the same.

He has determined that, once you understand your ideal client, you’ll be able to market effectively.

Interact with your prospects.

Once you understand who you’re marketing to, watch them to see how they use social media.

Rom discovered that his prospects are in their 30s, so they are primarily using Facebook, although they are also moving to Instagram. Because his prospects are moving, he’s going with them.

He also said he is careful not to spread himself too thin, choosing instead to focus on a couple of different platforms instead of trying to master them all.

In Rom’s case, he follows the school calendar and other related events to provide value to prospects.

If they ask a question about education, he answers it. If they accomplish something, he congratulates them. If the end of the school year is coming, he posts about summer learning. During back-to-school, he shares information about that.

By understanding who he’s going after and the problems they face, he is able to provide content relevant to the pain they are facing.

Invest in the people you’re trying to reach.

People tend to overthink social selling and incorrectly assume that the goal is to push their own agenda.

Instead, Rom said, take the time to invest in your ideal customer. Understand her. Provide value to her.

When prospects are considering whether to pursue tutoring, Rom works to land their cell phone numbers because he calls text messaging the “Holy Grail” of social selling. (People respond faster to text messages than email, in his experience.)

Once he has the number, he sends an infographic to their phone with a list of questions they should consider as they continue their research and decide which tutors to choose.

  • How flexible is your schedule?
  • How will you track my child’s progress?
  • How will you inform my child’s teacher about his progress?
  • Do you have a money-back guarantee?

This guide helps them make an informed decision about tutors, even if they decide to go with another company, and it’s directly on their phones so they can access it as they interview prospective companies.

Seek to serve when using social media.

Use time to improve your ROI.

It boils down to the platinum rule: treating people the way they want to be treated.

And though it may seem too time consuming to keep up with all of your clients via text message, Rom said the return-on-investment is incredible. If you are able to scale the unscalable, the sky is the limit.

It might seem too time consuming to send a Mother’s Day text to each one, or to acknowledge a child’s birthday, but people do business with people they know, like, and trust. Your clients will always be loyal, and they’ll refer you to other people.

“Seek To Serve When Using Social Media” resources

If you’d like to connect with Rom to hear more about how he tripled his revenue in less than two years with the help of social selling, connect with him on Facebook.

There’s a reason I continue suggesting the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic blueprint of all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

I’m so convinced of its message that I’m offering a free excerpt of the book so you can check it out.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Shared Vision, Prospecting, Adding Value, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 840: TSE Hustler’s League-“Shared Vision”

Shared Vision, Prospecting, Adding Value, The Sales Evangelist Podcast
Prospecting is hard work. Most sales professionals hate it because it’s demanding. It’s unique to every customer. The key to successful prospecting is shared vision, or helping your prospects see available options and alternatives.
On today’s episode of The sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, we’re talking about prospecting, and things you can do to move your prospect toward a decision.
If you aren’t familiar with our TSE Hustler’s League episodes, we listen to a snippet of one of our online coaching sessions that address a common issue for sales professionals.

Begin with research

One client shared that he begins by finding out what tools the prospect is currently using.

Because his company sells video and video production, he focuses on the capabilities that the prospect likely needs, and the things they might be missing based upon the tools they are using now. He determines whether there is anything the client could improve upon, and he bases his first outreach on that information.

He begins with contact that addresses the optimization that’s available to them, and he encourages them to find out what others in the area are doing for their own video needs.

It’s a great strategy because it helps the prospect compare the current capability with the possibilities that are available.

Offer key insights

Many sellers mistakenly provide too much information early in the process. They have so much knowledge about their product that they are eager to share that they overcomplicate the process.

Sears, the company that seems to keep surviving, discovered an odd correlation because they focused on data. They noticed that each time they had a sale on underwear, they also saw a spike in the purchase of power tools.

When they investigated, they discovered that while their wives were shopping for underwear, men went to the tool department to avoid waiting around.

If you find that you’re struggling to schedule follow-on meetings, it’s possible that you’re not providing value to your prospects.

Employ the 5 whys

Ultimately, our goal is to understand our prospects, their needs, and their struggles. The more successful we are at sharing insights with the prospect, the more likely we’ll be to move the process forward.
As you move into this part of the sales process, understand the power of the 5 whys. It’s a technique used to identify root causes, by repeating the question “Why?” after each previous answer.
The idea is that one problem often leads to second- and third-order problems, so by continuing to ask “Why?” you’ll more likely discover the problem at the root of the situation.

“Shared Vision” resources

Check out The Sales Evangelizers on Facebook to connect with sellers of all levels and all industries. Learn what they are doing, share ideas, and compare notes with sellers from all over the world. Our next semester starts at the end of the summer, and we’d be honored to have you join us.

Assistant.to can help you streamline your appointments and make it easier for prospects to engage with you early on in the sale process. It’s a free tool that allows you to embed your calendar in your emails so prospects won’t have to work too hard to connect with you.

Salespeople can be leaders instead of being subservient. Our friends at Wiley  have provided a free excerpt of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading which provides a blueprint to help sales professionals lead in the way that customers prefer. Read an excerpt of the book here.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

The podcast is part of our newly-launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. To learn more, email us at SPN for more information.

Tell others you know about our podcast, and subscribe if you haven’t already. Leave us a review wherever you consume this content so it will be easier for others to find us as well.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Social Media, Amar Seth, Social Selling

TSE 838: Social Selling Practices That Will Drive Results For You Today!

Social Media, Amar Seth, Social Selling

Your buyers are exactly like you. Statistics suggest that at least 57 percent of the buying process happens online before any conversations ever take place. If you aren’t taking advantage of social selling, and if your prospects can’t find you online, you’re missing a huge opportunity to impact the sales process.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’re talking with Amar Sheth about why sales professionals must harness the power of social selling in order to stay relevant.

Make the most of content

Content offers the best opportunity to engage with your prospects. If you aren’t willing to provide information to your potential customers along the course of their journey, you have no choice of impacting them.

How do you communicate your value and your expertise in a 30-second phone call?

Instead of using sneaky techniques to reach your prospects, share material and you and your company and your knowledge of the industry. Instead of relying solely on cold calling, incorporate social selling into your day. Share information that educates your buyers.

Imagine this: I post content that you find intriguing, and you click “Like” on the social media platform. That single, simple action will trigger your entire network.

If you’re connected to 1,000 people on the platform, I now have access to a lot of potential eyes for my content. I can potentially reach second and third-level contacts because of a piece of relevant content.

That would never happen on the phone.

Employ simple tools

Plenty of free tools exist to help you connect with your prospects.

Begin on LinkedIn, and look in the top corner for something called Pulse. It’s a social content aggregator that will help you find content that’s relevant to your audience.

Use Twitter to query the search terms that matter to your prospects. Note the top 10 results you get. If the same names consistently appear in your results, make note of them.

Find content that matters to your buyers. Go to sources that you know your buyer relies on and get content there.

If you’re serious about engaging with your prospects, you must tap into social media.

Shift your mindset

Tony Robbins frequently says that anything you try to accomplish is 20 percent mechanical and 80 percent psychological.

Accept that the buyer has changed, and internalize it.

If you have difficulty getting people on the phone in cold call outreach, understand that it’s not you. The buyer has changed.

Think of it this way: would you rather spend 8 hours a day making phone calls, or attend one happy hour event where all the same people are gathered together after work? Spend all day cold calling, or spend one hour handing out business cards?

You can’t close a deal if you can’t first have a conversation.

Episode resources

Connect with Amar on Twitter or LinkedIn.

You can also become a leader to your buyers by presenting value and building relationships. The book Stop Selling & Start Leading, offered by our friends at Wiley, provides a blueprint for your customers and what they are seeking. Read an excerpt of the book here.

Once you’ve applied the concepts you heard here today, message me or email me and let me know what your results were.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

The podcast is part of our newly-launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. To learn more, email us at SPN for more information.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

 

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Different, Sales Leader, Prospecting, Donald Kelly

TSE 835: TSE Hustler’s League-“What Is Different About You?”

Different, Sales Leader, Prospecting, Donald KellyYou are not the only salesperson who has contacted your prospect this week. In fact, she has likely heard from 10 other salespeople selling exactly the same thing you are. So what is different about you?

How do you differentiate yourself from the other 10 people so she’ll want to move to the next step with you? Today, on The Sales Evangelist, we’ll discuss how you can set yourself apart in your relationships with prospects.

What is different about you?

If your only focus in your initial contact with a prospect is setting an appointment, your focus is too narrow. You must go into every appointment with the intention to provide value; to bring something to the table.

In other words, what can you offer the prospect that she can’t get from any of the other 10 people? Busy buyers have lots of options, and you don’t want to be just one of many options. What is different about you?

How can you stand out from the others? Consider the following questions:

  1. Why should the prospect meet with me?
  2. What can I offer that she won’t get from anyone else?
  3. What will she miss out on if she doesn’t meet with me?

Recognize that she has many roles in her life, and this is just one of them. Do your research and figure out how to provide value to her.

What problem can you help solve?

In my early days of selling, it never occurred to me to think about the prospect and what she might need. Instead of helping my prospect, I was focused on getting appointments and closing deals.

I discovered my mistake the hard way, and I learned that prospects have no shortage of choices, so I needed to do more than sell.

Before you meet with your prospect, conduct some research. Call the company and speak to people who can give you insight about the problems the company is facing.

Find a solution to those problems and bring those solutions into your meeting.

In the case of an inbound call, use your pre-existing knowledge about the industry to move them toward the next stage of the process.

Look at past customers you’ve solved problems for. Look to situations in which you solved problems that the customer didn’t even know she had.

Bring insights to the table that no one else is offering to move the prospect to the next step.

Episode resources

Pick up a copy of the book The 3 Value Conversations: How to Create, Elevate, and Capture.

If all of this sounds great to you but you still aren’t sure how to start, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights.

We’ve just started a new semester, and it’s not too late to apply to see if you’re a good candidate for our program.

You can also join our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers to connect with sales professionals from all walks of life.

There’s a reason I continue suggesting the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic blueprint of all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

I’m so convinced of its message that I’m offering a free excerpt of the book so you can check it out.

Email me for more information about our newly launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. You can also email us about our new business development services.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Jared Easley, Podcast Movement, Twitter, Prospecting, Social Selling

TSE 828: How To Use Twitter To Grab Prospects Attention

Jared Easley, The Sales Evangelist, capture prospects' attentionDepending on how you’re using it and what you’re trying to accomplish, Twitter is alive and well. In fact, Jared Easley, known as a “noticer,” believes  Twitter is full of people who are starving for true connection, and he believes you can use it to grab prospects’ attention.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, we’ll discuss techniques for using Twitter to build connections and create an army for yourself.

Genuine connections

If you reach out to someone and express interest in what they’re doing, it will almost always be received well. When you’re willing to have a dialogue, people respond.

On the other hand, think about your own reaction when someone tries to cram something down your throat. 

Connections that only involve an attempt to sell or self-promote will almost always be ignored.

The issue isn’t automation, because automation can be done well. The issue is a stack of posts queued in your account that only promote a sales opportunity or a link to sign up for something.

The good news is that Twitter has become proactive in its efforts to clean up some of the mass automation and is policing that kind of behavior. Furthermore, those kinds of interactions won’t benefit you on Twitter.

What will benefit you on Twitter is a genuine connection; a willingness to concern yourself more with the other person than with yourself.

One-to-one

Some people mistakenly believe that one-to-one contact doesn’t work on Twitter. We tend to get so caught up in numbers that we miss the chance to start small and measure whether our message will resonate with just a few people.

The truth is that those who genuinely connect with other people will find that their message compounds, and ultimately they reach more people because they were willing to invest in one-to-one connections.

Jared recently put Twitter to use during a trip to Las Vegas. He started with a keyword search  and narrowed those results down to the people in Las Vegas. Then, through a campaign of @ mentions, rather than direct messages, he reached out to podcasters in the area and invited them to a free meet up.

The outreach worked because he wasn’t asking them to buy anything or come see what he was doing. He simply invited them to meet other podcasters. As a by-product, Jared had the opportunity to interview a few of them for his own podcast.

Although there’s no guarantee that any of those relationships will ever result in a sale, you will have created rapport. You used one-to-one messaging in a way that wasn’t spammy.

As a result of the positive experience you created, the prospect will be more likely to think of you in a positive way.

Grab prospects’ attention

You can also use Twitter to find targeted lists of people.

The Google Chrome extension TWLETS allows you to find a public Twitter list, download it as a CSV file or spreadsheet, and then use that data to connect with people.

You can ask relevant questions of the people on the list, such as “What inspired you to begin podcasting?” or “What microphone do you recommend for podcasters who are just starting out?” Rather than bulk messaging, you can come up with a short list of questions that you spread out among the people on the list.

If you’re operating alone, you’ll likely be ignored. The people who don’t get ignored are the ones who create an army of supporters by building genuine connections.

Once you have demonstrated your interest in what your prospects are doing, reciprocity will kick in and they’ll develop an interest in what you’re doing.

We challenge you to adopt one principle and apply it today. Look for opportunities to notice your prospects. Watch and “notice” them in order to figure it out.

Episode resources

Connect with Jared at podcastmovement.com or on Twitter @jaredeasley. Pick up a copy of Jared’s book, Podcasting Good to Great: How to Grow Your Audience Through Collaboration.

Our friends at Wiley  have provided a free excerpt of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. Based upon research and interviews with buyers, the book provides a blueprint sales professionals. Read an excerpt of the book here.

Once you’ve applied the concepts you heard here today, message me or email me and let me know what your results were.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

The podcast is part of our newly-launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. To learn more, email us at SPN for more information.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Douglas Vigliotti, Paradox, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 806: The Salesperson Paradox

douglas-vigliotti, Donald Kelly, The Salesperson ParadoxThe Salesperson Paradox requires sales professionals to shift their focus from selling something to the customer to helping the customer solve a problem.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, Douglas Vigliotti helps us understand how sales fundamentals can help us grow our business.

As a strategic selling partner for small business owners, Vigliotti understands that businesses without processes don’t progress or grow.

Salesperson Paradox

The most important question a salesperson can ask himself is this: Am I selling products and services or am I helping to solve a problem?

Sales professionals have been conditioned to sell by their bosses, their investors, and a host of other people. What drives the process, though, is helping someone solve a problem. When the customer gets what he wants, the sales professional gets what she wants.

People innately think of themselves first.

Imagine you’re at a party with a group of friends and someone takes a picture. When you look at the picture, who do you look to first? We look at ourselves first, of course. If we don’t like how we look, we may stipulate that the picture can’t be posted.

Rock-solid strategy

Tactics are interchangeable.

One day the focus might be Facebook, and another day it’s Google.

Your sales focus must be on strategy rather than tactics because without a rock-solid strategy, you’ll never reproduce your success.

The key to business relationships lies in positioning the deal so that both parties win. Reducing the social, emotional and financial risk makes it easier for the customer to say yes.

When you make it easy for the customer to come on board, you increase the likelihood that they’ll choose you repeatedly.

Simplicity

Never confuse simplicity and ease.

Simplicity is the key to reproducibility. If you strive for clarity about your process, you’ll be able to reproduce it.

The number one skillset for entrepreneurs is problem-solving, and Vigliotti offers a framework for creating solutions. He calls them CRINGE solutions: they’re so good that customers would cringe at the idea of saying no.

Customer first: Does my customer feel like he has won?

Real problem:  Am I solving the customer’s true problem or a problem I perceive he has?

Immense value: Can I provide value, either real or intangible, that increases the value of my customer?

Non-negotiable: Am I communicating my belief that you’re better off with me than you would be without me?

Good timing: We can do everything right, but if the timing is off you won’t win the deal. Optimize timing by improving the speed of delivery.

Easy to say yes: The most powerful acquisition strategy is making it easier for the customer to say yes.

Episode resources:

In order to solve problems for our customers, we must know how to solve problems and provide value. If you aren’t sure how to do that, help is available.

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is an online group training program that will help you learn processes that you can apply immediately in order to see results.

It’s a weekly live training session that will help you become more influential and be more successful. We’ll help you find more leads, build more value, close more deals and do big things.

If you enjoy our podcast, leave us a review wherever you consume this content. Share it with someone else who can benefit from it.

Check out Douglas Vigliotti’s book The Salesperson Paradox, or find him on LinkedIn.

Sound in this episode provided by Free SFX.

Objections, Donald Kelly, How to handle objections

TSE 787: Why They Should NOT Buy

Objections, Donald Kelly, How to handle objectionsSometimes, your customers shouldn’t buy from you. We don’t often think about that as sales professionals, but we should. Sometimes, their objections are correct.

In today’s episode, we discuss why you should empathize with your customers and put yourself in their shoes. The more empathetic we are, the more likely we are to persuade them to purchase our product or service. We’ll build credibility.

Recently, for example, I generated a Facebook podcast that asked people about the biggest problem they have with sellers. The most frequent response was that people didn’t like how pushy salespeople were.

We aren’t all pushy, of course, but we have to deal with that public perception. Obviously, we want to make money, but we can’t allow that to be our push.

Your job as a sales professional is to persuade people to buy your product or service. We often focus on making money instead of adding value.

[Tweet “Our goal as sales professionals should be to find solutions to challenges rather than pushing a sale for our own gain.” #SalesSolutions]

In this episode:

  • Hear how customers work to disqualify you and your products and services.
  • Learn the questions you can ask to understand the competition and identify with the customer.
  • Understand the role your commission does or more realistically doesn’t, play in the sale.

Objections

When you empathize with your customers and establish credibility, your customer will be more likely to recognize you as the solution to her problems.

Establish what sets you apart from the competition. Identify the ways your prospect is seeking to disqualify you as an option. You’ll be better prepared to create content that is molded to your customer.

If you or your team could benefit from learning to build value with your prospects, the April semester of The Sales Associate Hustler’s League is a group coaching program designed to help sales professionals, entrepreneurs, and sellers of all levels.

Each week’s training addresses concepts or training relevant to the theme of the training. For the month of April, it’s building value. Visit thesalesevangelist.com/hustlers.

 

Listening, Sales Conversation, Donald Kelly, Listening Skills

TSE 772: How Can I Improve My Listening Skills?

Listening, Sales Conversation, Donald Kelly, Listening Skills

Ideally, as sellers, we should only talk 30% of the time during a sales conversation and let the prospect or customer talk about 60% to 70% of the time. You want to make sales? Then you have to improve your listening skills!

However, in the real world, I find that many salespeople talk and talk without even listening to their prospects.

Without properly listening to your prospects, you might miss on what’s really important for them. And that means missing your sales deal.

Strategies for Improving Your Listening Skills:

1. Know what you’re listening for.

Go into the first conversation and figure out what can make them buy. Identify the top four drivers why people purchase. Listen for those and poke at those. Know what to listen for so you don’t just talk or be random.

2. Ask meaningful questions.

Instead of the yes or no questions, ask the open-ended questions like what, when, where, why, or how.

3. Follow up.

Don’t be afraid to ask a followup question. Try to really dig deeper into uncovering their real pain point. Use Toyota’s five whys where you keep on asking your prospects why until you get to the fifth why and you will notice you’ve uncovered their real problem. Try to do this exercise even in other areas of your life.

Episode Resources:

The 12 Week Year by Brian P. Morgan and Michael Lennington

The Lean Startup by Eric Ries

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Facebook group The Sales Evangelizers

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Value, Questions, Listen

TSE 764-Sales From The Street-“Don’t Make Them Feel Stupid”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Value, Questions, ListenAs a seller, our job is to ensure we make our prospects feel comfortable with us.

During this episode, I share why and how we should help our prospects feel comfortable.

In a Perfect World

As a new sales professional, you want to get a templated script and be able to follow along. You want to know exactly what to say, when to say it, how to say it.

You just want everything laid out so you only have to follow it, thinking it’s going to work in every perfect situation.

In reality, it doesn’t work like that.

You need to have intelligent business conversations.

One of the major challenges I had when I was starting out was that I was being robotic as a sales professional.

Scripts are not bad per se, but it’s bad when you’re just reading the script and going without emotions, without connecting or understanding the person you’re talking to.

Strategies to Make Your Prospects Feel Comfortable

Don’t make your customers feel confused or look stupid.

When you’re just reading off the script and you have no emotion built into it, that would make them think you’re stupid.

Have a business conversation.

Don’t just ask rogue questions to the customers that don’t necessarily make sense to the customer because you didn’t do research on them.

First, understand how your customers are making money. What are the challenges that cause them to not make money?

Try to research on their industry to get a better understanding. That way, you’d know how to move the needle and have a business conversation with them.

Educate your customers and have meaningful conversations. As Donald Miller says, “A confused customer will never buy.”

Episode Resources:

Building a Story Brand by Donald Miller

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Value, Donald Kelly, Raúl Sánchez Gilo

TSE BLOG 014: Value vs. Price: The Importance of the Perceived Value

Value, Donald Kelly, Raúl Sánchez GiloLast week I saw an interesting infographic on social networks saying the following: “Something is happening, Facebook, the most popular social network, does not generate content. Airbnb, the large provider of accommodation, does not own properties. Uber, the big taxi company, does not own any vehicles. Alibaba, the biggest marketer, has no inventories…”

Well, this is already happening a long time ago. Generally, we think about products as tangible items, as physical goods with a set of attributes (features, functions, benefits, and uses) that are capable of meeting one or several needs and requirements. But the product nowadays can also be something intangible, which cannot be perceived by the senses previously, at least not until they are used, and in that sense the product can be a service, or may even be an idea, a concept, a philosophy, a story, that is also perceived by buyers as able to satisfy their needs or desires and therefore as subject of exchange.

A product can be a good, a service or an idea.

In fact, on most occasions is a set of all of them. A beauty treatment is a service, but the idea that sells is the desire of youth. There are companies that sell ‘experiences’, and that is something else than just a service. Ideas are also the religious ideas, political ideas, environmental awareness, and also the reputation of the seller. The salesman, the trust he can generate, his personal look, his charisma, are also part of the product that he sells. Other main and differential psychological attributes of the product are the Brand and Quality, which also add value to the product.

People buy more by ideas, by emotions, by feelings and heart. They buy benefits and solutions, they buy advantages and buy services that are intangible. And they buy the ideas they perceive from the seller, and in the seller.

Said this, we can better address the concept of the perceived value of the product which allows us to avoid entering price wars, allows differentiation and even to increase the price of the product.

The Perceived Value Formula

We should not compete just on price, which is an unproductive battle. The price is important in the purchase decision but should not be the only buying reason. If we do not have differentiating advantages, or when the customer perceives similar products or services, he decides just for the price. So that it’s needed adding new ideas and concepts, add value to avoid competing only on price. The salesperson needs to persuade with a value proposition, aggregate value to his offer to find advantages that differentiate him.

In short, we have suggested that the price is just one more variable in the perceived value scales of customers and consumers, and not the only component. It is best to explain it with a simple formula that everybody will understand:

Customers always perform a mental operation, sometimes more unconscious than rational, and sometimes very calculated, to know when buying is positive. To justify the purchase, they make a balance between benefits and sacrifices perceived in the supplier’s offer, and the perceived value of the customer is based on the difference between what they receive and what they give, something like this:

Perceived Value = Total benefits and/or advantages – Total costs and/or prices

In this formula, the first is the whole set of economic, functional, abstract, psychological (such as brand, quality, etc.) benefits and advantages of the product or service, and all the added and differential values. The second term includes all prices, economic costs, and also time, energy and psychological costs. It must be stressed that part of the costs are also the time that is used to make a decision, also the time spent in making use of the service, the psychological cost (e.g. against a particular brand, or stop using the usual product to change to another) and the cost of energy spent or effort for the purchase and enjoyment of the service.

The customer will also make this assessment with your competition:

  • If the perceived value of your product is greater than that of the competition, he will be inclined to your offer, and vice versa.
  • If the perceived value is negative, the price is the barrier, and generally, he will not buy. Or he will say that it is very expensive, he perceives nothing beyond the price.
  • If the perceived value is very small, the price and the consequent price war may be what decides if he buys from you or from the competition, he will buy the cheaper, or not buy.
  • On the other hand, if the perceived value of your product is very high you will sell more and better.

The value proposition

It is the seller’s job to increase this value, making the customer perceives and properly assesses the full set of benefits, including here all the factors, subjective and emotional advantages and added ideas to counter the price force. In this sense, the price and value of a product are not the same. And so we say that the price is not or should not be the only reason to buy, it is not the only element of the equation unless we do not make any value proposition.

When a customer is asked how they perceive the value of a product, they are actually being asked to compare it with their perception of other existing purchase alternatives. And therefore a product is not expensive by itself, the answer is: ‘expensive compared to what?’…

In short, the value proposition is to explain to your customer why they should buy from you and not to your competition. This must include the whole range of benefits and advantages of your product or service that solve their problem and meet their needs and your differential value. In other words, to provide a higher perceived value to the customer.

The dynamic perceived value.

The ‘problem’ is that this scale of customer values, this perceived value, is subjective, is abstract and it is a dynamic variable, changing, but not only from yesterday to today, but also from one day to the next. That is, the valuation of the customer is different before the purchase, at the time of purchase, while using the product, and after using the product. There is an initial, middle and final perceived value.

Furthermore, it changes with each client, it is subjective, so for each client, or customer type, each market segment or niche, you have to make a different value proposal, because ultimately we are people, and we value differently the same advantage, we have different sensitivities, as well as different economic capacities that will also affect the appreciation of those advantages. For the same product, different customer segments perceive different values.

There are also companies that play with the initial and final perceived value, looking to satisfy their customers by promising something they can deliver, and deliver more than they promised or surprise the customer with small details that were not in the initially accepted formula, values that were not expected. But also the opposite happens, disappointing the client with a final perceived value lower than the initial, and that is not what we want.

Lower prices are not the way

Well, despite being a formula, it is not accurate. That’s why the ‘easy’ way of that formula is to lower prices, but this does not always mean that demand rises, and it also generates another spiral of problems. Just like raising prices, it also needs to increase the perceived value of the product to be able to raise the price without problems. It is a Price vs. Value balance. In today’s competitive and changing world, the best way is to increase the value of our product, not to reduce prices. Rather, even to increase the price, if and only if, we increase our perceived value.

Therefore, companies and salespeople must deal with the perceived value of their product in the customer’s mind, which is a continuous job. Furthermore, building customer loyalty, as result from their satisfaction degree, will depend on the good or bad management by the seller and the company of that perceived value in relation to the initial expectations. That is, customer satisfaction and his loyalty will depend on the difference between the perceived value and the expectations. But that’s another story. One that is priceless.

Author bio 

Raúl Sánchez Gilo is a Spanish engineer, traveler, salesman, chess player, and writer. And not necessarily in that order. Thanks to his long experience in exporting technical products to more than 60 countries, throughout Asia, the Middle East, Africa, Europe and Eastern Europe, the author now shares the secrets to success in sales in his first book: “Sell More and Better, Eternal Sales Techniques beyond Internet”. A must-read literary experience for the thousands of salesmen, entrepreneurs, sales managers, sales trainers and coaches, exporters, business owners and sales students, among others.

Donald Kelly, Message, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 617: There’re Too MANY of Us Here!

Donald Kelly, Message, The Sales Evangelist PodcastWhether you’re selling life insurance or a car or plumbing service, you’re in an area where there’s a lot of competition and you’re trying to standout. But how can you best stand out within the industry you’re in?

Creativity is key.

In one of the early episodes of How I Built This Podcast by NPR, which has now become one of my favorite shows. Barbara Corcoran (the lady on Shark Tank), a successful real estate tycoon, talked about effective marketing. And one thing she did was being creative and was able to take something common and twist it in a way that she’s able to bring value to the buyer.

So she was getting one of her first properties and trying to rent it. She told the guy putting it up for a rent to put up a wall and partition the room, which was supposed to be just a studio room. They guy rented it quickly and Barbara was able to out beat the other ones who was just renting a one-bedroom apartment. She added a bit more to it.

Strategies to help you stand out:

  1. Look for the area where competitors are not focusing their efforts on.

Any industry will train you to do what you need to do into buying this particular product. Everyone does that. Don’t just do what everyone else is doing. Try to do an area that you will be a master in.

  1. Do podcasts.

Instead of having coffee with a bunch of people, try going on other podcasts. Or do virtual workshops and use Google Hangout. You don’t have to talk about the product you’re selling per se but try to talk about, say, the successes and challenges people have as they’re preparing for the next phase of their life. Get as many information from them as you can and then from that, create a little eBook.

  1. Get the local experts engaged.

Find local experts in your industry and have them write on your blog or interview them.

  1. Find that one thing that’s going to help you get some activities.

For me, personally, podcasting is the thing that works for me. I’m able to share things that have worked for me. But maybe you’re a video person so you want to videos. Or maybe you want to write instead or be a speaker. Find local speaking opportunities where you can talk to your audience and your potential customers.

  1. It’s okay if it doesn’t work.

Don’t be afraid, just do it. What’s the worst thing that can happen anyway? If one thing doesn’t work then pivot. Stop doing the same old things that are giving you the same old, no results.

Episode Resources:

How I Built This Podcast by NPR

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

 

Decision Maker, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 614: Sales From The Street -“Reaching VITO”

Decision Maker, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistAs an entrepreneur and seller, prospecting is one of the fundamental things you need to master. Today, I’m sharing some effective ways I’ve seen to get to that decision maker. This is something you’re going to have to do as a seller. These are strategies I’ve seen that work and that you can tweak and utilize in your business.

 

 

 

Who are the decision-makers?

These are the people in the organization that have the ability to say yes to you. These are people who can decide on buying your product or service.

They’re not necessarily CEO’s. They can be the Chief Marketing Officer. Again, these are the people who have access to the funds or budget.

Decision makers are not necessarily going to be the one you can get access to right away. They’re busy and have process where you have to go through multiple individuals first before you get access to them.

The key contact or decision maker is the VITO (Very Important Top Officer).

  1. Utilize referrals.

Go through your current customers and understand who your ideal customers are. Understand your buyer persona and see who else they know they can introduce you to.

Your chances of getting to the VITO through the receptionist is slim to none.

  1. Send a snail mail and follow up.

The whole point is to get a key target list of accounts and send them something in the mail that will grab their attention. Then call and do an introduction. By doing this, the secretary will be more willing to pass you through because you caught her attention.

  1. Take advantage of social media.

Sometimes decisions makers are utilizing social media. Use a platform that does not have a lot of traction. When you go on social media., don’t pitch right away. Bring value first. Find a way to share information or something they like that you can connect with and comment on. If there’s positive news about them in the media, share your insights too. Also, fill out the contact information on their website.

  1. Call the sales department of that organization.

Salespeople are often more compassionate and willing to get you the key information or email address or phone number to the right individual. Don’t be afraid since they’re doing the same you are. Also look for a way that you can bring value to them.

Episode Resources:

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

 

John Brubaker, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Upselling

TSE 583: Stop Leaving Money on the Table

John Brubaker, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, UpsellingToday’s episode is jam packed with great insights into two of the essential aspects of sales: Prospecting and standing out.

Today’s guest is John Brubaker, a nationally renowned Performance Consultant, speaker, and award-winning author. He has written six books on leadership performance including his latest book, Stadium Status. John shares his secrets to keeping a healthy pipeline and the secrets to upselling.

John actually started as a lacrosse coach and getting fired on his birthday became a blessing in disguise that eventually got him into the world of sales and entrepreneurship.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with John:

The Coach Approach:

  • Don’t sell. Recruit.
  • John took his skills he learned as a college recruiter where you sell the invisible and you’re selling hope, dream, and education.
  • John sold radio airtime and took the best practices he learned selling a more expensive product or service and applying it to the world of advertising and sponsorship.

How to Sell a Dream:

John did college recruiting for three years until going on his own as an entrepreneur, speaker, and author. He says the fundamentals of selling are all the same.

  1. Prospecting – Identify good opportunities.
  2. Qualify the prospective buyer. – Be able to sniff out the suspects. Separate suspects from prospects.
  3. Tell a story and make a compelling offer. – People want you to solve a problem (ex. save money, find them more time, new revenue stream).

Be different.

John explains that It’s ingrained in us through our educational system to fit in and stand out, to be seen and not be heard. You’re not taught to question authority or taught to be different. So it’s hard to be able to differentiate. You have to find ways to differentiate, to add more value, and stand out.

Your reality is not always right for everyone. The faster you can get a no from the suspects, the easier it is to sort through the prospects and figure out the right ones to get a yes. According to John, best practices are well and good. However, they become common practices. Unique, remarkable brands stand out for something and one thing ideally.

Make an intangible product tangible.

John tells a story of how they actually turned an intangible product where they sold airtime into a tangible product through experience. And through that simple act that no one else was doing, they hit the rating books for the first time in the history of the station.

Another example is Flo. Progressive Insurance took an intangible product which is insurance, that’s not sexy and they attached a human being with a fun, goofy character to it and put her on a retail store front. They made an intangible tangible and they made it fun.

Get creative and make your own version of that. Have the courage to stand out and be different.

Do not rush the process.

In sales, we’re always rushing and doing everything so fast. Learn how to work your process and just play the long game.

Register Today

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Register Today

Strategies for Upselling:

  1. Show people success.

Show to them early on how your product solves a problem. Oftentimes, a buyer will trust you with something small before they’re willing to trust you with a bigger deal. Show first that you can drive traffic to the door. Once they’re happy with that, you have that opportunity to upsell.

  1. Attach celebrity, social proof, and name recognition to your brand.

In any way you can, try to tie in celebrity, social proof, and name recognition to your brand.

  1. Build that trust.

What business are you really in? First and foremost, you’re in a relationship business. Built that trust and it will pay dividends later.

Strategies for maintaining a healthy pipeline:

  1. Build a brand that attracts instead of chasing.

Cold calling and those traditional ways of selling are an example of chasing. People are going to run away from you and that’s exhausting.

In order to get people interested, you need to first be interesting. Be different or be invisible.

In his book, Stadium Status, John interviewed American country rapper Cowboy Troy where he explains the concept of the Law of Sevens.

  1. The Law of Sevens

Seven is the number of methods you need to employ to make your brand known. Our brain remembers things in units of seven. (ex. phone numbers). Have seven different ways to connect people back to your brand. Figure out seven ways that you can make yourself known to the public and attract people to you.

Create a minimum of seven different points of awareness for people to be attracted to you and make you a household name (ex. Publish a book. Host a radio show or podcast. Contribute articles to a magazine or trade publication. Get out and speak. Be a media guest.)

Seven is also the number of times people need to see your message before they move to take action.

Some insights from John’s Book Stadium Status: Taking Your Business to the Big Time

  • The biggest problem you have is not having enough people to pay attention to your brand, product, or service. The Law of Sevens come in here.
  • We are in an attention economy. Attention comes first. Then, you can monetize people’s attention.
  • Obscurity is the biggest thing everyone is fighting in sales, not the competition or lack of resources.

John’s Major Takeaway:

Focus on your first few fanatics. We have our fans and we have our super fans. The more we cater to our super fans and over-deliver to them, the more they advocate for us and they can expand the amount of attention we get for our brand.

Episode Resources:

Find John on www.CoachBru.com or www.CoachBrew.com (John’s bonus strategy: If you have a website, buy the misspelling of your website.)

Check out John Brubaker’s books:

The Coach Approach

Stadium Status

Join our online workshop this week, 5 Simple Strategies to Increase Your Win Rate and get real stuff you can apply and implement into your business!

Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Help us spread the word out by leaving us a rating or review on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play or whatever platform you’re using.

Scarcity, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 577: How to Incorporate Scarcity When Selling

Scarcity, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist PodcastToday’s episode is about scarcity, why it’s important, and how it can actually help you even when you’re selling. One of the members in our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers, actually posted this question concerning scarcity so I want to specifically touch on this today.

Not only in the real estate world, there are so many industries wherein buyer have so many options so they don’t necessarily need you or your company since they can find the same thing elsewhere. So how do they do business with you?

A Scarcity Study

A study done in 1977 and published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology entitled Physical Barriers and Psychological Reactance: Two-Year-Olds Response to Threats to Freedom where the researchers took a group of 2-year-old kids and took two cool toys, putting on behind a clear plexiglass and the other right next to the plexiglass. The bigger kids were able to reach over the plexiglass and get access to the toy while the others had to walk around to get access to the toy. The toy that was out of reach actually drew the most attention to those who didn’t have the capability of reaching over to get access to the toy. So why didn’t they just grab that toy next to the plexiglass to save them of all this time and effort?

The same thing applies to us and the buyers we’re going after. In real estate, for example, people can sell their houses anywhere and there different resources and companies that can help you sell your house. But what can you do to bring in scarcity to they want to work with you as a realtor or as a seller?

Value through Education

We have to be masters at providing value to our clients through providing education. No two sales are created equal. Figure out a way for you to convey to your prospects the importance of education you have to offer. This could be in the form of blogs, website, or by addressing the topic straight up.

The Potential of Loss

People actually pay more attention to what they may lose as opposed to what they may gain. They are more willing to focus on things where there is a loss tied to it. So try to figure out a way to provide good education either through video or content or when you’re meeting with the prospect. Formulate questions you can ask to educate them and show them that you have knowledge of your industry and the potential of losing.

People hate losing money. Find a way where you can talk about the things they could lose and make them think about the potential of losing something.

Incorporate Deadlines

Another tool you can use to present value is through incorporating time in your sales process. If possible, present studies that are able to show how, for example, a house in the market for an x amount of time would decrease in the potential sale price and then show them how you have sold homes with an x period of time which is outside of that range, hence their house won’t decrease in potential value.

Scarcity of People You Work With

You may also make your clients understand that you only work with x amount of clients at any given time or talk about the clients you’re working with. Talk about the limit of people you can work with.

Do you have any idea of how you create scarcity? I’d love to hear your thoughts about this topic. Simply go to The Sales Evangelizers and drop us a line or two.

Episode Resources:

The Science of Selling by David Hoffeld

Join our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Physical Barriers and Psychological Reactance: Two-Year-Olds Response to Threats to Freedom

Value, Decision Maker, Sales Meeting, Donald Kelly

TSE 575: TSE Hustler’s League-“Executive Language Part 1”

Value, Decision Maker, Sales Meeting, Donald KellyToday, we’re pulling out another snippet from one of our sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League. It’s a great community of members, new to sales and experts alike, and we all come together because they all want to sharpen their skills, increase their opportunity rates, and to close more deals.

This week’s topic is focused on value, specifically speaking the language of executives so you can look valuable.

Being Afraid of Heights

We tend to have this mindset that we don’t have the ability to speak to people who are in the higher ranks such as executives. The only way this is the case is if you don’t know what to speak.

Give Them Insights

One survey suggests that business issues, business trends, and business insights are 4x more than traditional relationships and product knowledge. Conversely, several sales people when they go into a sales conversation, focus more on product knowledge. And it’s just traditional relationships you’re building.

Executives don’t want to hear that stuff. They want business insights. This is why it’s important to do your research before your call. Know your ideal customer. Know the industry you’re going after and understand their unconsidered needs or regulatory changes (ex. Health Care policy changes).

Speak About Your Champion

Your champion is someone in the organization, the manager for example, that helps you try to get to their executive and once you’re able to speak to that CEO or executive, speak about your champion.

Have Strategic Conversations

Speak about revenues, profitability, percentages, growth, or strategic words. Use the information you on their website to have strategic conversations to make you sound more intelligent.

Today’s Major Takeaway:

Study the language of executives. Learn what executives like the most, what they want to see and understand. They want to learn about the bigger picture. Find out what their initiatives are and speak to that.

Episode Resources:

Join us at the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

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Closing Deal, Building Value, Mark Cox, Donald Kelly

TSE 566: Why You Will Probably Lose Your Next Big Deal (And How To Avoid It)”

Closing Deal, Building Value, Mark Cox, Donald KellyNo one in the right mind would like to lose a sales opportunity. My guest today, Mark Cox, is going to teach you specifically why you will probably lose your next big deal and how you can avoid that. The goal is to take a pause to get some quiet time and think about the strategy for moving that deal from left to right.

Mark Cox is a Managing Partner at In The Funnel Sales Consulting. He is a sales coach and a sales consultant working with a lot of small and mid-sized businesses to help them improve their sales. 

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Mark:

6 Reasons You Might Lose Your Next Deal

  1. You don’t have a compelling problem you’re solving for the customer.

You don’t tie to their desired business outcome. People love their technology so much that they’re presentations are so focused on what the technology does without really communicating well what problem your technology is going to solve for the customer.

Everything a business owner does rolls ups to one of these three things:

  • Increased revenue
  • Reduced expense
  • Reduced risks

Therefore, you want to be clear that your solution is going to help them get to one of those three desired business outcomes. Make sure everybody in your team is very clear on what problem do you solve for the customer. Being able to articulate the value proposition is the responsibility of sales leadership and management.

  1. There is no compelling event forcing you to make a change.

No decision is actually the reason most deals don’t get done and that means the customer simply does nothing. Hence, there has to be a compelling event to have a greater likelihood that a decision is going to be made. Work with the customer to figure out if there’s something compelling them to make a decision. If there isn’t, oftentimes it gets a little bit too easy to delay.

How do you create a compelling event?

Tie in your solution to return of investment or help them run their business better and drive revenue instead of inducing the customer to make the decision. If you think that the customer didn’t get it, it’s because you weren’t able to communicate it well.

  1. You don’t know the real economic buyer.

You’re dealing with someone but you’re not actually engaging the person who makes that real decision face-to-face.

Companies make decisions by a group in a company. But at the end of the day, there is somebody with more influence than the next person and with more ownership of the decision and usually the person who owns the budget. This is the economic buyer.

If you’re not able to influence this person directly and engage that person, one of the other people we’re working with is going to sell our solution on our behalf and they’re not as good as we are.

Engage the folks you know and get their coaching on how to progress forward to get in front of the economic buyer. Then you have to add value when you interact with that senior level person and you have to engage them.

 

  1. You don’t have somebody on the deal team on their side who’s a champion for you.

You will realize that you’ve won most of the deals over time because somebody on the customer side was really rooting for you and you know that because they told you. The champion within an account tells you they want you to win.

When you’ve earned the right to this kind of conversation, ask them if it’s the right thing for their company to move forward with your solution. If yes, great. If no, ask why and talk through it so you have a deeper understanding of the barrier to getting the deal done. Again, you have to be able to articulate and tie in your solution to their desired business outcome.

  1. They don’t actually understand that the process by which the prospect/company they’re working with actually makes a decision to buy their product or service.

The more you understand about how they go through the process on their side, the better off they’re going to be in terms of being able to support them as they go through their decision process.

Keep in mind that your customers go through their decision and buying process and not through your sales process. You need to understand what that is so you can navigate it properly.

Once you’ve done some digging into their challenges, their business and industry, where they’re at, and their options to accomplish this goal, ask your customer what their process is for assessing the options available to them. And if they don’t have a process, this would encourage them to develop a process.

The more you know what process the company has, the better positioned you’re going to be in navigating it.

  1. They don’t understand the criteria by which they make that decision.

Another way of saying this is asking what’s important to them. Use open-ended questions and nice, casual language to get somebody talking. Then ask them to expound on that. Usually, they’re not thinking about it and it just dawns on them when they hear it come out of their own mouth. So you need to use your ears and mouth in proportion. Listen for more than you talk and that will differentiate you from company coming right in behind,

Mark’s Major Takeaway:

Plan for your next sales calls longer than you travel to it. There’s a little too much adrenalin in sales these days and not enough quiet, thoughtful planning. So think about what you want to do in that next sales meeting and you will have a better outcome.

Episode Resources:

Visit Mark’s site on www.ITFAcademy.com/TSE and fill out their qualification checklist to find out whether you will win your next big deal.

Join our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers

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Free Online Workshop
Anil Kaul, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, AI

TSE 561: Using AI To Close Deals Faster

Anil Kaul, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, AI63% of sales leads don’t convert for at least 3 months. One reason is that many salespeople just don’t understand how to use the information they have that’s been sitting on their CRM this whole time.

My guest today. Anil Kaul is going to teach us how you can circumvent this issue through the power of AI.

Anil Kaul has grown a successful organization as the CEO of Absolutdata, a 15-year old data analytics company that help companies make informed and better decisions as well as empower sales teams to make better decisions. Sales is a combination of science and art for which their company can provide the “science” side of things. Listen in to find out how you can utilize technology to make your life so much easier!

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Anil:

Lessons from Anil’s coolest sales experience when he was the customer:

  • Sales is not about selling, but about helping.
  • As soon as you help, you’re going to be their friend and they’re going to buy from you because you are their friend.

Why companies find it difficult to convert leads:

  • Salespeople don’t understand because they don’t have the information behind the scenes
  • If you provide the right level of information to the right person, the process starts to flow and move forward. Otherwise, bombarding the customer with information, the flow stalls.
  • You have to be strategic with what you share with your leads in order for the sales process to move forward.

The role of a sales leader to move the process forward:

The sales leader needs to enable the sales team which of the leads they need to focus on and then determine the right strategy.

The role of the sales leader now is to provide the team with the right tools on the science side and the right kind of coaching and training on the art side of things.

The Role of AI:

Now is the time that AI will make a difference. One of the biggest challenges sales is facing as well as other departments is too much information coming from all directions and it’s difficult which pieces to take in with not enough time.

There is too much information that you only need to sift through only those that are relevant to you and that can make a difference.

AI can process a huge amount of data in terms of text, events, data, social media, etc. It’s good at figuring out what matters and what doesn’t. AI can now correlate and connect discrete pieces together based on these different pieces of information obtained.

How sales teams can take advantage of AI:

Change the mindset of leaving that burden on the sales individual because the organization itself has to take responsibility and AI needs to be done on an organization level.

How small businesses can get started with AI:

Absolutdata focuses on the salesperson and looks at what they need to do and what kind of information can be pulled up from the data they have.

Most small businesses have CRM systems and there is so much data sitting in that database that you can leverage by finding patterns that can help your sales team. Absolutdata can help you find out new opportunities you’re not aware of and also find out the most likely effective paths to closure.

They have access to the history of the customer, to the history of similar customers, and access to what your best salespeople have done. By combining these three, Absolutdata can give you the best recommendations on what your game plan can be. So you can focus on selling rather than spending extra time sitting down trying to figure out what your game plan should be so you become a significantly effective salesperson!

Who can best benefit from Absolutdata:

Larger sales teams and organizations are better suited to what they have since they have access to more data so that makes recommendations more robust.

They can also give tools to smaller organizations. They have a tool where you just give your quotas set for the beginning of the quarter and they can look at your sales history and tell you which customers are more likely to buy and which gap is the largest.This little tool simply sits on your phone and you can have access the necessary information you need to move that deal along.

Anil’s Major Takeaway:

Make sure you take the optimum value of the data the organization has because you make better money because the data is sitting there so just use it.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Anil through email at anil@absolutdata.com and on Twitter @anilkaul

The Sales Development Playbook by Trish Bertuzzi

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

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Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, WoW Factor

TSE 560: TSE Hustler’s League-“WOW Factor”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, WoW FactorToday’s snippet from one of our past training sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League is about what you can do to maximize those major gateway points to help move your deal to the next level.

  1. Get them to get the first appointment with you.
  2. Do the diagnostic test or the apples-to-apples comparison.

The biggest competitor you have is the status quo. Even if it’s bad, you tell yourself lies because you’ve gotten used to it.

  1. Demonstrate the solutions.

Present the solutions with them and get them to understand. That meeting is going to be totally educational and the best way to educate is to ASK questions.

  1. Create some questions that can educate them to go to the next level.

Ask questions that are going to get them to think and propose action.

  1. Think about what you can do to WOW the customer in this process.

Don’t think about the huge stuff as everyone can do the big things. Most people do not do the little things. Take time to listen to them.

  1. Return their calls.

Most leads go bad because people don’t return calls within the first 24 hours of getting the lead.

  1. Follow up.

People love to buy but they hate to be sold. So give that power back to them and think about the little things in that sales process that you can make it easier. Price would no longer matter if they feel the value is there.

  1. If you find a lot of fall-off after the demonstration, educate them.

If there is something that is causing the deal to not move forward, think about what you can do to educate people at that point to help them go further.

  1. Educate before the purchase.

This is another little factor that can separate you from everybody else.

Episode Resources:

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 535: TSE Hustler’s League-“Become An Expert In The Details”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Are you keen to details? Or are you just too assuming your prospects will understand? Today’s snippet taken from our past training session over at the TSE Hustler’s League is focused on being expert in the details. Where in your sales process can you better focus on the details?

A few areas where you can focus on details:

  1. Qualifying

Get a better grasp on not only their statistics but really dive more into the challenges they’re facing. This way you can put together an even more compelling solution. You can be technical, but if you’re able to do a better job of getting the details out of them, every account would be a slam dunk for you.

Do a better job on the front end by really uncovering all their pain and most importantly, getting them to feel it. Help draw out emotions from them.

  1. Presentation

Make sure your prospects understand your product and what that means for them, exactly what value you’re bringing to the table. Make it seen in their mind why it’s important for them to have your product or service. Paint a picture by telling a story.

Stop assuming your prospects already know these things and they understand. Go deeper into details and when you do that, you get better results.

The Principle of the 5 Why’s

This was originally conceptualized by Toyota but this principle has been used by a lot of companies today because it’s so effective. The idea behind this is to dig into the details. For each problem, ask why five times so you can go deeper to the core root of the problem until you can offer a solution.

For example:

A person drives into work and gets a flat tire. Most people say you need to get the tire fixed. Instead, ask yourself…

  1. Why did you get a flat tire? (I hit a pothole.)
  1. Why did you hit a pothole? (I was driving fast and I didn’t see the pothole.)
  1. Why were you driving fast and didn’t see it? (I was late for a meeting.)
  1. Why were you late for a meeting? (I didn’t set my alarm clock.)
  1. Why didn’t you set your alarm clock? (Because I was lazy and went to bed early so I didn’t have the time to set it.)

The deeper you go, the better you understand. The root problem here is that this person is unorganized. For sure, there’s going to be another issue other than the pothole.

Today’s Major Takeaway:

Dig down into the deepest level of your customer’s whys. Go into the details.

Episode Resources:

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, Corey Goltz, CleanMark

TSE 534: Sales From The Street: “Sell Different”

cleanmark, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Donald Kelly My guest today is fellow local Floridian, Corey Goltz, as he shares with us his biggest sales struggles, how he overcame those, and some of the results he has seen, and hopefully apply some or all of these principles to your own sales success.

Corey Goltz is in charge of developing CleanMark’s current customer base in the southeast region as well as building new business relationships. In addition, he plays a key role in extending CleanMark’s full scope of services to both existing and new clients.

Following a distinguished military career with the U.S. Army 3rd Ranger Battalion, Corey honed his business development expertise over the following 15 years within the fitness and financial services sectors. It was at the latter that he developed a defined value proposition and supporting communications strategy that ensured a compelling, consistent brand that drove outstanding client acquisition.
In addition to receiving the coveted Ranger Tab from the United States Army’s premier leadership course, Corey also attained an MBA in marketing from Palm Beach Atlantic University, Florida in 2013. This unique combination of military precision and business flair has helped him to excel in both business-to-business and direct-to-consumer sales, underpinned by the consistent delivery of innovative solutions implemented across myriad business requirements.

HE IS MOST PROUD OF:

* His service with the United States Army and 3rd Ranger Battalion.
* Annual Sporting Clays Fun Shoot committee member for Place of Hope in Palm Beach for the last 3 years.
* Vice-chairman on the Board of Directors for Unity For Kids School.
* Finishing IronMan Arizona with his wife by my side (in less than a day)
* He and his wife Brenda have two wonderful and productive children who you will often find volunteering with them on the weekends or hiking and kayaking in one of our the beautiful parks. They have made a wonderful addition to “Team High Goltage”.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Corey:

Corey’s means of prospecting:

  • Inbound marketing through social media
  • Being in the right place at the right time when the customer is ready to talk to you

Corey’s major challenges:

  • Getting in front of a new group of people and getting into the space they’re already in
  • Presenting himself as a thought leader or field expert in a new industry

Strategies Corey applied to overcome his challenges:

  1. Develop a mission statement.

Why are you out there? Why do you wake up in the morning? You can’t just wing things and do things without a compass.

  1. Research your potential prospects.

Go into LinkedIn profiles, Twitter conversations or talk to friends to find out about your prospects. Talk to your prospects without selling and just get to know more about them.

  1. Research and implement an effective CRM

Find something that fits your company’s needs.

  1. Have a sales process.

Having a sales process is often overlooked by many salespeople. A great personality is not the only way to sell. You have to have a basic process in place. Get a proper education or training. Base knowledge is important but having a process will help get you to the next level. By having a process, you have something to fall back to.

Some results Corey has seen:

  • Their expected learning curve has been shortened by half.
  • Peace of mind

Episode Resources:

Connect with Corey on Twitter @HighGoltage or shoot him an email at corey.goltz@cleanmark.com.

HubSpot

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Success, Working Hard, Fred Diamond, Donald Kelly

TSE 531: What Are You Willing To Do To Be Successful In Sales?

Success, Working Hard, Fred Diamond, Donald Kelly One of the qualities of top salespeople is their willingness to do whatever it takes to close the deal. How about you? What are you really, truly, willing to do?

Today’s guest, Fred Diamond, shares with us how you can think out of the box to get your deals closed. Fred is the co-founder of Institute for Excellence in Sales (IES), an educational platform that promotes best practices, business excellence, and thought leadership through sales training.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Fred:

Word of the Year for Fred: WILLINGNESS

What are you truly willing to do to achieve what you’re committed to do?

What are you willing to give up?

There’s a huge difference between commitment and your willingness to really do it.

Strategies to Focus on Your Willingness:

  1. If what you’re doing isn’t working anymore, do what needs to be done and adapt to changes.

Most customers have remote offices now. Think about being present on social media as well as get familiarized with technology and apps that can help you improve your sales.

  1. Think about how you can be different.

How can you be different now that the customers are in charge.

  1. Know your customer’s business.

How can you add value to your customer’s business? It’s not just offering your solutions to your customers, but be willing to be there for them.

  1. Understand your customer’s challenges.

Understand whether customers are really going to buy. Don’t think that just because they click on a link, they’re already going to buy. There needs to be much thought and energy that you need to put into solving your customer’s challenges.

  1. Be willing to do things that may be uncomfortable for you.

Some prospects take calls on weekends or Sundays, are you willing to call them?

  1. Focus on prospecting.

Leverage social media to understand your prospects and their challenges. Prospecting the right way is valuable.

The Principle of 58 and 2

There is a greater chance to get into somebody if you get to them 58 minutes after the hour or 2 minutes after the hour.

Fred’s Major Takeaway:

Selling is not just a charisma or about trying to convince someone to buy. The lifeblood of customer success is the ability to sell. Put yourself ahead of the curve to learn and tap into resources to get better and you can get better. Read. Listen to podcasts. Treat sales as a profession and it’s one of the most rewarding professions ever.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Fred Diamond on Twitter @iesbd or send him an email at fdiamond@i4esbd.org or call him at 703-628-6910.

Check out Fred Diamond’s blog on KiteDesk.

Coaching Salespeople into Sales Champions by Keith Rosen

The Ultimate Secret to Getting Absolutely Everything You Want by Mike Hernacki

High Profit Prospecting by Mark Hunter

Selling with Noble Purpose by Lisa Earle McLeod

Leading with Noble Purpose by Lisa Earle McLeod

KiteDesk

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

DONALD KELLY, THE SALES EVANGELIST PODCAST

TSE 517: Reduce Cost or Increase Revenue? What Should I Lead With?

DONALD KELLY, THE SALES EVANGELIST PODCASTAs a seller, your job is to bring value to your clients by finding ways that will either help them cut their expenses and save money or increase revenue. But which one should you lead them with?

What is the goal of every business?

For any business, one of the biggest goals is to increase revenue. Cutting cost is imperative but as a seller, this may not be the most effective thing for you to lead with every single time.

The problem with reducing cost every time

There is only so much cost you can reduce before it comes ineffective. You can’t get rid of everything or go out and fire your employees. Sometimes, cost go hand in hand with increasing revenue.

The thing to lead with: Find ways to increase revenue

Companies continuously seek ways to increase their revenue and if you could come in and speak of ways where you can strategically explain or give specific examples of ways that your product/service can help them increase revenue.

Create value through their unconsidered need, which are things that your prospects have not necessarily thought about and things that they don’t know that could be benefiting their organization but they haven’t taken advantage of.

There is no limit to increasing sales

Focus on increasing revenue because there is no ceiling with it and there is no set limit on the money you can bring in. Unlike reducing cost where there just comes a point where the could no longer go any lower.

Social intelligence is key

Do your homework. It is important to know the best strategy or process to understand how a company makes money.

Today’s Major Takeaway:

It is better to lead with ways that you can help your clients increase revenue than to just share with them ways to reduce expenses otherwise you come to a point where you simply outsell yourself since they can’t go any lower.
Episode Resources:

Get a free audio book download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 515: TSE Hustler’s League-“Credibility and Trust”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast Today’s snippet taken from one of our sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League is about building credibility.

Credibility leads to trust.

Trust is essential in sales. You have to trust those you’re working with and build trust with . People do business with those they know, like, and trust. Credibility is a precursor to that. Build credibility, then you gain trust.

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3 Pillars in Building Credibility:

  1. Don’t be desperate.
  2. Be specific.
  3. Back it up.

Don’t Be Desperate

  1. Identify your ideal customers. Go for those that fit your product. You cannot be the “yes” man to everyone.
  1. Set the rules before you play the game since there are people who can alter rules during the game or even deny there were any.
  1. Offer them an “out” or the fitness test. Set the perimeter early on and ask your prospect to be open to telling you at any point during the conversation when they recognize that you’re not a great fit.

When you can give people an out, you become so much more credible.

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Episode Resources:

Join the TSE Hustler’s League and be part of a dynamic, results-driven, like-minded group of awesome people!

Say goodbye to long, boring proposals and check out PandaDoc. Create electronic proposals to your prospects. Sign and receive payments without leaving your CRM. It integrates well with other CRMs such as Salesforce. Pipedrive, and HubSpot. To get a quick demonstration and a free trial, go to www.thesalesevangelist.com/panda

Donald Kelly, PandaDoc

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

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James Muri, Donald Kelly, The Perfect Close

TSE 513: How To Craft The Perfect Close Every Time

James Muri, Donald Kelly, The Perfect CloseThe CLOSE is one of the most interesting parts of the whole selling process. While most sellers highly anticipate this, it’s also one major area where people make several mistakes in. Our guest today, James Muir, shares with us how you can be more effective through making the perfect close every single time.

James Muir is the author of The Perfect Close: The Secret to Closing Sales – The Bestselling Practices and Techniques for Closing the Deal. James is a Corporate Trainer and Executive Coach who specializes in B2B complex sales, helping salespeople and B2B executives become as effective as they can be.

You may have heard a lot these concepts already but oftentimes, we don’t basically apply the things we know or we know we should be doing. So pay attention. Take notes. And most importantly, take action.
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Here are the highlights of my conversation with James:

Why another book on sales:

  • James discovered the need for a book about closing because he noticed many mistakes done by salespeople on closing sales.
  • People don’t ask for a sale at all or any commitment; in fact, in 50-90% of all sales encounters.
  • A problem of skill (not knowing how) and will (attitude) – The will problem is the most common reason people don’t ask.
  • There is so much dysfunctional selling out there and people are afraid of rejection.
  • 99% of closing methods being taught are manipulative.

Examples of a “manipulative” close:

  • Assumptive close
  • It’s when you try to push the customer faster than they’re ready for that they start to feel being manipulated.

Some Principles of the Perfect Close:

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  1. Figure out the two questions you’re going to ask near the end of the meeting that advances the sale to the next step.

The saying that “selling is everything you do” is not very actionable.

  1. Come in with the right intent.

Intent matters more than technique. Your voice and body languages are sending messages and all this is happening in the first few seconds. You have to come in with the right intent and your body will be sending all the right signals. Otherwise, your prospect will hold information from you and the process now becomes dysfunctional.

  1. Selling is serving.

Understand that each solution you sell helps another person so helping that person move towards that goal is an act of service. Don’t get so caught up in “what’s in it for you” that you tend to forget your goal of helping the client.

  1. Be a better coach and a better teacher.

Clients want a guide that’s going to help them through each little commitment that takes them to achieve their goal. It’s more than selling. It’s leadership. So be a better teacher and a better problem-solver.

  1. Move the sale forward in a little way.

This is taken from Neil Rackham’s concept of advance where you make little advances to create a momentum towards closing the sale. It involves several little “asks” on the way to the big “ask.” Spend time to figure out what are the little steps in your kind of sale that will lead up to your bigger sale.

  1. Have an ideal advance with a couple of alternatives.

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Closing variation #1: The Fallback

Use an alternative in the most natural way to fall back to another possible option. If they say it doesn’t make sense for them to x then you’re going to say, “Other clients this stage tend to do y. Does it make sense for you to do that?” By giving them a logical next step, you’re helping them through their buying process.

Closing variation #2: The Add On

Instead of you saying what’s the good next step, ask if there are any other logical steps you should be taking right now. This allows you to pace your advance at the rate that the client is ready for. Remember, it’s when you start to push them faster that they’d start to feel manipulated.

  1. Create agendas.

At the bottom of your agenda, put your next steps and that’s the moment you’re going to ask how your ideal advance is.

  1. At its core, the perfect close is not a closing question, but a timing question.

Asking for the timing leaves you on a much higher emotional ground than any of the other questions out there. Also, it allows you gauge how engaged they are in the process so this is perfect for pacing.

James’s Major Takeaway:

Intent matters more than technique. If people can see you’re genuinely trying to help them, they will let you help them. Get your intent in the right place and everything else will follow. Be with the customer and be present. Just try to figure out how you can help them out.

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Episode Resources:

Connect with James on his website www.puremuir.com and follow him on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

The Perfect Close: The Secret to Closing Sales – The Bestselling Practices and Techniques for Closing the Deal (Download their models on their website including The 7 Deadly Miss of Closing)

Tired of sharing old, boring proposals to your prospects? Check out PandaDoc. Create electronic proposals to your prospects. Sign and receive payments without leaving your CRM. To get a quick demonstration and a free trial, go to www.thesalesevangelist.com/panda

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, PandaDoc

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Donald Kelly, Building Value

TSE 512: Sell Me What I Need, Not What You Want

Donald Kelly, Building ValueI want to share with you an experience I had when I was shopping for a computer monitor over the weekend. And this salesperson who approached me was probably a fan of Glengarry Glen Ross’ Always Be Closing!

Things he did wrong:

No questions were asked about how he can help me with. Anyway, I just went with what I wanted.

Then the salesman simply pushed their promotion for me to sign up for a credit card but that was a total turnoff because in the first place, I didn’t need that.

He didn’t dive into questions to find out what I really needed. There was no education on his part. There was no value added at all, but only wanted me to add another credit card to my wallet. Again, it’s what he wanted, not what I wanted.

So when I told him I wasn’t interested, he jumped into offering me a $20 discount, which was a dishonest way of selling.

As sellers, we need to make sure we take care for our customers. How do you make sure you’re bringing value to the table?

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Principles I want to underline when you’re selling:

  1. Seek first to understand than to be understood.

Go into the prospect’s shoe and go into their situation. Understand their challenges. Realize that prospects are now more educated when they come to the table. Do not push your own agenda.

  1. Your Call-to-Action:

What can you do to add more value? If you were to offer a promo such as a credit card, you could approach it in a way that you tie it into the needs of the customer.

Do you have some tips related to customer-focused selling? I’d love to know more about them!

Today’s Major Takeaway:

Give your customers what they want and not what you want to sell them. Do this and you will always get what you desire since they will know, like, trust, and love you.
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Episode Resources:

Say goodbye to long, boring proposals and check out PandaDoc. Create electronic proposals to your prospects. Sign and receive payments without leaving your CRM. To get a quick demonstration and a free trial, go to www.thesalesevangelist.com/panda

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, PandaDoc

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Value, Conversation, Listening, Asking Questions

TSE 510: TSE Hustler’s League-“What Is Value?”

Value, Conversation, Listening, Asking Questions Today’s snippet taken from one of the past training sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League is focused on building value.

The extent to which a good service is perceived by a customer to meet his needs or wants is measured by a customer’s willingness to pay for it. The company depends more on the customer’s perception of the worth of the product than on its intrinsic value.

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Establishing your value:

  1. Ask for more than what you’re comfortable asking for.

Follow the 10x rule and bump up what you ask for 10x. Sometimes your customers will value something a little bit more.

  1. Educate your customers.

It’s your job to educate customers on the value you’re bringing to the table so they can make that important decision.

Ways to find out what your customers value most:

  1. Ask what is important to your customer.
  2. Get the customer to understand the potential pain without using scare tactics.
  3. Tailor your presentation and solution to what’s important to them.
  4. Ask them questions in a way that you make it seem you’re not selling but instead they’re buying.
  5. Figure out how you can establish value.

Again, people need to see the value first before they even decide to buy. Sometimes they don’t know about you, so you need to provide education.

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Episode Resources:

Say goodbye to long, boring proposals and check out PandaDoc. Send proposals that not only will your customers enjoy and love but also have time to be able to do more selling. Perfect combination! To get a quick demonstration and a free trial, go to www.thesalesevangelist.com/panda

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, PandaDoc

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Mike Saunders, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Best Sales Podcast

TSE 506: Selling with Authority

Mike Saunders, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Best Sales Podcast Don’t just become a salesperson to your clients but become their trusted advisor or resource. In this world of competitive selling, you’ve got to set yourself apart and the best way to do that is to sell with authority and be the authority!

Mike Saunders shares with us how you can sell with an authority positioning approach. Mike is the author of the book Authority Selling. He is also the host of the Business Innovators Radio Network.

With 15 years of experience in the mortgage banking industry, Mark got an MBA in Marketing and started working with small businesses beef up their marketing strategies until he created his own digital marketing agency called Marketing Huddle. Mark continues to position himself as the obvious choice by articulating their competitive advantage and building trust on their clients.

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Here are the highlights of my conversation with Mike:

Strategies for authority positioning:

  1. Speak loud and clear to your target audience.

Whatever you sell and whoever you sell them to, be able to provide a solution to their problem or variations of it.

  1. Become an educator and an advocate for your target audience’s success.

It’s not all about asking them to buy or giving them coupons or having a discount sale or countdown timers. Instead, teach and advocate for them through authority positioning.

How to maintain your authority as a sales rep:

  1. First, determine what you’re selling, your commission, and your ROI breakeven.
  2. Use HARO (Help A Reporter Out)

Sign up for a free service called HARO and get pitches from various journalists writing on a variety of topics. Reply or comment and you could be mentioned in that piece of media content and it gives you credibility.

  1. Focus on getting media mentions.

Focus on getting those mentions in the media and you’re on your way to collecting the pieces for your authority positioning portfolio.

  1. Send a package to your target audience.

Send your prospect a package containing a professional cover letter plus some colored copies of media mentions you’ve been featured in. (Note: These media mentions would be focused on your solution to a problem they’re probably facing.) Then add in a flash drive of more publications you’ve done things on or client testimonials.

  1. Connect through a meeting or a phone call.

Once you connect with your client, you are now perceived as a trusted advisor or resource and not as a salesperson. This is what sets you apart.

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Other ways of building your authority positioning portfolio:

  • Become a radio show or podcast guest.
  • Building links to your website, blog, etc.

How relevant is SEO?

  • People will Google you or your company name so SEO doesn’t come into play here. SEO comes in through the keywords you’re using.
  • Use these keywords in your interviews and media mentions so once people Google about it, you will appear on the results.
  • Build links to your main website, blog, etc. (which builds your authority positioning asset) so it will be ranked up there.

How Mike can help you build your authority positioning portfolio:

  1. Mike offers Brand Boost to his clients for a one-time fee of $297 where he does a brand boost for the company. What does the Brand Boost entail?
  • Become a guest on his show, Business Innovators Radio Network where you will focus on giving solution to the problem.
  • Media release
  • Syndication to different news media sites and you get a link to that media show.
  1. Mike’s 3-hour Authority where he takes you through a 3-hour call to help you become an Amazon bestselling author without writing a word.

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Mike’s Major Takeaway:

Do the opposite of what your competitors are doing. What could you do that would make you stick out in their mind?Episode Resources:

Check out Mike’s website Marketing Huddle and Business Innovators Radio Network

Get a free copy of Mike Saunder’s book Authority Selling. Just go to www.authoritysellingbook.com.

HARO

Why waste time creating proposals when you can easily drag, drop, and create proposals that your prospects will enjoy and thank you for? Check out PandaDoc. People using it have seen a 35% increase in sales productivity. To get a quick demonstration and a free trial, go to www.thesalesevangelist.com/panda

Donald Kelly, PandaDoc

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

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Donald Kelly, TSE Hustler's League, Sales Training, Best Sales Podcast

TSE 505: TSE Hustler’s League-“Customer Friendly Sales Process”

Donald Kelly, TSE Hustler's League, Sales Training, Best Sales PodcastTraditionally, the sales process has not been very conducive to providing value to clients. But this doesn’t work anymore. Over the years, the buying process has significantly changed and so you must also be able to align your sales process with it if you want to achieve success.

Today’s snippet is taken from one of the previous sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League is all about giving value.

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Here are 7 key steps to creating a value-friendly sales process:

  1. Your goal is to understand your prospects and their challenges.
  2. Define your prospect’s unconsidered need.

This may be something your prospect may not be thinking about because they don’t see it but it can become the most damaging.

  1. Educate your prospect on the unconsidered need.

Again, this could be something they’re not aware of or they’re blinded to, or have lived so long with that they don’t pay attention to and could cause more damage to them.

  1. For prospecting purposes, spend at least 1 month focusing on just one particular industry.
  2. Be sure to ask the appropriate questions.
  3. Give the prospects not what you want but what they want.
  4. Align your process with your client’s process.

What can you do to change your process so that it’s reflective of your client’s process? Have a single sales process that can tailor to one specific prospect.

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Episode Resources:

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Say goodbye to long, boring proposals and check out PandaDoc. Create electronic proposals to your prospects and save an enormous amount of time. Sign and receive payments without leaving your CRM. It integrates well with other CRMs such as Salesforce. Pipedrive, and HubSpot. To get a quick demonstration and a free trial, go to www.thesalesevangelist.com/panda

Donald Kelly, PandaDoc

Help us spread the word out by leaving us a rating or review on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play or whatever platform you’re using.
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Sales Story, Sales Leader, Donald Kelly, Paul Smith

TSE 498: Sell with a Story: How to Capture Attention, Build Trust, and Close the Sale

Sales Story, Sales Leader, Donald Kelly, Paul SmithSell with a Story. Paul Smith is going to share with us a load of insights into how you can improve your storytelling so you can improve your sales.

Paul teaches the art and science of storytelling to leadership groups and sales teams. He helps people dive deeper into how they can craft their own stories to be much more effective.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Paul:

Paul’s impetus behind writing a book about storytelling:

  • Storytelling has not been thoroughly explored in terms of sales technique
  • Keep using whatever process you’re using but storytelling is something you can add to your skill set and your current process
  • Adding stories to your sales process and skill set can help you achieve more success

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What is a sales story?

A story is a narrative about something that happened to somebody. A story has the following elements:

  • Time
  • Place
  • Main character
  • The goal of the main character
  • Someone or something getting in the way of that goal
  • Resolution
  • Events happening along the way

How to use a story effectively:

Don’t replace your sales pitch with a story; instead, add a story to your sales pitch.

Types of stories you can tell and add to your sales process:

  1. Value-adding story

It literally adds value to the product or service you’re selling and it makes it more valuable to your prospects. It creates an experience for your customers.

  1. Why I do what I do

This helps in the rapport-building part. Help the buyer understand why you’re even in the business you’re in.

  1. Founding of your company

Nobody ever started a company for a boring reason.

  1. How you’re different from your competitor
  2. Story about your product’s invention or discovery
  3. Explaining the problem

This is a story about the quintessential problem that your product or service is designed to solve that your buyer can relate with.

  1. Stories we tell ourselves

People that heard or told themselves stories about the benefits of what they’re doing for the customers did much better at sales than the ones that told people stories about themselves or didn’t tell stories at all.

  1. Stories you tell other salespeople in your company help them learn from your lessons
  2. Personal motivation story
  3. Stories to help people relax and take the stress off of a call

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How to make clients tell their story:

  1. Shut up and listen

We tend to hate silence in conversations so we quickly fill it up with our own voice. Just be quiet for a moment and the other person will feel awkward that they’ll start to open up and share something.

  1. Ask open-ended questions about specific moments in time

“Tell me about the moment that you realized your biggest problem was your biggest problem.” Help them give you a specific kind of problem by asking a specific type of open-ended question.

  1. Find something in common

Look around the buyer’s office and find something personal to comment on or find something in common to elicit a story.

  1. You tell the story first

Tell the kind of story you want to hear and your buyer will reciprocate with a similar story.

Telling stories with data: The discovery journey story

  • Turn your ideas into their ideas. People are more passionate about pursuing their idea.
  • Tell the story about you and the analysis process you went through right up to the moment you had your brilliant idea and conclusion.
  • Stop and let them have that aha moment themselves.
  • Your idea becomes their idea because you let them have that aha moment themselves.

Donald Kelly, PandaDoc

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Paul’s Major Takeaway:

Storytelling is a skill you can learn. You just have to study. Read a book on it. Take a class on it. Learn the skill and then put it to use.

Episode Resources:

Sell with a Story by Paul Smith

Connect with Paul Smith on www.LeadWithAStory.com and find his books and podcast.

List of 25 types of sales stories: http://leadwithastory.com/category/podcasts/sell-with-a-story-series/

Create electronic proposals to your prospects quickly through PandaDoc. Sign and receive payments without leaving your CRM. Add videos or graphs that cater to their needs. Take advantage of their analytics. To get a quick demonstration and a free trial, go to www.thesalesevangelist.com/panda

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Help us spread the word out by leaving us a rating or review on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play or whatever platform you’re using.
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Danny Iny, Teach and Grow Rich, The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly

TSE 489: Sales From The Street-“Teach and Grow Rich”

Danny Iny, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist PodcastYou’re probably familiar with Napoleon Hill’s Think and Grow Rich. But today’s guest, Danny Iny, is going to teach you how you can Teach and Grow Rich through building your own online courses.

Danny is the founder of Mirasee, a company that helps clients with audience building, offer creation, and building and selling courses. He is an entrepreneur and the author of several books including Teach and Grow Rich. Today, Danny shares with us some great thoughts about how you can utilize online courses to grow your business.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Danny:

Why online courses are a hot topic:

  • Crossing the boundary from niche to mainstream
  • Entrepreneurs can create a real educational experience and a huge impact

Biggest mistake in course creation: Confusing information and education

Most online courses don’t do a good job in delivering the outcomes they promise. In order to do a good job, you need to back up and be able to distinguish between information and education.

  • Information is exemplified by books which can be bought and the responsibility to learn is on you. Find to create an information product and sell it at a price that information justifies (cheap or free).
  • Education leads to transformation. There is a partnership between the student and the teacher so it commands a premium price. Find to create an education product that creates a real transformation and charge a premium for it.

Why build courses:

  1. It can be a revenue stream.
  2. It can be a diversification for an existing revenue stream

Things to consider when getting started with your online course:

  1. Make sure to test.

Just because you think people should want it doesn’t mean people actually will. Make sure what you think people want is aligned with what they really want. Reach out to a group of people and ask if this certain topic interests them.

  1. Get a bunch of yes’s to get their commitment.

Get a bunch of people to put money on the table so you know they’re committed. Offer them a great deal since they’re going to give you feedback on what’s working and what’s not.

  1. Limit the scope of what you’re going to teach and deliver.

Sometimes we have the tendency of stacking more and more into our course but it’s not great for students. You can’t include things that are not critical as these can distract them or confuse them. Don’t think about all the things you can include but what is the least that you can give people that will still lead to a transformation that they want.

  1. Start mapping out what to teach.

The best way is to start with the end goal. What do they need before that and before that until you get to where you are. All the other stuff would come later.

  1. Once you find a routine that works, then you can make it permanent.

Only do stuff such as videos after you know that you nailed it.

  1. Design your curriculum with your average students in mind.

These are the students who want to be successful with the right support and infrastructure. They are your guiding north star. The length of the course depends on your content.

Strategies for pre-selling your course:

  • The number one driver for sales is proof.
  • The more proof you get, the easier everything else gets.
  • The trick is having a process in the infrastructure that makes leads want to turn into customers.

Danny’s Major Takeaway:

Come from a place of service. Find the legitimate way in which what you have is best for them. Teaching is putting aside what you think is important and focusing on what they think is important to serve them as well as you can.

Episode Resources:

Visit www.teachandgrowrichbook.com to either get notified once it’s live and have the chance to get its digital copy for free or to pre-order a paper copy. The first 50 people to use the coupon code: TSE will get a paper copy of the book and all the bonuses for free.

www.mirasee.com

Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Help us spread the word out by leaving us a rating or review on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play or whatever platform you’re using.

 

Donald Kelly, Hidden Figures, NASA

TSE 487: How To Become Indispensable To Prospects & Clients

Donald Kelly, Hidden Figures, NASA Today I’m going to teach you how to  stand out and become indispensable to your clients, prospects, and your company.

My wife and I saw a movie last week called Hidden Figures. It’s about a group of African-American “computers”, who were really mathematician women working for NASA. When Dorothy Vaughan (played by Octavia Spencer) realized that a newly invented computer mainframe was going to put them out of job. She decided to make herself become indispensable to NASA by learning the computer language.

NASA hired her to be one of the lead project engineers over the programmers. She brought the other girls along with her as well and taught them how to program the mainframe. They would have been out of a job had they not put themselves in a situation where they have become indispensable.

How this applies to sales and how you can become indispensable to your clients:

  1. Treat others the way they would like to be treated.

Figure out how you can be indispensable to your prospects. What value can you bring to the table that people cannot say no to? Look at your clients and prospects and think about this one thing. Give people what they want and not what you want.

  1. Give them stuff they don’t know they need yet.

Think about what’s on the line for your prospects. What are some of the changes that you can foresee that may be coming down the pipe in terms of your industry, business or solution that you provide that can help them recognize things they could already do now to prepare for that so they can continue to make money or reduce cost. Consider account-based selling. If cold calling works for you then great, but if not try a better way to become indispensable by giving value.

  1. Take the initiative.

Share ideas and concepts. Try new things. Learn new stuff. Be a doer and always do your very best.

Today’s Major Takeaway:

Find out how you can be indispensable to your prospects, clients, company, and even to your family and friends. Be the person that brings value to the table every single time.

Episode Resources:

David and Goliath by Malcolm Gladwell

How to Win Friends and Influence Others by Dale Carnegie

The Challenger Sale by Brent Adamson and Matthew Dixon

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Prospecting, Joe Koufman, AgencySparks, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 474: Sales From The Street: “Be Unique”

Prospecting, Joe Koufman, AgencySparks, The Sales Evangelist How often do you find yourself thinking out-of-the-box and doing the opposite of what everyone else is doing? We’re off to a new year. New year, new start, new strategies. So if you haven’t yet, it’s time to create that spark between you and your prospects so you can have an explosive 2017!

Today’s guest is Joe Koufman, CEO of the AgencySparks and he’s going to share with us some very amazing things to prove to you how creativity can go a very long way.

Founded about three years ago, AgencySparks is a dating service for brands and marketing agencies. Eight marketing agencies get their services to help them connect with potential clients. They set up that first date in the hope that both the agency and the brand get to kiss at the end of the date. In other words, business development is outsourced to them so they can help bring clients to their clients.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Joe:

One of the major challenges Joe faced during his career:

From selling product to selling service and getting challenged that he wasn’t doing a great job

Strategy Joe used to overcome his challenge:

Working on his deficient areas so he can be productive

Result he got:

When Joe joined the company, they were about a 60-person digital agency. They soon became part of a full-service 250-person marketing agency. His responsibility: bringing in new clients and being a key part of the agency’s success. This led them to be acquired by a $10-billion holding company.

Unique strategies Joe has done with AgencySparks to be UNIQUE:

The Perfect Match

In time for Valentine’s day, they shot a video which “spoofs” an eHarmony or Match.com where a person delivers cheesy lines. As the video progresses, visitors who watch it would come to realize that it’s actually not a dating service per se but a service that will help connect them with the perfect marketing agency for their needs.

Next, they sent a physical mailer piece to some of their prospects. They purchased 250 matchboxes from a wedding favor website and there were writing on them in red and white that says, The Perfect Match. go to MakeSomeSparks.com. Inside each package, they filled the boxes with little heart-shaped candies with a handwritten note that tells them to watch the video on their website as well. (There was also a form capture for lead generation.)

Speed Dating

They hosted an in-person event the week before Valentine’s day where they invited 25 senior marketers and facilitated a “speed dating” event. They asked each agency person who were their clients and every 7 minutes, by the sound of the bell, they switch over to the next seat to have a speed dating conversation with the prospects.

Benefit for the prospects: They got exposed to 8 different agencies in a very short period of time.

Benefit for the agencies: They were able to pitch themselves in a very short of time to a bunch of clients;

Result: 19 requests from clients for a “second date” with the agencies.

Joe’s Major Takeaway:

Step outside of your norm and everyday routine and be creative. Step outside of the box. Joe also ends the interview with a quote from Theodore Roosevelt

“It is not the critic who counts; nor the one who points out how the strong person stumbled, or where the doer of a deed could have done better.

The credit belongs to the person who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming.”

Episode Resources:

To learn more about them, visit http://MakeSomeSparks.com. Check out the video they made as well as their blooper reel.

Contact AgencySparks at http://AgencySparks.com/contact.

Subscribe to their content by visiting http://AgencySparks.com/preferences

Dare Mighty Things by Theodore Roosevelt

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