Tag Archives for " Sales Leader "

Company Culture, Purpose, Josh Levine

TSE 1186 Write Your Company’s Obituary: Identify or Rediscover Your Company’s Purpose

Having to write your company’s obituary sounds a bit morbid but there’s a good reason why doing this is important. One result is that doing so will help you identify and rediscover your company’s purpose. 

Josh Levine is a culture company strategist and works with technology, social enterprise organizations, and firms to help them improve their work. His goal is to make the employees love what they’re doing by building strong relationships, higher trust, and deeper engagement. 

Josh published a book called Great Mondays: How to Design a Company Culture That Employees Love. It talks about all his learnings for the past 10 years in advancing the idea of company culture as a strategic advantage. It defined what culture is and gives people the tools that they need to improve the culture. 

Write your company’s obituary 

This was a tool that Josh’s mentor used and many clients would react negatively upon hearing it. There is more to sales than just putting the product out there and selling it. It’s more than just the numbers. Doing business isn’t only about the money; it’s also about understanding what you are trying to do with your company and with your life. 

This is also about knowing your own purpose and helping the organization discover its  ‘why?’ 

Imagine that your business closes its doors after 30 years. Don’t think of the reason why it shut down. Your goal is to write down two or three short paragraphs about why your company will be remembered and will be most missed. This will give you the opportunity to see what you achieved that made the difference. 

Josh’s team works with a board executive team and leadership peers together. They make teams write because what matters isn’t just the end result. They also consider the kind of language, the words, and the phrases used together. 

Obituary exercise

Don’t stop short of the fantastic. When you start writing your company obituary, you need to go beyond how far you think you can make it. 

The point of the exercise is to come up with your achievements and look for the possible ways that you’re going to achieve those. 

Josh had a client who said that they would solve poverty. It’s a far-fetched goal and impossible to do but it didn’t keep them from aiming to do so. When the discussion happened, the team thought of how to make it work and figured out that their technology connects communities together. The community that works together will solve poverty. With that, their previously written achievement of solving poverty now sounds plausible. 

Define your purpose

Next, you have to define your purpose. The company’s values are the hows and the company’s purpose are the whys. Businesses and companies need to figure out the why behind what they’re doing. You won’t be able to find your purpose if you’re thinking about this quarter’s return or this quarter’s sales number. 

As a sales leader, you can help define the purpose by shaping the culture of your company according to the company’s vision. You can help strengthen the team and find the values and purpose of the company over time. 

Components of a company’s culture 

There are six components mentioned in the book Great Mondays. The first three are as follows: 

  • Purpose
  • Values
  • Behaviors

The first two define the company’s purpose and values. The third component is the behaviors. Behavior is the center point of culture and is what you are trying to adjust to help people make better business decisions. 

The next three are the following: 

  • Recognition
  • Rituals
  • Cues

Recognition and rewards have been used in businesses. These are effective strategies in aligning behaviors to build and strengthen the synapses of culture. Your goal is to spread your culture and share the behaviors. 

Keep reminding your peers why they’re in the business and getting the people back to the top of the pyramid. Love what you and find something that you believe in to make everything worthwhile. 

“Write Your Company’s Obituary” episode resources

Great Mondays: How to Design a Company Culture That Employees Love is available on Amazon. The purpose of the Write your company’s obituary exercise is laid out in the book. 

You can download the supporting materials for free at free@greatmondays.com. You can also sign up for newsletters, one minute Monday, and case studies.  We will e-mail you all the necessary information for building cultures that matter. 

Connect  with Josh Levine via Twitter and LinkedIn. 

This episode is brought to you in-part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a helpful guide for sales reps and sales leaders to improve their pitches and presentations. It has 12 courses and you can get the first two modules for free! 

If you like this episode, don’t be shy and give us a thumbs up and rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. We produce podcasts weekly so make sure to subscribe to get more of these sales talks that matter! Share this with your friends and teach them how to subscribe as well. 

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

If you’re a reader who loves reading and listening to books, you can also check out Audible as well and explore this huge online library with thousands of books. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

For sales concerns, you can shoot us your question anytime. Connect with Donald via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Sales Leaders, The Sales Evangelist, Donald C. Kelly

TSE 1181: 3 Things Leaders Do To Hurt Sales Rep Relationships

 

 

Sales Leaders, The Sales Evangelist, Donald C. Kelly

Sometimes, there are 3 things leaders do to hurt sales rep relationships and most times, they do it unintentionally. This is especially hard because sales leaders and sales reps spend a lot of time together. A bad leader can negatively affect how a sales rep makes his sell. While a good leader helps how sales reps can improve their sales. 

Marc Levine founded his ImprovMySales business four years ago. The company is dedicated to creating wonderful and profitable places to work. Before this business venture, Marc was part of a sales team as a national account executive and technology and professional services. For the last 16 years, he has been developing leaders and teams, teaching people communication skills, selling services to certain companies including Citibank, Prudential, and Best Buy.  

3 things leaders do to hurt sales rep relationships

There are probably more, but let’s focus on just the three things for now. 

  • A leader does not create a psychologically safe environment
  • The leader forgets about humanity 
  • The leader is emotionally unintelligent

August has been a leadership month and people have been talking about the important things to become a good sales leader. This involves setting a vision and becoming a good coach. It’s about creating a culture where sales reps can thrive and succeed. 

When a leader fails to create that safe environment, the sales relationship takes a hit. 

By definition, psychological safety was a term coined by the social psychologist, Amy Edmonson. Google did a two-year study and analyzed the qualities of its most effective teams. The results of the study have shown that teams promoting psychological safety produced better revenues and their team members stayed in the work longer than others. Psychological safety is a team norm that says it’s safe to take risks, to be vulnerable, to ask for help, and to disagree with the rest of the team. 

When you do, you won’t be ostracized for disagreeing but instead, you’ll be honored and validated. 

An environment where sales leaders can thrive

As a parent, when your kid doesn’t understand something, you want your kid to feel safe to come to you and ask for help without getting embarrassed. The same is true in sales. As a leader, you need to develop a team where your members can be honest and can come forward when they don’t understand something. 

You want your team members to come to you about their problems early on in the sales cycle rather than at the end of it where the deal is falling apart. This is the essence of psychological safety. 

It’s an environment where people can ask for help, be vulnerable, take risks, and be supported 

Create a psychologically safe environment 

This doesn’t happen overnight. It happens when your sales reps come to you asking for help and instead of reacting, you validate and support them. Do it a couple of times for the team members to realize that you want to help them. 

Sales leaders also need to stop blaming the team members. Blame and accountability are two different things. 

Blaming makes the blamed feel bad and threatened. It’s when sales leaders bombard the reps with questions like: 

  • Why didn’t you hit the quota last month?
  • What are the reasons why you lost that sale?
  • Why aren’t you doing this?

These questions foster negativity. Accountability helps you raise the team’s standard without making the reps feel bad. It’s more like saying, “Hey you didn’t hit your quota last month and I know you’re disappointed. Let’s talk about what happened that may have contributed to this and let’s figure out the solutions.” Build an environment where your members can be comfortable in having a dialogue. 

As a sales leader, you also need to admit your own mistakes. Research shows that when you admit your mistakes, the people around you will come close and will open up about theirs as well. 

There’s power in vulnerability and when you use that power, you will see your sales team come closer and open up to you. 

Leaders forget about humanity 

The next in the list of the 3 things leaders do to hurt sales rep relationships is forgetting about humanity. 

Salespeople are like stand-up comedians. We go out there showing confidence knowing that we’re going to be rejected. We are a fragile group. When sales leaders remember the humanity of the people on their team, the members tend to go above and beyond. The members put in incremental efforts. 

Sales leaders also need to stop making the team members like little versions of themselves. Every member is unique with their own set of skills and strengths. Forcing things that you do well onto them will make them feel resentful. Instead, honor their strength. Validate the things that they do well to make them feel excited and engaged. Make them feel heard and understood. 

Remember that you are working with human beings who have hopes and fears. and get scared. Honor that part of them. 

Build strong relationships with your sales team

Sales leaders need to build strong relationships with their team and practice emotional intelligence. Daniel Goleman wrote in his book Working with Emotional Intelligence that people with emotional intelligence are more successful in their careers than those who are just relying on pure intelligence. Emotional intelligence is the ability to understand and regulate your own feelings to understand and empathize with the feelings of others. As a sales leader, you need to be aware of your emotional triggers to be able to manage them. If you fail to develop that, you can easily be overtaken by your emotional triggers and start to judge your team. 

These triggers tend to show up again and again and these are no surprises. 

Some of the triggers are when your sales rep didn’t hit the quota or when someone in your team isn’t adapting to the new technology, and when someone’s not putting something into the CRM.

So, list your triggers and think of all the situations and the people that trigger the fight, flight, or freeze responses.  

The sales team and all its members are the backbones of an organization. We want them to feel empowered and we can’t make that happen if we don’t provide them an environment where they can thrive and if we keep blaming them. Have conversations with them and make them feel good so that they’d want to produce for you. 

“3 Things Leaders Do To Hurt Sales Rep Relationships” episode resources

Connect with Marc at improvmysales.com or reach him at (718) 637-7890. 

If you like this episode, don’t be shy and give us a thumbs up and rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. We produce podcasts weekly so make sure to subscribe to get more of these sales talks that matter! Share this with your friends and teach them how to subscribe as well. 

This episode is brought to you in-part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a helpful guide for sales reps and sales leaders to improve their pitches and presentations. It has 12 courses and you can get the first two modules for free! If you want to take your sales to the next level, then I recommend that you join us with our group coaching. 

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

If you’re a reader who loves reading and listening to books, you can also check out Audible as well and explore this huge online library with thousands of books. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound

Sales Process, The Sales Evangelist, Erin Pheil

TSE 1163: How Leaders Sabotage The Sales Process

Sales Process, The Sales Evangelist, Erin PheilSales leaders sometimes make mistakes that compromise deals, so understanding how leaders sabotage the sale process can help us avoid the same mistake. 

Erin Pheil is the founder of The MindFix Group, a company that specializes in helping entrepreneurs, high-achievers, and high-performers eliminate their biggest mental roadblocks that hold them back and keep them from achieving what they’re capable of. 

Head trash

Some sales leaders have very specific definitions of what a sales leader is. For Erin, anybody who is in charge of guiding the people in making the right decisions and who is doing sales for a company is considered a sales leader

Many sellers read books and work with experts to improve their skills in sales. They keep learning, and then they show up on calls. They often show up to these calls prepared, but also with head trash. They’re showing bits and pieces of their old mental programming and outdated beliefs that aren’t helpful in closing deals. They go to the calls and they try to combine new knowledge and strategies that their coaches have taught them with their old beliefs. 

When things go wrong, they don’t blame themselves. They blame the technique and the process, or even the people they hired. They don’t look at their head trash and suspect that they might be the ones sabotaging the process. 

Blaming the process, techniques, and tactics instead of examining how they’re screwing things up sabotages the sales process. 

Accepting blame

It takes courage to accept blame because it’s human nature to blame somebody else. It takes courage to stop, pause, and hold a mirror to yourself and ask how you’re contributing to the challenges that you’re experiencing. It’s much easier to project outward and place the blame.  

Head trash commonly appears as the need for approval or the need to be liked. Sellers will show up to a sales call and, instead of focusing on guiding the prospect towards the right decision, they operate from an underlying need to be liked. This goes beyond having a bond and rapport. It’s more of wanting to be approved. A person with that need often sabotages calls just to be liked. 

They get nervous, they make concessions, and they apologize, which shifts the whole frame of conversation. Being liked becomes the more important outcome. 

Self-doubt 

Money block and old programming from a salesperson’s childhood also have a negative impact on sales calls. 

For example, a client raised to believe that she isn’t supposed to talk about money in the household where degree and certificates are the next big things had a huge block in her sales process. Since this particular client had no degree, she ended up questioning her ability and wouldn’t bring up the pricing until the last minute, or until the prospect asked for the price. This client had old head trash on the concept of pricing and money so that often the price in her head was different from the price that came out of her mouth. 

Even with constant reminders here and there, she just couldn’t do it. It just wouldn’t come out of her mouth the right way. 

This is what head trash is. You show up with a plan and all the right information, but your old pieces of programming, beliefs, and thoughts sabotage and compromise your ability to make a productive call. 

Figure your patterns 

The first thing to do is to figure your patterns. Knowing your patterns brings awareness to your calls. You must pinpoint where in the process you’re having your patterns of resistance and frustrations. 

Create a list of the areas where you keep repeating some patterns that you know do not serve you. It might be telling the same jokes, doing what you’re not supposed to do, or not talking about the money even though you have to. 

The buyer might think that you’re hiding something or you have some trick up your sleeves. Before you know it, you have already sabotaged your opportunity. The same is true if you keep talking to your client without giving him the time to speak. It scares the prospect off as well. 

Consider a salesperson who can’t even have an intro opportunity because she can’t stop talking. Her problem clearly exists at the beginning of the process. 

This is a perfect example of a pattern of people who can’t stop talking. They don’t listen because it has been ingrained in their minds that they should keep talking so that someone will buy from them. They feel the need to show off and prove their expertise in order to be respected. 

Changing patterns

After listing the patterns that you observe, ask yourself, “What would I have to believe to be true in order to keep acting this way?

What we believe determines how we act. 

If you believe that talking about money is wrong, then you’ll probably act in ways in accordance with that belief. A lot of these beliefs are in the back of our heads and most of us might not believe them to be true. But even if a tiny part of us holds true to that belief, then we’ll act according to those beliefs. 

What you get from asking that question for each pattern is a list of old pieces of head trash, programming, and beliefs that you’re still carrying around that are sabotaging your sales process. 

Set aside time to implement the two things mentioned here. First, identify the patterns and second, come up with a list of what you’d have to believe to be true. This will open your mind and make you see things that you didn’t realize are impacting your close rate and your success as a sales leader. 

“How Leaders Sabotage the Sale Process” episode resource

Learn more from Erin and visit her website mindfixgroup.com. Check the hour-long training video that explains how your head trash is impacting your actions and behaviors and causing you to sabotage things. There are also case studies and stories of real people who have overcome their challenges. 

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a tool for salespeople and sales leaders to help them improve their skills and abilities in finding the right customers, creating strategies that work, and asking the right questions to close powerful deals. You can go to The Sales Evangelist and see the first two modules for free. 

This episode is brought to you in part by Audible, the awesome library with thousands of books. Try it now to get a 30-day free trial and a free book. Goo to audibletrial.com/tse

If you find this episode helpful, give us a ravishing review and rating on Apple podcast. We are also on Google Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Sellers, Sales Coach, Donald C. Kelly

TSE 1162: How to Effectively Coach Struggling Sellers

Sellers, Sales Coach, Donald C. Kelly

Sales leaders must help their teams perform at peak levels, so they must start by understanding how to effectively coach struggling sellers

I’ve seen this kind of coaching done badly in the past, and I’ve walked my own team members through these struggles. I’ve developed tips of my own and I’ve learned from Mike Weinberg’s book Sales Management Simplified

Questions to ask

All sales reps and sales leaders endure dark moments where nothing seems to work out. Despite the fact that we’ve been selling for years, we endure periods where we simply can’t close. Very often, when that happens, there are several key things we must address.

These situations don’t develop overnight, and they usually result from slippage in certain areas. Begin by answering the following questions as honestly as you can. You’ll never find improvement if you’re dishonest about your situation. 

  • Does the struggling seller have a desire to succeed and thrive in sales? If he doesn’t have the drive to succeed, no amount of training or coaching will help.
  • Why is this particular seller on my sales team? Did you inherit this seller? Did you hire him?
  • How did the seller get into this situation? What signs did you see along the way? 
  • What has been done to fix the problem? What steps has the seller taken? What steps have you taken?

One-on-one meetings

If you aren’t already holding them, schedule one-on-one meetings with your sellers. I’m a big believer in this method because these leadership meetings offer opportunities to connect with our team members. 

One-on-one meetings with sellers provide time to fine-tune and fix micro-problems before they become huge cracks that jeopardize the stability of our organizations. #SalesCoaching

These can be monthly, or weekly, but quarterly isn’t frequent enough.  

As you work with a struggling rep, you can determine the things that stopped happening. Did he stop planning his prospecting? Is he failing to manage his time? Does he fail to establish a plan for his activities?

If you aren’t engaging in one-on-one coaching, you won’t know what’s happening with your team. When you recognize the problems, you can implement solutions and guide your team members to the right solutions. 

These meetings should be knee-to-knee, eye-to-eye if possible. 

Conducting one-on-one meetings communicates to your reps that you care about their success. When you take time out of your schedule to share suggestions and guidance with your team members, it’s meaningful to your team. 

If something is important to your sales reps, it must be important to you. One-on-one meetings help you determine what’s important to your team members. 

If the rep is really struggling, you can increase the frequency of your coaching sessions. 

Changing mindset

When I was a sales rep selling software, I changed my mindset so that I considered myself the entrepreneur over my territory. Mike Weinberg suggests that you do the same by establishing a business plan for your territory or area.

Whether you’re a BDR or an inside sales rep, begin by determining a goal for yourself. For struggling sales reps, help them to create their own goals and then to establish a plan to follow. Including them in the plan gives them accountability. 

Begin with small goals over the next three months of the quarter. Consider what your financial goal will be. Then determine exactly how they’ll accomplish that. Identify the existing customers that you’ll engage.

Establish a time frame in which your rep will accomplish that goal. Remember to include consequences. Ask your reps what a fair turnaround would be. Then ask your reps what should happen if they don’t meet their stated goals.  

Very often your reps will establish tougher consequences for themselves than you might have set. 

Desire to improve

When you have a sales rep with an obvious desire to improve, bend over backward for that person. Move mountains for her. If she is taking advantage of coaching and she establishes an awesome business plan, reward her efforts. Find other resources that will help her succeed.

Get her books or send her links to relevant podcasts. Meet with her when you can, and email her when you can’t meet. Check in through the day and throughout the week. 

When your sales reps thrive, your business will improve and your company will grow. 

It’s far cheaper to help your sales reps improve than to begin the hiring process over again because you need successful sellers. #SalesTraining

On the other hand, if your sellers don’t have a strong desire to succeed, and they won’t dedicate the effort to improve, then it may be time to remove them from your team. 

In my own case, I had sales leaders who believed in me and who recognized my drive to improve. They coached me through my struggles and helped me get where I am today. 

Re-evaluate

Once you’ve worked through the plan over the course of 30-90 days, if your rep still isn’t improving, you must identify why. If you’ve done the one-on-one coaching and you’ve helped her create a sales plan, you may have to put her on probation. It can be an informal program, but you must establish a marker that she will hit within that probation period. 

Usually by this point, if the rep truly wants to succeed, she’ll show signs of improvement. Eventually, she’ll have to work on her own and prove that she can hit milestones without other people’s assistance. Without that ability, she’ll eventually have to move on. 

The Sales Evangelist Certified Sales Training Program helps sellers improve by identifying problems and developing solutions to address them. Many individual sellers choose our program for themselves because it’s worth the cost of the training to increase their success rate. 

“Effectively Coach Struggling Sellers” episode resources

Grab a copy of Mike Weinberg’s book Sales Management Simplified

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. We want you guys to go out each and every single day to find more ideal customers and do big things.

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Stress, Fatigue, The Sales Evangelist, Dana Cavalea

TSE 1160: How To Deal With Stress, Fatigue, Burn Out & Lack of Creativity

Stress, Fatigue, The Sales Evangelist, Dana Cavalea

Sales is a year-round activity with no off-season and no breaks, so it’s important for sellers to understand how to deal with stress, fatigue, burnout, and a lack of creativity. 

Dana Cavalea is the former Director of Strength & Conditioning and Performance for the New York Yankees. Coach Dana, who helps companies optimize performance and productivity, wrote a book called Habits of a Champion: Nobody Becomes a Champion By Accident.  

He became a coach after realizing the tremendous difference that coaches made in his own athletic career, and how they helped him overcome bumps in the road. 

Opportunity knocks

Dana, who originally hails from New York, chose to attend school in Tampa because he knew it was near where the Yankees conducted their spring training. When he got the opportunity to join the team as the guy who handed out towels and cleaned the weight room, he jumped on it. 

Within a few years, he earned a paying job as the director of strength and conditioning and performance, and the team won a championship during that time. 

He discovered, through that experience, that many executives, CEOs, and sales teams wanted to know how athletes prepare to compete at the highest levels. How do they deal with injuries and fatigue and the obstacles they face during a season? How do they keep showing up every day in the face of fatigue and burnout?

Individual protocol

People assume that high-level musicians and athletes feel good every time they perform, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. They’re tired a lot, but they don’t tell themselves that. They understand that fatigue is part of life and that you’re going to have days where you don’t feel great. The goal, Dana said, is to have fewer of those days and more of the days where you do feel great. 

To do that, Dana coaches people to focus on a couple of simple things that affect performance.

  • Hydration
  • Sleep

These factors can inhibit the way you function overall. To address them, you must have an individual routine specific to your needs that helps you perform at your best every single day. 

Some players like music that pumps them up, and other players like music that calms them down. Each person must have a routine and protocol that is based around their needs. 

But how do you get there?

You get there by testing things. If you sleep for six hours but wake feeling tired, that may mean that you need more sleep, or that you need to understand your 90-minute sleep cycles better. We must perform each day and test different things like the food we eat to determine what makes us feel better. 

How do I feel?

Begin by asking yourself the question, “How do I feel?” Phrased that way, the question takes you out of yourself and gives you a moment in the midst of all that you have going on to consider how you feel. People listen to a million different podcasts and listen to two or three books at a time, and we’re so busy that we don’t take time to think about how we’re feeling. 

We’re working to create a self-awareness that is super important in determining the strategies that will help you overcome your struggles. 

Sometimes we underestimate the impact of stress on our bodies. Sports are very competitive, as is business. Sales is extremely competitive. You must prepare and train to compete. 

The key is to keep your energy up by hydrating, sleeping, fueling, and training. Then, fill your mind with good stuff to crowd out the doubt and fear. 

Sports have a defined starting and ending point, but sales continues all year, quarter after quarter. There’s no break because each year leads into another. 

Expectations

If we do well this year, what will the people around us expect from us moving forward? They’ll expect us to do better. So now we’re constantly trying to push our threshold. Although what we did last year was good, it’s not good enough for this year. Expectations shift.

Some people, though, get comfortable playing things safe, and doing “just enough.” They don’t want to do more than they’re already doing because they know it will simply shift the expectation higher. 

People fear success almost as much as they fear failure. Sometimes, they sabotage themselves in order to avoid the pressure of accomplishment. 

Leaders can help their sales teams overcome these struggles by being honest. If a salesperson has hit his numbers for the month and he has a pending deal that he could close this month but he’s holding it for the next month, his leader must remove the need for the seller to impress him.

Creating clarity

Dana heard an interview with Mariano Rivera in which Rivera said his career changed when Yankees manager Joe Torre called him into the office and explained that Mo would always be his guy. As long as Torre was with the Yankees, he wanted Mo by his side. That freed Mo to relax and do what he was best at. He was freed from the need to prove himself. 

If you can reduce the need to prove yourself because you’ve validated yourself, you’re in a great position. When a manager does that for his team, it’s like glue for the team. 

Dana puts his clients on a morning walk routine that includes a 30-minute walk with no technology. It forces them to be by themselves without the defense of jumping into the phone. Without distractions, they can think about the things they actually want. They get the clarity of evaluating their current situation and their own performance. They have time to ask themselves questions about how things are going. 

Taking ownership

You may find that you have a leader or manager who isn’t leading in the way you need her to. In that case, it’s up to you to tell her what you’re struggling with, where you need help, and how she can support you. You can also ask for clarity around the work you’re doing. 

When you have the conviction to seek clarity without fearing the conversation, you’ll invite more clarity. 

Dana often encounters people who exude confidence. He calls it their birthright because it’s so natural to them. They know exactly what must be done in order to succeed. In most cases, though, your team will include really intelligent people who simply haven’t experienced enough success in order to feel confident. Coaches can navigate their sellers to achieve small, frequent wins that stack up and build confidence. 

Sellers can acquire confidence even if they don’t naturally have it.

On the other hand, Dana sometimes encounters finance people who allow the market shifts and trends to impact how they feel about themselves. He reminds them that the market will do what it will do, so these people must avoid being reactive to the external environment. 

Striking out doesn’t make you a loser, and losing doesn’t make you a loser. 

Dana got this advice some time back: People can either love it or shove it. Not everyone is meant to work with you and you’re not meant to work with everyone. That’s just the way it is. 

Starting point

Nobody leaves the gym feeling worse than when they got there. They leave feeling glad that they went. Training is your starting point. 

Not all sales are equal. Don’t compromise yourself in the process of making a sale. Some sales aren’t the right ones and they’ll be a death sentence for your company. 

Sales is a hustle and a grind, so you must approach every day with a vision of what you’re trying to create. We’re quick to judge ourselves against other people. 

Sales is a relationship game. If people know, like, and trust you, they’ll open up to you. If they don’t, they’ll be closed to you. Relationships take time and they aren’t one-sided. 

Burnout and stress are perspective-based. Stress is the result of pressures you put on yourself, and stress over time leads to burnout. 

If you try to be perfect, you’ll ultimately fail. Hit singles. Don’t try to hit home runs. If you hit a single every day, you’ll get a run on the board and another man on base. 

Create a healthy process for yourself and then execute every day. 

“How to Deal With Stress, Fatigue, Burnout” episode resources

Connect with Coach Dana at danacavalea.com or access his YouTube channel for more content. Grab a copy of his book, Habits of a Champion: Nobody Becomes a Champion By Accident.

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. We want you guys to go out each and every single day to find more ideal customers and do big things.

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Sales From The Street, Donald C. Kelly, Top Seller, Contracts

TSE 1159: Sales From The Street – “The Unicorn Seller”

Jen is the unicorn seller and everyone is enchanted by her rainbow-colored sales skills. She has lots of techniques and strategies which help her close deals. You want Jen, but she’s from the competing company and just in time, you heard that Jen wants to jump ship. This is your dream come true! 

You think of Jen and you automatically think of all the clients she’s bringing along. It’s a whole list of clients and deals closed left and right. Your company will be making money and you’re going to hire more people due to expansion. Jen is the answer! 

As a top-performing sales rep, I was once Jen, too. I’ve had my fair share of being lured by other companies. I know how it feels to be offered something and to be on the receiving end of the decision whether to hire the top-performing sales rep or not. 

Before making that decision, here are some things that you need to consider.  

Why are they leaving?

We make decisions out of desperation sometimes, especially if money is included in the picture. When your sales aren’t doing too well and you need the pipeline, you want people who can bring the money in. Even if you’re snagging them from the competitor. 

You present them with a good 401k plan, you say all the nice things to convince them to jump to your company, and you tell them how fantastic your company’s culture is. 

You need to assess the situation seriously before making a hiring decision. These are some of the questions that you can ask yourself: 

  • Why are they leaving the company?
  • Are they a problem in disguise? Are you willing to take that risk?
  • Why would they come to your company when they’re already making tons of money in their current company?

The answers to these questions will help you understand their reasons and see if they’re a fit for your company’s values. 

What did they do for the competitor?

In Mark Weinberg’s book, The Sales Management Simplified, he pointed out the need for sales leaders to consider what the salesperson did for the previous company. You need to consider whether they sold at their last company. 

It is important to know the system of how their previous company worked. Find out whether they were tasked to find their opportunities or the opportunities were given to them. You need to be specific about the things they do well. 

What if the person you hire hates prospecting? After three months of work, you see no progress because that salesperson never had to prospect before and now she is having a difficult time. This situation is like putting together a jigsaw puzzle that doesn’t fit. It will never work.

Be upfront 

Many sales leaders and managers are lured into this kind of situation because they focus on the number of opportunities they will generate or the business they can get from their competitors once they’ve hired the top-earning sales rep. 

But this isn’t always the case. You must remember that contracts are of two kinds: the long-term and short-term contracts. Jen, the unicorn seller, might be able to sweet-talk some of her clients into coming with her to the new company, but clients with long-term contracts will be staying in the previous company until their contract ends. When it does, you’ll need to coax them into coming to sign with your company. It’s a long process and it takes patience. 

If that’s the case, you need to be upfront and figure out how much business Jen can bring over. Ask her how much business she is bringing along. 

Talk about the numbers and figure out how you can convince the clients to jump from their current company to yours. Think of the agreement structure and find the solution. Figure out if there’s a non-compete.

All of these things must be considered before you bring Jen along. 

Take Tom, for example. I worked with Tom before and wherever he went, his clients tagged along with him. But that isn’t always the case for some clients who are in long-term agreements. People love Tom and he would often bring a couple of businesses with him to the current company. He is a great salesperson, but even at his best, he still can’t bring all of his clients along with him. 

Culture 

The fourth thing to consider is the culture of the company. Will the salesperson fit with the culture of your company? Will your sales team like the new person you’re bringing along? Is there bad blood between them in the past, perhaps like client stealing? It is challenging to fit in and adjust to the ways your company works right away. 

The new salesperson you’re hiring must be willing to follow the culture.

Have the adult talk and orient the salesperson to the ways of your company and how things work. Give her some time to adjust and if it still doesn’t work, then be ready to cut losses and move on. 

Do not toss money on something that doesn’t work. 

Contingency plan

Have a contingency plan laid out in the event that Jen, or whoever you are hiring, doesn’t work out. You can think of some other way of increasing your sales by bringing somebody else. Maybe instead of the top seller, you hire the most experienced one. 

A person with experience may not bring tons of businesses along but they come with an understanding of how to operate the business successfully. Perhaps you can hire someone who may not be Jen but who fits right in the culture of your company with proper coaching. 

Interview properly 

The last tip is to interview the prospects before hiring them. Grill them to make sure that they can do a great job. Do not cut corners and skip over the interview process. You must listen to the team and to the other executives before making the big decision. 

Going back to Jen, even if you really want to hire her, try to disqualify her just as much as you want her. If you see her desire to work for you, that’s when you know that she’s a perfect fit. That’s when you know that you found your unicorn. 

In my experience, the unicorn rarely exists. If it does, consider the tips I mentioned above. 

“The Unicorn Seller” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by Sales Success Summit. 

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

The episode is also brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a helpful tool for sales leaders and sales reps to find the right customers, ask the right questions, and close powerful deals. The program has twelve courses with two courses for free! 

Visit Audible as well and explore this huge online library with thousands of books. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

August is my birth month and it would be amazing if you share this podcast to your friends as a birthday gift! Drop us your comments and reviews on Apple podcast. We are also on Google Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald C Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Sales Leader

TSE 1155: When Should I Promote Someone?

Donald C Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Sales LeaderYour company continues to grow and you need leaders to guide your team, so you’re considering the question, “When should I promote someone?

Because of your company’s growth, you need leaders and you need managers. So who should you promote? What do you look for in the people who will lead your teams? What characteristics or habits should they possess? 

Developing leaders

Even if your business isn’t growing at breakneck speed, you may need to focus on developing people who can lead when the time comes. The last thing you want to do is keep people in the same position for long periods of time without any opportunity for growth. They’ll get tired and burn out, and then they’ll look elsewhere for growth opportunities. Make sure you’re always looking for ways to create and develop leaders internally. 

The qualities necessary for leaders in your industry may differ from those of other segments, but for sellers in general, the following guidelines offer a good start for identifying potential leaders. 

Seller doesn’t equal leader

Your employee might be a spectacular seller, but that doesn’t necessarily translate to leadership. Furthermore, if you have a particularly gifted seller on your team, you may not want to remove him from that sales role. 

It’s tempting to believe that your best closer can become a sales leader and train all your other sellers to close as effectively as he does. And it might be true that he can. But it might also be true that he loves selling and he doesn’t want to spend his time conducting one-on-ones or creating reports. 

If your team members aren’t interested in leading, don’t force them. Let your sellers do what they do best for your company.

Look for these traits as you ponder when to promote someone.

1. Sellers who want to lead

When you begin your search, look for sellers who actually want to lead. If one of your team members talks frequently about leading or climbing the corporate ladder, consider giving him the opportunity to do it. If he is ambitious and goal-oriented, he might be just the leader you’re looking for. 

I recently met with a BDR that a client of mine hired, and the guy was passionate about his work. He strives to go above and beyond the call of duty, and he wants to work his way into a leadership role. He wants to contribute to the organization, but he isn’t power-hungry. He understands that great leaders don’t threaten the people above them because they aren’t competing to take their jobs. 

Prepare your replacements as you consider other opportunities you’ll compete for. 

2. Sellers with a proven track record

Desire isn’t enough to be a successful seller. You must also have good results behind your name. 

You’ll note that I said above that you should not necessarily remove your top seller to turn him into a sales leader. The exception is when that seller is the best candidate for the job and when she wants to do the job. 

Recognize, too, that a top performer won’t necessarily be the only team member with amazing results. Consider the top five sellers on your team and then decide whether any of them possess leadership potential. 

Consider whether they have any desire to train other sellers, and take note of a “lone wolf” mentality that suggests they don’t want to share with others. Make it your goal to develop a nurturing leadership approach in which team members help one another. 

3. Sellers who don’t volunteer to lead

Keep in mind that some sellers may not volunteer to lead, but that shouldn’t necessarily exclude them from consideration. If they have the framework, the talents, and the characteristics of a great leader, challenge them to step out of their comfort zone. 

In the book Sales Management. Simplified, Mike Weinberg recalls a CEO who believed it was his responsibility to stretch people like a rubber band: to the edge of their capabilities without breaking them. 

They may not recognize their own capabilities, but your job is to help them see what they are capable of. 

4. Sellers who are problem-solvers

Too often, sellers fall into the trap of complaining about their work situations. Instead of looking for ways to improve things, they look for mistakes. That negative outlook shows in their results.

Look for sellers who are problem-solvers as you seek people to promote. Typically, they’ll be your best sellers because they make it a practice to solve problems for customers. If you find a seller like this among your team members and promote him, he’ll set an example of problem-solving for the rest of the team. 

You’ll have less to worry about because they’ll solve the problems before they get to you. Surround yourself with leaders who can think for you and take care of things so you can focus on other issues. 

5. Sellers who are willing to work

Your leaders must be willing to work hard. This doesn’t mean that they work 18-hour days, because it’s very possible to do great work in less time. Instead, you want leaders who can plan and accomplish things. 

Watch for the people on your team who show up for work early or who listen to podcasts to learn more. Be aware of the people on your team who dedicate time and effort to develop themselves. 

This isn’t about developing a culture of staying late every day, but rather a willingness to do whatever it takes to get the job done. For me, I’m a family guy, and Mondays and Fridays are my family days during the week. If I need to stay late, I’ll make it happen around those commitments. 

6. Sellers who are developing themselves

As a bonus, look for people on your team who are investing in themselves. Find those people who are reading books or seeking events to further their training or signing up for webinars that will help them improve their skill set. 

If your team members are seeking to improve without you telling them to, you’re well on your way to finding an amazing leader. 

Help your team members get to the next level and transition into roles that challenge them. 

When Should I Promote Someone? episode resources

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. We want you guys to go out each and every single day to find more ideal customers and do big things.

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Sales Leader, Revenue, Activities

TSE 1152: Managing Tasks as a Leader

.

Sales Leader, Revenue, ActivitiesManaging tasks as a leader is difficult because all the tasks are urgent and you have the internal battle of deciding which tasks need your attention. 

You might have a meeting with recruiters about the hiring, or you’ve got to do an interview with some sales reps, or you’ve got to create a report for the VP, and other equally important stuff. The list could go on and on and in the end, you aren’t able to get anything done to bring in more revenue. 

The challenge 

As team leaders, the best thing we can give to the sales rep is our care and utmost concern. Unfortunately, though, things don’t go the way we plan due to minute tasks that bog us down. Team leaders are faced with the challenge of managing their time to do the things that will impact the entire team in a good way. 

The grumpy sales manager syndrome 

The grumpy sales manager syndrome is nothing new and you might have experienced an episode of it once or twice. You are the leader so it’s natural to be bombarded with so many things to do: 

  • make reports 
  • attend meetings with sales reps 
  • meet with recruiters
  • meet with marketing folks

You are swamped with many different tasks and it’s overwhelming you.

Mike Weinberg mentioned this in his book Sales Management Simplified where he discussed all the different sales management myths and challenges. He then explained it in a way that’s both understandable and relatable. In the book, he said that this problem stems from the executive

level. 

Company owners or VPs are usually the reason sales managers have a tough time in juggling all their duties and this has nothing to do with the reports they are asking for. Rather, it has to do with the culture that is set within an organization. Executives, for example, aren’t focused on sales and so they don’t do everything in their power to cater to the sales effort. 

First line of defense

All the departments in a company or organization are important for the entire operation to work successfully. The marketing team, the development team, and all the other departments you can name are imperative for the organization to thrive. But all these other departments won’t be getting any money unless the sales team brings in more revenue. 

Sellers are the ones out there who are battling it out against the others. That is a huge amount of weight for the sales team because if it can’t happen, the company may fire the sales leaders for the lack of good results. 

Salespeople are foundations of a successful company and failing to recognize that is a problem.  We need a culture that is built around salespeople. 

Rate the tasks accordingly

Sales managers don’t necessarily have a defined role and instead, they have interconnecting roles within the organization.  For example, if you are helping the team generate revenue, then all your tasks must be related to that. But that’s not always the case. 

To define your goal, try to list the things that you do on a day-to-day basis and rate these activities from 1 to 5. (1 if the task isn’t helping you in fulfilling your goal, 5 if the activity is directly related to accomplishing your goals).  For instance, a one-to-one meeting with your sales rep to help the CS team increase its revenue is a full 5 rating. The meeting is an opportunity for you to give pipeline reviews with the sales rep to help him close more deals.  

Going on key account calls and weekly sales meetings are income-generating tasks and are closely tied to your goals. 

Housekeeping

On the other spectrum, you can have others complete tasks such as cleaning your inbox, creating spreadsheets to track sales and metrics, and attending meetings not related to your role. Or, if you prefer, do these tasks in your downtime. If you want to clean your inbox, then do it in your downtime. If you want a spreadsheet, then use CRM. And, if you want to attend the meetings unrelated to your task, you can jump in for a few minutes to check how it’s going instead of sitting down the whole two hours. 

Assess the tasks and if it’s possible to get an assistant to help you, then hire one. There are several platforms like Upwork where you can find somebody who can do something for you on a project basis.  Rating your tasks will make your work more efficient and will give you time for the more important things. 

Focus on the important ones

Ask yourself a series of questions before proceeding to every task. 

  • Am I needed at the meeting? 
  • Will it run effectively if I am not there? 
  • Will this task help my goal in increasing revenue? 
  • Rate the tasks and pick the ones that are most important by focusing on threes, fours, and fives. 

Fives are the obvious things that must happen. Set down the time for your meetings: time for the one-on-one, time for talking to your sellers, and all the other activities that are immediate. You might want to do the interviewing for new hires on a weekly basis or you might want to review resumes on a monthly basis. 

You must decide the schedules for the different activities and follow through. 

In this way, you can focus on the things that you need to and not be around for things that you don’t need to be a part of. You can also set a time to motivate your team and raise their morale by going to weekly or monthly lunch. 

Time is important 

Time is important and your sales reps need your time in closing deals and making sure that they’re overcoming challenges and working effectively. 

You are the coach and the sales reps are the players, and the only way for the team to work out is if both the coach and the players work hand-in-hand. If you are bogged down, hiding behind paperwork, and locked up in an office without a chance to connect with your reps, then you are never going to reach your goals. 

Applying this to The Sales Evangelist team helped me set the right culture as a leader of an organization. 

Money comes through the door when you are focused only on the things that you need to do.

“Managing Tasks as a Leader” episode resources 

Sales managers and leaders have different strategies in managing their tasks. If you have a story, don’t hesitate to drop me a message or tag me on LinkedIn, Donald C. Kelly. 

Check out Mike Weinberg’s book, Sales Management Simplified

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program which aims to help sales reps and sales team improve their skills in finding the right customers and knowing the strategies and activities that work. The program also teaches you the right questions to ask in order to build strong values and close huge deals. Go to thesalesevangelists.com/freecourse to get the first two episodes for free.

Audible is also a great avenue for sales learning. It has thousands of books that you can read

and audiobooks to listen that can help you to grow as a savvy salesperson. 

Give it a go to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. Just type in audibletrial.com/tse. If you enjoyed this episode and learned from it, please do give us a review 5-star rating on Apple podcast. You can also share this podcast with your friends and colleagues who are using other platforms such as Google Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Leadership, Accountability, Trust, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1151: Respected Leadership Traits

Leadership, Accountability, Trust, The Sales EvangelistEvery person in every industry can improve a little bit every day by focusing on self-improvement and developing respected leadership traits. Whether you’re a seller, a sales leader, or someone who isn’t even involved in sales, you’ll likely find yourself responsible for guiding people and helping them succeed. 

Luis Weger works with a startup focused on changing the medical construction industry and serves as an offer in the Army Reserves. He recently launched a company called “Self: Reinvented” designed to help others discover their purpose and passion and enhance their resiliency.

He believes that anyone can develop their leadership skills, even those who seem to be natural-born leaders. 

2 ACT

He developed a phrase to help people remember the important aspects of leadership. Leaders must remember 2 ACT. Each letter in the acronym represents two concepts. 

A = Aware and Accountable

C = Competent and Confident

T = Trusting and Trustworthy. 

From his experience leading people, training people, and working with clients, leaders must have these six attributes in order to lead well. It’s especially true in the sales profession. 

Aware and Accountable

Every military leader learns situational awareness because it’s vital in foreign countries. You cannot operate in enemy territory without knowing what’s going on around you. 

In business, this refers to knowing what’s going on around you. It also refers to emotional awareness. 

  • Are you in tune with the people around you? 
  • Do you know what’s happening within the company you represent?
  • Do you understand what your client needs? 
  • Are you tracking changes in the industry you’re in?

Industries change constantly, from rules and regulations to policies and procedures. You must stay aware of the changes that are taking place. 

Leaders who live under a rock won’t be leaders very long. You cannot ignore the realities in which you operate because if no one’s following you, you aren’t truly a leader. 

Luis was recently invited to change military units, and he discovered just prior to the transition that there was only one other officer in the unit. That meant that he and the commander were responsible for all 50 soldiers. No one told him that ahead of time, but because he was aware, he picked up on the situation and made an informed decision.

Accountability is also vitally important in the sales industry. 

Being a sales leader means taking accountability for the performance of your team. Don’t pass the blame. Share the credit wherever you can and take ownership of mistakes. 

Leaders guide and protect their team members. They sit down behind-the-scenes with their team members and acknowledge the things that went wrong. Then they help them correct those problems. 

Competence and Confidence

Luis points to the book The Speed of Trust by Stephen M.R. Covey as one of his favorites. When you’re in the sales profession, your clients look to you as an expert. You represent the perfect solution to your client’s problem.

If you have ever sat across the table from a person who doesn’t truly understand the industry he is selling in, you recognize the importance of competence. No one expects you to be an expert in everything. In fact, companies recruit fresh blood all the time. It’s one thing to bring a new perspective in the form of someone who is learning and quite another thing to recruit someone who is incompetent. 

In the military, lieutenants who come right out of college outrank noncommissioned officers who have been in the military for 20 years. They don’t really know much about the military because they are fresh out of school. How do you lead people who have 20 years more experience than you do? 

You don’t have the same knowledge and skills they do, so how do you reflect competence? You reflect a desire to become competent. Like CEOs, you don’t have to be the smartest person in the room; you simply surround yourself with smart people. 

Build a network. Demonstrate humility. Show people around you that you aren’t the greatest but that you’re seeking help to get better. 

Then demonstrate that you’re comfortable leading. Luis knows leaders who are in charge by title but they don’t want to be there. Confidence doesn’t mean feeling 100 percent all the time. It simply demands that you have the right frame of mind. 

So what

Luis developed a technique he calls “so what?” 

  • “So what if I mess up on my speech?”
  • “So what if I say something unplanned on The Sales Evangelist?”
  • “So what if I don’t close this sale today?” 
  • “So what if someone sees me make a mistake today?”

The point isn’t to minimize consequences. We’re reminding ourselves that it’s ok to be human and to be imperfect. When you get beyond the discomfort that comes from the fear of failure, that’s true confidence. It’s about managing fear and putting fear in its proper perspective. People will be more attracted to you because they’ll see you as a real person. 

Trusting and Trustworthy

Luis recalls hearing a CEO talk about the need to be trusting and trustworthy. You must trust in the skills and training of those who lead as well as those you are leading. If you try to micromanage everyone around you, you’ll burn out. 

Ask yourself whether those people have developed the skills, knowledge, and training to allow you to trust them. You don’t have to trust them right out of the gate because you don’t know what they’re bringing to the table. So what do you have to do to get to the point where you can trust them? Invest in them. Make sure they are trained, led, and managed in a healthy way. If you find that you can’t trust them, ask yourself why. What is it about that person that makes it difficult to trust him? 

Fix the issue if you can. If you can’t, you may have to consider how to move forward.

Perhaps more importantly, be trustworthy. Be a man or woman of your word. Even the smallest failures to do what you said you’d do cause your trustworthiness to be depleted. 

Lack of trust undermines any other attribute you bring to the table. 

Who’s following

If no one is following you as a leader, consider whether you’re truly leading. You may hold the title of leader, but are people willing to follow you into battle. 

As a sales professional, you’re a mentor and trainer and you have capabilities and competencies, but are people willing to follow your advice? Will they do what you ask? 

Be humble and be human. Move beyond the perfect image. Everyone brings something to the table, and you can learn from everyone around you. 

“Respected Leadership Traits” episode resources

You can connect with Luis at selfreinvented.com. He enjoys helping people succeed and sharing his own leadership experiences. 

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program or free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. 

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

The Sales Evangelist, Leadership

TSE 1150: How To Show Your Team You Care!

The Sales Evangelist, LeadershipSome sales teams complain about everything from marketing to CRM and comps, but if you develop the ability to show your team you care, you’ll overcome the negativity and establish a great work environment.

I’ve worked as a sales rep, as a sales leader, and as a consultant, so I understand that complaints are a normal part of the sales process. In some organizations, though, the sellers don’t complain as much because they believe their managers care about them.  

Imperfect selling scenario

It’s tempting to believe that sellers who don’t complain work in better environments. Even if they don’t get great leads, and if they don’t have the best CRM, or if their facility looks outdated, some sales reps enjoy what they do and they enjoy the people they do it with. Because the management cares about their welfare, the sellers are able to enjoy their work.

Although your CRM and your environment are important, culture plays a vital role in helping sellers thrive. In a subpar culture, typically the focus remains on numbers alone. 

Sales leaders

During the month of August, we’ll focus on sales leadership and the principles that will help sales leaders succeed so their teams can succeed. Of all the things you could possibly do to encourage your team, investing time in them ranks the highest. 

Just like a relationship with your husband or wife, the relationship probably won’t survive unless you spend time together. Nice gifts and other symbols of affection won’t overcome a lack of time together. The same is true for your kids.

Don’t base your relationships with your sellers on shiny new CRM or an awesome facility. Instead, demonstrate that you care about their success by dedicating time to help them improve their performance.  

One-on-one

Prioritize one-on-one meetings with your sales reps. Although sales leaders get bogged down by countless things that demand their time, you must invest time in the things that truly matter. Log it on your calendar so it won’t get pushed aside. 

In my own sales journey, when my own leaders prioritized one-on-one time, they were able to help me overcome challenges that were hindering my success. It also made my sales leaders seem human and it helped me see them as something other than a boss. I see her as a trusted friend and someone I can respect. Leaders who jump into the trenches with you have the authority to guide you. 

When my sales leader stopped investing in one-on-one time with me, my sales performance declined, not because I wasn’t doing my part, but because I was able to draw motivation from her experience and example. 

Share priorities

Be aware of your team members’ priorities and make sure that the things that matter to them matter to you, too. If my sales rep is engaged to be married, I need to be aware of her priority. I can support her priorities by making sure that she’s earning enough money to pay for an amazing wedding. I must make sure that, during our one-on-ones, I’m helping her figure out how to accomplish her goals. 

Better yet, if I know of someone who owns a wedding venue, I can consider connecting the two of them. As a leader, I can provide guidance and resources to help her achieve her goals. 

If my leader is willing to prioritize the things I value, I’ll do the same in return: whatever is important to her will become important to me. Whatever she needs me to do in order to be successful, I’ll be willing to do it. 

This kind of relationship isn’t intended to be manipulative or controlling. Instead, it’s a natural by-product of the leader’s care for the seller.

Go on-site

Once a month, or on a recurring basis, free your schedule to do site visits with your reps. Don’t go with the intention of taking over the meeting. Evaluate her progress and ask her afterward what she did well and what she might have done better. Help her improve as a seller. Demonstrate to your sellers that you value them enough to share your time. 

Give them room to make mistakes and room to grow. 

In Jamaica, families frequently send their 10-year-olds to the grocery store to shop for the family. That doesn’t happen often in this country. The opportunity helps children learn from their mistakes and gain valuable experience.

Give room for failure

Don’t jump down their throats when they make a mistake in the midst of a deal or when an opportunity flops. Guide them. Let them know you care. Talk to them and coach them. Then give them an opportunity to try again. 

Acknowledge improvement and give your team members room to lead and coach others when they find success. Show them how to become trusted individuals. 

“Show Your Team You Care” episode resources

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester. You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561) 578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

As a savvy seller, you’ll want to continue learning, and you can take advantage of a free 30-day trial, complete with a free audiobook, on Audible. They have thousands of books to choose from and you can begin your free trial today. 

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. When you share your experiences with the show, others will read the reviews and give us a listen.

I truly appreciate you and appreciate your reviews and your subscription, and your willingness to tell your friends and anyone you know that’s in sales about the podcast.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

sales team, sales leader, quota

TSE 1148: How to Build a Championship Sales Team

sales team, quota, sales leader

Whether you’re a brand new sales rep, a sales leader, or an experienced seller, the key to success relies on your ability to build a championship sales team. 

Will Richter drives revenue for medical device companies by increasing their sales volumes, reducing their operational inefficiencies and crushing their competition. He has the unique ability to find the blind spots in any company’s sales process and can turn around a growth plan of action and a winning team in less time bringing bottom-line results faster.

Deep assessment

Will points to leadership and culture as the keys to building a championship sales team. Whether you’re a business owner, a CEO, or middle management, the culture gets dictated by the leadership. They set the tone for the culture and they define the expectations for everyone on the sales force. Those leaders also determine what will not be tolerated. 

Once teams accept mediocrity, it becomes the norm. 

When you’re a sales leader, you’ll either inherit a team or you may get the opportunity to take some educated risks and build a team. You must do a deep assessment of the team’s skills, its motivations, its past successes, and get to know the team members. Find out what makes them tick. 

You cannot manage every member of your sales team the same way because they may have different motivators. If you don’t discover their motivators, you’ll struggle to create a championship kind of environment. 

People and culture

People are the fabric of any great culture. If you’re at the top, you’ve got to reassess your talent base, and you’re probably going to have to let some of that go. Think about the culture you want to create. Then, seek out people who have the experience and the knowledge you want. If your sellers are strong and they have similar values, they’ll outlast someone who simply looks good on paper. 

The average sales rep lasts about 18 months in any company. So if you bring a new seller on board, imagine the cost of onboarding plus the cost of training and the ramp-up time it takes for him to start earning money. Your company won’t likely make anything if he only stays for 18 months.  

Wrong person

The worst part of the sales leader job results from having to let team members know that they aren’t a good fit for the team. In fact, the higher up you go, the more these people have on the line. They have families and wives and big mortgages and a lot to lose. Will reports feeling a lot of empathy for these folks. 

At the same time, do not accept exceptions or excuses. Expect your team to have the same “win all the time” attitude that you have.

Will was hired to turn a sales team around in which only about half of the team members were strong. One gentleman who had been with the company for six years absolutely killed it his first year, but then he rested on his laurels. The company couldn’t fire him because people had tried in the past and it had become a political issue. 

Will had to work closely with the guy, giving him a lot of feedback and working to coach him up. But Will’s says that people are either coachable or they aren’t. If you aren’t coachable, you’re cutting yourself off from professional development. This guy didn’t want to be coached, so Will put him on a 30-day plan. The guy got in his face and screamed at him and eventually, they were able to ask him to go.

Difficult conversations

Will likes to build relationships by getting to know his sellers as people. He asks about their families and their hometowns, and what makes them tick. Then he recommends being an open book yourself. Be transparent and real about your shortcomings. 

As you coach your team members, speak factually. Leave the emotion and personal information out of the conversation. Stick to facts and data. 

Highlight the fact that she has a quota, she has a territory, and she has a quantifiable history. Now, she has a certain amount of time to accomplish this other thing in order to avoid moving to a new set of consequences. Document everything. Factual information feels less personal and it’s easier to digest.   

Background information

Create a profile for the kind of players you’d like to hire. How many do you need? What type of background do you want? Should they have a certain amount of experience? What kind of values are you seeking? 

Whatever your criteria might be, create a profile and then create a world-class recruiting strategy and a strong hiring process. 

Many companies place an ad on Indeed any time they need to hire a new seller. They sort through resumes, pick three, interview two, and hire one. It’s called reactive recruiting.

On the other hand, when you’re proactively sourcing candidates, begin by hiring a recruiter. Tell him exactly what you’re looking for and ask him to leverage his database to find candidates who meet your criteria. Have him call the candidates that meet your criteria and then screen them. Ensure that they are the top of the top before you ever sit down with them. 

Hiring process

Determine what you want your hiring process to look like. 

  • How many interviews should their be?
  • Who should they meet with? 
  • What kinds of questions should we be asking? 

Once you’ve matched the values, make sure you don’t hire reps with massive egos. Implement these strategies, then onboard them properly and train them thoroughly. That’s the foundation of a championship sales team. 

Once you’ve established your value system, you’ve put the right leadership in place, you’ve created the right culture, you’ve developed a good recruiting strategy, you’ve created your profiles, and you’ve built an excellent training program, then you must train your team on your product, as well as training them on superior sales skills for your market in your industry.

Your ultimate goal is to create a proactive sales management program that sets realistic but strong goals that hold the reps accountable. Recognize that your success is directly tied to your sellers’ success. 

Military tactics

Will calls himself a big fan of military and their tactics. He finds that leading from the front demands leaders who are willing to be in the field. If all they do is sit in the office, they won’t know what the team is doing. 

Sellers respect managers who get into the fight with them. After your presentations, talk with the seller about the call and the things that were great about it. Then address things that could have been done better. 

We all feel good when we accomplish things. It makes us confident. Understand, though, that there’s a big difference between being busy and being productive. 

Be mindful of managing the team’s time as well. What activities are they engaging in? Where are they going? Who are they calling? Are they making the best use of their time?

Young sellers often think they can cut corners. Approach-based management allows well-trained, talented sellers who engage in high activity levels to reach their goals. If they do the right things at the right times and the right places, they won’t struggle. 

Shared culture

You want to be in a culture with people who share your same values. Hire the people that you can trust and respect, and who are competent and honest and hard-working. 

We’ve all taken jobs where we didn’t know what to expect until we started working. Do a great job of smoking out the company’s values and culture. 

If you can’t click with the existing employees, your time there will be short-lived. 

“Build a Championship Sales Team” episode resources

You can connect with Will on LinkedIn. He’s happy to help sellers who are working to build a championship sales team. 

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester. You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561) 578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

As a savvy seller, you’ll want to continue learning, and you can take advantage of a free 30-day trial, complete with a free audiobook, on Audible. They have thousands of books to choose from and you can begin your free trial today. 

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. When you share your experiences with the show, others will read the reviews and give us a listen.

I truly appreciate you and appreciate your reviews and your subscription, and your willingness to tell your friends and anyone you know that’s in sales about the podcast.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Justin Dauer, Empathy, Accountability, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1143: Building a Culture of Empathy and Accountability

Justin Dauer, Empathy, Accountability, The Sales EvangelistEvery organization needs a culture of empathy and accountability no matter what it’s doing. Sometimes, we only have empathy and neglect accountability but it’s important to have both. Justin Dauer is with us in this episode to explain to us how to get both and give recommendations on the right way to do it. 

Justin is the VP of the Human Center Design at BSwift, a healthcare and benefits management firm owned by CVS Health.  He is also a writer and a public speaker when he isn’t in his 9-5 job, and he enjoys talking about humility, empathy, and accountability. 

Discovering agency culture 

Justin’s entire career revolves around agencies primarily in the creative direction. In his 10 years being in the business, he observed that agency culture tends to burn people out.

In some cultures, the driving factor is perceived by who went out the door last, regardless of the reasons why others left earlier. Maybe they went to pick up their kids from school or went to a doctor’s appointment. Meanwhile, whatever their reasons are, someone else in the firm is tapping a wristwatch noting the fact that they left early.

This buildup of passive-aggressive situations in the agency space resonates to many because they have experienced it too. 

He got a tremendous amount of feedback so he knew it was an important topic, which prompted him to write a book about it. 

Burnout

Burnout has a domino effect that is detrimental to an organization or an agency, partly because agency space is often about making money. Most times, a name on a spreadsheet doesn’t equate to an individual. The name has to do the work and that’s all there is. 

Justin shared the same experience before he was in a senior position. He’d come to the office and face a stack of papers, printouts, and a load of work with red lines on them. His value for the day depended on the quantity of work he could do for the day, without regard for quality in the process. 

There is no room to pause in some agencies, so employees can’t do anything not work-related, even in their free time. They fear that if their supervisor walks by and sees them, he’ll ask why they aren’t working. Employees are constantly on the edge, which isn’t healthy and wears them down. But as human beings, we all need to pause and calibrate. 

Another example of burnout is the cost of hiring people over and over again, which takes a toll on the organization’s morale. 

Addressing the issue 

Solving this takes action, not lip service. It’s good to start by demonstrating respect and humility. Humility is baked into both empathy and accountability. Humility is when a leader admits a mistake and follows up with an action plan. 

Dialog is a two-way street, which means less oration and delegation but more of a collaboration. Once a mistake has been made, admit it. This is what accountability is about. 

People who work in high-stress environments have little pockets of culture. They might gather in a kitchen and talk about something related to their craft. Saturating the culture from the top communicates that when they make a mistake, there’s a culture of support where people will rally around them and help them improve.  

Leaders must set the tone

Leaders have to set the tone. They should be the first to trust that their employees have done their job before they leave work for personal errands. Consider, too, that some may be single parents taking half the day off to pick up their kids from school. The simple concept of trust is something that’s taken for granted when it shouldn’t be taken for granted at all. 

Some organizations have a culture of fostering growth where leaders are truly leaders rather than taskmasters. When they find a problem, they ask questions, and they open a dialog to discover solutions to the problem. 

The same thing happened to me in the past where my team members share stuff with me. I made a culture of discussing things with each other and it proved to be a good move. Team members share their brilliant ideas that I couldn’t have conceived on my own, and it made the work more efficient. 

Everyone has value

It is ideal to have everyone be involved in the thought process when running a workshop. The same is also true in business. You want people from C-level to people who are answering the phone in the room because everyone has a voice and that voice has value. Hierarchies should be thrown out the window. 

In business, everyone’s viewpoint is important, from the stakeholders to the other people in the room with different perspectives. 

Sales leaders and managers must be cognizant of what the new hire thinks when they come in. They have to be aware that they won’t be scoffed at and demanded to go back to their desks when they get coffee from the coffee machine. They need to know that they are not chained to their desks and that they are allowed to work on another floor or to take their laptops outside if it’s not against company rules. 

Simplicity 

Another way to create a culture within the organization is through simplicity. People will more likely engage with things that are simple and easily understood.. Simplicity is also clarity which is one of Scott M. Cutlip’s  Seven C’s of Communication. What you’re saying should be exactly what you mean. 

Government Digital Services in the UK fosters this kind of cultural sense. They put up signs that say ‘It’s okay to x’, that it’s okay not to check their email after work, that it’s okay to have a day-off, and that it’s okay to pause and talk to their coworkers. These are simple and clear and people engage in them. It makes sense for businesses to do this as well but it’s still put by the wayside.  

Top-to-bottom approach

We did this in one of the companies I worked for where they gave us a Wii. It was super cool and we could play the Wii to destress and have a good time. The company was a small organization and we got all the people to be in the break area for 10-15 minutes and play Wii bowling. But then the sales leaders saw us playing and told the CEO about it. They told us that we could play it either before work or after work, and nobody touched it since. 

It was the culture that killed it. We could have had that 15-minute break and then go back to our desks afterward but the culture says that you can’t have fun. It says that growing a business and growing sales can’t be fun. This goes to show that when you don’t have the culture built from the top then clearly, you’re in trouble. 

The danger in perks is that sometimes it can take away one’s individuality, too. Some big tech companies have sleeping pods where you can zone out for a little bit. They get you a cab or buy you dinner if you work beyond 9 p.m. or they send someone to get your laundry at home. These perks look good on paper but they keep people in the office and squeeze more hours out of them and marginalize them and take their individuality away. They think of these people more as a production line who is there to work and sacrifice their personal life. So we must all be wary about perks like that. 

Be observant 

If you are someone looking for a job in any industry, maybe in tech or in sales, keep your head on a swivel and be observant. When you’re looking for a position, really poke in on the culture and see the things that are important to you. Are the people validated and supported? Poke in on their level of accountability as an organization.

Be involved and have a dialogue; you’re just not there to be grilled. Ask questions or talk to people who have worked there or who are working there. The manner in which your questions are received is a huge indicator of the validity of their response. Do these things before signing because you’ll never be able to do these dialogue and transparent conversations when you’ve signed the papers. 

In the end, it’s important to respect people ultimately because that goes beyond being a good person and being a good human being. Respect, humility, and empathy go far in the workplace. It permeates innovation, office dynamics, and creativity. It permeates everything. The golden rule always applies – treat others the same way you want to be treated. This permeates so many things at the business level, the profitability level, and the quality of work level. 

Building a Culture of Empathy and Accountability” episode resources

Connect with Jason (@pseudoroom) by following him on Twitter, and his online portfolio at Pseudoroom.com. He also has a book entitled Cultivating a Creative Culture and a second edition that’s coming by next year. 

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program or free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. 

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, Sell Me A Pen

TSE 1112: Sell Me This Pen!

Donald Kelly, Sell Me A Pen
You’ve likely heard the scenario before where an interviewer asks a seller to “Sell me this pen,” but how much value does this approach offer??
This scenario will likely throw your prospective sellers into a nervous panic because you’re asking them to sell something they know nothing about. So how much will it really tell you about your seller?

Features and benefits

Sellers who don’t know much about the product they are selling or the audience they are selling to usually revert to features and benefits. They sell the aspects of the product that they can see.
“It’s comfortable.” “It has a good grip.” “It has a clicky thing and even a laser pointer. That’s great for folks who do presentations.”
“It writes smoothly and it isn’t too expensive. In fact, it’s cheaper than many of the pens on the market. And if you buy it today, I can throw in a notepad and a pocket protector.”
Why would people even do this test in the first place?

Quick thinking

People often conduct this test to see how well you think on your feet and how you perform under pressure. And though I can understand those motivations, this test won’t truly work unless you’re selling something that might be a consumer sale.
Typically, sellers aren’t selling simple products like pens. Rather they are selling something like a software solution that is much more expensive and has a much longer sales cycle. In those cases, it won’t matter as much how good you are with your words. You won’t be able to persuade someone within one minute to buy your expensive product.
If you’re selling inexpensive trinkets on the side of the road, it might just work. But if you’re selling something with a significant price value, it won’t.

Reviews

This idea to “Sell me this pen,” might have provided a good judge of a seller’s abilities in the 80s and 90s, but today’s buyers rely on reviews.
So as a sales leader, what if you stopped using this unrealistic test and offered a better one? What if you gave your sellers a scenario and ask them to prepare for it?
Test your sellers to see whether they can find true problems or interesting facts, figures, or statistics that will help you win the deal. Determine whether the sellers will try to “wing it” instead of coming prepared.

Sales scenario

You want a sales rep who is prepared, so use your interview opportunity to determine their ability to prepare. Ask your receptionist to send a scenario to the interviewees. Let them know they will be asked to role play a selling scenario like this.
Present a scenario in which a particular business owner has a certain set of challenges. He is already working with a particular vendor. The sellers’ job is to show up prepared to understand the product and services and have a meaningful conversation selling this service to the business owner.
If the sales rep shows up with information about the company in-hand and prepared to have a meaningful discussion, you’ve likely found a good seller. If the seller shows up with the intention to “wing it,” you’ll know what you’re up against.

Selling pens

The secret to successful selling lies with asking appropriate questions, even in the case of selling a pen. If you do use the pen test, expect your sellers to begin by finding out whether the buyer even needs a pen.It doesn’t matter how much ink it will hold or how great the cap is if the seller doesn’t need it.
Instead of spending the time pressuring the buyer to spend money on a pen, expect your sellers to begin by asking questions.
Meaningful questions about the buyer’s situation will either qualify or disqualify the buyer. It will also communicate that the seller understands the buyer’s actual situation. The seller will demonstrate a desire to identify the pain point and solve the problem.
Maybe the customer needs a computer more than a pen. Don’t waste your time pitching a product the customer doesn’t need.

Consultants

Seek sellers who will serve as consultants rather than those who will try to trick the customers. Help the buyer feel like he is making a buying decision rather than being sold to.
Jeffrey Gitomer said that people love to buy but they hate to be sold to. Help your customers understand the true pain that exists and then help them solve it. If you do this, they’ll evangelize about you and ultimately help you get more business.
Empower your sales reps to sell on their own. Teach them to become consultants who ask meaningful questions to identify challenges that the buyers may not even realize they have.
He’ll be successful and he’ll have great clients who love him.
If you create a meaningful scenario for your interviews, you’ll have more meaningful discussions and dialogues and both parties will enjoy the process more.
Besides, we probably already have enough pens.

“Sell me this pen” episode resources

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Larry Levine, Selling From the Heart, Linkedin, Sales Book

TSE 1066: Selling From The Heart

Sellers have a bad reputation as people who are artificial and only concerned about themselves, but in order to succeed, you must focus on selling from the heart.

Larry Levine has spent 30-something years in the trenches of B2B work, and he recognized some glaring weaknesses in sales teams he worked with. He values authenticity and he points to it as a big disconnect for many sellers.

But it isn’t just sellers. Think about how many times you’ve run into a friend you haven’t seen in a while, and you toss out the phrase, “we should do lunch.” It doesn’t usually mean anything other than “I’ll see you when I see you.”

Sellers must pay attention to their words.

Use your words

The words genuine, authentic, value, and trusted advisor prompt the follow-on question: “What does that mean?”

Start by leading an authentic lifestyle. Think about this: When you say you’re a salesperson or an SDR, you’re already behind the 8-ball already in the minds of your clients and prospects.

For every great sales professional, there are 10 that give the sales world a bad name.

When you deal with the people in your personal life, are you genuine and true to who you really are? Most likely you are. So why can’t we play that same role when we’re dealing with our clients and prospects.

Building relationships

Many sellers maintain a certain amount of distance in their relationships with their clients. In his book, Slow Down, Sell Faster, Kevin Davis asked how it’s possible to sell something to someone if you don’t spend time figuring out who they are?

  • What makes that person tick?
  • What do they care about?

Sellers try to move their prospects through the sales funnel as quickly as possible instead of investing the time to understand. Listen with intent and help them do their jobs. You’ll be surprised to find that things actually speed up.

Vulnerability

If you don’t build a relationship throughout multiple steps and influencers, it will be difficult to sell anything. People will buy from people they know, like, and trust.

People are beginning to understand that it’s ok to bring your heart to the sales world. It’s ok to be genuine and real. But in order to do that, you have to be vulnerable, which goes against what we believe about sellers.

If you asked your prospects what they truly desire in a seller, what do you think they’ll say? Maybe someone who is honest and who can solve their problems. At some point, you’ll hear them say “I want them to be sincere and show up after the sale.”

Conversations

Have a conversation like you would with your friends.

Memorizing scripts may make you sound too robotic. It isn’t that scripts are bad, but we must make the verbiage in the script our own. If you can’t align to it, you’ll struggle with it.

Imagine if you understood the person you were reaching out to. What are the issues and challenges they are facing.

If you’re calling a VP of sales to set up a demo for software, find out the issues that VPs of sales struggle with. Offer three issues that are most common for sales teams. Ask your prospects which of those three topics he can most closely align with.

The truth is that even tenured sales reps are going about this the wrong way. Instead of the phone call being focused on setting a meeting, focus the call on starting a conversation.

Sales leaders

Time and patience matter. Your organization wasn’t built in a day. You took a series of small successful steps to get where you are.

The same is true for your sales process, but no one has time or patience for it. No one wants to slow down.

Larry recalls deciding one day to focus on quality over quantity. He focused on opening at least two new conversations with two people he didn’t know every single day. His phone skills improved and his mindset did, too.

Sellers who are allowed to focus on quality over quantity may find that they enjoy their roles a bit more because they are connecting with people.

Foundations

Larry’s first mentor freed him from the pressure of memorizing his prospecting script word-for-word, and instead encouraged him to understand the foundation of the script. Once you’ve done that, make it your own.

Get back to humanizing what we’ve previously dehumanized in the sales world. There’s a time and place for technology, but human-to-human matters. Technology can’t replace every human aspect.

Larry warns against being an “empty suit with commission breath.”

Once leadership realizes that there’s a human on the other end of the sale rather than just a bunch of dollars and they set out to solve problems, watch what happens to the level of your relationships and referrals and profits.

Avoiding sameness

In a crowded field, in order to rise above the sea of sameness and be seen in a different light and stand out from the sales wolfpack, the differentiating moment goes back to the human aspect.

People smell sincerity immediately. Instead of juggling personalities, be authentic.

Understand that credibility and clarity sell in a world of insincerity.

Create a transformational experience by having a conversation. As you transform your relationships, you’ll stick out like a sore thumb in a world of transactional conversations.

“Selling From The Heart” episode resources

Find Larry on LinkedIn @larrylevine1992 or on his Selling From The Heart podcast at sellingfromtheheart.net.

Grab a copy of Larry’s book, Selling From the Heart: How Your Authentic Self Sells YouHis website also offers an accompanying self-reflection journal.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Ty Bennett, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1061: You Can Love People Without Leading Them, But You Can’t Lead People Without Loving Them

Ty Bennett, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistRegardless of your industry or your product, relationships are the currency of your business, and though you can love people without leading them, you can’t lead people without loving them.

Ty Bennett is an entrepreneur who fell in love with the speaking and training development aspect of building a sales team and it led him to write books on the topic and start a training company called Leadership Inc.

Ty points out that we’re in the people business and we’re interacting with, networking with, leading and influencing people every day. The care, investment, and love you have for people will communicate that you have their best interest in mind.

Those relationships engender trust, foster accountability, and build a level of commitment that you want in your team. And love drives it.

Missing love

Many business books never discuss love, perhaps because it isn’t considered a business-centric word. Ty addresses this issue in his new book called Partnership is the New Leadership.

He interviewed a guy on his podcast named Tim Sanders who wrote the book Love is the Killer App but this hasn’t always been a business word. Traditionally it has referred to personal relationships but when it drives your actions and when you’re coming from a place of service and contribution, that’s where love exists.

Leadership is much more effective there.

Soft leaders

Some people believe that leaders can’t be perceived as soft, so they shy away from the idea of loving the members of the team. If you’re too soft, after all, you’ll be walked on.

If you were to line up 10 people and evaluate the production level of those people, you’ll find a relationship to how they feel about their manager. Statistically, most people will tell you that they hate their bosses, and also that people join companies and they leave bosses.

People also show up differently when they are in the right frame of mind; when they feel supported; when they feel heard; and when they have opportunities to win.

When people feel like part of a team, the commitment level changes drastically. #TeamCommitment

Training to lead

If you’re seeking to develop this kind of leadership without being perceived as soft, focus on being interested rather than interesting.

Rather than figuring out how to stand out and making it all about you, focus on the other person. Great leaders are those who truly care about other people and become adept at asking questions. They have a genuine curiosity about people. They want to know what drives them and what’s important to them.

As you get to know your people on a deeper level, it speaks volumes to your team members.

Now take things a step further and focus on hearing them. Don’t forget the idea that people support what they help create.

Give your team a voice. Welcome their feedback. Those efforts demonstrate that you care about what they have to say and you’re listening rather than simply issuing marching orders. You’re demonstrating that you’re confident enough in who you are to allow them to be part of the process.

We no longer live in the era of top-down leadership where I tell you what we’re going to do and you implement it. Social media has changed us psychologically and it has given each of us a voice.

Invest in people

Go above and beyond for your people. Do things that are not in your job description. Give more time, more energy, and more of yourself into your relationships. Reach out in ways that are meaningful to each person.

No doubt each of us can think of someone who has invested in us this way.

As leaders, those investments change our relationships. When you invest in people they become family.

Ask yourself whether people would ever say that about you.

This level of investment can be difficult because we’re busy. We have so much on our plates that it’s hard to think outside our own agenda.

It can also be tempting to focus on the things we have to do and ignore the things that we could do but aren’t required to do.

At the same time, we have to shift our mindset. Maybe we need to listen to a podcast or hear a story from a different leader. Maybe we need to find a leader who can open our eyes to different approaches. Perhaps read a book.

Following the manager

Although every industry is different, Ty interacted with sellers recently who told him that their loyalty was to their manager, not to the company. The product matters a lot less to them than the manager does.

If you’re seeking to become this kind of manager, start by carving out one-on-one time for your people as often as possible. Come in five minutes early and ask one of your people to come in five minutes early. Make time for it.

Find time to connect with your people with no agenda. It’s just to show that you care.

Ty also recommends reading The Go Giver, one of a series of books about adopting a giving mentality on the way to greater success.

Relationships change when people invest in them. When a leader invests, it will impact the relationship in a huge way.

“You Can’t Lead People Without Loving Them” episode resources

If you’d like to connect with Ty, you can find him at tybennett.com and on LinkedIn, and you can check out The Relevant Leadership Podcast.

Grab a copy of his new book called Partnership is the New Leadership.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Charles Bernard, Donald Kelly, Problem Solving

TSE 1051: How To Solve The Most Common Sales Problems

Sales leaders who can solve the most common sales problems will increase their productivity and improve their performance.

Today, Charles Bernard explains how a disciplined system for selling and managing can remove barriers to performance for sales leaders.

Bernard founded ‘Criteria for Success,’ an organization that develops online sales playbooks and provides leadership and sales management training. Charles was a top performer in his division with General Electric and has run several businesses as well.

Caught in the middle

Charles believes that the number one issue facing sales managers today is the feeling of being caught in the middle between the CEO/Management and the sales team. Sales managers must bring in the numbers, on one hand, while acting as a micromanager on the other.  He compares it to having a target on his front side with another on his back.

Charles finds that pressure from above is unfiltered and passed directly down onto the sales teams, whether it’s justified or not. And, he says, the sales teams hate that.

If management feels that something is wrong or that people are not doing their jobs, for example, it is the responsibility of the sales manager to balance the push/pull of the situation. She must absorb the pressure in order to adapt the message – without losing the importance behind it – to empower the team.

Passing the pressure from management to the team does nothing to motivate or incentivize sales.

Many times, leaders fall into the trap of thinking they must have all the answers for how things should be done. An enlightened manager should be able to pull the boss and the team together.  He should encourage conversations that promote transparency and foster teamwork.

Charles prefers for his sales teams to hear directly from the bosses and he often facilitates meetings to allow for such interaction. It allows each side to learn the concerns of the other and to work as a team.

Pulled in different directions

Charles cites the challenge of staying focused as another common issue facing sales managers. Don’t engage in too many meetings or with multiple different initiatives. Lack of focus prevents the managers from spending time in the field and with their sales teams.

It was a struggle but Charles eventually learned how to say ‘No’ to those who people who weren’t impacting sales.

Charles recalls numerous instances where he was asked, for example, to intervene with an upset client. He had to put his foot down and direct those calls to others in the organization better equipped to handle such situations.

It is understandable that sales managers want to prove their worth to the company. But it is a mistake to do so by getting involved in matters that do not pertain to their job or to assist with sales if the team is underperforming. It only serves to further scatter the focus a sales manager needs to succeed.

The purpose of the sales manager is to be available to the team. It must be the priority.

Inability to set goals

Sales managers often don’t have the time to spend on the proper vetting of the forecasts. As a result, they are often unable to create realistic forecasts and to set goals.

The need for realistic forecasting is obvious. The problem arises when the decisions made on that forecast – where the growth is coming from, how much we will grow, what the profits will be, and how the funds will be reinvested – are very linear and rigid. There isn’t a lot of thought behind it.

Charles believes that people should not think about what they are going to sell in a year. People tend to miss things like backlog, which is probably going to give you the most wind behind your sails.

If forecasting in 2018 for 2019, for example, you must see all the deals that didn’t close, at the individual and team sales levels. You want to know what stage they are in because that backlog will give you a jump on each quarter.

What is your backlog going in? What is your backlog coming out?

If you begin with a strong backlog of unclosed business and put that into your forecast, you can then see where you are short and what you need to do each quarter. It is very important to have a notion of forecasting that includes backlog. Without it, you are already behind at the start.

Sales advice

  • Rank your sales team. Who are your A’s? Who are your B’s?
  • Rank your customers. Who are your partners and who are your advocates? Who buys on a whim, or transactionally?
  • Build a playbook. Take all the knowledge in the company and make it available for everyone to access.

“Solve The Most Common Sales Problems” episode resources

Charles can be reached via email at cbernard@criteriaforsuccess.com, or you can call him at 212-302-5518. Charles can also be found on LinkedIn.

This episode is brought to you in part by our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, which teaches you to improve your sales skills, find more customers, build stronger value, and close more deals.

The next semester begins in April.

If you’re not familiar with the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, it’s a program designed to help brand new sales reps, as well as those who have been selling forever. The 12-week module offers videos you can watch at your own pace, as well as the option to join a group discussion. It’s broken into three sections: finding, building value, and closing. It’s amazing and it’s fun!

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

The episode is also brought to you by prospect.io, a sales automation platform that allows you to send cold emails in a personalized manner. To find out more about how it can help you automate your sales process, go to prospect.io/tse. Your prospecting will never be the same.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Andrea Waltz, Donald Kelly, Go For No, Failure

TSE 1041: Just Go For No!

Andrea Waltz, Donald Kelly, Go For No, FailureSalespeople don’t like to hear the word “no” but Andrea Waltz is going to help you change the way you look at that response so that you’ll find yourself trying to go for no.

Andrea and her husband struck out on their own about 19 years ago. They did sales workshops and trainings for big companies, and they found that their rejection piece was the thing everyone loved.

This was a problem and a solution that affected everyone no matter what business they were in.

In this replay of a 2017 episode of The Sales Evangelist, Andrea offers the following advice to those dealing with rejection.

It’s not about you.

Although it’s true that the rejection isn’t personal, it’s hard to avoid internalizing that rejection. It’s normal to respond emotionally when someone tells you no.

If, however, you allow rejection to take control of your sales process, you end up with mediocre results because you’re little more than an order-taker.

Go for the no.

Eventually you’re going to have a conversation with someone, so rejection is always a possibility.

Andrea’s husband had an experience once selling menswear, and his manager asked him what the customer said no to. Her husband pointed out that the customer bought everything he recommended and didn’t say no to anything.

The manager then asked, “Well then how did you know he was done?”

As sellers, we tend to sell to our own wallets, but if we could get comfortable being told no, it’s possible that we’d be even more successful.

We must get used to hearing “no.”

Help struggling sellers.

“No” doesn’t mean never; it means not yet.

“No” is the beginning of a negotiation. If you call on someone who is happy with the current supplier, that won’t necessarily be true forever.

You must stay in touch and follow up even when people tell you “no.”

Encourage your sellers to continue the follow up. It’s easy to lose track if you don’t use your CRM.

There’s also an interesting phenomenon around getting a “yes.” Everyone celebrates that “yes.” Contrast that with the person who makes 20 phone calls and gets nothing but “no.”

Consider that a lot of those “no” answers can turn into “yes.”

Track your “no” answers. Set a “no” goal.

If you get permission to follow up, you absolutely must do it.

Manage “no.”

Sellers must learn to distinguish the different kinds of “no” answer. When you avoid hearing “no” you don’t get good at handling rejection emotionally.

When you get used to hearing “no” you learn to distinguish the “no” answers that could potentially turn into a “yes.”

Get permission to follow up with that qualified prospect. At worst, ask if you can check back in a few months to see if anything has changed.

You can also try to figure out what the “no” is by figuring out how you got to “no.”

You have nothing to lose at this point, so try to figure out why it wasn’t a good fit. Figure out why people are saying “no” and figure out how you can mitigate that in the future.

Talk to the right people.

If you’re getting a large number of “no” answers, determine whether you’re talking to the right people. Consider that maybe you aren’t contacting qualified leads.

Maybe your presentation needs a few tweaks.

If you’re only being proactive, you’re only dealing with the “yes” answers.

People usually have to be contacted multiple times before they say “yes.” They are often hesitant to change, so if you’re changing a service but the prospect doesn’t want to make a change, that’s why multiple contacts are necessary.

Add value. Get them accustomed to the idea.

Change your mindset.

Understand that you don’t just have to focus on “yes.” That mindset shift forces you to let go of being perfect.

People have been conditioned to believe that “no” and failure go together.

When you avoid “no,” you miss opportunities for some big “yes” answers. We want to give people permission to believe that it’s ok to get a “no.”

Create a “no” awareness.

“Just Go For No!” episode resources

Learn more about these concepts by visiting GoForNo.com. You can also grab a copy of their book Go For No!: Yes Is the Destination, No Is How You Get There.

This episode is brought to you in part by our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, which teaches you to improve your sales skills, find more customers, build stronger value, and close more deals.

The next semester begins in April.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Steve Richard, Execvision.io, Sales Manager, Sales Coaching, 5 common mistakes

TSE 1003: 5 Common Mistakes Sales Managers Make When Coaching

Steve Richard, Execvision.io, Sales Manager, Sales Coaching, 5 common mistakes

In our work with sales reps, sales teams, and sales managers, we encounter many people who believe that sales coaching doesn’t work, but many of them fail to realize that there are 5 common mistakes sales managers make when coaching.

Steve Richard, founder of ExecVision, shares how to avoid those mistakes, and he suggests you start by recognizing that there’s a difference between coaching and training.

Coaching

Training is teaching someone to do something new that the person doesn’t know how to do. Coaching is helping someone do something that they do know to the point of mastery.

If we expect a rep to embrace a certain behavior, we have to train him. If we don’t, that failure is on us. Then, after we’ve trained him, we have to overcome the “forgetting curve” which is a function of our brain’s tendency to purge information.

Coaching is the act of training iteratively, focusing on the person, and repeating that behavior until it becomes second nature, like tying a shoe.

Consider whether your organization is struggling with any of these mistakes.

1. Failing to define what good looks like.

We must give our teams a definition of what a call should look like. Include the key things you want them to say, the behaviors you want them to exhibit, and give them a target.

Give your team members total clarity on what you want them to do. [06:11] Develop consistency among your team members so you can hit bigger numbers.

Also, build a team of people who will identify these steps. Include managers, senior executives, and representatives from operations, enablement, and sales. A varied team can ensure that these decisions aren’t being made by people who haven’t made calls in a while.

Check out the book Cracking the Sales Management Code: The Secrets to Measuring and Managing Sales Performance for clarification about metrics. Learn the difference between activity metrics that you can control — things like making phone calls and sending LinkedIn connection requests — and objectives like having conversations with people which you have less control over.

Aside from simply giving your team members goals, give them a roadmap to achieve them. [08:32] How many activities should they achieve in a week to achieve their goals?

Many organizations have salespeople who are “unconsciously competent,” which means they don’t know why they are successful. Though it’s not bad, it’s impossible to scale. You can’t pair a new employee with someone who is “unconsciously competent” and expect her to learn the right way to do things.

2. Neglecting to train because of time.

Most every sales leader intends to coach his team. [10:26]

Managers typically know they have to be more consistent as a team, and they know that the way to do that is through coaching. But they also universally say that time is the thing that prohibits them from doing it.

They have the greatest of intentions, but something always gets in the way.

3. Misunderstanding how to train correctly.

It’s shocking to think of the amount of money that is spent on sales rep training. Sales managers, however, typically receive very little training. Many of them have never been taught to coach the right way.

Think, for example, of a sales manager who observes a call and then immediately launches into constructive feedback. Basically, he tells you all the things you did wrong.

When the sales rep hears it, his system sends a hit of the stress hormone cortisol, which triggers the “fight or flight” response.

The sales rep either defends himself by digging in his heels or he puts up a wall and stops listening. In either case, it’s not good.

Instead, try the model that Jim Kennan recommends: observe, describe, prescribe. Leave the judgment on the shelf.

Listen to the call. Recount what the rep did during the call. Then ask a question that prompts the seller to figure out what he could have done differently to improve the call.

People value more what they can conclude for themselves than what they’re told. 

4. Lacking observable moments.

If sales reps can’t listen to recordings of their calls, they’ll have no way to improve their performance. [18:45] They will only have vague ideas of what they think they did during the call.

During the 80s, the Japanese beat us in the auto industry because they were continually improving their operational efficiency.

Adopt the continuous improvement mindset that served the Japanese so well.

5. Making training ad hoc.

Your organization’s training must be habitual. It must be part of the rhythm of the company.

Make your training such a part of the process that it becomes the gospel.

It can be as simple as listening to 5 minutes of a call with a rep and asking for reflections. It will do good things for your company.

Instead of feeling like sales managers have to do all the work, involve the sales reps in their own development. Run call-of-the-month competitions where reps submit their best call every month with written commentary.

Give people an environment in which it’s fun to learn and improve.

“5 Common Mistakes Sales Managers Make When Coaching” episode resources

Connect with Steve via email or call him on his cell phone at (202) 302-3193.

Check out ExecVision’s Call Camp that breaks down real sales calls like game tape to evaluate what works and what doesn’t. It’s a free webinar that shares practical advice with sales reps, managers, and leaders to improve their effectiveness.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

They are offering a 14-day free trial, and half off your subscription when you use the code Donald at checkout.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Sales Training, Donald Kelly, Sales Manager

TSE 1002: What If I Train Them And They Leave?

Sales Training, Donald Kelly, Sales ManagerMany leaders avoid adequately training their team members because of a single looming question: What if I train them and they leave?

They structure their businesses so that multiple people work on a single project while other projects sit undone. It costs them money and productivity.

If you’re one of those managers, I’ll offer you a different consideration: what if you don’t train them and they stay?

We’re devoting the month of January to the topic of mental toughness, and today’s topic is directed at business and sales leaders as well as sellers.

Leaders

When team members aren’t trained well, they won’t be effective at their jobs. When team members aren’t effective at their jobs, the manager will have to help them do their jobs in addition to doing his own.

Leaders who fear employee departure often choose not to provide the necessary training, but the reality is that many of those untrained employees end up staying in their jobs. [3:37]

What if they stay with you and they don’t know what they are doing?

Financial considerations

Imagine your employee makes $40,000 a year. Are you willing to pay him $40,000 despite the fact that he doesn’t know what he’s doing, and then require someone who is making $60,000 a year to help him do his job?

Maybe you’ll eventually fire the person because he isn’t performing. [04:23]

When you let someone go, you may end up paying unemployment benefits, and then you’ll incur the cost of hiring someone new.

Whether you use an agency or review the resumes yourself, you’ll have to invest time trying to find someone who already has training.

Cyclical

Even if your new hire does have sales training, she won’t know your process. She won’t be able to perfectly understand your organization, so she won’t immediately be effective.

If you choose not to provide training, you’ll be back in the same cycle three months after you hire her. [05:04]

You will have spent countless amounts of money to avoid spending money on training. You’ll suffer from lost opportunity and lost revenue.

Long-term benefits

Imagine you have three employees. After you train them, one of them leaves your organization.

First of all, consider why the person is leaving. Is it possible that you’re not paying enough? Does your organization lack direction for its employees? Don’t miss a chance to evaluate why people are leaving. [06:36]

Even if you have a great situation, people may still leave. They may have to move out of state for family reasons or something else. People don’t stay in one place forever.

If one leaves, you still have two great employees who are giving you money back.

If you don’t train them, you’ll likely lose thousands in sales because they aren’t good at their jobs.

Do the math

When I was a young seller, I worked for a company that spent probably $7,000 training me to be an effective seller, and I’m thankful for it.

After my training, I landed a $30,000 deal as one of my first big successes. [07:52]

You don’t have to be a scientist to understand that $30,000 is a good return on $7,000.

If you invest in your people, they’ll love you, they’ll stay with your company, and they’ll earn you more money.

For sellers

When you’re considering your next organization, find out what kind of sales training they provide. Even if you’re a seller with a 10-year track record, it’s ok to consider training programs at prospective companies. [08:58]

If they don’t offer coaching or continuing education, that might be a red flag. If they aren’t willing to invest in you, consider other organizations that will.

Do it yourself

Sales leaders might consider providing the training themselves as a way to save money, and it might be true that they’re able to do it. For me, though I’m able to change my own oil and cut my own hair, I don’t do it. [10:21]

Just because we’re capable of something doesn’t mean we’re the best person for the job. Consider the opportunity costs and the cost for you to stop your own work in order to train other people.

Give them podcasts to listen to or books to read.

Don’t hurt your company by trying to save a dime.

“What If I Train Them And They Leave?” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Meridith Elliott Powell, Planning, 4th Quarter, Donald Kelly

TSE 986: Driving Sales in the 4th Quarter

Driving Sales in the 4th QuarterToday we talk to Meridith Powell about driving sales in the 4th quarter and how organizations can drive success from the selling side as well as the leadership side.

Meridith was voted one of the top 15 business growth experts to watch, largely because she is passionate about helping clients learn strategies to succeed in any economy.

4th quarter complications

Meridith calls the 4th quarter of the year her favorite because typically organizations have relaxed a bit and let their guards down. That presents an opportunity for other organizations to put on what she calls a full-court press while everyone else has relaxed.

Everyone takes their foot off the gas at the end of the year. They’ve been working hard all year, and they have achieved decent numbers, so they aren’t worried about driving sales in the 4th quarter.

They are tired, and when Thanksgiving rolls around, it’s followed soon after by Christmas. The cold weather makes it an easy time to be a bit lazier. She calls it the perfect storm of sales laziness.

You must keep selling during the 4th quarter to keep that quarter strong. Additionally, though, sales has a lag time. The sales you make in the 4th quarter will determine how well your 1st quarter goes. If you don’t invest energy into 4th quarter sales, you’ll establish a self-fulfilling prophecy for the 1st quarter and you’ll be behind all year long.

Begin in October

It’s never too late to salvage the 4th quarter.

Proceed carefully, though. There’s a lot happening in the 4th quarter and your clients and prospects have to-do lists of their own.

Establish a plan, and identify a sales leader who will focus on driving sales in the 4th quarter. Even if you don’t have one, determine who you need to connect with during the 4th quarter. List your top clients, your best prospects, and those who could be doing more business with you.

Once you have that list, design the touches. Focus on thanking them for an amazing year and let them know you’ll get in touch with them at the first of the year to establish a plan for the next year.

Plan for sales in January

If you want your January to be productive, you must lay the groundwork in December by booking appointments.

By connecting with people at the end of the year and again in January, you keep yourself visible with your most important customers. As a bonus, you’re likely to find organizations that need to dump money before the end of the year to avoid paying taxes.

For those customers who haven’t yet committed, you’ve taken one more step to move forward at a time when everyone else is resting.

4th quarter trouble

If you haven’t hit your numbers by the start of the 4th quarter, you’re likely in trouble. Desperation sets in and you make decisions you wouldn’t otherwise make.

Meridith said that when she consults teams, she often finds that 4th quarter is their greatest struggle. She insists that buyers can smell desperation and they aren’t interested in working with desperate sellers.

When your 4th quarter strategy focuses on thanking them for their business and coordinating for the 1st quarter of the following year, you lose the smell of desperation and you end up making deals.

You’re also setting yourself up strong for the new year so that next year’s 4th quarter won’t end badly.

Give up the day

If you’re listening to this episode and you haven’t hit your numbers for the year, let it go. Think of it as cheating on a diet and realize that you’ll do better next time.

If you push hard to make your numbers now, you may get there, but you’ll likely drive your customers away. Instead, focus on staying visible and starting 2019 really strong.

You’ll maintain your credibility and you’ll keep your focus on the buyer instead of focusing on yourself. You can’t play basketball by focusing entirely on the scoreboard.

You have to look at the ball. You must keep your focus on the prospect.

Take responsibility

The reality for sales leaders is the same for sellers. If your team hasn’t hit its goal by the 4th quarter, you don’t want to give up the lifetime cycle of a client in an effort to make last-minute sales.

Take responsibility for the fact that your team didn’t hit the goals. As a leader, you have total responsibility for those goals. You must give them the strategy, the plan, and the accountability to achieve their numbers in the next year.

Begin with an autopsy of the things that prevented you from hitting your numbers. Resolve to learn from your mistakes, and do it as a team.

Determine the things you did really well, and try to identify where you lost deals.

Meridith calls it seeds, weeds, and needs.

Seeds are those things we need to keep doing in order to drive growth. Weeds are the things that weigh us down and get in our way. Needs are the things we need to be doing that we aren’t currently doing.

Make sure to include a plan for how you’ll measure your success and how you’ll stay accountable. Learn from each other.

Make it safe to fail

If someone on your team loses a deal to a competitor, make it safe for your team to evaluate what happened with the deal and to coach each other toward success in the future.

If you have discipline issues, keep those separate from the coaching environment.

You must make it safe for your team to share what is working and what isn’t working. Help your team develop those skill sets to succeed.

Fill a dry pipeline fast

If you find yourself in the 4th quarter without the numbers you need, Meridith has a few ideas to help you fill a dry pipeline fast.

Before you try them, commit to keep yourself out of this situation in the future, but use these for emergency situations.

Make a list of your 10 best customers and do a holiday check-in. During the call, ask about their goals moving forward.

You can find the rest of the ideas in Meridith’s blog here, but use these sparingly, and refuse to put yourself in this situation again next year.

Fourth quarter is a major opportunity. Don’t treat it as a time to take your foot off the gas.

“Driving Sales in the 4th Quarter” episode resources

You can find Meridith’s blog at valuespeaker.com, where you can also access free tools and resources. Find Meridith on the social networking sites, but most often on LinkedIn.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Jeff Propp, Maximizer, Donald Kelly, Sales Process

TSE 958: Fundamentals Of An Effective Sales Process

Jeff Propp, Sales Process, The Sales EvangelistOn today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’re talking to Jeff Propp of Maximizer about the fundamentals of an effective sales process.

Jeff is the head of revenue for Maximizer CRM, one of the pioneers in the CRM industry. It’s a boutique company focusing on smaller midsized businesses in a crowded CRM marketplace.

Sales process

Sales isn’t about being charismatic or being a smooth-talker.

There aren’t a lot of barriers to entry in sales but there are a lot of barriers to success.

If you don’t have a process by which you as a seller enter into a relationship with the buyer, it won’t go well. You must have an understanding of prospects’ needs, goals, wants, and desires.

You must establish trust and then develop a mutually beneficial contract, and it can happen quickly or slowly.

The majority of people who are successful in sales adhere to a process.

Many new and struggling salespeople don’t have sales processes, and they face common struggles as a result.

Methodology

Jeff has seen salespeople get into trouble frequently by cutting corners. You have to go slow in order to go fast.

Take time to understand the root causes that are the catalyst for your customers’ desire to seek change.

It’s tempting to be anxious to pitch but start by understanding their business, their processes, and the stakeholders you’re working with.

Your process must be consistent, that’s understood, that’s simple, and that you have deliverables to support and that they are aligned with your company values.

Sometimes people accidentally eliminate the customer in the process and they forget to think about how the customer is buying.

Skipping steps

Closing is the fun part of selling so it’s tempting to hurry toward that part of the process.

Some stages may feel like “rubber stamp” stages, and sellers can get frustrated at those points in the process. Continue to be deliberate and methodical even though it sounds boring.

If you don’t eventually invest in a sales process, your business won’t scale properly. People will go rogue and do their own thing. It’s also impossible to forecast if you don’t have some kind of process in place.

It’s also important to have predictability in your revenue and your budgets. You must have some idea where you’re going to end up financially, and that will be tougher to do without a process in place, especially with larger teams.

Additionally, different customers will have different experiences if your process isn’t consistent. There will be a lack of consistency.

Consistent customer service keeps customers loyal to the brand.

Developing a process

The best practice for those who don’t have a process in place would be to hire a team that can help you practice and learn sales processes.

If you don’t have the budget for that, there are dozens of great books that can help you begin. You can go through the book together as a team.

The most important aspect is practicing as a team. Anytime Maximizer has a new initiative or process, they use role-playing to execute it.

If you can get into a course with materials that allows you to practice the things you’re going to be doing, that’s a great help.

Likewise, if you’re a new seller working in a company that doesn’t offer sales training, consider finding a mentor or a coach. It could even be someone in the company who is already doing well for himself.

Find podcasts and blogs you can engage with and other resources you can take advantage of. Audiobooks are a great tool as well. Learn to self-develop.

Make your interactions with people about them. Check out how much you’re asking compared to how much you’re telling. Great salespeople know the answers to the questions but the act of being curious creates trust and goodwill.

The spirit of reciprocity comes back to you when you put other people first.

“Effective Sales Process” episode resources

Connect with Jeff on LinkedIn or find him at the Maximizer switchboard. If you DM him or leave a voicemail, he’ll get back to you.

Grab a copy of the book SNAP Selling: Speed Up Sales and Win More Business with Today’s Frazzled Customers.

This episode is brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. Maximizer is intuitive, simple, and personable. Maximizer integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one. It works throughout the whole organization and it’s customizable to the way you sell.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers and provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

“The Sales Evangelist”

Check out TSE Hustler’s League and apply to see if it’s a good fit.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share it with someone else you think might benefit.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Sales Process, Donald Kelly, Sales Fundamentals

TSE 957: Sales Process 101

Sales Process, Donald Kelly, Sales FundamentalsWhen I worked for a corporate organization, I had to call executives and convince them to consider our product. I had no direction for the conversation. Until I got sales training, I didn’t know what to stay to get them to the next step.

That map is known as a buying process or a sales process, and we’re going to give you the fundamental basics a sales process should have.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’re going to help you determine whether you have an effective sales process and what you can do to develop one.

 Sales process

You probably have some sort of process in place and it’s probably working to some degree. But would it benefit you to tweak it? Do you feel like you’re not closing enough deals?

Maybe it’s the way you’re presenting things or maybe you’re working in a company where you don’t have anything at all. Instead, you’re just winging it when you communicate with customers.

If you feel like you’re walking in the dark, that system won’t help you hit quota and you won’t be able to scale.

I want to give you basic sales processes that you can apply.

What is a sales process?

A sales process is different than a sales philosophy. Your philosophy is the belief that you have or the things that you value. It’s the values you present to your customer.

There are certain things you believe in that you’re unwilling to cut corners on.

Your sales process is the steps that you take in order to help a prospect go from an interested prospect to a paying customer.

What do you do at each level? You need to establish repeatable steps so that you aren’t making it up every single time.

Without a process, your sales will be agonizing and it will never scale.

Identify your existing process

If you don’t have a process or you have a process that is outdated, visit with each of your sellers to find out what they are doing to bring brand new prospects to the point of purchase.

What steps do they follow?

Why are they using those steps?

Some of your sellers will be doing things well and you can share those effective steps with your entire group. If you have this discussion as a large group, people will most likely give the answers they think they are supposed to give instead of the steps they are actually using.

Involving the sales team in building a sales process will give them buy-in.

Share commonalities

Once you’ve discovered what each person is doing, share the commonalities you found and what seems to be working best for the team.

Find out how your prospects buy. You can have a prospect on a call or you can simply research.

Once you know what works and what the buyer wants, you can develop a process that is in line with what the buyer wants. Your job is to tweak your process so that it falls in line.

Types of processes

There are many types of buying processes but there is something specific that must happen at each stage.

Determine what must happen at each stage. What things must we do in order to be effective?

If we skip steps, we get to the close before the buyer has addressed all his objections and uncovered all the needs. You’ll skip basic qualification steps.

Some companies use a top-down approach and some use a checklist of things that have to be accomplished. My door-to-door sales operated that way because we didn’t have a long closing process.

Flowchart approach usually exists with big-ticket items and b2b selling where your process evolves based upon the buyer’s behavior.

The approach requires adjustments at each step of the process. You must be moldable.

The more complex the sale, the more people you’ll have involved in it.

If you don’t have a process, create one. If you have one, tweak it.

“Sales Process 101” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Alice Heiman, Alice Heiman LLC., Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 943: How Business Owners Who Don’t Like Sales Can Improve Sales Performance

Business owners often have to lead their sales teams despite the fact that they don’t always understand exactly how to do it. Often times, they’re simply ignorant about what to do. It’s absolutely true, though, that business owners who don’t like sales can improve sales performance.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’re talking with Alice Heiman about the challenges business owners face when selling their product or service and how business owners who don’t like sales can improve sales performance.

Alice leads the Alice Heiman, LLC team, which helps companies drive sales growth and bring about sustainable change that leads to growth.

Challenges for business owners

Not all business owners hate selling, but many of them do. The truth is that the person who leads the company is the sales leader.

We have to help them understand their role in sales.

Most people who start a company didn’t do it because they loved sales, and though the entrepreneurial enthusiasm is necessary to start a company, sometimes it leads us down the wrong path.

We assume we’ll just build a great company and people will automatically buy, but the vast majority of business owners have no sales experience. They don’t understand strategy or tactics.

Whether it’s an early stage or a more mature company, many business leaders are abdicating their role as sales leader. The most successful companies have leaders that are very involved in sales.

Even if you intend to hire a sales leader, unless you understand sales, it will be hard for you to hire the right person and then coach that person to lead well.

Team approach

If you’re pursuing a company that is a billion-dollar or a multi-billion-dollar company, you can’t send a lone salesperson to capture the entire company. You have to think of your team as a whole.

  • What role does the salesperson have?
  • What role does the sales leader have?
  • How will the subject matter experts support the effort?
  • What role will the IT people have?

In order to be successful, you have to get everyone positioned properly, which means that the business owner must take a role as well.

Begin by addressing the simple question of how you feel about sales in your company. In many cases, you’ll discover a lot of negative perceptions of sales.

Often the sales leader must address a negative mindset, and begin by talking about the future of the company and how sales will help the company achieve it.

Then you’ll determine where you are right now.

Are you still doing the selling yourself? Have you hired salespeople to help you with sales? Are you ready to hire a sales manager to manage your salespeople? Do you have a sales organization built?

Once we know what the sales organization should look like when it’s complete, your company can begin building toward that.

B2B sales

Sales has changed tremendously,  but most business owners haven’t seen it yet. They are stuck with the notion of selling as they were previously sold to.

In B2B complex sales, you are a smaller company selling to a much bigger company with a long sales cycle and lots of complexities.

You must know your market first. If we know of companies that we want to sell to, we have to get smart really fast. The other option is to make lots of phone calls trying to set up appointments, but you’ll likely burn your people out.

Instead, take the companies you want to do business with and divide them among your team. Give them teams within the same industry so they can learn the industry and its language and do basic research.

It’s important to learn the right things rather than just whether they are a viable prospect.

  • What initiatives are they pursuing this year?
  • What are they posting this year on social media?
  • Can you determine their priorities?

Then figure out how to marry the information you found with your product or service.

Realize, too, that the one lead you connect with may very well block you from other decision-makers. Because they’ve been tasked with this project, they want to look like the hero, so they block you from interacting with others.

Work to find 9 or 10 people who could be involved in the sale.

Get educated

Be a smart, savvy problem solver because you can’t solve problems if you don’t understand what your prospect’s problems are.

Information, especially about large companies, is all over the place. Read annual reports, press releases, the president’s message, and read about products your prospect is launching.

Then think about your customer’s customer. How does your prospect serve its customers? Who does your prospect sell to? How does your prospect help its customers meet their goals?

If I come prepared, and I know your products and services and your industry, you’ll choose to work with me.

If you’ll approach sales as solving problems, perhaps it won’t feel so icky anymore. As a sales leader, focus on your salespeople so they can focus on your customer. If you have happy people who know what to do, if they love their product, and if they are well-trained, they will serve your customers well.

“Improve Sales Performance” episode resources

You can connect with Alice on LinkedIn, Twitter, or Instagram, or you can email her or check out her website and her blog.

This episode is brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Dave Lorenzo, Networking, Sales Reps, Donald Kelly

TSE 924: Sales From The Street: “The 60 Second Sale”

 

 

The Sales Evangelist, Sales From The Street, Dave LorenzoWhat if you could make more money and get home on time for dinner every night? Sounds impossible, right? The 60-Second Sale might be the answer for sales professionals who want to achieve success without sacrificing their lifestyles.

Today on Sales From the Street, we’ll talk to Dave Lorenzo, author of The 60-Second Sale, about how to develop deeper relationships with prospects and align your business goals with your lifestyle.

Dave calls the book the ultimate system for building lifelong client relationships in the blink of an eye.

Business relationships

Dave compares his concept to love at first sight: a lightning-bolt moment of magic when two people are deeply connected. Likewise, his book is about making those moments and creating the conditions that allow you to close a huge deal in 60 seconds.

The secret is having the right relationship with the right person.

Regardless of your industry, and whether you’re B2B or B2C, the process works for everyone.

A lot of salespeople are struggling to figure out how they’re going to make enough money to take care of their families.

Dave’s answer to that is that every salesperson already knows enough people to make the money they need for the month. They know enough people to make their sales quota.

Connect with people

It may be true that those people have forgotten what it is you do, or they’ve forgotten about the value you can add, so you have to refresh their memory.

Start by making a long list of everyone you know and reaching out to them. Your goal is to make sure they know what you do and how you can help them.

Once you’ve done that, those people will be out looking for people they can introduce you to.

In the past, when I’ve given this advice to struggling salespeople, they usually get themselves back on track within a few days if they follow my advice. They usually have some solid leads and some even close some deals, and though those deals aren’t huge, they are usually enough to spark some confidence.

Once you get the first one, it gives you some momentum, and relationship sales is all about having the confidence to help people.

Sales mindset

Your mindset is the key to success in sales.

If you sell security systems door-to-door but one person tells you they aren’t interested because they already have a system, you shouldn’t take that as rejection.

You hand the person a card and ask them to put it in the kitchen drawer so that later down the road when the current provider fails to meet his standards, he can call you back about changing companies.

About 90 percent of your sales career hinges on your mindset.

Lasting impression

If you’re a member of the Chamber of Commerce, a couple of days before the next meeting, call the membership person who signed you up for the chamber. Let her know that you want to make two really good connections at the event.

Given that she knows about your industry, ask her to name the most valuable people for you to target.

She’ll make a couple of suggestions, then you ask her for an introduction to those people. She’ll understand, after all, that the reason people renew their memberships to the chamber is because of the ROI.

Any chamber person worth their salt will be happy to make those introductions, and once you have a great introduction, you’ll be able to have a productive conversation.

Maximize the conversation

After the introduction, you explain that you’re thrilled she introduced you and you’ve read up on the person’s company. Then ask the other person how she gets the most out of her chamber membership.

They expect that you’re going to make a pitch. When you ask about the chamber, you’re highlighting a commonality, and you’re asking them for help that isn’t related to their business.

Then, ask her how she got into the industry that she’s in now. You’re opening a chapter in her mind where she gets to talk about herself, and she’ll start to relax a bit.

She’ll think either one of two things: either this guy is really into me, or this is the worst salesperson I’ve ever seen in my life. Either way, she will let down her guard since she isn’t anticipating a sale.

Then you ask how business is. You ask how the economy is treating her. Ask her whatever you want to know about her business.

Then you can say something about goals and targets. When you do, you’ll be speaking the language of entrepreneurs and business people rather than sounding salesy.

Then you offer to introduce her to someone who can help her achieve her goals, or you can follow up with her later.

Sales leaders

A lot of sales leaders shouldn’t be in leadership roles. They simply get thrust there because they are the best salesperson.

Dave’s philosophy is to determine your best salesperson and then get out of his way. Remove all the barriers and let him sell.

Your best managers should be capable of three things:

  1. Removing barriers to free their best people to soar.
  2. Onboarding people and training them effectively so they know how to develop deep relationships.
  3. Coaching and mentoring people to maintain their attitudes and confidence.

The worst thing you can do to your salespeople is forcing them to do something unnatural, and the best thing you can do is challenge them.

Rule of thumb

Each industry is different.

For every 100 relationships you develop, about 10 will result in business in the short term. about 15-20 will result in business within the next 60-90 days. Over the next six months, about 35-40 percent of those relationships will produce business.

Be very intentional about the people you meet in a business setting.

Of everyone you’ve met in college or in your town, two-thirds of those people are going to either refer business to you or do business with you.

Dave has a list of 20 names in his office that will be future clients. He works every day to find people in those companies that he can call or email and he reaches out to them.

Get three pieces of stationery.

Send one to a client thanking him for doing business with you. Include a business card so that if someone needs your services, he can share your card.

Send another to someone who referred business to you in the past thanking them for their help.

Send the third to someone you want to work with who has been highlighted in the news, either online or in the physical newspaper.

Do three cards every day, even on Saturday and Sunday.

The 60-Second Sale” episode resources

You can connect with Dave at his website, DaveLorenzo.com. You can find all kinds of free stuff there, including about 300 articles and 500 videos.

Grab a copy of The 60-Second Sale: The Ultimate System for Building Lifelong Client Relationships in the Blink of an Eye

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Paresh Shah, Lifter Leader, Trust, Innovate

TSE 908: Lifter Leadership-How To Innovate, Engage, Build Trust And Be Purposeful All At Once!


Paresh Shah, Lifter Leader, Trust, Innovate

For sales leaders, improving your team’s numbers isn’t always enough. If you can help your team innovate, engage, build trust, and be purposeful, you’ll lift your team up and improve their lives. Lifter leadership will change your sales team and change your company.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Paresh Shah, author of the upcoming book Lifters, talks about why his methodology is important for sales efficacy, and how Lifter leaders help companies address disruption and innovation.

Paresh helps governments, large companies, small companies, and entrepreneurs solve their biggest problems. His company, the Non-Obvious Company, is named that because he said that obvious thinking won’t solve big problems.

Statistics suggest that customers only trust 55 percent of companies today, so the first obstacle companies have to overcome is distrust among its customers.

Lifters are leaders

Lifters are the new leaders of the world.

These leaders help their customers and their coworkers find a better way of being. They lift their coworkers and other people around them by creating a better work environment, characterized by positivity, integrity, authenticity, value, and creative expression.

Lifters lift their companies, and as a result, they drive more revenue and more loyalty while they lower costs and innovate. They lift their world and their companies at the same time.

Lifters see beyond transactional relationships.

Fundamental reset

As Paresh became more mindful throughout his career, he discovered that humans are fundamentally changing the way they connect with one another.

As part of that, the model for how to transact, sell, and run and build a business was fundamentally being reset.

That led him to the Lifter paradigm, where he realized that the sales process wasn’t really about hunting for customers, targeting them, capturing them, segmenting them, and analyzing them.

Paresh realized that model no longer works. Lifters understand that it’s about helping customers, inspiring them, serving them, and lifting them. It’s a whole different model.

As a result of his shift, he’s happier, he’s making more money, his customers are his friends, and everything is working better.

Four mind shifts

1. The hunt is over. The days of hunting for your customer are behind you. It’s about serving, inspiring and lifting now.

2. Truth or consequences. We must be authentic and have integrity in everything we do as leaders.

3. “Yes and” people. They are multitaskers. They bring great value to the people they manage and to their customers because they are good at a variety of things.

4. Lifters take Invictus action. In the movie with Matt Damon, victory wasn’t winning. It was bringing people together under a common purpose. Lifters attract customers and inspire them.

We do have to take action, but we don’t do it with a poverty mindset. We shift into a generosity mindset and ask how we can help.

Start with “What do you love?” and “How can I help?”

Lifter skills

Paresh teaches that we are all energy. We are not separate people.

Lifter leadership shifts into a mindset of compassion, caring, creativity, and interconnectedness of everyone. We’ve shifted to a higher consciousness, and people, the younger generation especially, can feel inauthenticity.

People will quickly call us out for lack of authenticity. If, for example, we’re building wells for people in Africa, but we’re polluting a river with the byproducts of our products, people will call us out for it.

Lifter leadership turns the whole model upside down.

How do you show up in the moment? Are you seeing the interconnectedness of all the people you interact with?

If you don’t become a Lifter leader, you will be left in the cold.

Paresh quotes a Harvard Business Review article that reported that companies that operate with conscious purposeful principles like Lifter leadership perform 10.5 times better.

Rock star companies

In the early days of farming, families engage in subsistence farming in which they worked together all day every day to raise enough food to support their own needs.

At some point, non-obvious innovators had a different idea: to rotate the crops instead of planting the same crop in the same place every time. They used massive scale agriculture to change the world, and these farmers were the rock stars of innovation.

It freed up labor and people started moving to the cities.

Eventually, the Industrial Revolution began. If you were someone who could automate work processes or create a non-obvious idea for how to streamline a factory, you were a rock star.

New rock stars who understood automation and other concepts like steam and mass manufacturing eventually launched mega-companies like Rockefeller and Carnegie.

Nerds and geeks

The next group of rock stars created the companies that run the world right now, like Google and Apple and Microsoft. They created a whole new world with the Internet, information, and software.

Initially, those people were nerds and geeks, and they were outcasts. They were on the fringe of society until someone realized we needed to pay attention to them.

These people understood something other people didn’t, and the companies that embraced and nurtured them became rock stars. The companies that didn’t embrace them were obliterated.

Lifter leadership isn’t just about sales. Lifter leaders have workers that are engaged who will walk on fire for you. Seven out of 10 workers are disengaged because we aren’t giving them Lifter leadership.

“Lifter Leaders” episode resources

Connect with Paresh Shah at his website where he has a diagnostic for our listeners to help them determine their Lifter capability. Visit www.iamalifter.com/salesevan.

Also, check out his TEDx video about Lifters.

If all of this sounds great to you but you still aren’t sure how to start, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights.

You can also join our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers to connect with sales professionals from all walks of life.

Today’s episode is brought to you by Maximizer CRM, a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

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Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Leading, Little Things

TSE 907: The Little Things Matter The Most When You’re Leading


Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Leading, Little ThingsHow far are you willing to go to get ahead of the competition? In order to be successful, you must do the opposite of what everyone else is doing. Realize that little things matter the most when you’re leading, and if you adopt them in your own business, you can become a better sales leader.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, I’ll share the true story of a dentist I visited who went the extra mile, and why it made such a big difference.

This dentist didn’t do anything big. Take note of the five little things that will cause your sales staff to look to you as a sales leader.

1. Recognize them out of the blue.

There are natural occasions like birthday, anniversaries, kids going to college or graduating, or 5th anniversary working with the company. A lot of sales leaders aren’t acknowledging these natural opportunities to recognize an employee.

Call them to see how they are doing; maybe on a Wednesday just to see how the day went and how the deals are going. Encourage them along the way, even if things didn’t go the way they wanted.

Your team will learn to trust that you’re looking out for their best interest, and they’ll trust and support you. And when you need help, they’re going to work harder for you.

2. Take time for one-on-one coaching.

Make sure you spend time with your sellers so you’ll understand their strengths and their struggles. Prioritize one-on-one coaching.

Stephen Covey’s fifth principle says to seek first to understand, and then to be understood. Before you focus on helping them understand the things you need them to get done, seek to understand the things they need.

Treat them like your customer. Make them feel good.

3. Recognize their successes in front of their peers.

When a sales rep closes a deal or lines up an appointment or gets a referral, recognize them in front of their peers.

Sales reps love recognition, and if you can make them feel good, they’re going to work harder to repeat that action. You’ll communicate to them that you care about the sales reps and they’ll want to work hard over and over again.

4. Make their goal become your priority.

It’s tempting to think of this the other way around and expect your sales team to make your goals their goals.

Begin the other way around. If your sales rep wants to buy a house, or get a new car, or take his family to Europe, or pay off college loans, make that goal a priority.

If you, as a sales leader, are focused on making me win as a seller, I am going to do everything you need me to do. I’ll understand that you had my best interests in mind.

If, for example, they are planning a trip, and you engage with them to find out details about the trip, and where they are in the buying process, and what the costs of the trip will be, it will communicate that you care about their needs rather than pushing your own.

5. Challenge them, trust them, and empower them to do tough things.

Let your team members know that you’re confident that they can handle the tasks you’ve given them.

Remind them that you’ll help them through the process.

Don’t simply give responsibility to the best sales reps on the team; trust and empower your sales reps with important tasks. Don’t give them too much too soon, and don’t give them work that is difficult for them to bear.

Remind them that you have confidence in them.

As your team members achieve success, gradually increase the tasks you entrust to them.

Give your sales team reasons to brag about you; to realize that they have the best sales leader in the world.

I share stuff like this because I want to help you guys find more ideal customers, to build stronger value, to close more deals, and most importantly to challenge you to do big things.

“Little Things Matter the Most” episode resources

Today’s episode is brought to you by Maximizer CRM, a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Jason Loh, Sales Manger, Get Time Back, Anaplan,

TSE 903: How To Get More Time Back As A Sales Manager To Exceed Quota

Jason Loh, Sales Manger, Get Time Back, Anaplan,Regardless of your industry, you’re probably invested in helping your sales team optimize its performance. Ultimately, we need our teams to hit their quotas and perform at their peak. So how do you help your team get more time back in order to exceed quota?

Jason Loh visits The Sales Evangelist podcast today to help us understand how to make the best use of our time and to help us understand the value of time. When we do, we can help our sales teams get more time back to exceed quota.

Jason is the global head of sales solutions for Anaplan, a software vendor that is pioneering a category of connected planning. Anaplan seeks to bring together people with data in order to help organizations better manage their business.

What is the value of time?

Sellers do best when they have clear marching orders.

Sometimes the problem emerges at the end of Q4 when an organization is moving into a new fiscal year.  Sellers don’t always know whether they are supposed to sell into the same accounts they sold into the last year.

While the company cleans house at the end of a fiscal year, very often the sellers find themselves with a nebulous period of time. They could spend as many as two or three months waiting to see what comes next.

If sellers don’t have a clear sense of what they should be doing, uncertainty causes them to hesitate. By the time the organization gains its footing for the new fiscal year, the company has lost two months’ worth of time, which means it has to complete 12 months’ worth of selling in only 10 months.

One of the first thing sales reps want to know when they begin a new job is how they’ll be compensated. If their compensation will rely on productivity, it’s in their best interest to make the most of their time.

How can teams get more time back?

Sales leaders can’t simply expect sellers to figure things out. Instead, they have to set a good example and get the house in order to remove roadblocks to success and empower their sellers.

Identify the top three things for the upcoming fiscal year.

You must make sure that your organization’s plan correlates to how you’re designing your compensation plans. Without an extra incentive to drive your reps to accomplish those goals, how will you expect them to accomplish those three things? Furthermore, why are you incentivizing things that don’t match your company’s top three goals?

So often there’s a disconnect between senior leadership and the sellers, so people are scratching their heads wondering why things aren’t matching up.

How does a lack of goal setting affect organizations?

The Alexander Group reports that 81 percent of organizations don’t have their comp plans connected to their sales team’s marching orders.

Jason says there are things organizations can control, and things they can’t control. Your organization should do its best to control things like marching orders and sales plans because those things are well within your control.

Things like employee turnover are completely outside your organization’s control and they can present a significant challenge.

How do you effectively plan for the hiring process of bringing on a new rep, ramping for a period of time, covering for employees who are absent for a period of time, all while still managing the entire process?

What platforms and technologies should my sales team be using?

From a seller or sales rep’s perspective, CRM is the core.

For leaders, consider this: does micromanaging your sales teams’ number of emails, number of voicemails and other metrics help you build your larger strategy? Does it get you where you need to be in 12 months?

Aim to help your sellers manage their sales basics so you can transfer a marketing qualified lead to a sales qualified lead.

Opt for a decision-based platform that helps you pull together data. Make sure you know who your contacts are at each organization as well as who your influencers and decision-makers are.

Identify the tools that will help your sales team elevate its game and develop more opportunities.

Measure your reps on whether they delivered.

Productivity depends on the industry you’re in and the tasks and activities you’re required to do. Understanding those requirements will help you understand whether your team is maximizing its productivity.

Imagine this:

If I’m a sales rep with a killer sales forecast and I miss my number, I might be escorted out the door. If I’m a sales rep with a horrible sales forecast, but I exceed my number anyway, I’ll be carried around the office like a rock star.

As a sales leader, it’s challenging to marry the endgame with the leading indicators like phone calls and emails, but it’s worth the effort. Otherwise, your team will focus primarily on the end number without paying as much attention to the process.

If you don’t incentivize the process, your sellers won’t pay attention to it.

There are a lot of movable parts in this process.

It’s all interconnected so the decisions in one part directly impact the other parts.

Introduce a decision platform so you can understand how even small decisions will cascade against the organization. Don’t look at things in a vacuum.

Look at things holistically and see all the components of your sales strategy to make sure you’re able to attain those goals.

“Get More Time Back” episode resources

Find out more about Anaplan or contact Jason Loh directly at the website.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Barth Getto, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Leadership

TSE 899: Sales From The Street-“Your Legend”

Barth Getto, Sales From The Street, Sales LeaderLeadership is difficult. Even when the people you’re leading have something in common, it’s tough to lead a varied group of people. Leading a group of independent, free-thinking employees presents a unique challenge, but it’s one that allows you to leave your mark.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Barth Getto, president of Empowery eCommerce Cooperative, talks about the challenges of leading a varied group of people well. Barth, who leads a collection of independent entrepreneurs that sell in the eCommerce space, says you must learn to motivate and encourage.

Lead by experience

First and foremost, it’s much easier to lead a group of people when you have experience doing their job. If you’re the VP of sales, it will be easier to lead a sales team if you’ve sold the product yourself.

People look at you differently when you’ve walked in their shoes.

You also have to set very specific goals and hold people to those goals.

Salespeople want to be told when they’re doing well. They don’t mind being told when they are doing poorly if they’re being measured fairly.

Realize, too, that you can motivate so much better by giving positive feedback than you can by giving negative feedback.

Be a confident leader

When you’re a leader who isn’t worried about losing your leadership position, that confidence allows you to operate differently. You relax a little more.

Some managers see capable people as a threat to their own positions. They fear that if they give too many public accolades to another person in the organization, they’ll lose their job to that person.

Barth said his goal is to make sure his employees are so well-versed in how the company runs that they won’t miss him when he leaves.

As a leader, the leaders he raises up are his legacy. He trains them and gives them all the tools they need to succeed. It’s a selfless idea: striving to benefit everyone instead of just yourself.

Every time he has left a company, it has done well in his absence.

Seek group input

There’s no such thing as a perfect decision. The best you can hope for is to analyze all the information you have and make the best decision you can.

No one has all the answers to any issue, and that’s especially true in eCommerce.

It is possible, however, to improve your odds by including others in the process.

Be direct

Issues are easier to identify when you have a good CRM in place and a good tracking system so you can provide examples to your team members.

When issues arise with people on your team, tackle them head-on. People who know you care about them will be open to discussions about their performance.

Allow them to be part of the discussion. Ask them where they believe the problem is occurring. Treat it more like a consultation than an accusation.

Again, this is why experience in their job gives you credibility because you’ve personally done the work they are doing.

Also realize that sometimes releasing people from a job that isn’t a good fit is a kind act.

Enjoy the work

Building leaders is rewarding work, especially when you lead a varied group of people. Barth compares it to watching a child grow.

As your team gels and solidifies, you watch the organization move forward and find more success and learn from its mistakes.

The goal, he said, is to watch people blossom and then step out of the way to let them lead. In short, when you lead well, you’re working yourself out of a job.

Once you’ve had success, it’s easy to find another organization that needs your help, and then you get to have the experience again.

Be positive. Give your team a shot in the arm. Do things together outside of just selling.

Understand how your people like to have information shared. It’s easy to have a conversation with someone who knows you care about him.

“Your Legend” episode resources

Connect with Barth via email, barth@empowery.com. If you’re a listener in the eCommerce space selling through any major marketplace, Barth would love to talk with you about becoming a member of the cooperative.

The costs are nominal but the benefits are huge. The co-op provides a support network — a sort of safety net —  and helps you sort through the wild-west aspect of eCommerce.

Grab a copy of the book Turn the Ship Around that Barth mentioned during the podcast.

If you think you might benefit from more stories like these, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights. We’re beginning a new semester this fall, and we’d be honored for you to join us.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Trust, Sales Leader, Innovation, Stop Selling & Start Leading

TSE 877: How To Build Trust & Be Seen As An Innovative Seller


Trust, Sales Leader, Innovation, Stop Selling & Start LeadingYour prospects likely have dozens of sellers seeking to connect and build relationships with them. That means dozens of cold calls, emails, and presentations by dozens of different organizations. The key to success with any prospect is to build trust and be seen as an innovative seller.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, we begin a 3-part series based on the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen. We’ll discuss principles that sales professionals need to adopt and apply in order to be successful.

Be human.

Imagine yourself in a meeting with a prospect for a deal that could be the biggest of your career. The prospect continually interrupts you and you’re frustrated because none of your best content seems to be making a difference.

In a moment of frustration, you tell her you’re only here because she invited you. You could be home hanging out with your family and your pet rabbit.

Something changes immediately. It turns out the prospect has a pet rabbit, too, and suddenly you have something in common. You two launch into an entire conversation about lives outside of work and a relationship begins.

This is one of the stories in the book Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen, and it illustrates how commonalities can boost you from seller to trusted advisor.

Let the prospect know who you are. Let her see behind your sales persona to your other interests. Find a way to remind her that you’re human.

Building rapport encourages the prospect to share something of her own with you, and it may give the buyer reason to connect with you.

See around corners.

Illustrate to your prospects that you’re an innovative seller.

You must know the roles and challenges of the industry you’re selling to in order to provide solutions that make your prospect’s life easier. If you’re working with CFOs in manufacturing, what are the challenges they face on a daily basis? Trade wars with China? Looming high prices?

If I can provide intel or info, even if it’s unrelated to my product, I can help the prospect prepare for — and deal with — the challenges that are stumping her.

Will the company face layoffs? What if they have to raise prices?

When a small organization hires a new seller, they begin a honeymoon phase in which everyone is excited. Eventually, though, the seller gets bored because he doesn’t have any training processes. The CEO doesn’t have time to invest in him because he’s busy running the company, and the seller gets tired of doing cold calls.

I’ve seen it happen countless times, and I can see around the corner for small organizations because I’ve seen this happen before. I can point out five things they’ll struggle with long before the issues actually arise.

If you present yourself as a trusted advisor, your prospect will trust you in all things, and she’ll look to you for solutions.

“Innovative seller” episode resources

We’ve been recommending the book the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley  for quite some time because we believe in the message. Based upon interviews with buyers, it offers specific information for sellers to help them become trusted advisors.

As part of the series this week, we have a SlideShare available for you to download, or you can link to it here. As always, we also have a free excerpt of the book so you can try it out for yourself. We believe you’ll like it so much you’ll want to grab your own copy.

Today’s episode was also brought to you by Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and making your brand pop using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

If you think you might benefit from more stories like these, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights. We’re beginning a new semester this fall, and we’d be honored for you to join us.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

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Moral, Values, Ethical, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 822: Selling Basic 101…Establish Your Own Set of Values

Moral, Values, Ethical, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

It can be very tempting for sellers to compromise their core values in pursuit of sales and money.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’re discussing how to stay on the high road and still make plenty of money.

Determine core values

Your core values are the principles you live by. Think of them as your North Star, keeping you on the right path.

A father and son were navigating trails in the woods when the father told the son to keep his eyes on a fixed point to avoid getting lost. Instead of following his father’s directions, the son got distracted by a rabbit that ran across his trail. He followed the rabbit and couldn’t find his way back to the trail.

When we establish values that won’t change, it helps you navigate the tricky waters of trying to accomplish your goals without sacrificing your relationship with your prospects.

Be honest. Treat people the way they’d like to be treated.

Be respectful, ethical, patient, and give them what they want.

Keep long-term goals in mind

The book Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen  advises sellers to do what they say they’ll do.

If you schedule an appointment and then realize you can’t make it, let the prospect know and reschedule.

Otherwise, the prospect will assume that, if you couldn’t keep that commitment, how will you keep other, more important commitments?

Be straightforward with your prospects when you aren’t the best fit for them, and they will respect you and your honesty. They will look for ways to do business with you because you were honest.

Sometimes as sellers we focus on the short-term gain because we want to get the deal. When that happens, we may land a small deal for ourselves.

Very often, though, if we keep the long-term in mind, we may land a bigger deal with a prospect who refers us to other people because we provided value and we built trust.

The prospect doesn’t know you yet, and they don’t have an understanding of who you are. Create a good impression.

Episode resources

We’re big fans of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen by our friends at Wiley. The authors compiled research from customers that will help you become a leader instead of an order-taker. The information will help you bring value to your customers.  Read an excerpt of the book here.

If you haven’t already subscribed to this podcast, subscribe today and tell a friend or colleague about it as well. Consider leaving us a rating wherever you consume this content to help other people discover our message.

To learn more about our newly-launched Sales Podcast Network designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries, email us at SPN for more information.

Check out the Video Jungle Podcast, part of SPN, to hear best practices for video and film production and to learn the art of selling your product with video.

We want you to find more customers, build more value, close more deals, and do big things every day.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Karim El Gammal, Donald Kelly, Sales Plan

TSE 766: Developing an Effective Sales Plan

Karim El Gammal, Donald Kelly, Sales PlanKarim El Gammal is a sales leader who knows how to develop an effective sales plan. He likes to help software companies develop innovative sales strategies and maximize channel-profitability.

He managed to achieve $3M in recurring revenue at Vodafone, in 18 months. Karim also grew the Cambridge Education Group sales team from 1 to 10 people, remotely from Boston, and was one of the key players in creating the Stafford House digital brand.

Currently, Karim is building a sales team in NY, at STRV – software development company.

As an entrepreneur, Karim was featured on Gimlet Media Startup-Podcast after being on the winning NY StartupBus in 2017. He is currently building Phishly to help large companies detect social engineering attacks and avoid getting phished in the future.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Karim:

The Power of Having Clear Goal and Plan

  • A team should follow a clear path. There should be clear direction and strategic planning. Otherwise, an organization can’t function properly.
  • This should be team collaboration mindset.
  • Give your sales reps full ownership so they can have a clear picture of the bigger plans.

3 Major Pitfalls Why Sales Plans Fail

1. Bad Data

IBM estimates $3.1 trillion of the yearly cost of poor quality data

When data is transferred from one department to another, it could burn thousands of dollars on running the wrong campaigns or wrong target audience.

2. Aligning the Company’s Objectives Across the Board

The company has to have a mindset as a company of having the right data and apply best practices across different departments.

Generate better inbound leads by talking to your marketing team. Then figure out a plan together. Share feedback, best practices, and align goals together to make it easier for everyone.

3. Tracking

Take time to step back and analyze the data on a monthly basis. Figure out what you’ve done wrong and what to do better next time. Then track that data to reach the higher level.

Elements of an Effective Sales Plan

1. Pick a niche market and build traction.

When you track to create something to everyone, you end up creating something for no one. Think about how big is the market, what products are sold, value proposition, and competitive advantages.

2. Target customer

Who’s your target customer and why? Consider your geographic information, target channels, budget and measuring the budget. All these info will help you create your customer profile that will qualify your leads and manage your funnel more effectively.

3. Conversion versus customer fallout.

Think about your competitive advantages or are you missing on important features? Sales reps must report every single feedback in the CRM. The seniors should verify questions and analyze data before sharing the feedback with the product and marketing teams. Transferring the right data at the right time is also crucial.

Karim’s Major Takeaway:

Understand your value within the organization or wherever you go. It’s essential to grow your career.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Karim on LinkedIn and Instagram or reach out to him thru karim@strv.com.

STRV

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

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Sales Metrics, Sales Performance, SEO,

TSE BLOG 018: 5 Sales Performance Metrics You’re Probably Not Following

Sales Metrics, Sales Performance, SEO,“Every entrepreneur and business owners have one most common burning question running through their head, “How can I improve my sales?”

“What’s your sales metrics (the average revenue per sale)?” I respond back to them.

Unfortunately, almost all entrepreneurs and business owners stare at me clueless, unable to answer my simple question, which is perhaps one of the most common reasons why their sales never increase.

You see, knowing your sales metrics is super essential to sales growth because once you know it, you can dramatically (or methodically) skyrocket your sales and your competitors will get left behind in the dust.

 

Here are five sales performance metric you must follow:

  1. Website Traffic

The number one metric that every website owners obsess about is website traffic – a total number of unique visits to your website.

Surely, website traffic is supercritical for a successful online business, and you can monitor this metric quickly by using Google Analytics.

Your website traffic is a good indication to know whether your website is growing, stagnating, or declining. You can also measure this sales performance metric to see the efficiency of specific promotional methods. Let’s say, for example, your website experiences a sudden traffic spike after posting a guest post on a popular blog, which should indicate to you that you should be doing more of the same in the future.

On the other hand, if your website’s traffic is in decline for a very long time, this tells you that you should change your approach and try new things because whatever you’re currently doing is not working. If you don’t do it fast, your website will fail.

  1. Your Website Traffic Sources

In addition to knowing your website traffic numbers, you should also know where all those traffic are coming. Again, you can do this quickly by using Google Analytics (it’s free).

This free SEO tool breaks down your traffic sources into four different categories: organic traffic (traffic that comes through the search engines), direct traffic (traffic that types your domain into the browser), referral traffic (traffic coming from another website), and social traffic (traffic generated through social media).

Why should I care about all these traffic sources?

The answer is simple: each traffic source will tell you more information about your website.

For example, if 70% of your website’s total traffic is organic traffic, that tells you how well your site ranks in the search engine, which in turn will show you how effective your SEO strategy is. With over 40,000 searches per second on Google alone, today search engines have become one of the most important sources of traffic.

Referral traffic gives you an idea of a total number of visitors who come through other websites – perhaps you published a guest post, or a site linked back to content on your website.

If a lot of websites are linking to your site, your business can benefit in two ways: First, your website rankings will dramatically improve, and you’ll be less dependent on the search engines to drive traffic. Second, plenty of links referring your site means that you’re doing an excellent job and shows how valuable your content is.

Direct traffic is the total number of visitors who type your website URL into their browser – for instance, http://www.yourwebsiteurl.com. A good amount of direct traffic indicates a loyal following.

Lastly, social traffic indicates a total number of visitors that come from the social media sites. The more valuable, relevant, and shareable your content is, the more engaging it becomes on social media, and thus, more traffic you will get to your website.

Which traffic source is best for me?

Well, the answer isn’t simple. It all depends on the website type you’re running. However, one thing is for sure: it’s always beneficial if your traffic came from different sources as it will help minimize the risk of your website being slaughtered if your primary site traffic source shrink.

  1. Your Website Bounce Rate

Bounce rate is another critical sales metric, which has a significant impact on SEO. It tells you how many people leave your website immediately after arriving. So the lower your bounce rate, the longer your visitors are staying on your site (enjoying your content) and converting.

On the other hand, a high bounce rate indicates to you that your visitors are leaving, immediately after they arrive.

But, this sales performance metrics don’t tell you why they are leaving. You’ll have to do the spy work yourself by digging a little bit deeper. However, usually, a high bounce rate include poor website design, slow load times, poorly targeted keywords, and broken websites.

With these things in mind, you can easily and quickly improve your website’s bounce rate by making your site look professional, function properly, and publishing valuable content regularly.

  1. Your Best Performing Pages

Google Analytics also has a Behavior section that allows you to quickly see your top performing pages in regards to traffic volume.

Knowing which pages get the most traffic on your website is highly decisive as it helps you understand what your audience honestly respond to. If you publish different types of content on your site, this is when you can start to analyze what content type is working, and post more of those materials in the future.

However, traffic numbers aren’t the only way you can discover your “top performing” pages.

You can also look at the total number of social shares for a page, which is an indication of a high-quality article. Google Analytics doesn’t have this tool. However, there are plenty of other tools and WordPress plugins that displays this information, such as Social Metrics Pro.

Once you know which content is popular with your audience, the next step becomes even more straightforward: publish more of it!

  1. Your Website Conversion Ratio

The conversion ratio is another top critical sales performance metric, or perhaps the most vital sales performance parameter of all because it can have a massive impact on your website’s profitability – if you can only improve your conversion rate from 2% to 4%, you can double your profits, almost overnight!

Conversion rate indicates how well you motivate a traffic to take the desired ACTION.

Here’s how to calculate your conversion rate:

Conversion rate  = total visitors to your site/number of conversions

A website may have different conversion “goals.” For instance, if you’re running an eCommerce store, then you might have these three conversion goals:

  • Make a sale (number one priority!)
  • Ask a visitor to sign up for your email list
  • Ask a visitor to share your content on social sites (optional, but still highly valuable)

Understand this: if your website has high conversion rate, then whatever you’re doing is excellent. On the other hand, if it has a low conversion rate, either you are probably driving the wrong traffic, or your sales copy is weak, or your call to action isn’t powerful enough to drive conversions.

Because conversion rates can have a powerful effect on profits, you should spend your time and effort on optimizing your website for conversions, regularly. Even small changes can deliver a dramatic spike in your sales.

 

Author bio:

Annabelle Short is a writer in contentblossom and a seamstress of more than 5 years. Annabelle is a mother and she loves making crafts with her two children, Leo (age 9) and Michelle (age 11). When not working, she’s spending time with her family or putting pen to paper for her own personal pursuits.

Sales Manager, VP, CEO, The Sales Evangelist

TSE BLOG 017: 22 South Florida Entrepreneurs and Sales Leaders Doing Big Things

Sales Manager, VP, CEO, The Sales EvangelistThe key to success is proximity.

According to Tony Robbins, you’re far more likely to be successful if you surround yourself with people who are playing the game at a higher level than you are.

It allows you to model already-proven strategies, shaving valuable time off your timeline.

So why not start close to home?

The following 22 people are entrepreneurs who live in our midst. They call South Florida home, and they have demonstrated success in their respective fields. Learning their stories and studying their techniques could translate to career and personal success.

Many of the companies represented below landed on Inc.’s list of the 5000 fastest growing companies, and some of them have been there for years.

Jorge Plasencia Co-Founder, Chairman & CEO of Republica, one of America’s leading and fastest-growing independent marketing and communications agencies. República is an international agency creating relevant, enduring connections between brands and people across culture, language, and technology. The Miami based company generates north of $15 million in revenue.

Brett Forman is the founder and CEO of Forman Capital, a real estate lender for bridge and commercial real estate loans. The Boynton Beach company generated $7.9 million in revenue in 2016, landing it at #4252 on the Inc. 5000 list.

 

 

Suzan McDowell is the president & CEO of Circle of One Marketing, a full-service marketing and advertising agency with a tilt towards the African American and Caribbean markets. Circle of One has developed successful multicultural campaigns for a wide range of clients, across all types of media. The company generates about $2 million in annual revenue.

 

Maria Salazar is the Director of Sales at Azulle, #249 on this year’s list. Azulle, based out of North Miami Beach, boasts a line of mini PC’s, tablets, and the Quantum Access computer. The company seeks to bring affordable and innovative technology to businesses and families, generating $6.3 million in revenue.

Adam Mopsick is the CEO of Amicon Management in Miami. The real estate and construction company generated $2 million in revenue last year, earning it the #1232 on the Inc. 5000 list.

 

 

Niles Tagliamonte is the Vice President of Sales for Endosystems, based out of Fort Lauderdale. The B2B company distributes equipment and devices related to the aesthetic and wellness industry. Endosystems is #1412 on Inc.’s list, with a revenue value of $3.2 million.

 

 

Brian Scheel serves as the Vice President of Sales for Arrow Consulting & Design, a software development firm headquartered in West Palm Beach. With revenue of $10.3 million, Arrow has twice been named to the Inc. 5,000 — in 2015 and again in 2016.

 

 

Robin Tidrick of PaperStreet Web Design is Sales Director at the Fort Lauderdale-based company. With a 2016 revenue of $3.4 million, PaperStreet offers website design, internet marketing, SEO and content services. Founded in 2001, the company has served more than 1,300 firms since its inception.

 

Alexander Nygart and Gary Garth co-founded White Shark Media, a digital marketing company that tailors online marketing solutions for small and medium-sized businesses. Ranked #786 on the Inc. 5000, the Miami-based agency had a 2016 revenue of $10 million and was included on the previous two years’ lists as well. White Shark Media was also ranked #18 on Inc.’s list of Top Miami companies.

Kevin V. Michael is the co-founder and managing partner of Invizio, LLC, a South Florida IT services and consulting firm dedicated to helping businesses maximize their use of technology. He oversees business development, strategic relationship development and client relations for the company. The company generates about $6.2 million in annual revenue.

 

Ron Green is the President and CEO of Greenlight Staffing Group, an IT staffing firm in Hollywood, Fl., that offers temporary, contract and permanent staffing to various industries. Greenlight has made the Inc. 5000 list for the past two years and generated $3.1 million in revenue in 2016.

 

 

Jessica Massad is the founder and CEO of Collateral Management, a network of appraisers that provides valuation services for both commercial and residential properties. This year’s #1589 ranking marks the third time the Fort Lauderdale-based company has made the 5000 list, and the company generated $10.8 million in revenue last year.

 

Eric Rhoads is the founder and CEO of Streamline Publishing in Boca Raton. In its 20th year, the company generated $5.6 million in 2016 and made the Inc. 5000 list for the third consecutive year. Streamline is anchored in the traditional printing of consumer and trade magazines and is also well-versed in digital radio and video products.

 

Richard Ticktin is the CEO of Synergy Labs, the manufacturer of dog and cat hard-goods in Fort Lauderdale. Synergy Labs earned the #1469 spot on the Inc. 5000 list with $8.7 million in revenue and 276% growth. Synergy boasts its own R&D laboratory and its own chemists, and it supplies more than 40 countries.

 

Henry Woodman is the President of ICE Portal in Hollywood, FL. ICE Portal is a technology company that helps hotels produce and distribute visual content to clients, generating $2.3 million in revenue in 2016.   

 

 

Paul Rubenstein is the managing partner of Convert IT Marketing in Fort Lauderdale, an advertising, and marketing firm that specializes in internet marketing for law firms. The company earned the #1676 spot on Inc.’s list and generated $6.2 million in revenue last year.

 

 

Christine Phipps is the president of Phipps Reporting — a company that provides transcription, deposition and litigation services to the legal industry. The West Palm Beach company generated $8.6 million in 2016 and earned the #1915 ranking on the Inc. 5000 list. This year was the company’s fourth consecutive appearance on the list.

 

Sylvain Faber founded Eyevertising in 2010. The promotional product supplier, based out of Miami, generated a reported $2.4 million in 2016, and it holds six U.S. patents for its custom pinhole sunglasses.

 

 

Patrick Barnhill is the founder and president of Specialist ID, a distributor of photo identification badges and accessories in Miami. The company generated $3.7 million in 2016 and earned a spot on the Inc. 5000 list for the third consecutive year.

 

Gary Vermaas is the CEO of Base4, a management company that assembles teams of architects and engineers to design resorts, theme parks, hotels, and hospitals as well as retail, commercial and institutional buildings. The company generated $5.7 million in 2016, earning it the #1607 on the Inc. 5000 list. Base4 also earned a spot on the list in 2016.

 

Nicholas Santillo is the president and co-founder of Fractl, a Delray Beach advertising and marketing firm that gets attention for clients through viral content and media mentions. Fractl generated $5.1 million in revenue in 2016, and it landed at #1053 on the Inc. 5000 list.

 

 

Increase Your Odds of Success

LinkedIn recently surpassed 500 million members.

The networking giant estimates that each new contact you make reflects 400 potential relationships, 100 potential companies, and 500 potential jobs.

Be deliberate with your time. Invest your time in things that have an impact. Maximize your time by learning important lessons from the people who have already learned them.

Start with the people in your neck of the woods. Start with successful entrepreneurs on LinkedIn.

Use proximity to your advantage.

Selling Success, Jeff Bajorek, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 738: Rethinking The Way You Sell

Selling Success, Jeff Bajorek, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist PodcastToo often as sales professionals, we have the same old mindset that doesn’t give us the result we want. How about changing that? How about rethinking the way you sell?

Today’s guest, Jeff Bajorek, challenges sellers to rethink the way they sell. He is a consultant, speaker, sales advisor, and a podcaster.

He has been selling for several years and has learned that by rethinking the way you sell you will become successful.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Jeff:

Is Social Selling the New Cold Calling?

Focus on what allows you to bring value to your audience and personalize that. Think about those things that got you to the table in the first place rather than focusing on the likes you get.

Salesperson-centric versus customer-centric

  • Have empathy for who’s receiving that message otherwise it’s nearly impossible to convert anybody.
  • Most salespeople just see names as numbers and how many people they can reach. They want to make their quota but don’t realize that at the end of the day those prospects are humans. Being honest is the way to go.

The Power of Connection

  • Instead of focusing on hitting your numbers, think about calling, say, 50 people, and connect with 20 with them and make four sales.
  • Just put yourself in those 50 shoes and try to tailor your pitch or proposition in a way that it’s going to resonate with them so they will respond to it.
  • The reason you only get a 10% response rate is because it’s a garbage proposition in the first place.

Strategies for Scaling to Get Better Results

1.Put yourself in the place of the rep.

Think about how you felt when you were in that role and you didn’t know about anything.

2.Take notes and review.

Take extra time after each call and if you were in the position of the prospect, would that proposition have resonated with you?

Take notes of what worked and what didn’t and review those stuff. What do you need to change? What needs to stay the same?

3.Pay attention to things.

Be aware of yourself and don’t think about the next five dials while you’re on a call. Be there for the person you’ve got on the phone at that time. Really engage with them.

4.Motivate people.

When you’re a manager, your salespeople are your customers. But managers stop thinking about that all the time. As a result, the sales professionals lose sight of what they’re trying to do as well.

5.Instead of worrying about scaling at an alarming rate, just make it work.

Figure out what works. Make it work repeatedly. And then build it own as tolerably as you can. Don’t lose sight of what you’re doing.

Developing Underlying Trust

If you do it right, your best customers do the prospecting for you.

You’re in this business to connect with people. You’re there to help.

Jeff’s Major Takeaway:

Everything is coming at you a million miles a minute. There’s more room than you can possibly imagine. So stop, take a deep breath, and think twice about why you’re doing what you’re doing. Effectiveness increases your efficiency.

Episode Resources:

Check out Jeff’s podcast The Why and the BuyThey’re soon starting a book club where they pick a book every month and they’re going to do a live podcast recording where everyone can join the conversation.

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Tired of PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same.

Cynthia Barnes, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 651: It’s Time to Transform Our Sales Training

Cynthia Barnes, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

There’s nothing wrong with traditional training models, but with a few tweaks, you can even go further!

Cynthia Barnes shares her insights into the current sales training system and why you need to transform the way we do sales training, women in particular. Cynthia is a keynote speaker and sales trainer, showing women sales professionals how to influence decision makers before they miss out on a big opportunity.

At Barnes Sales Institute, they focus on women-centric sales training. Cynthia is also the Founder of the National Association of Women Sales Professionals, also known as Women Who Sell,  a global organization that seeks to empower women sales professionals in male-dominated industries to give them the voice, to be heard, so they can stand up and be confident.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Cynthia:

Lessons from Cynthia’s uncoolest sales experience when she was the customer:

  • We want to sold by someone who is an expert because we want to know, “What do you know that we can’t google?”
  • Figure out exactly why they need to buy from you.
  • Your customers and prospects expect you to be the expert.

Traditional sales programs:

  • They’re created 40 years ago for men, by men, and at a time when men made up the majority of the sales force.
  • In 2017, women make up 49.8% of the salesforce yet the traditional sales programs have not evolved with the demographic change.
  • One thing often overlooked in training is the verbiage that they give you in the sales training where they let you say this to affect this.
  • But they don’t consider the women’s natural nuances and the ability to be patient and the way she interacts with people.
  • Instead, use your own authentic verbiage to elicit the response you’re looking for rather than a canned response.

Importance of Women in a Salesforce

Women control over 51% of the wealth and influence over 71% of the household spending. So it makes sense to have women salespeople in your organization. The alpha male approach doesn’t work for everybody.

Does the gender of the seller have an effect on the buyer?

  • Yes. In male-dominated industries, they’re not used to having women talking to them. So as a woman, you have to know everything frontwards and backwards.
  • If you play in a certain field, you have to know that stuff because you need to be that expert. This will then allow you from a being a sales expert to a consultant.
  • As a woman, you’re able to naturally develop that relationship as a friend. You’re able to develop that trust

Women as Natural Networkers and Relationship Builders

  • Women have strong emotional intelligence, excellent listening skills.
  • They’re natural networkers and they build strong relationships.
  • Women especially shine when the sales cycle is slow enough to build up a strong relationship with the client.

How you can transform into a women-centric sales training:

  1. Build upon a woman’s natural strengths of intuition, patience, and relationship-building.
  2. Address their weaknesses. Women tend to not have as much confidence in the selling situation. Women like perfectionism. They like to play it safe and won’t really go for it.
  3. Companies need to provide a safe environment where women can learn to take risks and make mistakes without the fear of being embarrassed or ridiculed.
  4. Let them know it’s okay to take risks and make mistakes.
  5. Role-play with them and ask them what is it you think you would say without giving them the answers. They may surprise you with the verbiage they would use.
  6. Educate them on the desired outcome and what you want and how you would get there.

How to get access to women-centric sales training:

Connect with Cynthia on LinkedIn and she can give you access to a pilot program for online training they’re rolling out.

Cynthia’s Major Takeaways:

For females:

You are you and you are okay. Everything you do is great. You have to have that internal confidence. Your competence is going to fuel  your confidence. So become an expert in what you’re doing.

Surround yourself (or get a mentor) with women sales professionals making it happen. (Join the National Association of Women Sales Professionals at https://womenwhosell.co)

For male sales leaders:

Create that safe environment. Let your female sales employees know that you can help them. Be humble enough to say to women reps to let you know if you can’t get them to where you want them to go so you can bring in somebody who can.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Cynthia Barnes on LinkedIn or give her a call at 313-586-SELL.

Read Cynthia’s blogpost on Transforming Sales Training: The Case for Women-Centric Sales Training

The Experience Economy by Jason Pine II and James H. Gilmore

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Help us spread the word out by leaving us a rating or review on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play or whatever platform you’re using.

 

Donald Kelly, TSE Hustler's League, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 630: TSE Hustler’s League-“Be One With Your Prospects”

Donald Kelly, TSE Hustler's League, The Sales EvangelistBuilding rapport is critical in sales. We all know that, I’d assume. It even sounds basic, right? However, not all of us necessarily do what we already know. And you may have probably done some of this stuff but don’t just realize you’re doing it so you have to be intentional as well.

Therefore, it’s important to understand how you can build that rapport with your customers by being one with them.

Empathy

You need to understand and share the feelings of other people.

Help them recognize the problem.

  • Ask the customer what they want or the problem they need to solve. Otherwise. get the third party to ask the client about it or how they enjoyed the experience with you. Sometimes it’s easier for people to open up this way.
  • Write down the problem you got from their honest feedback and not what you think they want.
  • The best way to craft your message that the buyers would believe in is to be someone they like and offer a message they want.

Strategies for rapport-building:

  • Build this habit and do it over and over again until you’re already doing it without thinking because it’s now habitual.
  • Rapport is a closed and harmonious relationship in which the people or groups concerned understand each other’s feelings or ideas and communicate well.
  • Majority of our communication is non-verbal. Hence, the non-verbal part is also essential in our messaging.
  • Treat people they want to be treated. People buy from those they know, like, and trust.
  • Use the terms they use. Look at where they go and spend their time on. For example, subscribe to a trade magazine they read to be able to comprehend and digest everything they could be doing.

Episode Resources:

Maximum Influence by Kurt Mortensen

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, Message, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 617: There’re Too MANY of Us Here!

Donald Kelly, Message, The Sales Evangelist PodcastWhether you’re selling life insurance or a car or plumbing service, you’re in an area where there’s a lot of competition and you’re trying to standout. But how can you best stand out within the industry you’re in?

Creativity is key.

In one of the early episodes of How I Built This Podcast by NPR, which has now become one of my favorite shows. Barbara Corcoran (the lady on Shark Tank), a successful real estate tycoon, talked about effective marketing. And one thing she did was being creative and was able to take something common and twist it in a way that she’s able to bring value to the buyer.

So she was getting one of her first properties and trying to rent it. She told the guy putting it up for a rent to put up a wall and partition the room, which was supposed to be just a studio room. They guy rented it quickly and Barbara was able to out beat the other ones who was just renting a one-bedroom apartment. She added a bit more to it.

Strategies to help you stand out:

  1. Look for the area where competitors are not focusing their efforts on.

Any industry will train you to do what you need to do into buying this particular product. Everyone does that. Don’t just do what everyone else is doing. Try to do an area that you will be a master in.

  1. Do podcasts.

Instead of having coffee with a bunch of people, try going on other podcasts. Or do virtual workshops and use Google Hangout. You don’t have to talk about the product you’re selling per se but try to talk about, say, the successes and challenges people have as they’re preparing for the next phase of their life. Get as many information from them as you can and then from that, create a little eBook.

  1. Get the local experts engaged.

Find local experts in your industry and have them write on your blog or interview them.

  1. Find that one thing that’s going to help you get some activities.

For me, personally, podcasting is the thing that works for me. I’m able to share things that have worked for me. But maybe you’re a video person so you want to videos. Or maybe you want to write instead or be a speaker. Find local speaking opportunities where you can talk to your audience and your potential customers.

  1. It’s okay if it doesn’t work.

Don’t be afraid, just do it. What’s the worst thing that can happen anyway? If one thing doesn’t work then pivot. Stop doing the same old things that are giving you the same old, no results.

Episode Resources:

How I Built This Podcast by NPR

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

 

Sales forecast, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Salesforce

TSE BLOG 011: Say Good Bye To Inaccurate Sales Forecasting!

Sales forecast, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, SalesforceWhen’s the last time you made a miscalculation on your sales forecasting? Sometimes the mistakes are positive—say, forecasting too slow of a growth period. But sometimes the mistakes can be costly, especially when you forecast too much growth, amp up production or staffing, and find yourself with too many people and too many goods.

There has to be a better way—right?

Turns out, there is. What too many business leaders do is take an isolated approach to sales forecasting. They also may not know how much of a positive impact accurate sales forecasting can have on a bottom line. But the best sales forecasts are done with a group-think mindset: involving different departments and different information so that each piece of the business puzzle has a vested interest in making sure that the forecasts are as realistic and achievable as possible.

How can you do that? This graphic can help.

Click For More Information

How to Forecast Sales Accurately Every Time: An SME's Guide

Via Salesforce

Sales Coaching, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 612: Four Fundamental Areas You Should Start Coaching Reps In

Sales Coaching, The Sales Evangelist PodcastCoaching problems? Basically, it all comes down to the situation the seller is in at a particular time. They may be having a tough time with cold calling or closing the deal. In each of those situations, tailor your sales coaching towards the benefit of the individual.

Account Executives versus SDR’s

First, it’s important to differentiate account executives and sales development reps. Account executives are people who call in to get the lead and close the deal. Sales development reps (SDR’s) are those who prospect and guild opportunities that your account executive is going to close.

If you’re a small organization, I recommend you split these roles up where the SDR can focus on SDR work while your account executive focuses on closing and then the client success team focuses on advancing and upselling as well as in managing the account.

Here are four key areas sales leaders can focus on particularly when coaching sales reps.

  1. Opportunity management and opportunity development

This comes down to prospecting and most people tell me who are working in small businesses say they’re getting 5-10% of their leads through inbound. This means a lot of the businesses are not coming through your inbound process or you may not have an effective inbound marketing strategy right now. You, therefore, have to get business by actively going out and developing opportunities.

Make sure your sellers know where to find people whether through cold calls or social media or networking events. Find the ones most beneficial for your team. Coach your reps on how they can improve on this.

  1. Actual phone conversation

If a large portion of your business comes down to talking on the phone, make sure your reps understand what they say. Utilize proper wording, messaging, scripts, and giving feedback. The script works well especially for newbies but these should only work as a guide in terms of what to say. They can memorize it but they still need to make it their own. During your coaching sessions, do some practice run or role plays. Get them to talk on the phone and record the conversation. Practice is key.

  1. Value creation

This is focused on the question-asking skills and the capability of having meaningful conversations. However, this is an often overlooked area. Write down the top 15-20 questions you could ask your prospect in your sales process. Sit down with your team and write down meaningful questions and practice those. Utilize your personality, emotions, and facial expressions (even when you’re on the phone).

  1. Actual account management

This involves having a plan of how you’re going to help the account to advance and grow. Have a plan or process to help the person give you referrals or figure a way you can generate more business opportunities for them. Find a way to upsell them on one of your higher-end product and coach them on how they can do that.

Episode Resources:

Check out The Sales Evangelizers on Facebook

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 600: Our 600th Episode Q & A

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist PodcastIn celebration of our 600th episode, we’re doing a Q&A session where I’m answering some questions posted on our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers, and I’m sharing with you a lot of great stuff about sales, about this podcast, and about me.

Q: What did you know now that didn’t know then and thought you knew then but totally changed your view since?

A: First of all, I didn’t know this podcast was going to keep going for this long and actually leave my day job and do this full-time. I didn’t know this podcast was going to bring me business and people are going to reach out to me for coaching, training, and speaking opportunities. I didn’t know I was going to outsource to get to the next level but I quickly learned that’s what I needed to do for it to grow.

I thought I knew how to run a business then and thought I knew the things I needed to learn I can just learn and keep going. But I realized you have to treat the business as a business like taxes that need to be taken care of and that we need to do our books properly, HR things, and making sure team members are getting paid. I had to make sure I had to put processes in place or SOPs (Standard Operating Procedures) and learn from other people in business to make sure it thrives. So this went from just a hobby into a lifestyle business.

Q: What’s hot in social media?

A: Videos. You’ve got to have videos. Utilize different things like Instagram stories or Snapchat depending on your audience. The idea of sharing stories has become really big. Personally, I love Instagram. Another is the use of bots. Click on the Facebook Messenger button on the right-hand side of this page and you will get a chance to connect with us through messenger and interact with the bot Evangelist that will ask you questions and interact with you.

Q: What are your upcoming big dreams and how are you planning to do them?

A: One of my big dreams is to turn this podcast into the premier organization for new and struggling salespeople. I want them to find me. I want an entrepreneur starting a sales team and needs help. We also want to bring on another consultant on TSE who can go on-site to a client and deliver a training internally. I can see the vision of hundreds and thousands of certified Sales Evangelist trainers. I want our organization to be known as a place for new and struggling salespeople, whether you just finished college and want to learn sales or you’re doing a career change or have been selling but haven’t just been making money. I want to start that hiring process and by next year, bring that person on as one of our consultants.

Q: How has podcasting helped your business or how is it helping your business right now?

A: Podcasting brought the business into existence. Initially, I was just sharing with people things that worked for me and then interviewed guests and experts. Then people started asking me if I could do coaching and then came speaking and training opportunities. Things just came as a natural byproduct so the podcast is a fuel for the business. It’s a great way of getting in front of your audience and bring your message and expertise.

Q: How do you decide on what content to produce for your audience?

A: I usually like to let the audience help me out with this that’s why sometimes we ask questions in TSE Hustler’s League, our Facebook group, or sometimes people will ask questions and then that I will get an idea that it’s a topic a person is struggling with, let’s do an episode on that.

Q: Why did you choose to podcast as a channel for your content?

A: I thought I didn’t look good enough for a video and because it’s easier than video. It was new. And I’m a speaker so I figured it’s easier to speak on the mic. I’m a big fan of Pat Flynn and Seth Godin and my buddy Jared Easley persuaded me to continue going down that path. What keeps me going is the fact that it’s totally fun! The community is a very big plus for me. Second, I have a passion for selling and sharing my learning with people.

Q: How do you manage to keep getting new people on your podcast and ensure that they will make your episode interesting, I assume you want to have good content?

A: I want to have good content because it helps people and when it does, people share the content and then the community grows and opportunities come to us. It’s a cycle. You have to produce good content. The moment you stop producing good content, people will go elsewhere.

I get emails from people wanting to guest on the podcast and when I get them, I look for topics that tie into sales and business, even if it’s not directly about sales but I can see it’s something I can apply to my business. I look for stuff that’s going to be beneficial for salespeople.

Q: What’s your morning routine and how does it help you to get motivated for the rest of the day?

A: I get up, do my morning prayer, and study my scriptures in the morning. Then I do an Instagram post. Next, I exercise. Then take advantage of opportunities to start doing some creative content I need to do be it writing or producing a podcast episode. Then study a sales book or an industry-related book through podcast or listening to an audiobook. Lastly, I eat right.

Q: What is it really like to be Donald Kelly?

A: My wife and I have been married for four years and still in the young stage. Cristina, my wife, is helping us out with The Sales Evangelist, particularly doing the marketing stuff and doing things in the background. I’m a member of the Latter-day Saints and at 32 years old, I am the leader of this congregation of about 140 active members and I’m responsible for their spiritual being. We have a youth ministry and I teach a bible study class. I basically do about 20 hours a week of service and then I have the TSE. Friday night is date night so I don’t do any work. Monday nights are family nights so we get together with family. o family and faith are big for me. I also love flag football. I love barbecuing. And I love sales. That’s the real Donald Kelly!

Q: How do you select who to interview?

A: I select people who can bring education or knowledge around sales to our community and people that can offer value.

Q: How did that persevere for so long? 600 is an achievement!

A: It’s something I love. I love talking so it just became a part of my life. The podcast is just something I love and then the business just starts to evolve each and every time.

Q: What are your favorite type of guests?

A: My favorite type of guests are people who I can just chat with and have fun with. They are people I have instant interaction with. Some of my favorite episodes are with Justin Su’a, Ralph Quintero, Jeffrey Gitomer, Patricia Fripp. It’s hard to label but I learned a lot from each and every one of them. Not one favorite in particular but I just love the opportunity to learn from each and every one of our guests but I had people I’ve built strong relationships with after the podcast.

Q: What is the best piece of advice you have implemented from your guests?

A: To make sure you create SOP’s (Standard Operating Procedures) shared by Ace Chapman. It helped me with by business overall. You’ve got to have processes. When Ace said it, I implemented it even more.

Q: What do you want your next 100 episodes to be like?

A: I want them to be the best episodes ever, with the best downloads, the best audio quality, and the best shared episodes. I want them to get out there and impact and impact people. I want to be their education

Q: What topic was not covered in your 600 episodes?

A: I think we’ve covered almost every aspect of selling. We’ve tagged all our episodes. We have a drop-down feature here where you could search and see all of the different pieces of content we’ve tagged.

Q: What tools do you use to best manage your territory and time?

A: My Google calendar is key. One concept I’ve learned from one of our guests is to break down your day up to 15-minute chunks so you can tackle different aspects of your life as well as to make sure you plan. For CRM, we use Pipedrive internally to help me manage deals and those I oversee within my territory.

Q: What has been gratifying to you in presenting these 600 podcasts?

A: When somebody comes back telling me they closed a deal or they landed an opportunity or a job or they earned an x number of dollars because they implemented something that we taught. That is the most gratifying!

Q: How have you changed?

A: I became much better at communicating. I learned to communicate with a wide variety of guests, sharing complex topics, and answering questions. It has helped me with my sales as well.

Q: What made you want to go into sales?

A: It’s just a part of my lifestyle. I was just doing it since I was a kid and then later on people tell me I have a great personality for sales so I listened to them. But it wasn’t easy. I had to learn a lot of things and that’s what I did.

Q: I want The Sales Evangelist origin story?

A: I was new to sales and really wanted to learn and I was struggling. I went through a sales training program and saw some success and I was making money. I started seeing it was easy to sell if you applied the fundamentals and the processes. So I started to share that information with our community and then the podcast grew from there.

Q: What have you learned over the past 600 episodes? Biggest surprise?

A: The biggest surprise is that people cared about our show and people from all over the world actually listen to our show. People would reach out to me from Australia or a Middle Eastern country, from Europe, and Tokyo. It’s just amazing! It’s surprising for people to find our podcast and would take the time to listen to is and then would reach out to me and tell me how much that podcast has helped them.

Q: What does staying in curiosity mean to you and how do we do this genuinely?

A: Staying in curiosity means you’re always willing to learn, to grow, and to increase especially if you’re dealing with prospects. When you’re genuinely curious about individuals and their stories and you find out what moves them, when you ask those questions, you cannot help but stay curious. You cannot help but learn. Ask people deep questions and you will be amazed how many people share with you really interesting things about them.

Episode Resources:

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

The Sales Evangelizers Facebook group

Pipedrive

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, Jim Ninivaggi, Brainshark

TSE 586: Structuring Sales Onboarding To Get New Sellers Ramped Up Faster

Donald Kelly, Jim Ninivaggi, BrainsharkOnboarding new hires is a crucial process every company should have, big or small. But this is something a lot of salespeople struggle with, worse, several companies don’t have an onboarding process at all. Today’s guest is Jim Ninivaggi and he shares with us the importance of having an onboarding structure to ensure that your new hires are confident and ready to sell. Structuring

Jim is the SVP of Business Development at Brainshark, a software company focused on sales readiness and they help clients build learning and training modules for salespeople, deploying those modules to the rest, and tracking the ability of the salespeople through a video coaching tool.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Jim:

The importance of having a structure for your sales onboarding:

Without a good onboarding process, you’re letting your prospects and customers onboard your salespeople. Experience is a good teacher, but it may not be always efficient. This is an expensive way because every time they make a mistake, it costs the company real money.

You want to accelerate that time to full productivity.

Why many companies fail at building an onboarding structure:

  1. They underestimate how hard it is to get productive.

Trust but verify. It’s great if somebody you hired has got experience but verify that they can not only sell products but that they have good fundamental sales methods and habits.

  1. It takes a lot of work to design it, build it, and deploy it.

You have to take an assessment-centered approach in your onboarding.You don’t necessarily have to take courses but you have to pass the assessment so the company can understand whether or not you can present or negotiate effectively.

 

Strategies for building an onboarding structure:

  1. Pre-boarding

This starts before the rep begins. Send your new hire a kit that includes papers, pens, vests, etc. to get them excited about joining your company. Give them some reading you want them to do or a podcast they need to listen to in order to prepare them for that first day.

  1. Make sure their first day is orchestrated.

Make sure there is somebody in the office to welcome them and make them feel good about the decision they made and to ensure them that they don’t think about what their next step is. Structure the onboarding in a way that it’s a learning system or portal and everything is laid out for them in terms of the things they need to do.

  1. Do as much upfront work on knowledge transfer ahead of then coming to headquarters.

Their first two months should be for them taking learning courses, shadowing other experienced reps to see what good looks like, being coached by the manager, and a boot camp at your headquarters.

  1. Restructure the boot camp.

Make it an interactive boot camp to give them the opportunity to practice, to get certified, and to be a little uncomfortable. For learning to happen, you have to make the learner uncomfortable which means standing up and delivering and doing role plays. Then have a final certification at the end of that week.

  1. Make sure you provide continuous learning.

The salesperson doesn’t have to worry about what to do next or what to learn next. It should be managed for them. Managers play a critical role of coaching to help you, give you advice and feedback to get better every day.

  1. Determining the time period for your onboarding process

Are you hiring experienced people or hiring people who have never sold before? Do you have complex, long sales cycle or are you selling something very transactional?

Start with your sales cycle and use that as your gauge in terms of how long the potential onboarding period should be. Start with territory management, account planning, and prospecting skills right through to account-based selling and marketing and all things in-between.

Look historically and take the average revenue production for a new rep and do for month 9, 12, 18, and 24 and start to get a sense of the ramp-up time so you can use benchmarks to improve upon.

  1. The onboarding process doesn’t stop at the “onboarding process.”

Regardless of what you’re selling, it takes experience before reps really figure out how to effectively sell, most importantly, how to qualify. While the onboarding process might be deemed to be done in month 6, you still want to have a strategy in place from month 6 to 36 to ensure reps get what they need to get truly productive.

How Brainshark Uses Its Video Coaching Solution:

Using their video coaching tool, they send out every other week an informal challenge in the form of a question to the reps, and they answer it as they video record themselves. Then Brainshark aggregates the best of those and turns them into learning content. So they’re creating a library of pure learning to help reps engage with one another and learn from one another.

Implementing the pure learning program:

You have to make it super easy for the reps to share their best practice. Reps love to be acknowledged and they would be happy to share but you have to make it easy for them.

Jim’s Major Takeaway:

Make your onboarding process assessment-centric. Rather than tracking whether a salesperson consumed learning, focus on can they do the job? Build an assessment so that the salesperson can opt out of the course once they pass the assessment

Episode Resources:

Connect with Jim on Brainshark through email at jninivaggi@brainshark.com and on Twitter @jninivaggi.

Register for their webcast on video sales coaching on www.Brainshark.com.

Join the TSE Hustler’s League. The theme for this semester is increasing our win rate by becoming more buyer-centric. See if this is something you’d like to take part in.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Brook Borup, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 543: Documented Sales Process + Automate Tasks = Increase Sales

Brook Borup, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE Tired of doing mundane tasks? What if you had a way to automate tasks to make your job easier and increase your sales? Today’s guest is Brook Borup and she shares with us some ways to automate some of the mundane tasks in your business or your life in general, to make your life much easier and achieve success faster.

Brook is the owner of My Clone Solution, a company that helps business professionals and business owners learn to automate and delegate certain tasks so they can focus more on business development.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Brook:

Strategies for Getting Away with Mundane Tasks:

  1. Process before Login

Make sure the first thing you do is have a plan. Have written down processes for your sales plan or projects. Then you can look at that plan and figure out which pieces of the plan you can automate.

  1. Figure out where your targets are going to come from.

Figure out how you’re going to get your list or how you’re going to contact people (email, phone, in-person). Where are these people coming from? Start with that question and work all the way through your sales process.

  1. Automate your voicemail system.

Try using voice mail as your first touch point but use a system that automatically puts that voicemail in for you so you’re not doing it. This gives you more dial time.

  1. Schedule appointments right in your email.

Make sure you get their email address so you can email them and use a system where they can just click on a link and go and look at your calendar and pick the best time for them. (Now you’re not going back and forth with your emails. This saves you from having a full inbox. And it saves you time from looking at your calendar. You’re letting them do it so they’re in control. (Clients want to feel they’re in control because it makes them feel good.)

Examples of scheduling software:

Calendly (Free)

Acuity (Paid) – Aside from scheduling, this software allows you to add products in so instead of building an entire online shopping cart, you can have products that you can just send somebody a direct link to. It can also charge somebody for an appointment so they pay for that appointment before they even get on your calendar.

  1. Automate all touch points.

All touch points can be automated in a text message, an email, a phone call, or delegated to an admin. Either delegate it to software or people.

  1. Put the right people and software in place.

Make sure you put the right people and software in to make sure your system flows. So now you’ve taken your 10-step sales process into just 4 steps.

  1. Put the time up-front to automate each touch point.

The attention span of your client is nine seconds.for each touch point. Make sure that if your sales process doesn’t include an email or text marketing campaign, all touch points should be automated. It takes a lot of work and time but once the work is done, all of the stuff that comes after that is all automated. You touch where you need to when you see your stats where the person is opening every single email.

  1. Document each process.

For instance, somebody gets to email #3 and they’ve opened all three emails and are about to go into email #4, now is time for a phone call. So you have a daily task list and you know where those clients are in your sales process. There are so many tools you can use to remind you just by documenting your process.

  1. Find an ally in your business.

Find this salesperson and build this process out with them. Utilize their knowledge and utilize them to build your process. Have a company that has a specialist for everything so you can solve everybody’s problem with one project manager.

  1. Scale your business through packages.

Come up with packages and put a dollar figure on them so you can put on a whole big marketing strategy and expand your business development opportunities. Then you can just do the same for every single client because it all happens the same way, just different verbiage.

Brook’s Major Takeaway:

Don’t think you have to do it all by yourself. Find an ally in your business. Find your yin to your yang and keep them around. Find your partner. Utilize your skills because you don’t have to have everything.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Brook on www.MyCloneSolution.com and on Twitter @myclonesolution or Facebook.

Calendly

Acuity

The Sales Development Playbook by Trish Bertuzzi

Podfest

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

DONALD KELLY, SDR, THE SALES EVANGELIST PODCAST

TSE 542: How Can I Become A GREAT Sales Development Rep (SDR)?

DONALD KELLY, SDR, THE SALES EVANGELIST PODCASTToday, I’m going to share with you FIVE things to help you become a better sales development rep (SDR) or help you work better with your SDR.

First off, let’s briefly define the role of Sales Development Rep. SDRs are also referred to as your inside sales team. They help to qualify or bring in some opportunities and get some introduction meetings.

  1. Understand the rules.

Make sure you know what rules the game is governed by. Some SDRs in certain companies may have two objectives.

(1) Creating opportunities – This means creating opportunities for the Account Executive by qualifying individuals. It requires a bit more digging and to prep them to make sure it’s ready for the account executive to take over the role.

(2) Setting appointments – This means listing information, finding people, and setting the appointment.

Check out the book, The Sales Development Playbook where they teach you how they extensively define these roles. Clearly define what your role entails to make sure you’re doing your job right.

  1. Plan effectively.

Use your time wisely. Some sellers just dial for dollars but to be more effective, schedule the times when you can prospect most effectively. Personally, the best time for me to make phone calls would be mornings at 8-10 am or lunch time 12-1 pm or in the afternoon at 4-5 pm. Then in-between those times can be allocated for sending emails.

Be on top of your planner. Don’t be governed by your role. You govern your role as a seller.

  1. Shadow some great SDRs.

Shadow those who are really doing well in the company. You get to learn strategies, tactics, and terminologies that you don’t know or have never heard of before. Be open to learning but don’t be telling. Be a sponge who’s willing to learn. Take insights while checking your ego at the door.

  1. Don’t fear a “no.”

Don’t worry about prospects saying no. They probably just don’t want to be bothered at this point. Put rejections aside. Move on and go to the next one. If someone isn’t ready yet, set them up for the next round. The more no’s, the more opportunities are going to be there for you to get yes’s. No’s are also helpful for you to disqualify people.

  1. Seek to disqualify.

As an SDR, your job is to get numbers on the board. However, we can get so greedy and hungry that we want to put something up so desperately that we let everybody go through. So make sure you’re able to disqualify people. When you seek to disqualify, the better you’re going to be able to qualify people.

Lastly, make time to sit with the Account Executives you’re setting appointments for at least once a week to find out what things they’re working on and what industries you need to focus on. It’s all about working together so both of you are aligned to achieve success.

Episode Resources:

The Sales Development Playbook: Build Repeatable Pipleline and Accelerate Growth with Inside Sales by Trish Bertuzzi

Join our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Slip Miller, Donald Kelly, M3 Learning, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 539: Sales From The Street: “This Is How You Discover!”

Slip Miller, Donald Kelly, M3 Learning, The Sales EvangelistBuilding value is one of the most essential tasks we have as sellers. In order to do that, you have to make sure the discovery part of your sales meeting is done perfectly. Today’s guest is William “Skip” Miller and he shares with us great tips and strategies you can use during the discovery phase of prospecting.

Skip is the CEO of M3 Learning, a proactive sales management and sales training company that helps companies make their salespeople and sales managers better, qualify and disqualify better, and listen to customers better early on in the sales process.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Skip:

Lesson from Skip’s coolest sales experience when he was the customer:

During discovery phase, stop talking about what you’re selling and focus on the buyer.

What is Discovery in Sales?

Discovery is active listening. It is really understanding, from a mutual standpoint, what is it that the customer wants and here is what you have to offer and how that is going to fit the organization. And finally, realize if there’s a reason for both parties to continue the process.

The buyer/seller process is a mutual process. We talk about what the customers look for and what we do. Then if we agree, let’s take it to the next step.

Why is Discovery Important?

During discovery phase, you’re trying to find how much energy is really behind it. Sales is like a roller coaster. Be able to build up enough energy early in the part of the deal. Find the motivation why they’re calling or taking our calls or answering our emails. If there is a high degree of energy, the deal is going to come to a yes or no.

The “Cause ” Strategy

“Cause” is a nasty word to ask because when you use this word, you will find out somebody’s motivation. So start modifying that word in your early sales pitch and you will find out how much energy this deal has got.

Steps:

  1. Incorporate the word “cause” to your questions.

Examples:

  • What has happened in the last few months that caused you to say now’s the time?
  • As you look in the next couple of months, what’s causing you to say you’ve got to change…?
  1. Shut up and listen because buyers want to be heard.

The Biggest Mistakes During Discovery Phase

  1. Failure to ask good questions to get the buyer to start talking
  2. Failure to ask “cause”
  3. Putting some non-qualified deals in your funnel

Most of Skip’s clients have 80-90% forecast accuracy in Stages 4 and 5 because they’ve done good stuff in Stage 2.

The Quantified Cause

Get QC or Quantified Cause because most senior level executives talk numbers all day long. Find the QC and you get a great discovery call because you’ve understood what’s behind the buyer and by how much. Get numbers early in the sales process otherwise you’d be excited doing presentations and then all of a sudden what’s “super” in Stage 2 just turns “okay” in Stage 4.

Quantifying makes the buyer think and it gives you an idea of how much energy there is for this.

Get QC by ranging it.

Example:

On a scale of 1-10 (10 being great and 1 being near “we’re closing the doors”), how would you rank it now…

Questions During the Discovery Meeting:

Stage 2 has two value flags which you need to capture:

  1. Below the line

This is where you ask the feeds and speeds because if they want A and B and you sell D and C then there’s no use of you talking. Ask the feeds and speeds to make sure there’s a competitive fit.

  • Why did you call us?
  • What are you looking for?
  • Did you want the latest model or the older model?
  1. Above the line

This is where you find out energy and cause. Ask cause.

 

  • You’re telling me you’re losing 20% of your revenue for the next six months, you can see this could potentially make a dent in it…

Skip’s Major Takeaway:

Discovery is about asking, not telling. It’s about showing and giving. Ask great questions. Prepare your questions upfront. Know your audience. Prepare below and above the line questions otherwise you’re going to start telling and talking and showing and that’s not discovery. Ask and really care about this profession in sales. Listen. Really care and ask.

Episode Resources:

Know more about Skip on www.SellingAdvantage.net/tse and check out their special offer.

Essentialism by Greg McKeown

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

TSE 536: How to Develop an Unstoppable Drive to Sales Success

Dre Baldwin, Donald Kelly, Sales Motivation, The Sales Evangelist PodcastStill making excuses? I’ve got to tell you man, just stop. Our guest today is someone you can definitely draw inspiration from.

Dre Baldwin is an overseas professional basketball player having played through eight different countries in the course of nine years. After graduating from Penn State University, Dre has written books and has done a few TED Talks. He has created programs designed for both athletes and non-athletes and does coaching/ consulting and professional speaking.

From a 6’4″ student who had no innate basketball skills whatsoever, Dre figured he had to put in extra hard work and discipline he needed to be successful and now he’s sharing the resources which he never had.

Now it’s your turn. No more excuses.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Dre:

How Dre developed his skills to be adequate on the court:

  • Doing different than what others are doing (Dre practiced even at a time no one was practicing)
  • Showing up every single day to work on his game not thinking he would be discovered by any recruiter

Strategies to develop your passion and be better:

  1. Force yourself to be that motivation.

Use other people’s stories to motivate you and which you can use for your own purposes. Listen to their interviews. Read magazines on them. And just take any piece you can use for your own motivation and inspiration.

  1. Find out the one thing that makes you get up each day.

The success in life is basic. There are no secrets. It’s something you already know. Just figure out what you’re willing to do and throw yourself into it. Something that really motivates you and inspires you to get up and do even if there was no money attached to it when you achieve it.

[Tweet “Just figure out what you’re willing to do and throw yourself into it”@DreAllDay ‏]

  1. Stop saying lies to yourself.

A couple of common lies people tell themselves are:

I can’t do this because ________.

I need more information.

  1. Put in the hard work and discipline over and over again.

Success is not a matter of what you’ve done or what you’re doing today but what you continuously do over and over and over again. It’s not an object but a habit. It’s a discipline.

  1. Take action and stop talking your way out of action.

Stop second-guessing yourself and going back to gathering information. If information was all that any of us needed to be successful, then all of us would have been successful by now. Internet is free and widespread. You’ve got access to any information. So it’s not the key to getting anywhere. The is key is taking action. Unfortunately, people talk their way out of action.

[Tweet “If information was all that any of us needed to be successful, then all of us would have been successful by now”@DreAllDay]

How Dre’s pro-career started:

In 2005, Dre joined an exposure camp, which is like a job fair for athletes. You play your sport with other people to prove that you can play professionally to an audience of coaches, agents, scout managers who are brokers in the sport.

Dre took a video of the exposure camp but he had to market the video by sending a VHS copy of his video to an agent. Dre landed an agent who negotiated his first playing situation in Lithuania in 2005.

Dre took the video from a VHS tape to be put on a CD and then on YouTube, being his first YouTube video.

Strategies for your social media approach:

  1. Serve the under-served.

When Dre saw people who watched his video were asking more questions and pieces of advice, he decided to film everything he does and put it on YouTube so anybody can make use out of it. There were no athletes posting training content on the internet before Dre started doing it in 2006.

  1. Share value and don’t just do it for the money.

Dre was already posting hundreds of videos before any Facebook ads even existed. People see through you. Be who you are because people can tell. There will be people who go against you but that’s okay since you’re sharing something important enough for people to pick their side.

Dre’s Major Takeaway:

Each one of you has one competitive advantage and one one competitive advantage that can never be duplicated or taken away from you – your individuality as a person. Be who you are and if you can do that and be able to share your life and what’s going on with you, the more people understand who you are about. Get clear on who you are as a person and then start sharing yourself with the audience you want, which you won’t know until you start being yourself. People can choose until they see the real you.

Episode Resources:

Get to know more about Dre on his website DreAllDay.com or connect with him on Snapchat and Instagram @drebaldwin and Twitter @DreAllDay.

Watch Dre’s YouTube channel and TED Talks

Check out The Trailblazers Podcast by Stephen Hart

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Help us spread the word out by leaving us a rating or review on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play or whatever platform you’re using.

Scott Love, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 533: Become the Sales Leader People Want to Follow

The Sales Evangelist PodcastAs a sales leader, one of the most important tasks is to be the leader that people want to follow. We often find sales reps leaving the organization, not because they weren’t making money or the product is bad, but just because of the relationship side. How do you become that sales leader everybody loves?

Today’s guest is Scott Love and he shares great insights and more about his book, Why They Follow: How to Lead with Positive Influence, specifically on how you as a seller, sales leader, or entrepreneur can create an atmosphere where the people we lead are willing to follow us.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Scott:

About his book, Why They Follow:

Find out what motivates people to follow and lead based on that. His book will show you how you can lead that gets people to choose to follow and do it in a positive way (not because of fear).

The concept of response ratio that people choose what response to give shows that employees give a 1 based on authority and a 10 (they respond with their heart and soul) because of a manager’s leadership skills.

People choose to respond based on how they respond someone to be.

Strategies on how to become the leader people want to follow:

  1. Trust is a key factor.

Get people to trust you. People make decisions so you have to lead them in a way that gets them to choose to respond. Build trust with your team by going within. Leadership is intensely personal. People make decisions on a personal and emotional level.

  1. Identify your core values.

If you had all the money and time in the world, what truly motivates you? Those are your core values and take time to identify those. Write them down and this serves as your guide or compass to measure all your decisions.

  1. Write down your life purpose.

This has nothing to do with business or sales. Take the time to identify and clarify your mission as to why you are on this planet and you become more confident and more decisive. You will know which direction you’re going in.

  1. Be a great follower to be a great leader.

Become “followable” first and everything else will fall into its place. Say that you won’t do anything unless it provides value to other people first. Go back to your core values and your life purpose.

  1. Find out what motivates your team.

Get to know your team and find out what motivates them since everybody is motivated by something different. While some are motivated by money, others are motivated by recognition. Look for ways to motivate your team for different reasons.

At the end of the day, people want significance and control. According to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, self-actualization is on top of the pyramid. It’s more than the money. It’s about the meaning.

  1. Practice what you preach.

If your actions don’t adhere to your values, then your team will see that disconnect and they won’t feel safe. They won’t trust you anymore. Are you living in the values you are espousing within the company?

  1. Give your team members the attention they need.

Don’t looking at your iPhones as employees are talking to you. Every time you have a screen on your hand, you’re not giving the attention they need.

  1. Give your members public recognition.

Show them why their work matters. There is a pattern that if we can show there is positive leadership between the employee and the boss, that’s enough for them to turn down opportunities. Salespeople want to have a contribution into this world.

Scott’s Major Takeaway:

Invest one hour a day in personal development. Listen to this podcast. Read books. This is going to build up over time. If you read and listen to people who have been down the road, you’re going to become the kind of person that people will feel safe with and be the person people will follow.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Scott Love on www.scottlove.com.

Why They Follow: How to Lead with Positive Influence by Scott Love

Check us out on our Facebook community, The Sales Evangelizers

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Scott Ingram, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 491: Qualities of Top Performing Sellers

As a seller, how can you set yourself apart? What do you do to become a top seller?

For today’s episode I’m bringing in my great friend and fellow podcaster, Scott Ingram, to share with us the qualities of top-performing salespeople and what you can do to become the top performing seller in your industry.

Scott recently launched his podcast called Sales Success Stories where he features people in the trenches and at the top of their game. He also currently works at Relationship One where he serves as the business development executive doing sales and strategic account management for enterprise accounts.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Scott:

Top qualities of top sellers:

  1. Uniqueness
  • Hard work as your baseline
  • Leveraging your uniqueness and strengths: Find out what makes you unique and go to the extreme with that
  • Bringing value to the relationship
  1. Focusing on the buyer
  • Putting buyers first and foremost
  • Thinking about what their world is
  • Asking great questions to understand them
  • Bringing them value that is going to address what they want and need the most
  • It’s about serving the buyers
  1. Speaking to open doors

Having a system in place to qualify buyers who are willing to participate in the process.

  1. Drive to learn

Anyone can be a top performer but you have to learn.  Most top sellers follow an information diet where you focus on your main expertise and make yourself more valuable in your particular space.

Having an introvert skill set:

It’s about the empathy and being good in a small audience and thinking about the other person and what they need and not just being over the top. Almost all sales conversations should be one-to-one, otherwise, too many people in the conversation can get funky.

The role of sales leaders in helping sellers become top performers:

  • Sales leaders have a great impact on the success of a seller
  • As a seller, you should be reaching out to the top people in your organization and learn from them and get mentorship

The power of leveraging podcasts and other sources of information:

  • Listen to sales podcasts to gain education or to provide value to your ideal customer
  • Take on the knowledge and continue to learn
  • Take the pieces and incorporate it to the core of what you are and how you work and execute it well
  • Don’t try to be somebody else, but take the principles and be who you are

Scott’s Major Takeaway:

Be an extreme version of yourself in a way that adds the most value to your clients and future clients.

Episode Resources:

Scott’s Sales Success Stories episode with Justin Bridgemohan of Influitive

Connect with Scott through email at scott@top1.fm

Subscribe to the Sales Stories podcast. Visit www.top1.fm/subscribe

To Sell is Human by Daniel H. Pink

How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie

Get a free audio book download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

 

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Whiteboarding, Best Sales Podcast

TSE 400: TSE Hustler’s League-“Whiteboarding Concept Part 2”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Whiteboarding, Best Sales Podcast Last week, I introduced to you the concept of whiteboarding and this is part 2 of this week’s snippet pulled out from one of our training sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League.

As what I’ve shared with you last week, people remember only 10% of what you say within two days of meeting with you. Now compare this with the 65% memory retention that happens when you’re able to implement a concrete visual or story to converse with your prospects throughout your presentation.

The Benefits of Whiteboarding:

  1. Engagement

Writing out ideas on a white board actually enables your prospect to engage with you because this causes their brain to begin to process and think about the words or visuals you’ve written on the board. So they are more likely to remember you over your competitors.

  1. Credibility

They perceive that you know a bit more. Showing them you’re able to write these ideas out, makes them think you’re more credible because you know what you’re talking about.

  1. Presentation Quality

The quality of your presentation becomes more powerful when you’re able to use a whiteboard because people get more engaged. They’re more into it. They’re paying attention to you and what you’re trying to explain. Traditional slide presentations can be distracting sometimes.

  1. Total recall

The chances of your prospect being able to relate the information back to you increases significantly.

  1. Entertainment

People want to be entertained than they want to be educated. Using a whiteboard is one of the best ways to entertain them because it feels more live so it more engaging.

How you can make a powerful whiteboard presentation:

  1. Use stick figures.

You don’t have to be a great artist. Remember that you have to keep it very, very simple, right?

  1. Use the handwritten fonts to breakdown the concepts.

This is applicable when you can’t be there in person so you would have to send them a presentation.

Your next steps:

  1. Look at the way you’re creating value.

Look at your sales presentations and look at what you have to offer to your prospects both the known and the unknown factors. Think about the stories you have. How can you visually explain those stories using the whiteboard concept whether you’re writing it out or just using the fonts (when you’re conversing via the web).

  1. Find other ways to write your visuals on.

You don’t necessarily have to use a whiteboard. Other tools that you can write your stories on include:

  • Use of handwritten fonts (when you’re having conversations via the web)
  • Easel boards
  • Post-it boards
  • Flip boards

What’s important is you’re able to tell stories in conversations the simplest way possible. People seeing handwritten stuff makes it more real.

Episode Resources:

The Three Value Conversations by Erik Peterson, et al.

Pitch Anything by Oren Klaff

Please support us in our Indiegogo campaign, a movement to inspire others to Do Big Things. Simply go to www.DoBigThings.net.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Register Today!

Do BIG THINGS, West Palm Beach, Florida, EMKO, Donald Kelly, Travis Thomas, The Sales Evangelist, LIVE YES AND

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, George Santino, Best Sales Podcast

TSE 393: Tips for Building a High Performing Team and Steps to Build a Career from the Ground Up

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, George Santino, Best Sales PodcastAs with many other sales people, our goal is to perform well. Today, I’m bringing on George Santino so he can teach us how we can be better working on a team whether you’re the leader of the team or part of a team. He gladly shares with us his stories and experiences he has had with his 20 year- experience at Microsoft. George shares with us how you can think like an entrepreneur and how you can be better working on a team regardless of its size.

Remember that as you go higher and higher up the ranks, it’s not only your personal contribution but also your team’s. So it’s absolutely important to have a highly effective team that gets results because now your review is based on their results.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with George:

Tips for Building a High Performing Team:

  1. Determine what you’re building them for.

Determine what you’re trying to produce and what skills you need to help you do that. Make that assessment as to the needed skills you need from your people.

  1. Determine how your team’s skills will complement your skills.

Determine how your team can bring in a set of skills that you don’t have. Don’t hire a bunch of people that are just like you. You already have you so bring people in who know things you don’t know and things that people can add value from day one.

  1. Give your team permission to speak up.

Make sure you give your team permission to speak up. You want a team of people who can sit down on a project and be willing to express their opinions and be willing to tell you when your opinion might be incorrect. Ultimately, you’re the boss but you want a team who will question things as necessary. Give them the permission to tell you when you’re screwing up. You would rather hear it from your team than from your boss.

  1. Hire a diverse group of people with different perspectives and experiences that will add value to your project.

Always listen to your team’s opinions. In the end, you all deserve the right to say, “I told you so.” This fosters cohesiveness within the team that makes you more effective as a team.

  1. When motivating people, motivate the individuals.

A team of people is like an orchestra with different instruments. Your job is to get the best music you can get out of all the instruments so that when they come together, they make an absolutely beautiful sound.

  1. Create an environment that they’re empowered to voice their opinions.

Take the best ideas regardless of who is in charge or not. Build that kind of environment where people feel safe to say things.

  1. Always give “positive” feedback.

This means that even when they’re wrong, it’s feedback that’s going to have actionable information where people can improve. As a manager, it’s your job to give the employee enough feedback to where they can adjust their course towards exceptional performance. Be comfortable with giving feedback.

  1. Give feedback along the way, not after your employee’s performance.

Tell them what they’re set out to do, what they did, what obstacles they ran into, and the adjustments that need to be made in order for them to be exceptional. Tell them these along the way so they’re given the opportunity to adjust.

How You Can Help Under-Performing Employees:

  1. Determine the cause or what the employee lacks

Sit down with them and determine what happened or what the employee lacks. Try to discover some external factors and if there’s anything you can help them with. You have to dig in. If it’s an issue at home, give them some time off if they need that time. Or help them find some skills they lack through mentorship or internal training. First determine the cause and if there’s something you can do about it. Then put together a plan to bring about that positive change.

2 If your employee is a wrong fit for the job, help them find something else in the company where they can be successful but DO NOT transfer your problem to another team.

If they’re not going to be effective anywhere in the company, let them see that as well. An employee who is not doing a great job is unhappy and is under a tremendous amount of stress. Help them see where they can be better off.

 

How You Can Foster a Good Relationship with Your Boss:

  1. Recognize that managers have different styles.

Determine what is important to them, what they value and what do they reward.

  1. Determine that can you do to help him achieve those goals and objectives.

Your manager has goals. The more you can get your boss to write in his review things that you accomplished, the more indispensable you can become to that boss.

  1. Don’t be afraid to move on if you are going to run into incompetent bosses.

If you’re think you’ve put out your best efforts but you still find your boss to be incompetent or just a real jerk, then move on and look elsewhere. Go to a different company or different department. Life is too short to put up with that. Do not be afraid to make those changes.

Steps to Make Sure You Have a Successful Career:

  1. Pick the right company to go to work for.

Determine where you want to work and not just for the sake of finding a job. Do the research. Determine what these companies do, what they’re trying to accomplish and whether or  not they’re a fit for you.

  1. Don’t be afraid to ask good questions during a job interview.

Answer the questions well obviously. But you’re making a decision too, in fact, it’s more important than the company’s because to you, this is your life and this is your career. So make sure you’re asking intelligent questions to determine if you really want the job.

  1. Once you get the job, truly understand what your job is.

Look into the job description. Is there an employee handbook? Are you going to be assigned a mentor? What are you supposed to be doing? What does success look like to you, to your boss, to the company. Determine what things are valued and rewarded.

  1. Do things better than anybody else.

Put in the time and energy. Be willing to take the scales of work-life balance towards work early in your career because you’re building a foundation that everything builds on from that point forward.

George’s Major Takeaway:

Depend on the people around you. Trust them and empower them so you can truly utilize their diverse sets of skills to build up what you’re trying to build up or sell. Have fun! Celebrate the successes. Take care of your people and reward them. Be honest with your people.

Episode Resources:

Connect with George through his website www.georgeasantino.com or connect with him on Twitter @georgeasantino and YouTube.

Check out George’s book, Get Back Up from the Streets to Microsoft Suites

Please support us in our Indiegogo campaign, a movement to inspire others to Do Big Things. Simply go to www.DoBigThings.net.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Register for DO BIG THINGS TODAY!

New Generation of Sales, John Condry, Donald Kelly

TSE 383: Next Generation Of Sales Talent

John Condry, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Gone were the days when you sell just for the sake of selling. Sales has become an even more competitive world that if keep yourself ahead of the pack or seek to develop yourself and become different from the what everybody else is doing then, this may not be the right career for you. Today, we talk about the next generation of sales talent. 

Let’s welcome John Condry as he shares with us how to become the next sales superstar. John Condry has recently trademarked his management system that helps people in sales, production, and service to be able to manage their week to become more well-rounded and more successful in a technology-driven environment.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with John:

Changes in the sales world:

You can’t stay around sales and not develop.

A lot of people do not look at sales as a profession. They see it as not having other options to do. You can’t do this anymore.

How to Become the Next Sales Superstar:

  1. Identify which part of sales is your gift.
  • Find out which of these areas you’re good at:
  • Prospecting
  • Business development
  • Networking and building relationships
  • Qualifying
  • Presenting
  • Closing
  • Using technology

Recognize which part of the equation did you bring with you. What part are you really good at? Ask a friend or take evaluations online to give you insights into your natural sales talents.

  1. Develop the other parts of your game.

Look at the other parts of your game that are severely underdeveloped. Never have a week go by without developing those other parts of your game. You can’t change you however, you can change the way you do things and when you do things.

  1. Close on Friday morning.

Use Friday morning to become a closer. This doesn’t mean you only close on Friday mornings, but that’s where you work on your closing game. People who are not closers don’t get that time kills deals. Use Friday morning as the time to call in all your chips. Anything you’ve started, anyone who’s interested, anyone who’s in the loop, schedule that next appointment, get the agreement in or let people tell you that they’re not really interested. Closers let go of people that are not candidates for what they’re doing.

  1. Be careful in giving out vital information too early.

When giving your magic too early, people don’t appreciate it. People want what they want and when they want. But there are things that only you have as a seller. It could be your solution or your pricing. Hold on to that until you move to the close and just trade that vital information for a decision.

How to know what to give:

  • What do you have that nobody else can find on the internet?
  • Personalized solution
  1. Don’t make generalized assumptions. It’s all personal.

The moment you assume that everybody is the same, what you sell is a commodity, and every customer is the same – that’s when you get into trouble. Salespeople are there to provide personal solutions to customers.

John’s Major Takeaway:

Work on all of your game a little bit even if it’s just a little bit. Start working on your game and expand your game. Mondays, do prospecting. Friday mornings, be a closer. Friday afternoons, do some training and learn some technology. Break it down to smaller pieces so you’re not trying to do everything. Just do something in all the key areas every single week to start building your muscles Focus on being consistent.

Episode Resources:

Connect with John on www.ConnectionBasics.com or send him an email at john@connectionbasics.com. Connect with him too on LinkedIn and Facebook.

Please support us in our Indiegogo campaign, a movement to inspire others to Do Big Things. Simply go to www.DoBigThings.net.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Register Today! 

Do BIG THINGS, West Palm Beach, Florida, EMKO, Donald Kelly, Travis Thomas, The Sales Evangelist, LIVE YES AND