Tag Archives for " Selling "

Kyle Morris, Donald Kelly, Lead Sift

TSE 1131: The Importance of Data in Sales

Kyle Morris, Donald Kelly, Lead SiftSellers that don’t have good data will struggle to repeat their success so we must recognize the importance of data in sales.  

Kyle Morris operates a company called SifData which features an application that sits on Salesforce to help companies track job changes.  

Defining data

Sales reps are very intuitive. They understand things well and many people assume that anecdotes and data are the same. They assume that, because they closed a deal with a company similar to the one they are interacting with, the information constitutes data. Because a tactic worked previously, they may assume that they can use that information as data moving forward. 

In other words, they assume that if a tactic worked once, it’s solid and they should continue using it. 

Kyle points out that the plural of anecdote isn’t data. We must stay objective and make decisions based upon actual information rather than sticking our finger to the wind to determine which way it’s blowing. 

Data is objective information about people, companies, or whatever your data set is that helps you make informed decisions. One of the easiest ways to identify the companies that could buy your product is by identifying the companies that have already bought your product. Figure out what’s common among them and then use that as a template to decide who to sell to in the future. If you’re selling to companies that are unique, you might find another market that also has that same commonality.  

Data problems

The two biggest problems common to data are that companies use data sources that are inconsistent and that they have too much data that isn’t actually valuable. 

Consider Uber as an example. If you’re trying to sell to Uber, some sellers might consider it enterprise while others view it as mid-market since they only have a couple of thousand employees. LinkedIn might reflect that the company has 35,000 employees, including drivers. If companies aren’t careful about where they are choosing data, it can create confusion. 

Be consistent about where you get data, even if it isn’t perfect, because you’ll at least be consistently wrong. Limit the number of resources you use to make classifications, especially for things like territories or number of employees or revenue. 

Many CRMs have a full page of information that reps never use. It doesn’t add value and it actually becomes a burden to them. Approach this with the same mentality you use when designing your website: what’s above the fold is critically different than what’s below the fold. It’s impactful where things are placed, and if reps have a bunch of unnecessary information at the top of the form it burdens them. 

If the reps don’t absolutely need it, then remove it. Streamline your process. Develop a discipline around reducing the amount of noise that your reps see based on the information they need. If the data won’t actually impact how they work through the sales process, it should be removed since it won’t actually move the needle. 

Guesstimation

Donald Miller says that if you confuse, you lose. We cannot confuse our reps. If we do, they’ll likely go back to what they’ve always done before, which is guesstimation. 

Imagine driving a truck built in 1965 versus a fighter jet built in 2019. The truck likely has a stick shift and two buttons for the radio, so almost any person can use it to get from point A to point B. Put that same person in a fighter jet with a million buttons and they won’t understand how to move forward. 

Sales reps must be able to execute and they shouldn’t be asked to fly a fighter jet if all they really need is a 1965 Chevy. 

Additionally, more data points mean that some operator has to maintain those fields. You must make sure the information is accurate because inaccurate data will make your CRM less valuable. Again, if that happens, your reps will start using anecdotes to make decisions again. 

Cry wolf

All those unnecessary fields will prompt your reps to fill them in, which will become cumbersome. If it isn’t a useful data point, they may just plug something in to fill the blank so they can move on. Your reps must be able to trust the fields that are on the page. 

Make the process simple and easy to engage. Remove as much as you can from the page layout so that your reps are only interacting with data that moves the needle. 

Everything can’t be critical. You can’t have 10 tier-one problems with no tier-two problems. You cannot cry wolf and represent that everything is vital.  

Kyle recalls his operations team once telling him that they needed a new field to be added to the CRM. He insisted that the team could add one field if they could identify two that could be removed. He said that it forces them to be intentional about the information they gather. 

Words are currency. You must make sure the process is easy. Find ways to break down barriers.

Effective data

Kyle said he’s a fan of using very specific people in very specific roles. Sales reps are most effective at building rapport, identifying pain and need, and closing deals.If you’re using your sales reps to collect data, you’re probably spending more money for it than you need to. And just as you would never ask your data-entry person to close deals, you probably shouldn’t ask your sellers to crunch data. 

Businesses may think they are being efficient by asking sellers to multi-task. They may figure the seller is already going to be on the site anyway so he can just collect the data. Consider the brain change that must take place in that situation. Sales reps must change their entire thought process in order to shift gears into data collection.

Switching back and forth can be tedious because it requires different muscles. Allow the people who are better at data to handle data. 

Every minute your seller isn’t selling results in money down the drain. Keep your opportunity costs in mind. 

Refresh data

Establish a process to refresh your data. As your company continues to accumulate accounts, you must track which ones are good or bad. Make it part of your cadence and establish a date on which you’ll refresh data. 

Consider hiring a team overseas to log into your Salesforce and identify the accounts that haven’t been updated in the past year and then refresh the data. Then track when the fields were updated. 

Also monitor duplicate accounts in your CRM which pollute your database. But before you can start eliminating duplicate accounts, you must work to ensure that you’ve prevented the problem of new duplicates. Duplicates create more mental overhead for your reps because two reps may be unknowingly working on the same account at the same time. It’s wasted energy that could be focused toward closing. 

Don’t assume that anecdotes and data are the same thing. Be sure, too, that you pick a single source of truth and stick with it. There’s no perfect data source, but at least be consistently imperfect. Allow your sellers to trust what they are working on. 

Importance of Data in Sales” episode resources

You can connect with Kyle Morris on LinkedIn or send him an email at Kyle@sifdata.com.

You’re a savvy salesperson who wants to learn and grow. Check out Audible for thousands of titles, plus a free 30-day trial, plus a free book. 

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there. I’m fairly easy to connect with. Just comment on something about my podcast. Send me an email.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester. You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561) 578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. When you share your experiences with the show, others will read the reviews and give us a listen.

I truly appreciate you and appreciate your reviews and your subscription, and your willingness to tell your friends and anyone you know that’s in sales about the podcast.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Confidence, Salespeople

TSE 1012: You Are Important As Well!!!

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Confidence, SalespeopleIf you find yourself hesitant to tell people that you work in sales because you think anyone can do it, today we’re discussing the fact that You are Important as Well!!

The year was 2011. I was a recent college graduate working for the first company in my professional career. I was attending a fine dining networking event when I ran into an old friend.

The old friend, it turns out, had decided to take on Wall Street after graduation and was now the head of finance for a multinational company in Miami. It sounded like he was doing great.

“Hey! Donald! It’s great to see you! What are you doing these days?!”

I clammed up because I didn’t want to tell him that I was in sales for a medical company. I was ashamed of saying I was a sales rep because, early on, it felt to me like anyone could do sales. [0:00]

Change your mindset

It took me awhile to realize that not just anyone can do well in sales. And I want to help you change your mindset, too. I want you to understand that you are important as well!

Many professional careers – medical, law, finance – require college degrees. They are critical jobs with important tasks.

Sales, however, doesn’t carry the glamour it once did. Many of us don’t even wear a suit to work anymore. Rather, it is believed that anyone who can “sell” can get a job in sales. We sit behind a computer and make phone calls … we are pushy people, bottom feeders, and we lack the ability to do anything else. [03:19]

That is how I used to feel. Now I know better.

Money

In sales, we have an unlimited level of income. After executives, sellers earn the highest incomes.

  • As a salesperson, it is your job to bring money into the organization.
  • Money is the lifeblood of any company, even for non-profits.
  • Finance, HR, tech, even the CEO – none of them can do their job without money.
  • The company cannot grow without money.

Every department needs money but only sales can deliver it. [04:38]

Certain jobs, like sales, are an asset to any company. Other positions – ones that earn a paycheck every week without bringing money into the firm – are liabilities. [06:21]

Salespeople are so important to the bottom line. The information we have is needed in board meetings because everyone wants to know what the sales pipeline looks like.  They need to know. [06:52]

Education

Sales can be an easier field to get started in because it doesn’t require a lot of technical training.

It is why I do this podcast. It is why I offer training and how I am able to help companies, and their sales teams, do better.

Understanding individuals, understanding the industry, and understanding the sales process is all part of training. It increases our education.

Schools are now spending time and effort to offer sales training as a degree because they recognize the power of the sales role. They recognize how critical sales is to any organization.

The prestigious capabilities of sales is returning and it is exciting. [07:33]

Believe in yourself

I am ashamed sometimes for ever doubting myself but I learned from it. I learned and I improved and I was able to perform better as a result. Now I understand what I am truly capable of bringing to an organization and I understand how valuable I am.

Have the strong and firm knowledge and belief that you are important. Listening to this podcast, for example, shows that you have taken an interest in learning something new. Improving yourself improves the entire profession. [09:19]

I was fortunate enough the other day to be thanked by a regular listener who credits this podcast with helping him succeed. He took some of the things he has learned from our guests and from the books we’ve recommended and is currently enjoying a sales incentive trip for doing so well in 2018. [10:00]

Recognize that you are important.

You are a professional sales rep with a skill that many people do not have. Work for a company that validates your contributions and offers a product or service that you feel strongly about.

Keep learning and keep growing. Earn that unlimited income.

I want you to be successful and to find more ideal customers. Build stronger value, close more deals. Do more each and every day. [10:56]

“You are Important as Well!!” episode resources

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Prospect.io is offering three months at half-price.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kathleen Hessert, Krista Jasso, We are Gen -Z, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 988: How To Adjust My Sales Process When Selling Gen Z

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’re talking to Kathleen Hessert and Krista Jasso about the newest generation and how to adjust your sales process when selling Gen Z.

Kathleen launched a project called We R Gen Z because she saw a lack of information about the newest generation because the marketplace was completely focused on millennials. Her organization conducts original research with a bank of 1,000 teens on a monthly basis to understand Gen Z.

Krista — a member of Gen Z herself — works as the social media coordinator and intern coordinator for We R Gen Z and she believes that her generation will take the world by storm.

Massive spending

Gen Z spends $44 billion a year in the U.S. and influences $600 billion when it comes to household spending.

It’s vital for the marketplace to understand that Gen Z will make up 40 percent of the U.S. population and 37 percent of the global population by the year 2020. [3;47]

Organizations that exclude them will be behind in their sales efforts, and they may never catch up.

Mistakes selling Gen Z

Sellers often talk down to Gen Z and the generation sees it. Gen Z has what Krista calls a “strong BS filter,” and they see right through lack of authenticity.

The generation values authentic, genuine behavior. Gen Z is turned off by fake, flashy marketing, instead choosing brands that are transparent about what they value and believe. [6:50]

Gen Z cares about who is behind the product as well as the product or service itself. They care about what top executives are saying about topics such as politics and the environment.

They include countless outside factors in their decision-making and if a brand doesn’t match what they are looking for, they won’t support it.

Gen Z trends

We R Gen Z hosts a trends panel that evaluates what’s hot and what’s not for the generation.

Organizations should understand that Gen Z are the next creators and innovators. Those companies need the young people of Gen Z more than the young people need their products or services.

They will buy or shun organizations based on their values and their passion. When Nike included Colin Kaepernick in its commercials, one member of We R Gen Z put all his Adidas clothes away and wore only Nike for two weeks to honor the decision made by the company. [10:19]

The founder of Tom’s Shoes gave $5 million to anti-gun-violence in response to a school shooting in California, marking the largest corporate donation ever to this particular issue.  The decision resonated with Gen Z.

Business is more than money, especially for Gen Z. Older marketers can miss this if they try throwing more money at the marketing effort.

Instead, marketers should look at the lifetime value of a Gen Z customer, which is a lot higher than the lifetime value of an older customer who has been with the company for a number of years. [12:13]

Digital natives

Managers must remember that Gen Z asks why. Previous generations were taught not to question authority, but Gen Z asks why, not to be disrespectful, but to understand the reasoning behind decisions.

The generation is curious and they want to understand motivations.

Gen Z is also the first generation to be true digital natives. They grew up in a world where the Internet was prolific. When they seek information, their first source is Google and their second is Instagram. [14:29]

They tend to seek a wide range of different perspectives on a topic. If someone tells them one thing, Gen Z tends to seek other voices before making decisions because they are used to this expansive focus.

Gen Z and video

Gen Z responds better to video than past generations. Primarily, the generation watches YouTube and Netflix more than they watch regular television. Many of them learn new things like how to play instruments simply by watching YouTube videos. [16:39]

Companies can’t take traditional routes when selling Gen Z.

We R Gen Z’s research shows that 48 percent of respondents said that social media influences their purchases most. Big sales are next because the generation is more frugal than its predecessors and they are watching their dollars more carefully.

Companies have to be on social media, present it in an awesome way, and be there for the right reasons at the right time.

They’ve seen all kinds of incredible creativity and they expect it cool and different and new each time they interact with a brand. [20:45]

Reaching Gen Z

Brands must actually engage with this generation on social media. Consumers are looking to see that brands are liking comments and responding to comments. They must show that they are authentic and real.

They must also understand that 64 percent of Gen Z will buy things via smartphones. Most of Gen Z will look to reviews before buying and that they will sometimes buy a product because their friends vouch for it. That suggestion will carry more weight than any marketing campaign. [24:41]

Other findings are that 65 percent won’t use voice tech such as Siri and Alexa to buy, though they will use them to accomplish tasks like making lists.

Spending habits

Krista told the story of one of their panelists who loved the idea of the Nintendo Switch so much that it motivated him to get a job. He hadn’t had a job prior to that, but the new system motivated him to save his paychecks to purchase it.

Gen Z is willing to save for a few months to buy a certain product, but if the product is overly expensive, they fear it will be irrelevant by the time they save for it, so they won’t likely purchase it. [27:51]

Gen Z has also learned from millennials that they don’t want to be burdened with hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt. Their frugality is based upon the things they’ve seen. they want a different future for themselves.

As an aside, clothes, gift cards, and tech are the hottest items for Christmas when you’re shopping for Gen Z. They also really appreciate making gifts for the people they care about.

Marketing

Look at your marketing and your brand. Look at how you’re reaching Gen Z and think outside the box. It’s a creative group of people and you have to stay a step ahead of them to gain their loyalty. [31:36]

Think about accessibility. They want brands to be easily accessible and to make their lives easier and faster. Speed has become their standard, and they want easy.

Brands that don’t make it easy to access products and services don’t stand a chance.

“Selling Gen Z” episode resources

Follow Kathleen and Krista atWe R Gen Z and find them on social media. If you’re a brand seeking custom research, email them at askus@wergenz.com. You can also find Kathleen on LinkedIn or @kathleenhessert on social media.

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This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Michael Wills, Donald Kelly, Sales Training, How to do a salesprocess

TSE 971: How To Develop A Sales Process That Works

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we talk with global sales team leader Michael Wills about how to develop a sales process that works.

Many sellers have no real sense of direction, but they expect to be successful despite the lack of a plan.

Defining a sales process

A sales process provides a way for you to communicate with a buyer in a systematic way that is successful and repeatable. A single success doesn’t mean you have a sales process. It needs to be measurable so you can confirm results and grow.

To start, recognize that you’re doing something well, but there are no doubt areas that you can improve.

Figure out who exactly your buyer is.

Find out these things:

  • Where do they live?
  • Where do they work?
  • How do they work?
  • How can you communicate with them effectively?
  • What’s my industry?
  • What’s the norm?

Be able to understand and document that information, which will give you a path. Once you have that path, you can figure out the processes to execute.

If you have someone who has had internal success, do a Q&A with him and figure out what his best practices are and build processes around those ideas.

People who aren’t led systematically will create their own strategies, which isn’t necessarily a positive thing. The process facilitates the execution of a strategy.

Dangers of operating without a process

If your team doesn’t have a process in place, you won’t know whether the team is selling to customers that you don’t necessarily want to do business with. You won’t know if the team is selling in a way that is unprofessional or inappropriate. Finally, you won’t know how consistent each person is in the process.

It’s important that you don’t let people operate on their own because you can’t grow around that system.

The sales process must be built around the way the buyers buy. When you truly know who you’re going after, you can understand their way of purchasing.

It’s also really important to understand where your buyer fits within the decision-making process because you’ll have different processes for different levels of people.

The method of communication and the information you share differs based on authority and timeline.

Fundamental parts of a process

Begin by understanding that your buyer knows 50 to 60 percent of what she needs to know because she ever talks to you for the first time. Knowing that frames the picture for you to jump in and be further down the sales process than you would have been without that knowledge.

Begin by talking about the client’s industry and situation. Use her language and previous client experience to bring value. You can share information, share best practices and share things you understand about the challenges her organization will face.

By doing that, you become a trusted person.

Today’s buyer needs value early. By sharing that value, you become trusted, and that person will share your information through the organization.

You can share solutions and then concrete details about how other clients have solved these problems.

Building a pipeline

Build a pipeline of prospects that are interesting to you.

Choose an industry you have a little bit of insight into and that you’re comfortable with. It’s important to understand the language of the industry.

Use the Internet to learn about the industry and the company itself. Determine hot topics and find out the things they are posting.

Instead of referring to it as cold calling, we should call it smart calling because we’ve done the research and you know who you want to talk to and why you want to talk to them.

It’s a lower conversion rate but it’s a great way to build your pipeline and gain some real opportunities.

Customization

Find the right level of customization for your prospecting.

Using a first name in an email is critical, but so is the information you find through your Internet searches, posts, product launches, and any other information that demonstrates that you’ve done some work.

Value

You can’t discuss value until you understand the industry you’re working in.

Use the experience you’ve gained by working with an earlier client to quantify benefits for your potential clients. Through your discovery process, talk to the prospect about the current situation and how your product or service could help them operate more efficiently or have capabilities they didn’t have before.

It’s “back of the napkin” stuff that doesn’t require an Excel spreadsheet, but it’s specific information that will be relevant to your prospect.

When a prospect agrees to meet with you, they already know a decent amount about your product. If you initiate the conversation talking about value, and you can quantify that value, it’s a different conversation.

Being consistent doesn’t mean you never tweak your process, but consistency is the only way to track whether your process is working or not.

It’s critical for salespeople to know what they do well and to understand why they do the things they do.

“A Sales Process That Works” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Jeffrey Gitomer, Napoleon Hill, Positive Thinking, Truthful Living: The First Writings of Napoleon Hill

TSE 966: The Law of Harmonious Attraction

Jeffrey Gitomer, Napoleon Hill, Positive Thinking, Truthful Living: The First Writings of Napoleon HillIn this episode of The Sales Evangelist, I had the pleasure of speaking once again with Jeffrey Gitomer, The King of Sales, about the Law of Harmonious Attraction.

Jeffrey is an author, speaker, and business trainer who writes and lectures internationally on sales, customer loyalty and personal development.  He also hosts the very popular Sell or Die podcast.

Jeffrey talked with us about his newest book, Truthful Living: the First Writings of Napoleon Hill. The first chapter, Success is Up to You, is now available as a free download for listeners of this podcast.

Napoleon Hill

Napoleon Hill was an American self-help author perhaps best known for Think and Grow Rich, one of the top 10 best-selling books of all time.

Jeffrey has a 15-year relationship of volunteering with The Napoleon Hill Foundation. As a result, when the foundation found the first writings of Napoleon Hill from 1917, they offered them to Jeffrey to edit and annotate as he desired.

Hill, as Jeffrey learned, believed that for someone to sell well, they have to learn more than selling skills; they need to learn how to be a positive person.

This book is not a life-changing book. This book is a life-altering book!

Jeffrey removed the lessons about sales but kept Hill’s personal development lessons.

He included his own observations at the beginning of each chapter and explained how to implement the lessons at the end of each chapter.

But Napoleon Hill’s 100-year-old writings remain completely intact.

If you already subscribe to the lessons in Think and Grow Rich, then Jeffrey’s book will reinforce every single thing that you already believe and already do. It will reunite you with great facts, and introduce you to new ideas.

This book will either put you on a bigger path, a better path, or it will reinforce the path you are already on.  Once you know you are on the right road, the incentive to continue stays with you.

Success is up to You. Finish what you start.

If you can get just those two things into your head, you will completely understand Hill’s writings on personal development and positive attitude.  

The Law of Harmonious Attraction

Don’t confuse this with anything you’ve read before about the Law of Attraction where you simply visualize what you want in order to make it happen.

The Law of Harmonious Attraction instead tells us that big pay and little responsibility seldom occur together.

Hill believed that it’s much easier to create a connection or friendship between like-minded people. It’s easier to build trust when people think alike, converse alike and are comfortable with each other’s strategies, philosophies, actions, and ethics. 

Hill, for example, wanted to attract people with wealth.  To that end, he urged others to read and reread The Law of Financial Success

If you are a diehard listener of Jeffrey’sSell or Die podcast, to offer a more current example, then you and he are already attracted to one another. You know his philosophy, his expressions, and you already feel good about doing business with him.

The salesperson can make things happen by building such relationships and keeping them.

Rapport vs Attraction vs Reciprocity

Building rapport is a lighter version of harmonious attraction. It begins when people ask superficial questions in hopes of finding opportunities to go further. It brings genuine value both people rather than being manipulative.

The idea of reciprocity is that if you help 10 people, then eventually, at least nine of them will help you.

Hill believed we should give without the expectation that people will give back, and with the realization that some will not.

The Five-Point Rule

Hill, in 1917, said this:

Success may be had by those who are willing to pay the price.

Most of those who crave a $10,000/year position*, especially if they are engaged in business, may realize it if they are willing to pay the price.

That price is eternal vigilance in the development of self-confidence, enthusiasm, working with the chief aim, performing more service than you are paid for and concentration. With those qualities well-developed, you will be more likely to succeed.

*approximately $250,000 in today’s dollars

“Harmonious Attraction” episode resources

Grab a copy of Napoleon Hill’s books The Master Key to Riches as well as The Magic Ladder of Success.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Business Development, Tom McMakin, Service Base Business

TSE 801: How Clients Buy-A Practical Guide to Business Development

Tom McMakin, The Sales EvangelistClients buy services differently than they buy products. Where products are frequently sold by features and attributes, services are sold on reputation, referral and relationships.

Today on The Sales Evangelist we talk with Tom McMakin about the challenges of selling services, and the key to becoming the very best at your chosen field of expertise.

Prioritize trust.

In his new book, How Clients Buy, McMakin introduces two different kinds of trust.

The first trust results when a person consistently follows through on his word. If, for example, I consistently show up on time to give you a ride to the airport, you will learn to trust my word.

The second trust develops as a seller demonstrates that he has his buyer’s best interest at heart. If a mechanic routinely recommends only the necessary repairs to your car without suggesting extraneous costly repairs, you develop a trust that your mechanic is protecting your interests.

That trust creates a valuable relationship over time, and it impacts how clients buy services.

Narrowcast.

The world tells sellers to broadcast in order to spread the word about their product. Sellers, conversely, should narrowcast.

Segment your market. Find the people you most want to serve and connect them to one another.

Instead of immediately trying to sell them, help them create a conversation amongst themselves about best practices in the space they occupy.

You don’t have to be the person with all the answers; you simply become the person who knows where to find all the answers. When they view you as a resource, they’ll likely become clients who buy services.

Shrink the pond.

Position yourself as the very best at something; use geography, company type, size and specialty. Shrink the size of your pond until you’re the biggest fish in the pond.

If you can’t be the number one cybersecurity company in the Rocky Mountain region, then consider positioning yourself as the number one cybersecurity company for law firms in the Rocky Mountain region.

Look at your case studies and your experience. Stake a claim to the service you’re best at.

Understand the buyer’s journey.

McMakin has identified 7 steps people take when they are considering buying services.

Because there aren’t many books about selling services, especially those that address the impact technology has had on the industry, he wrote a book to help those selling services become the best in their fields.

His major takeaway is to define who you want to serve an underwrite the conversation between them. Stop thinking about what you want to say to them and create a peer conversation instead.

That effort will seed the clouds that will water your future growth.

Episode resources

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is a group coaching program designed to bring sellers of all levels and all industries together to exchange ideas. The Hustler’s League provides high quality training that doesn’t cost a fortune, and it allows you to connect with other sellers.

We begin a new semester in April focused on building value for your prospects, and we’d be honored to have you join us.

You can email Tom directly at howclientsbuy.net for more information about his book or his services.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

prospecting

TSE 700: TSE Hustler’s League -“Prospecting System”

prospectingToday’s snippet taken from one of our sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League is big on prospecting. How do you create a prospecting system that keeps your sales  pipeline healthy?

Who is more likely to buy your product or service?

Write down who your ideal customers are. Write your ideal customer profile down.

Where did your last 10 customers come from?

Cold calling, door-to-door, referrals or from your Dream 100 customers. If you’can’t think of the past ten, think of your past five. Write down how you got them.

Where are you getting most of your customers from?

Inbound, outbound, cold outreach, networking, etc. This will give you an idea of which strategy you need to focus on.

Why do they buy?

List down the reasons your customers bought from you. Then you can use the information you get in crafting your message.

Episode Resources:

Tired of the same old, boring PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same. Tell your story the way you want to tell it.

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Donald Kelly, Service, Roscoe Chicken and Waffle, Customer Service

TSE 647: Selling Is Service & Service Is Selling

Donald Kelly, Service, Roscoe Chicken and Waffle, Customer ServiceNo matter how great your product is but if you are not treating your customers the way they want to be treated, you could be losing more money than you actually realize. I’d like to share with you a bad experience I recently had and hopefully you get insights into what you should do and what you shouldn’t do.

A Bad Experience at Chicken and Waffles

I just attended the Podcast Movement in California. We went to this chicken and waffles restaurant. All of the outside chairs were stacked on top of each other on the table. So we figured we caught them at a bad time. But it’s lunchtime! Shouldn’t it be open? So we went to the front of the store and before we even went to the door to go in, somebody came out to greet us. Now the manager also came out and told us they only took two credit cards and cash at a table after seeing that were a party of seven. I understand when small organizations don’t have a POS system and maybe they’re afraid of the credit card transaction fees. But I go to food trucks and they carry credit card machines and are able t do all this stuff. We didn’t make a big deal out of it and got the food. I realized the manager was just old school and he wanted to do things his way.

You’re next to one of the biggest convention centers in the state of California. You’re right down the street from Disneyland. So the market is pretty huge. You probably get a lot of parties come in with more than one or two individuals. He should have realized it was probably time to upgrade to a process where they could take care of large parties. But the way he said is was the worst part. It was more of like he got annoyed we bothered him and so he didn’t want to serve us. We were so close to walking away but we were so hungry we got the food anyway. Imagine if we didn’t have cash. Most people didn’t have at that group and some of us did. So we were only able to do those two credit cards and the rest of us used cash. It worked out in this scenario. But imagine if we didn’t. We would have just walked away and that would have been $100 for him.

Are You Pushing Your Customers Away?

Just imagine how many people does this establishment push away before they even come inside of the restaurant? A lot of money is not going through the door. They’re probably saving money but they don’t realize how much they’re losing. They’re not giving the customers to come in and spend more money. They could have made double the amount of money they’re making but they didn’t give that opportunity for people to come inside. Pay whatever the credit card transaction fee is because you’re increasing the opportunities of gaining more loyal customers and people coming back to you over and over again.

Next, we had to fall in line to pay. And the manager once more told us to make sure we had cash. How frustrating that was. Worse, it took forever to pay because there was only one person taking the payment. They had an old school calculator. On top of this, we wanted to break up a $20 so we can give the people in our group change. One of my friends asked if we can get some change. The cashier said no and that we had to go back to our server.

My rating: Service sucked!

The food was great. The service was horrible. The attitude needed to go. We’re giving money. You have to be grateful for us. I’m not trying to be entitled. But make sure you treat us well.

Insights from this experience:

  1. Observe empathy.

This concept comes back to empathy. You need to think about your customers. The golden rule is to treat others the way you like to be treated. The platinum rule is to treat others the way they would like to be treated. The way customers like to be treated is for you to personalize it towards them. Speak to their needs.

  1. Work smarter, not harder.

Don’t just be there and use a calculator to calculate a cash. Give people an easy way to do business with you. Because we think about ourselves, we make it difficult for others to do business with us.

  1. Keep the customer in the loop.

Especially for long term sales cycles, give customers the updates. Let them know what’s next. Keep them informed. It’s a simple thing you can do to express your appreciation.

  1. Don’t see them as a number.

See your customer as someone you can build a strong relationship with and be loyal to. Don’t just connect with an individual to make money. Make real connections with those people.

Selling is Service, Serving is Selling

So here’s a YouTube video going around and they made an awful commercial. But if that’s the goal they’re trying to get, it worked. It went viral now!

Watch this video. Sure it’s crappy a video. But the message got across. Selling is service and service is selling.  The concept is that when you give great customer service, you’re actually selling. And people will buy from you when you give them a great experience.

 

I also recommend that you read the book The Experience Economy and learn about how you can give great experience to your customers.

Episode Resources:

The Experience Economy by B. Joseph Pine II and James H. Gilmore

Podcast Movement

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

 

Marc Levine, Donald Kelly,Improv Selling

TSE 621: How to Empower Customers to Make Faster Decisions Through Improv Comedy

Marc Levine, Donald Kelly,Improv Selling

Looking for an exciting, highly effective tool you can use for your next sales conversation? Then you surely need to listen to this episode.

Marc Levine is the Founder of Improv My Sales, a training and coaching company focused on salespeople where he works with individuals and companies to help them utilize the power of improv to become more successful.

Today, Marc shares some insights into empowering customers to make faster decisions through improv comedy. Marc started taking improv classes in New York and he learned that  people who make it come alive on stage work with a set of guiding principles.

 

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Marc:

Why do improv in sales?

Sales is one of the least trusted professions so Marc seeks to help sales professional do this really well so sales profession is looked at in a respective way.

As humans, our real desires are hidden and with the improv approach, you become really good at uncovering your prospect’s concerns and needs and be able to think of them as if they’re your own so you can be the most trusted person to help clients move towards commitments.

The Power of Listening

A lot of times we miss the value because we’re not listening. We’re telling the story and there are conversations we’ve already set up that we’re missing the goal.

Who’s Agenda Is it?

Often in our sales process, our agenda is focused on gathering information we could use for selling which is around their needs, goals, and pain, but it’s actually really focused on you. It’s focused on your agenda, not theirs. Then they begin to become disengaged.

Client-Centered versus Sales-Centered

Change how you sound and really think about whether what you’re doing is client-centered or sales-centered. When people feel like you care, they feel like you’re on their side and they would trust you.

How improv comedy helps in building trust:

  1. No script

It’s just you and what you’re offering and the customer being the expert in their world and together building a solution.

  1. Listen

The best improvisors listen at a level 10 or 11. They say yes to the suggestions their fellow actors offer even if different than their own.

  1. It must be fun!

Improv is fun and if you’re able to bring that into your sales training, sales reps will be able to retain information they’ve learned much better.

  1. “Yes, and…”

Stop making your clients wrong, you need to make them right. So if the client says something, regardless of what it is, you say “yes” as a sign that you’re agreeing with them then add something else after the “and” part. Doing this helps justify their concern otherwise you’re not going to be in agreement.

This tool also helps you to ask the appropriate questions that would allow the prospect to express themselves. “Yes, and…” makes them feel you understand them and this makes them feel good.

Marc’s Major Takeaway:

Stop making your customers wrong and stop thinking their world is wrong because it’s getting in the way of you closing a sale. The only reason we think somebody’s world is wrong is because we think it gets in the way of closing a sale. When you start to say yes to their world and you can justify their world is making sense and add some questions on top of that, you’re going to build trust. You’re the person they can open up to and then you can help  them move towards commitment better than most other sales reps around you.

Can’t get enough of this episode?

Reach out to Marc through email at marc@improvmysales.com and he will send you a PDF that talks more about “Yes, and…” and some nuances to it. If you’re a sales manager, Marc will send you reasons why sales training doesn’t work and how you can fix that. Plus! Write to Marc and tell him what you like about today’s podcast and he will enter you into a contest to win one of three one-hour sales coaching that will rock your world!

Episode Resources:

Improv My Sales

The Five Languages of Love by Gary Chapman

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Help us spread the word out by leaving us a rating or review on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play or whatever platform you’re using.

 

Ace Chapman, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Best Sales Podcast

TSE 346: The Business of Buying and Selling Businesses

Ace Chapman, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Best Sales PodcastToday, we have a very interesting topic as I talk with Ace Chapman who runs a business of buying and selling businesses. He actually started his own business at a very young age of 19 until he found more success in buying existing businesses and building his vision on top of them when it’s already profitable as opposed to starting from scratch. He also talks about the importance of buying whole business at the right time.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Ace:

Strategies in running a successful business of buying and selling businesses:

  1. Understand the cycles.

There are cycles in how businesses go up and down. Understand that you can be at whim of the economy going up and down. It’s not seeing the future but seeing the past.

  1. Buy something at the right time.

Consider if the asset is salable making sure you’re able to get in and out of that.

Selling a business vs. selling a product or service:

  • Understand the buyer’s purpose.
  • Understand the buyer’s skill set.
  • Understand what they’re worried about.

More strategies to become successful in your business:

  1. Alleviate concerns.

A lot of people try to sell something based on what they think the person is worried about instead of just asking. Ask them what their concerns are and show them that you can alleviate it.

  1. Leverage testimonials.

Don’t just make stuff up. Be real with them. Put something in front of them in a way that can hold them and just get more of those involved in alleviating their concern.

  1. Have SOPs in place.

Having processes in place is critical to the success of your business. Also delegate some tasks to people who know how to do it.

  1. Agree with them.

It’s not necessarily about agreeing with the fact that it’s a problem but agree with the fact that you can see why they see it as a concern.

  1. Think outside the box.

Creativity is key to get you to the next level.

  1. Focus on what you want.

Many people focus on the tool that’s going to get them what they want instead of focusing on what they want. Be clear about your goal.

Things that motivate salespeople:

  • Freedom
  • Travel
  • Money

Ace’s Major Takeaway:

Do not take any aspect of it personal. Otherwise, it takes the focus off the process and what you can control, change, and improve.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Ace on www.acechapman.com or send him an email at ace@acechapman.com.

Check out Ace’s book on Amazon called The Ace Formula

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

The Sales Evangelist; Ken Thoreson, Sales Management

TSE 124: Sales Management & Developing High Performing Sellers

The Sales Evangelist; Ken Thoreson, Sales Management Do you absolutely, truly, definitely want to slam your way to sales success? Our guest today will show you how. Ken Thoreson is a speaker, author, and consultant with extensive expertise in strategic sales management.

Ken Thoreson, Acumen Management Group, Ltd. president, is a sales leadership professional who “operationalizes” sales management systems and processes to pull sales results out of the doldrums into the fresh zone of predictable revenue. As a sales management thought leader Ken is recognized as an expert in sales execution, channel management, revenue generation, sales analysis, compensation, forecasting, recruitment, and training within the sales function.

Over the past 14 years his consulting, advisory, and platform services have illuminated, motivated, and rejuvenated the sales efforts for companies throughout North America—from emerging, transitional to high-growth. Prior to founding Acumen, he led development-stage, entrepreneurial, and a $250-million national vertical software sales organization as vice president of sales. As a speaker, Ken energizes audiences and recharges their personal commitment to professional excellence to help drive personal and organizational change and growth.

In addition to the four released books based on his Sales Management Guru series, and Success Simplified, co-authored with Stephen Covey, Ken’s many articles and nationally recognized blog are excellent resources for executives who want to revitalize their organizations. He has been published in Selling Power, VARBusiness, Reseller Management, Business Products Professional and SmartReseller. He is currently a columnist for Redmond Channel Partner Magazine, a publication for Microsoft channel partners. Ken’s blog has been rated in the top 10 sales blogs in the United States and ranked a top sales industry social media user by Top View.

Ken is an author of four comprehensive, information-rich books about sales management. The latest of which, SLAMMED! For the First Time Sales Manager, is a fun book made for people jumping into sales management. Kens books are guide books with great tips, ideas, and tools for sales managers.

In this episode, Ken talks about how recruiting is a critical component of sales leadership and how it’s really about hiring the best candidate and not the best available candidate.

Ken is a leader at the Acumen Management Group that focuses around programs in place, alignment of compensation plan, marketing messaging issues and other issues that are preventing growth.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Ken:

Ken’s coolest sales experience when he was the customer

Ken’s books on Sales Management:

Your Sales Management Guru’s Guide to:

Leading High Performance Sales Teams

Creating High Performance Sales Compensation Plans

Recruiting High Performance Sales Teams

SLAMMED! For the First Time Sales Manager

Why break it down to 4 books instead of condensing it into one:

  • Sales leaders are busy
  • Designed as quick books with a lot of pertinent, textual information
  • Designed for sales managers to grasp the idea, see the examples, utilize the tools, and execute!

What separates high performance salespeople from the rest:

  • Creativity
  • Empathy
  • Ability to adapt
  • Take selling as a profession
  • Constantly refining their skills and investing themselves
  • High levels of energy
  • Intelligence
  • Passion and Commitment

How his book on Recruiting High Performance Sales Teams is different from others:

  • Focused on sales managers’ creation of interviewing process
  • Taking the emotion out of hiring
  • Creating a scorecard defining 5 specific work experiences and 5 personality traits you want the person to have
  • Interviewing questions that you ask salespeople
  • Sample of a new-hire salesperson on-boarding plan

The top 3 most important points on recruiting:

  1. You are always recruiting: 20% of the sales manager’s time is to recruit
  2. Taking the time in the interview process to get it right: Interview at least 5 and at least 3 people in your company interviewing the candidate
  3. Social Interview/Case Study

The biggest mistakes people make when they’re hiring:

  1. Taking too long to make the decision
  2. Improper on-boarding
  3. Getting emotionally involved with the candidate

Success in companies vs. stagnant growth in others:

  • Leadership: Creating an environment of high performance
  • Having the right culture
  • High expectations
  • High accountability
  • Having fun!
  • One element commonly missed: VISION

Building your personal business vision:

  • Identifying your business plan and understanding your goals
  • Defining your personal training goals for products/service and personal self
  • Making sure the manager understands the salesperson’s vision and goals

The importance of VISION for business growth:

  • Motivation
  • Having a mantra for your life

On creativity: It can be learned.

How a manager can be effective as a coach or mentor:

  • Establish a formal one-on-one and face-to-face conversation at least once a month
  • Coach around performance, not the person
  • Creating an environment and then the tool set and the mindset that coaching is a critical element
  • Using the word “feel” in asking questions

Current projects Ken is working on:

  • Working with individuals, organizations, and major corporations selling independent distribution and helping them build programs to drive more products (Ex. Cisco, Microsoft)
  • Sales Manager’s Tool Kit
  • Doing keynote presentations and sales performance workshops at conferences

Visit their website www.acumenmanagement.com for free information, videos, programs, and downloadable white papers. Also, find free information from his blog Your Sales Management Guru.

Or send him an email at ken@acumenmanagement.com

Ken’s Major Takeaways:

Think about what the definition of a professional is and make a commitment to increase your level of professionalism every quarter.

As a sales manager, focus not on the numbers; focus on the relationship and creating an environment that’s fun and with high expectations with accountability.

 

Lynn University, Dr. Andrew Burnstine; Sales, Fashion

TSE 115: Is The Role of The Retail Sales Professional Dead?

Lynn University, Dr. Andrew Burnstine; Sales, Fashion

Is the glamour of sales dead? Definitely not! And in today’s episode, my guest, Dr. Andrew Burnstine will explain to us why the glamour in sales is still very much alive.

Dr. Burnstine is an associate professor in the College of Business and Management at Lynn University at Boca Raton, Florida, where he teaches in areas of global marketing and principles of marketing. He also teaches a lot of fashion classes – evolution of fashion, fashion strategies, as well as some MBA courses in business leadership. He works with his students in many aspects of marketing, fashion, retail, giving them concepts, analysis and thoughts to have them think through these different areas and topics. These aspects help them become global leaders in business, marketing, fashion, management, e-commerce, entrepreneurship, and lastly, to equip them with tools they need to know and learn to be a successful leader in business today.

Also known as Dr. Fashion, Dr. Burnstine talks about his experience as a professor and being someone in business.

In this world of instant gratification, personal touch still matters a lot whether you’re a salesperson or an entrepreneur. You have to give that personal touch. At the end of the day, it’s all about giving your customers great real-life experiences.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Dr. Burnstine:

Dr. Burnstine’s coolest sales experience when he was the customer at Chick-fil-A

Has the glamour of a sales professional died?

No. It depends on the model of the retailer. The retail model has been existence for almost 200 years now.

  • Experience
  • Loyalty
  • Long-lasting relationships

Ex. Nordstrom

Are students interested in selling?

Many students in fashion don’t want to work in retail but it’s part of their school’s curriculum.

Reasons:

  • Too lazy to get up early
  • Don’t want to work for somebody
  • Don’t like selling
  • No true understanding of what retail encompasses

What students want:

  • Jobs that pay the most
  • Getting into a fashion career immediately
  • They want things too fast being in the “now” generation
  • Instant access and gratification

What students need to understand:

  • The value of getting on the floor
  • Knowing and understanding your customers
  • Understanding the buying and marketing plan

How to deal with students today:

  • Using a different way of teaching them (ex. technology like Apple)
  • Newer, faster teaching
  • Giving students the things they need now in business, retailing, commerce, and education

How to create great customer experience:

  • Have a great relationship between seller and buyer
  • Sell yourself
  • Understand your customers:
    • Do your research
    • Put yourself in the other person’s mindset without losing WHO you are
    • Not looking for instant gratification at a one-time deal but long-time commitment
  • Ethics is critical
  • Be transparent

Current projects Lynn University is working on:

  • Entrepreneurship projects – students and faculty putting together marketing and business plans for products
  • Facilitating the learning of students
  • Study abroad

Best way to contact Dr. Burnstine:

aburnstine@lynn.edu

 

TSE 037: Selling As An Entrepreneur with John Lee Dumas

John Lee DumasEntrepreneurs, get ready to ignite! During this episode I was able to interview Mr. John Lee Dumas! The man behind “Entrepreneur on Fire”! John’s podcast is a top ranked, 7-day a week business podcast, focused on inspiring entrepreneurs.

Some of John’s guests includes, Seth Godin, Gary Vaynerchuk, Barbara Corcoran, Tim Ferriss, Chris Brogan and over 500 inspiring Entrepreneurs.

Here are some of the questions/take aways I got from John during this episode.

Why are so many entrepreneurs afraid of selling? 

One of the major reasons why entrepreneurs dislike selling is the fact that they are fearful of rejections. To overcome that you must just launch and DO SOMETHING! Another way to overcome this fear of rejection is to get a mentor or be part of a mastermind group.

What does an entrepreneur do when your business grows greater than your ability to do it alone? 

John recommends that anyone in this situation reads Chris Decker’s recently released book Virtual Freedom. You can increase the value of your time and grow your business even faster by hiring others who can take care of minimal tasks for you.

How do you know at what point to price your product? 

There is no set answer to the ideal pricing of your product. John recommends that individuals focus on value and base the price on that, not merely on the hours spent offering that product or service.

John major take away is to JUST START!

John also recommend’s that listeners check theses two books: The Slight Edge & The Compound Effect.

FireNationElite

Entrepreneur on Fire (EOFire.com)

Podcaster Paradise

MUSIC PROVIDED BY FREESFX

Listen to Stitcher

TSE 008: Can Anyone Sell?

Donald KellyCan anyone sell? In this episode I address a question I discussed recently with some friends regarding my views on selling. You see, so many people feel that it is difficult to sell. Some say you have to look a certain way, you have to be a slick talker or be able to persuade others into doing something they don’t want to. If you really think about it, that is not being a successful sales person, that is being a con-artist. I personally feel that anyone can sell and you don’t have to persuade someone to do something that they  don’t want to do.

To be successful in sales you have to do 4 main things:

  1. Have a DESIRE to for sales. A DESIRE to provide value to others and help them recognize it.
  2. You have to have a PASSION for what you are selling (product or service).
  3. You have to get some kind of SALES TRAINING or a MENTOR who can guide you regarding the fundamentals of selling (also listening to podcasts, like The Sales Evangelist).
  4. You have to PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE and implement your personality with your selling.

That’s it! I feel it is that simple.  Come learn more and check out this episode. I know you will enjoy it.

Listen to this episode on iTunes or listen on Stitcher Radio.

MUSIC PROVIDED BY FREESFX

Is Knowledge Power? My Second Segment on the “Starve The Doubts” Podcast

Is Knowledge Power?I am back with my second segment on the “Starve The Doubts Podcast” with Jared Easley. During this segment, I hit upon the idea of “Knowledge” and “Power”.  On this same episode Ryan AveryThe World Champion of Public Speaking, is interviewed . Listen carefully to my segment since it is featured at the end of the episode.

Check out the episode and let me know your thoughts. Do you think that “Knowledge is Power”?

 

 Check out the episode!