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Donald Kelly, Presentation

TSE 1135: TSE Certified Sales Training Program – “Presenting In Person”

Donald Kelly, PresentationYour closing process will often require you to speak to a board or a group of people about your product or service, and you must provide value to your audience when presenting in person.

The Sales Evangelist Certified Sales Training Program provides specific sections for prospecting, building value, and converting to a paying client, and we’ve designed the training to help sellers prepare for presentations and to train their teams to do the same. It’s designed to help sales reps and sales teams improve their skills, find the right customers, adopt the right activities, ask the right questions, build strong value, and close more deals. 

Guessing game

Many situations demand that sellers meet with a team of individuals who will ask a variety of questions about the product or service. You’re wasting your time if you don’t understand the problems they need to solve or the challenges they are facing. It doesn’t make sense to play the guessing game during the limited time you have with this group of people. 

Once you understand the issue, you must also determine who the decision-makers and buyers are. You must understand the timeframe they are working against and their budget for the purchase. 

The company you’re pitching to will also bring in competitors who will pitch as well, but they aren’t your concern. 

Storytelling

John Livesay recently spoke about storytelling and the need to be memorable. It doesn’t matter who presents first or last, but rather who tells a better story. 

Consider having other team members attend the presentation with you and introduce themselves by telling an interesting story. Perhaps your CTO can share how his love of Legos® pushed him to create complex things and find solutions to problems. It inserts personality into the presentation. 

Tactical presentation

Make sure you know who will present information on the buyer’s behalf. Have someone from your organization research to determine who will attend.

If possible, learn what those people hope to discover from your presentation. Engage your champion, or the person you’ve been working with to this point, to find out whether you can introduce yourself prior to the presentation. When you do that, ask them what questions they’d like you to address in your presentation and then be prepared to address those specific topics. 

Once you understand who will attend and what information they’ll be seeking, you can build your presentation around those topics. 

Recruit help

If at all possible, take someone else to the presentation with you. Take several people if you can. Assemble a team of people from different departments. 

When you set up in the conference room, don’t divide yourself on opposite sides of the table. Use name cards for both groups to indicate where different people should sit. Also make sure you spell everyone’s names correctly. 

Intersperse the members of your group among the members of the company you’re pitching to. When you have breaks in the action, because the two teams are sitting together, they’ll be able to share conversation instead of squaring off like rival gangs. 

We recently used name cards for a presentation and they were a huge hit. The company was blown away by the preparation and the organization that went into the meeting. They assumed that if we were willing to invest that much preparation in a presentation like this, we’d certainly do it in our efforts to help them solve their problems. 

Control engagement

Develop slides that include imagery rather than a jumble of words. Tell a story about the problem your prospect is facing and how you can help solve it. Demonstrate your solution. 

Assign one member of your team to watch for reactions from the others in the room. Use him as a spotter. If he notices that someone is disengaged or fighting against sleep, he can signal that to you by interjecting or posing a question that will signal to you to adjust your direction. 

Have him watch for body language that indicates interest or to take note of those people who are jotting down things while you’re talking.

If, for example, the IT director takes lots of notes during the presentation, at the break I could suggest to the presenters that we talk a bit about IT and the most common questions we hear. 

Business case

Thank your champion in front of the entire group for making the presentation possible. Make her feel good in front of her colleagues. 

Then begin the work of building a business case for your prospect. Explain that you’ll answer the questions they submitted ahead of time and address the challenges you see based on the lessons you’ve learned. Describe how you’ve solved these problems for others and how you’ll translate that to this organization. 

Talk about how much the problem is likely costing the company and why they need to fix it. Explain how you’ll help, and do it all using stories. 

Virtual meetings

You can apply many of these same concepts to your virtual meetings as well. Although you can’t intersperse the participants, you can consider sending some treats that will arrive prior to the presentation. You can even send treats that somehow tie to the presentation you’ll be making, like Swedish Fish to make the case that you’re going to help them land bigger clients. 

Work to stand out from the pack by being unique and telling an amazing story. 

Action plan

When the meeting is complete, everyone in that room should leave feeling like they participated and like they were fulfilled by what happened. Then provide a specific action plan for what happens next. 

Present a few different options for ways to move forward. Give them time frames and explain the steps required to progress. 

I conduct presentations this way and they work well for me and for the people I’m presenting to. I want you to realize the same benefits in your own presentations.

“Presenting In Person” episode resources

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there. I’m fairly easy to connect with. Just comment on something about my podcast. Send me an email.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester. You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561) 578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

As a savvy seller, you’ll want to continue learning, and you can take advantage of a free 30-day trial, complete with a free audio book, on Audible. They have thousands of books to choose from and you can begin your free trial today. 

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Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Story Selling, Prospect.io, Maximizer, Story

TSE 930: TSE Hustler’s League-“Storytelling Questions”

Story Selling, Prospect.io, Maximizer, Story

 

 

 

 

 

It’s tempting to think that when a lead contacts us first, the transaction should be pretty simple. We’ll ask about the company; about the challenges the company is facing; we’ll try to determine how we can help. But what happens when the conversation goes nowhere? You must make sure you’re asking storytelling questions.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, we’ll address the questions you’re asking of your leads and discuss how storytelling questions will help him tell his story.

Maximize leads

Even when people land on your website looking for information, they may be a little shy about opening up. They may not immediately volunteer to share the problems they are facing.

So what do you do? How do you qualify the lead to determine whether you can help?

You have to begin by learning about the lead, and the best way to learn about your leads is through their stories.

Storytelling

I recently had Paul Smith on the podcast, author of Sell With A Story, and he talked about capturing attention, building trust, and closing a sale. He talked about the importance of stories.

We know that stories date back eons, and we’ve done countless episodes in the past about how you can improve your storytelling skills. What we haven’t addressed often is the fact that stories can help your buyer reveal important information to you.

When you need to understand his business and his challenges, you can do that by having him tell you a story.

In his book, Paul outlined 5 ways to get your buyers to open up:

1. Listen

Don’t be afraid of silence. Fight the urge to break the ice. Give your buyer time to process the decision.

Once you have rapport and relationship with a prospect, it’s ok to give him time to consider all sides of an issue.

Silence can be very powerful for both seller and buyer.

2. Ask

Ask the question that requires story. Use open-ended questions.

“When did you know you had a real problem on your hands?”

Unlike the question, “What is your biggest challenge,” this question prompts prospects to tell a story. When they do, they’ll include other characters, other situations, and specific instances that led to this moment.

Stories reveal a lot of information. They require people to recall a time something went wrong and identify all the problems that occurred.

That will help you identify true issues that will help you frame a demonstration or present a solution in a way that will help your prospect.

3. Research

Find out the prospect’s current role. Research on LinkedIn to discover what his position is and use that to build rapport.

Again, ask a question that prompts a story.

“How did you end up in your current role?”

You can bring up something you saw on the prospect’s LinkedIn and initiate a conversation. Ask the prospect to tell you about something you saw on the page, and it will lead to specific conversation and stories.

4. Meet

Consider having the prospect meet you somewhere outside of work. Go to lunch or dinner, or meet at a trade show event.

Get the prospect away from the office mindset and ask him to tell you a story.

In this setting, he won’t be thinking about his role in the company. He’s outside, and that allows him to share more freely.

Don’t use it as a fishing expedition. Do this with customers who have already expressed interest in the product or service you’re selling.

5. Share

Share your own story first.

Tell about a challenging situation you overcame. It may prompt him to share a similar experience he had.

Seed the story. If you sell office furniture, share your own story about office furniture to encourage him to share a challenge he has struggled with.

“Storytelling Questions” episode resources

Check out Paul Smith’s book Sell With A Story for more information about using stories to sell well.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

This episode is also brought to you byMaximizer CRM. If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Video Jungle, Arty Goldstein, Donald Kelly, Animus Studios

TSE 929: Sales From The Street: “How We Increase Sales By Helping Clients Tell THEIR Story”

Sales From The Street, The Sales Evangelist, Arty GoldWhen you tell stories, you capture the attention of the buyer and you build relationships. You also stand out from the competition, who isn’t using stories to grab the buyer’s attention. The key to marketing is helping clients tell their story.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, Arty Gold from Animus studios talks about the importance of story and tells how Animus Studios increase sales by helping clients tell their story.

Animus Studios is part of the Sales Podcast Network, and their podcast, Video Jungle, helps organizations learn to use video to impact their buyers. Arty calls himself a facilitator of ideas, and Animus studios is encouraging people to “find their fascinating.”

Consider the story

Arty doesn’t believe that the challenge today is a lack of video; he believes it’s a lack of compelling video. More than just point and press record, he believes the focus should be on really telling a story.

Consider what the story is and get to the heart of the matter.

Branded video associates your company, and your mission, to a story that makes people want to work with you and your company.

The big companies in the world had the advantage of launching at a different time when they were in control of their own destinies. They used to be able to just put a product in front of someone and people would buy it because it was the best.

Now there’s so much competition that companies have to understand who their audiences are.

Commercials don’t even necessarily have to show the product anymore. They can tell a great story with a logo at the end.

Representing yourself

Everyone is a salesperson. You sell yourself and you sell your company as part of the culture. You’re always representing something.

That’s salesmanship, but it can get lost in the translation a little bit because people always say they aren’t good at sales. If you have a job, you must have sold yourself well in order to get it. That doesn’t mean you did all the sales steps, but it means that you know how to sell yourself.

It’s not enough to be only a salesperson, because it’s not enough to simply sell a widget. People are drawn to the human factor and they want to work with people.

What you really want to do is build relationships because if you strip away all the product, you should always be able to go back to your network and connect with those people. If you change careers, for example, will those people go with you?

Helping others

Animus Studios isn’t selling a tangible item. They sell ideas.

It’s a challenge to show value when clients can’t see or touch what you’re selling, so the ideas and creative passion are what differentiate you from your competitors.

“Find your fascinating,” means that Animus gets to know the client first. They help clients find the story that they sometimes miss because they are so enveloped in their own marketing.

Making mistakes

People fear being the one who makes a mistake. They fear being demoted or losing a job.

Companies have been doing things the same way for years, so why change? They are often afraid of change, and they don’t understand that they can diversify and be flexible and try a variety of things.

It’s not about being afraid to try something new; it’s about being able to be flexible and test a new idea. If it doesn’t work, you can adjust quickly.

You have to report on yourself better than everyone else. We all report things the way we see them, but companies who learn to provide content to their customers are able to control their own stories.

Small changes

Companies can make small, even singular changes, that differentiate themselves from the competition. Sometimes they are simply afraid to do it.

That’s why “Find Your Fascinating” works: because it’s helping companies figure out what makes them different.

The industry will always be pushed by the written word because communication will always be important. But the way the world is going now, we have to be able to reach people quickly.

We can put a video together today and by tomorrow it can be seen all over the world. The younger sales generation has always had these tools and they can help them do their sales jobs better.

Don’t be afraid to be creative. It’s a differentiator.

Video has equalized people. If you’re the biggest jewelry company in the world, you’re facing the same challenges that the smallest companies are facing.

“Helping Clients Tell THEIR Story” episode resources

You can find Arty at the Video Jungle Podcast, where you can listen to episodes and see some of their links. Animus combines film and video and what it means to the marketing and salespeople in the world. Find Video Jungle on iTunes and Stitcher.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. Video Jungle offers top-notch, state-of-the-art advice about video, which is a great way to offer relevant content on LinkedIn.

Email me for more information about our newly launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. You can also email us about our new business development services.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

This episode is also brought to you byMaximizer CRM. If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Mike Adams, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Sales Stories

TSE 888: Seven Stories Every Salesperson Must Tell

Mike AdamsStories validate the work you’re doing. They build value. And really good salespeople never stop telling stories. Mike Adams, author of the book Seven Stories Every Salesperson Must Tell, explains that stories forge connections between people who don’t know each other and they help to establish rapport.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, Mike Adams outlines the seven stories every salesperson must tell, and how to tell the right story at the right time.

Mike’s journey originated in his desire to help salespeople learn to say the right thing, and his desire to understand what it’s like to sell in different industries.

He discovered that salespeople needed to know how to tell stories, and they needed to practice them before they got in front of the client. Finally, they needed to understand when to use each kind of story.

Hook the customer

These stories help your client understand who you are, and they position you as an authority who can be trusted.

1. Your personal story explains why you do what you do, how you became an authority in your industry, and why the buyer should like you. Tell a 1-2 minute story about yourself and then invite your client to do the same.

This story won’t be used for the first phone conversation. Instead, save it for the first meeting. Avoid bragging, but emphasize that you have experience and you know what you’re doing.

2. The key staff story introduces people in your organization who are critical to the sales process. Who are the people your client will need to know and trust as he goes through this process?

If, for example, you frequently pair with a tech expert to explain your product, tell a narrative story about how she got her experience. This creates a connection.

3. Tell the company story to help your client understand what sets your company apart. Most companies focus entirely on facts and accomplishments, but this should be a narrative.

You don’t know what your client knows about your company or division. This is your chance to influence what he knows.

Fight to win

You’ve hooked the customer with your connection stories, but now the fight begins to keep him on board. Why should he choose your company instead of someone else’s?

4. The success story tells about a client who overcame a big problem. It’s the classic marketing case study: a client found himself in a bad situation, our company offered a plan to address the bad situation, and the client overcame the bad situation and succeeded.

Your client will identify with the story if it’s about someone like him. Tell the story of the hero’s journey.

5. The insight story can be tricky because you’re suggesting that you know something about the client’s business that she doesn’t know, and that can sound arrogant. Instead of telling your client what you know, share the story of how you discovered your insight.

Presenting insight as fact that you know invites pushback.

Land the deal

These stories help you finalize the decision process by reassuring your customer why your company is the best choice.

6. Your value stories explain to the customer how your company will behave in a variety of situations. Tell stories of a time when something went wrong, and how your company addressed the challenge.

These stories will be based upon your company’s specific abilities. Hotels, for example, might tell the story of an employee who drove to the airport to deliver a customer’s wallet to her.

7. Teaching stories help you when your client sponsor is in a hole. You must teach your sponsors to be persuasive so that when the decision meeting isn’t going well, they’ll know how to proceed.

You must teach your clients how to buy by teaching them what to value about your services. Then you must teach your clients how to sell in order to get the deal done.

Stories help clients understand and trust us but we must not abuse that power. Stories are meant to be shared, so make sure you hear the client’s stories in addition to telling your own.

“Seven Stories Every Salesperson Must Tell” episode resources

Grab a copy of Mike’s book, full of links to online training about storytelling.

This episode was brought to you by our friends at Wiley, publishers of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. It’s a blueprint for sellers based upon years of research about the things buyers hate.

We’re so convinced that you’ll love the book that we’re providing a free excerpt to our listeners here. We also have a free SlideShare available to help you become a sales leader rather than a subservient seller.

Check out The Sales Evangelizers on Facebook, where a community of people shares their struggles and their experiences with selling.

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is an online group coaching program designed to help sellers of all levels. Whether you’ve been selling for 15 years or 3 days, we’ll give you all the coaching and guidance you need to perform well.

The course is only $167 a month for three months, and it will connect you with sellers in all regions and industries who can share their struggles as you share your own.

We have a new semester beginning in the fall and we’d be honored for you to join us.

Also check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

TSE 555: TSE Hustler’s League-“Make It Easy”

Today we’re going to talk about how you can make it easy for prospects to do business with us. Whether you’re a mom and pop shop or a large corporation, whether you’re selling for yourself or for someone else, each of us has a sales process that can be fine-tuned so it’s easier for the prospects, taking away any friction. Again, this is tied up to the concept of building value.

  1. Educate the prospect.

You have to educate the buyer as much as possible. The more you can do that, the better you can help them make a buying decision as opposed to you making a sale.

  1. Make sure you know what they need so you can prescribe the right kind of product or service.

Make sure they have at least a copy of what the services are just to make sure you’re both on the same page.

  1. Take advantage of storytelling.

Think of ways to incorporate stories and then get down to the main reason why you need this is for their profitability.

  1. Show that you care.

What’s going to set you apart from somebody else is the fact that you care or you’re showing empathy.

Today’s Major Takeaway:

There are main points in your sales process that are key gateways. Educate them as much as possible to help them make the decision so they feel more in control.

Episode Resources:

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