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Retail, Sales From The Street, Sales Reps

TSE 1170: Sales From The Street: “Teach Them How To Educate”

Retail, Sales From The Street, Sales Reps

Derek Badala frequently travels with sales reps to teach them how to educate the customer in an effort to solve problems. As the director of sales at Synthax, he is always on the road traveling with sales reps and training them to become another version of himself — a skilled sales leader, influencer, and consultant. 

Technology and education

Being in the audiovisual industry, it could be said that technology and education are their biggest challenges. Making a sale is difficult, especially with new products. You must understand everything about the product and its application. Everybody is trying to get a sale and trying to close deals fast without asking all the necessary questions. With the competition in the market, there’s not enough time to learn about the new product and how it can be applied to the prospects’ problems.

Derek focuses on educating the sales reps and covering all the ways that the products can be used, and less on the features and benefits. He’s working to find ways that his products can make the clients’ lives easier. 

Sales reps must not skip this educating stage and must learn the product and its application to the lives of the client. Too much excitement over a deal that hasn’t happened yet may cause the deal to fall apart. 

Skipping steps

Derek had a client who was excited about getting a product from Digigram that would provide background music to stores. Neither the client nor the sales reps understood all the things about the product and its services. They got ahead of themselves and weren’t able to prepare the details that the client needed. Instead, the company should have better studied the client’s needs to know exactly how the products fit. 

When reps skip steps, it can cause deals to fall apart, which can negatively affect your pipeline. #SalesPipeline

Their company also sells widgets that clients can buy in retail stores. It’s difficult to educate salespeople in retail stores about the product because they have their personal favorites and they immediately suggest those products. It’s a challenge to tell them about your product and make them answer the customers’ questions.

When customers aren’t given enough information about a product, they often buy something that they’re not happy with. They are boxed into thinking about this particular product that salespeople in the retail store like. This is always a challenge. 

Trade shows 

Derek’s company does a lot of trade shows where he teaches classes on audio networking, and how to do audio over IP net. He also teaches classes on how to choose the right audio interface for musicians so that they won’t be sold products they don’t need.

The company’s goal is to educate the market and the customers through webcasts, webinars, and a whole lot more. 

Lunch and Learn 

The company also does a lot of lunch and learn while traveling. While the internet is an efficient tool in disseminating information, there’s still nothing more effective than getting in front of people and teaching them. Buying them lunch and then educating them about your products in a graceful way is very effective. 

Derek travels with many sales reps and while traveling, he continues to teach them how to educate others as well. They attend sessions and they learn from him by example. Instead of telling them a litany of features and benefits of certain products, Derek tells them a story. 

It is important to have success stories to tell about the products. Share little nuggets about the product to catch the clients’ attention. 

Competition 

The industry is growing and with it, competition grows as well. With every product line added, there’s new revenue being added into the business. Even when a company experiences growth, it’s still hard to miss that others are growing as well. 

There are competitors out there who are as good as, if not better than you. Regardless of the competition, we’re now seeing more resellers who are interested in knowing more about the products they sell. 

Derek’s company has grown since he joined in 2017 and he has seen a lot of improvements. They’re now seeing great improvements in the Ferrofish brand as it’s now being used for Broadway shows, the Superbowl, and for broadcast.

It’s always a battle to be on the top line funnel. You always plant sales and cultivate the leads to turn them into closed deals. 

Be the best listener 

In sales, it is important to be the best listener. One of the biggest mistakes in sales is owning the talk. You want to know more about the customers to be able to present solutions to their problems. You need to listen to them and see how you can help. 

After listening, you need to ask questions and listen to their responses. These steps are more important than presenting your clients with the features and benefits of the product. 

“Teach Them How To Educate” episode resources

Stay connected with Derek via his LinkedIn account. You can also visit the company website, RME-USA.com.

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Training Sales Program. It is a helpful guide for sales reps and sales leaders to become better in doing their pitches and presentations. It has 12 courses to help you find the right customers, ask the right questions, and close great deals. You can get the first two modules for free! 

Or you can also check out Audible as well and explore this huge online library with thousands of books. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Thank you for tuning in and if you liked this episode, do give a rating and review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify

Sales From The Street, Vicki Antonio, Donald C. Kelly

TSE 1169: Sales From The Street – “Think Like A Large Company CEO”

Sales From The Street, Vicki Antonio, Donald C. Kelly 

 

 

Vicki Antonio is a business consultant and a life coach who helps small business owners think like a large company CEO. This is a result of her journey of knowing what her purpose in life is. She started working when she was 13 years old and she found herself having a pattern of working with startups. Her experience made her realize that startups have a pattern of growing pains. 

She used that when she got into real estate because she wanted to be that mom who goes to PTA meetings and football games for her kids. The knowledge gave her a deeper understanding of the entrepreneurial spirit and business acumen as a whole. 

With the fallout of the market, she learned some hard lessons. She then went into upper management in real estate and after that, she became a business developer for a global real estate franchise. Vicki oversaw about 30 of their shops and her role was to get them developed, get them brand-compliant, and partner with brokers and owners to keep the business profitable. She was a coach for the company’s business needs, whatever those needs might be, on a day-to-day basis. 

Blind spots

Most business owners scale their businesses to a certain place and then they’d have a business blindspot. Very few people see the blindspot and see the capacity that they can get to at the beginning. 

It’s similar to taking a vacation where you know where you’re going but you can’t see it from the place that you start. The closer you get to it, however, the clearer it gets. If you’re not familiar with the geographical location of the area, then you might have some detours that cause apprehensions. It may cause you to stop and get lost a little bit. 

This is where Vicki comes in. She is the guide and she helps the companies see their direction in a clearer perspective. 

Top problems 

Fear is the first problem that small businesses face. Sometimes, they become fearful and they build only up to where they know, and then they get stagnant. The fear comes in because they’ve got to relinquish what they know. 

It’s very much like taking your child to daycare for the first time. There’s apprehension and doubt about whether they can take care of your kid. The same is true for your business because you have an emotional attachment to it. You develop apprehension about handing it over. But it is important to allow someone else to come in, and then to trust that they will do their job. Trust and fear come hand-in-hand. 

The fear of somebody else taking the business to the next level or the fear of engaging with another system are reasons why small businesses fail to progress. 

Clarity

Clarity is also difficult for business owners, especially the entrepreneurs who are self-employed salespeople. These people do a lot to get to a certain place. There’s a lot of things that go into play to get them to the end. Often, they don’t have clarity about what those things are because they either don’t have enough components to see the end or they have too many components that they no longer see the end. When you’re in that slump, you need an analysis of the things you do to see the cause of the stagnation. 

Tiger Woods and Michael Jordan had coaches to give them the bird’s eye view, the area where they themselves could not see. The coaches help them and critique them. They also help them analyze what they are doing and how they can change it to make their play better. The same is true in sales. 

Salespeople are good at what they do but there are still things that they just can’t see. Sometimes, salespeople get in their own way and do things because it felt right for years. Like Woods, even when his form is okay, his coach can be there with him and tell him things like, ‘

If you just turn the club a little bit then you’d see a better performance.’

As salespeople, you need a coach to analyze your system and your tools to make sure that you’re using them correctly. It is equally important that you trust their input and that the information you’re getting is helpful. 

It is important for salespeople and business owners to trust the process. 

Fear 

Fear is false evidence appearing real. A lot of times, we think too much because we don’t have clarity about the direction that we take. We are also concerned about whether we’re doing things the proper way. This makes us fear the unknown, so we stay where we are instead of moving.  

It’s not saying that you’re doing something wrong. It’s more like you’ve known how difficult the climb has been and you want to take things to the next level, or to the next pinnacle. Overcoming fear differs from one person to another because everybody’s risk factor is different. For the risk-takers, there’s a great reward but there’s a big gap there. It’s different for people who are not risk-takers because they calculate their risk to the point of comfortability and the rest is pain. 

Trust 

Your business is like your baby and you’ve put all your effort into it and invested much into it. You have the responsibility of making sure that it’s sustainable, it’s growing, it’s healthy, and it’s cared for. 

Then somebody comes in and says to do the same things you’ve promised but it’s difficult to trust that person. 

This fear can be overcome using a trust list. It’s helpful to create a list of people who have the same core values that you have and people who have track records of having done it already. There’s a good possibility that you can rest for a bit when you work with these people, do business with them, party with them, or engage with them. 

The pattern of sales is changing now where relationships are being developed in the sales process. In the past, it has been a case of meeting a stranger, doing the transaction, and then never seeing them again. This time it’s different. 

As a salesperson, you build a relationship with them and vet them to know who they are and you also see their track records. 

Proof of credibility 

When you think like a large company CEO, establishing proof of credibility is also important. When you’re mentioned in the local newspaper or on a TV interview or magazine, third-party validation builds credibility. Donald Miller’s book, Building a StoryBrand: Clarify Your Message So Customers Will Listen talked extensively about this. 

Client testimonials and LinkedIn also build credibility.  You can use the platform to give recommendations and also get recommendations from clients. People who will check in on your page will see you and the things you’ve done getting that quick validation. 

You have to do your homework and leave your footprints, especially now that everybody is using platforms like Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter for marketing. They have great graphic artists and do amazing things. Sometimes, high profile companies do not excel in that area but they’re doing great in testimonials. 

Social media is usually the first place that people go and not having great track records in that platform will rob you of opportunities. Social media, LinkedIn, and testimonial platforms are things that you can improve on. 

Addressing clarity 

Clarity is two-fold. Be clear about who you’re working with and what they’ve attained. Second, know who you are as a business. The second aspect is about knowing your niche, your market, your strong suits, and the things you can highlight about yourself. 

Once you know yourself, then you’ll know how to work with others and how to bring somebody to engage to work with you. 

It’s like the trip mentioned earlier, If you hop in a car without mapping out your destination, you won’t know the streets to take and you’ll end up lost. Startups are like that, too. Many startups think that they can be all things to all people but in truth, that’s not possible. 

Vicki started out in real estate with a global and luxurious company. The properties can be worth millions. She has seen salespeople who wanted to get into that price point but because of the lack of experience, they hesitated. They had to first learn that in order to get to the high price point, they first need to stop taking the lower sales. 

It’s important to let go of the old mindset and get into a new mindset by being clear about where you want to be and then knitting yourself to that thing.

Jack of all trades

Becoming a jack of all trades is good because salespeople and see opportunities but sometimes doing that means turning down an opportunity to do something. For example, if somebody wants their house painted and you’re a salesperson in real estate, if you decide to paint the house, you’re wasting an opportunity of making calls doing things that will potentially help you land your next $25,000 client. 

You are impeding your progress because you can only spend money and time once.

Your time has more value than the actual money you’re making. 

The scripture says that you can do all those with Christ and that’s true but you can’t do it all at the same time. 

Seasons

You’re going to go through seasons, through phases, and through stages. If you learn the season and the stage that you’re in, then you understand the capacity for that time frame. 

You need to understand the season that you’re in, the same way that you’re not going to sport a bathing suit when you’re headed to someplace cold. You’re not going to wear an overcoat when you’re headed to the beach. 

This is the thing about clarity. It’s when you understand that you’re headed to the beach and you’re not going to feel offended or feel like you’re missing out on something when somebody steps in your elevator wearing an overcoat. You know that you are going in a different direction and it’s okay. 

If at some point you want to change your direction or change course, then it’s okay. The most important thing is that you understand very clearly where you’re going when you’re making the change so that you don’t impede good opportunities in the season that you’re in. 

Trust the process

It is important to trust the process. Trust is huge because this is the area where you have to have some faith. There will be blindspots in the trust factor but if you’ve made your part then it will be easier. It’s best to prepare, carve out of clarity, train, and sharpen your tools and learn how to use them. 

You’ve got to trust that when you take the leap, you’re gonna land in the right place. 

Remember this: trust that when you take the leap, you’re gonna land in the right place. 

“Think Like A Large Company CEO” episode resources

Stay in touch with Vicki to learn more about her services by calling her at 561-774-1333. You can also visit her website at victoriousu.com and victorious’s lifestyle strategies. She’s also on Facebook, so check her out there, too. 

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

This episode is brought to you in part by Audible. Check out Audible as well and explore this huge online library with thousands of books. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Training Sales Program, a course to guide sales reps and sales leaders to become better at pitches and presentations. It has 12 courses to help you find the right customers, ask the right questions, and close great deals. You can get the first two modules for free! 

I hope you liked this episode. If you’ve learned a thing or two then do give a rating and review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound

Sales From The Street, Donald C. Kelly, Top Seller, Contracts

TSE 1159: Sales From The Street – “The Unicorn Seller”

Jen is the unicorn seller and everyone is enchanted by her rainbow-colored sales skills. She has lots of techniques and strategies which help her close deals. You want Jen, but she’s from the competing company and just in time, you heard that Jen wants to jump ship. This is your dream come true! 

You think of Jen and you automatically think of all the clients she’s bringing along. It’s a whole list of clients and deals closed left and right. Your company will be making money and you’re going to hire more people due to expansion. Jen is the answer! 

As a top-performing sales rep, I was once Jen, too. I’ve had my fair share of being lured by other companies. I know how it feels to be offered something and to be on the receiving end of the decision whether to hire the top-performing sales rep or not. 

Before making that decision, here are some things that you need to consider.  

Why are they leaving?

We make decisions out of desperation sometimes, especially if money is included in the picture. When your sales aren’t doing too well and you need the pipeline, you want people who can bring the money in. Even if you’re snagging them from the competitor. 

You present them with a good 401k plan, you say all the nice things to convince them to jump to your company, and you tell them how fantastic your company’s culture is. 

You need to assess the situation seriously before making a hiring decision. These are some of the questions that you can ask yourself: 

  • Why are they leaving the company?
  • Are they a problem in disguise? Are you willing to take that risk?
  • Why would they come to your company when they’re already making tons of money in their current company?

The answers to these questions will help you understand their reasons and see if they’re a fit for your company’s values. 

What did they do for the competitor?

In Mark Weinberg’s book, The Sales Management Simplified, he pointed out the need for sales leaders to consider what the salesperson did for the previous company. You need to consider whether they sold at their last company. 

It is important to know the system of how their previous company worked. Find out whether they were tasked to find their opportunities or the opportunities were given to them. You need to be specific about the things they do well. 

What if the person you hire hates prospecting? After three months of work, you see no progress because that salesperson never had to prospect before and now she is having a difficult time. This situation is like putting together a jigsaw puzzle that doesn’t fit. It will never work.

Be upfront 

Many sales leaders and managers are lured into this kind of situation because they focus on the number of opportunities they will generate or the business they can get from their competitors once they’ve hired the top-earning sales rep. 

But this isn’t always the case. You must remember that contracts are of two kinds: the long-term and short-term contracts. Jen, the unicorn seller, might be able to sweet-talk some of her clients into coming with her to the new company, but clients with long-term contracts will be staying in the previous company until their contract ends. When it does, you’ll need to coax them into coming to sign with your company. It’s a long process and it takes patience. 

If that’s the case, you need to be upfront and figure out how much business Jen can bring over. Ask her how much business she is bringing along. 

Talk about the numbers and figure out how you can convince the clients to jump from their current company to yours. Think of the agreement structure and find the solution. Figure out if there’s a non-compete.

All of these things must be considered before you bring Jen along. 

Take Tom, for example. I worked with Tom before and wherever he went, his clients tagged along with him. But that isn’t always the case for some clients who are in long-term agreements. People love Tom and he would often bring a couple of businesses with him to the current company. He is a great salesperson, but even at his best, he still can’t bring all of his clients along with him. 

Culture 

The fourth thing to consider is the culture of the company. Will the salesperson fit with the culture of your company? Will your sales team like the new person you’re bringing along? Is there bad blood between them in the past, perhaps like client stealing? It is challenging to fit in and adjust to the ways your company works right away. 

The new salesperson you’re hiring must be willing to follow the culture.

Have the adult talk and orient the salesperson to the ways of your company and how things work. Give her some time to adjust and if it still doesn’t work, then be ready to cut losses and move on. 

Do not toss money on something that doesn’t work. 

Contingency plan

Have a contingency plan laid out in the event that Jen, or whoever you are hiring, doesn’t work out. You can think of some other way of increasing your sales by bringing somebody else. Maybe instead of the top seller, you hire the most experienced one. 

A person with experience may not bring tons of businesses along but they come with an understanding of how to operate the business successfully. Perhaps you can hire someone who may not be Jen but who fits right in the culture of your company with proper coaching. 

Interview properly 

The last tip is to interview the prospects before hiring them. Grill them to make sure that they can do a great job. Do not cut corners and skip over the interview process. You must listen to the team and to the other executives before making the big decision. 

Going back to Jen, even if you really want to hire her, try to disqualify her just as much as you want her. If you see her desire to work for you, that’s when you know that she’s a perfect fit. That’s when you know that you found your unicorn. 

In my experience, the unicorn rarely exists. If it does, consider the tips I mentioned above. 

“The Unicorn Seller” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by Sales Success Summit. 

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

The episode is also brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a helpful tool for sales leaders and sales reps to find the right customers, ask the right questions, and close powerful deals. The program has twelve courses with two courses for free! 

Visit Audible as well and explore this huge online library with thousands of books. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

August is my birth month and it would be amazing if you share this podcast to your friends as a birthday gift! Drop us your comments and reviews on Apple podcast. We are also on Google Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Obstacles, Sales From The Street,

TSE 1154: Sales From The Street – “Shoot the Donkey”

Obstacles, Sales From The Street,Sellers often face obstacles in their sales process, and the need to remove them is sometimes referred to as the need to Shoot the donkey.”

Will Batista has worked on several presidential campaigns and other political campaigns throughout the country. He recently led a state ballot initiative to change Nevada’s constitution and now he is now working in the energy sector, particularly in the communications and investor relations of the company. Jonathan Diaz works in the university setting where he serves as an adviser and he also teaches classes. 

Shoot the donkey 

This phrase originates from an article that Will discovered while he was looking at political media companies. Shooting the donkey means removing obstacles in your course.

In the movie Patton, based on true events, the characters were heading up a mountain but there was a donkey in the way. Failure to get the donkey out of the way would put them in a dire situation resulting in casualties, so they sent out some of the guys to move the donkey. Nothing worked so the general said, ‘Shoot the donkey!’ 

Remove the obstacles 

When we were in college, our obstacles were our beliefs. We didn’t believe in ourselves as much as we should have. There are times that we don’t give ourselves credit when we should. This is true in sales as well. You might not trust your sales ability and you keep telling yourself that you’re no good at it. This idea is difficult to overcome but it’s imperative that you get through it because it’s the only way for you to become successful. 

For example, back in college when we were selling water, the first obstacle that we had was that we spent a lot of money to get a booth and to get all the water, and eventually get my money back. In order to do that business at a bigger scale, we needed more people, so we went to Idaho Falls and that’s when we did a better job. 

The third time, we ran out of water and we could have given up, but we didn’t. Will went to Sam’s club and got ice and made it happen. 

We succeeded on a small scale. We didn’t make hundreds and thousands of dollars but it was proof that when you put a desire into action, you can make it happen. 

Fear of obstacles

Sometimes we fear obstacles and see them as a negative thing because they do have a negative impact at that moment. There is, however, an opportunity for growth and change in every obstacle, and the ability to tackle problems in a different way. It is a great time for a change and to challenge your ability to think differently. 

The water selling was very basic but year after year, we saw that we’re not doing so great and that became an opportunity to improve the process. Obstacles are typically not good things, but they are opportunities for us to grow and to think critically so that when we are faced with another problem in the future, we will be able to overcome the challenge. 

In politics 

A lot of times when you are trying to get something done, there are always goals that you need to meet. Will was thrown into the fire in his first year working as field staff in Reno because he had no experience recruiting volunteers or meeting metrics.

He had to learn the ropes quickly and the obstacles he faced were the goals that were being imposed on him. He had to find ways to meet the goals regardless of whether he had volunteers or not. 

Will needed to get into these gated communities but he couldn’t get in. Sometimes, they’d follow another car and find a way to get to the individuals and voters to get their contact information. He had to do whatever was necessary to meet their goals. They had goals in mind and they focused their actions to meet the goals. 

Obstacles will always be there but you’ve gotta do what you’ve gotta do. 

Another challenge was getting people into the office to make the calls for the campaign so sometimes, Will had two phones going at the same time. He’d be leaving a message on one phone and talking on the other. Hustling is when you do what you need to do to hit your goals.

For students

John advises students of three main things as they seek the best fit: 

  • Identify their interests 
  • Identify their skills and abilities
  • Determine their values, or the things that are important to them 

For students, the biggest obstacle is the parental control or familial influence. Students now are pressured with the idea that they need to choose a major that will provide them with stability in the future. Many are being pushed into taking courses that they aren’t interested in, courses that they aren’t good at, and courses that are not even aligned to their values. 

John tells his students that for them to shoot the donkey, they need to remove the barrier and talk to their parents. They need to choose the major of their choice because, at the end of the day, it’s them who will go through all the studying and not their parents. 

John helps the students remove the barrier of parental control to see the other options and areas that can work for them. 

Removing barriers

A typical challenge in sales is the people. Sales leaders manage sales teams and often they feel like they don’t have enough qualified workforce or that they don’t have enough people with qualified sales experience. Sales leaders overcome this obstacle by trusting the skills that people bring from all different walks of life. 

If you are experiencing a barrier in your sales, and you’ve hit a plateau even when you already have a very good team, try to think outside the box. Bring in somebody from outside of the organization who can break down the barriers that your current sales team cannot. 

Whether it’s in politics, in the corporate world, or in sales, people often fail to recognize the skills that people from other industries have. It’s time to break down that barrier and start looking outside your comfort zone. 

Keep it real without being rude. Give real feedback without being demeaning. You don’t want to waste time so it is important to make the choice that you really want. 

“Shoot the Donkey” episode resources

Connect with Will in his LinkedIn account or email him in batista.wilfredo@gmail.com. You can also reach John via his email jondlazas@gmail.com and johndssj@gmail.com

Whatever role you are playing in your industry, I challenge you to go out and look for the challenges that are in your way. Remove the challenges, make the hard decisions, and make things happen. 

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

This episode has been fun and it’s brought to you in part by Audible. It has thousands of books and it offers a 30-day trial and a free book when you sign up. Just type audibletrial.com/tse and start discovering the books to become a sales savvy. 

The episode is also brought to you in part by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It is a helpful tool for sales leaders and sales reps in improving their skills. It teaches you how to find better prospects, how to have meaningful conversations, and what questions to ask to close deals. Check out the program now and get the first two modules for free. 

Visit thesalesevangelist.com/freecourse to find more information about the program. 

If you like this episode then tell us about it, give us your good review and rate us on Apple podcast. You can also find us in Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

John Livesay, Audible, Story Telling,

TSE 1129: Sales From Street: “Better Selling Through Storytelling”

 

John Livesay, Audible, Story Telling,Instead of pushing your message out to your prospects in hopes that they’ll latch on, sellers can make their message magnetic and practice better selling through storytelling

John Livesay is known as the “pitch whisperer” because he helps people become compelling storytellers. Plato said stories rule the world, and it’s still true, except 2,600 years later, we have many distractions that he didn’t have. 

Push and pull

Pushing your message out to sell a product or service just doesn’t work anymore. The new technique is to pull people in with great stories. John’s work as a storyteller began at an ad agency where he was tasked with creating 30-second commercials for movies. He discovered the need to tell a concise story that made people want to see the movie. 

During a stint in Silicon Valley, he competed against IBM and other massive companies to sell technical products. He realized that if you confuse people, they say no. But you can pull people in by telling the story of what the technology does.

His work culminated in a career selling ads for Conde Nast magazine, where he had to bring to life the vision of a particular brand to a particular advertiser so they could see why their brand would resonate with the stories being told in the magazine.   

Self-esteem roller coaster

John points to the fact that sellers tend to feel good about themselves only when their numbers are up. When they’re down, self-esteem suffers. 

He recognized his sense that he had to constantly push information out, which was exhausting. Even worse, if you’re pushing and trying without getting anything in return, you end up feeling bad about the whole process. 

Campfires

The glow of PowerPoint has replaced the glow of campfires, and we often sit in meetings where someone reads to us from a slide. Don’t do that. Nobody wants to be read to. John suggests using a series of images from which you can tell a story. 

Stories work because of our right-brain, left-brain way of processing information. If you’re buying a car, when the seller shares how many miles-per-gallon it gets, you cross your arms and prepare to negotiate on price. But if you say, “Donald, let me tell you a story of someone like you who bought this car and how it changed his life,” you’ll pull the buyer into the story. 

People buy emotionally and then back their decision up with logic. 

Sellers who deal in Ferraris don’t talk about miles-per-gallon. They sell the emotion of driving a sexy car. People buy emotionally, and storytelling is the best way to tap into people’s emotions. 

If you tug at people’s heartstrings, they open their purse strings.  

Sales outreach

John recently worked with Honeywell on the sales of technical products that keep the air clean inside operating rooms. The team talked a lot about the technology and the specifications and how it was better than what the competition had to offer. 

The real story is what happens if the air isn’t clean in the operating room. The patient gets an infection and has to be readmitted for additional surgeries. 

Just about every seller has a case study or testimonial of some sort that can form the basis of a good story. 

Paint a picture

Some sellers use before-and-after pictures to sell their product or service, accompanied by a bunch of facts. There’s no emotion or story. 

A good story has exposition and it paints a picture of the work you did with a previous client. It marries the who, what, when, where, and why of a client with the problem you were solving. It demonstrates how much better life is for your client after he works with you.

But you are never the hero in the story. Tell your story so that the client can see himself in your story. It will make your closing very different because the client will want to take that journey with you. 

Tell a story with specifics, and be sure to include the drama that happened along the way. 

Presentations

Most sellers make the mistake of having too many words in their PowerPoint presentations and failing to think about what their opening will be. Thanking them for the opportunity to be there isn’t memorable because everyone does it. The fact that you’re excited isn’t what excites your clients.

Whether you’re pitching to fund a startup, to get hired, or to tell people why they want to work with you, use an opening that pulls people in. It’s the most important part of any presentation. 

Sellers often rely on ploys like presenting last in hopes that their presentation will be the most memorable, but the best story is going to get the sale. It doesn’t matter what order you present in. 

Sell yourself first, then sell your company, and then sell your product or service. Most people skip the first two. Tell a story about yourself, then about the company and its culture, and then how you help other people. 

Elements of a story

Don’t just tell the story of how you solved a problem for a client. Paint a picture of the resolution and what the client’s life looks like now. 

John recounted a client who was dropped into the Amazon jungle when he was 18 to survive for two weeks as a rite of passage. The entrepreneur shared the story of how his lessons in the Amazon jungle translated into the concrete jungle of entrepreneurship, and he got the funding he was looking for. His investors figured if he could survive in the Amazon, he’ll figure out how to survive here.

Make yourself memorable and connect emotionally with your prospects. It gives you a tool in your toolbox that you don’t normally have.

Three stories

Anytime you’re starting out with this concept, ask yourself these questions:

  • How am I going to sell myself? Why did I take this job? 
  • What’s the company story of origin?
  • What case study can I develop into a story that people will see themselves in?

Arthur Ash, tennis pro, said the key to success is confidence, and the key to confidence is preparation.

“Better Selling Through Storytelling” episode resources

Grab a copy of John’s book, Better Selling Through Storytelling. Text the word “pitch” to 66866 and John will send you a free chapter of the book that has a step-by-step process on moving from invisible to irresistible as a seller. 

You’re a savvy salesperson who wants to learn and grow. Check out audible for thousands of titles, plus a free 30-day trial, plus a free book. 

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there. I’m fairly easy to connect with. Just comment on something about my podcast. Send me an email.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester. You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561) 578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. When you share your experiences with the show, others will read the reviews and give us a listen.

I truly appreciate you and appreciate your reviews and your subscription, and your willingness to tell your friends and anyone you know that’s in sales about the podcast.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Ideal Customer, Dr. Frances Richards, Black Podcast

TSE 1099: Sales From The Street – “My Ideal Customer”

Ideal Customer, Dr. Frances Richards, Black Podcast

 

Business owners and sales reps who try to sell to everyone will struggle to succeed until they decide to focus their efforts on the ideal customer.

Today, Dr. Frances Richards, whose company helps people reclaim their wealth by transforming their health, talks about the journey of finding her ideal customer.

Sales From The Street allows us to connect with a sales professional and hear about the biggest professional struggles that person faced. Dr. Frances is the host of a podcast called Black Entrepreneur Experience, where she interviews CEOs, innovative thinkers, thought leaders, and black entrepreneurs across the globe.

Finding a tribe

Her biggest struggle was finding her ideal customer, and connecting with the people that her message would resonate with. When you’re building an internet business, there are so many different ways to connect with people that it can sometimes be overwhelming for businesses that are trying to find their tribe.

She points to the fact that there are plenty of people telling you what you should do to connect with your ideal client, so it’s tough to know what to do. She said that people told her, “It’s all in the email list,” or “It’s all in social media,” or “It’s all in Facebook advertising,” or “It’s all in the messaging.”

Changing landscape

The hardest part, she said, is trying to determine what’s really relevant. And with the internet constantly changing things, the way you build a company in 2019 is different than the steps you might have taken in 2014.

The steps to find your ideal customer have changed. And when you talk about sales, certain steps are appropriate whether you’re online or offline. Building rapport, and building quality relationships, matters in every situation.

Authenticity

Dr. Frances said that in order to find her ideal customer, she had to block out all the noise and focus on authenticity. She started by deprogramming herself from the idea of working for someone else.

She said she had to adjust to the idea of working for herself and to lose all of the things she was accustomed to, like listening to the bosses tell her what she needed to do. Because she had done many different kinds of sales, she was able to change her mindset from employee mode to employer mode. Then she had to be true to who she really wanted to serve.

When she was an employee, she had to serve anyone. Once she started to define who to serve, then she started to attract her ideal customer as opposed to just doing cold calling.

To-do lists

She had an extensive to-do list of doing 10 posts a day, doing a Facebook live, doing a Periscope, posting on LinkedIn, and all of those other things. She was busy working on the business instead of in the business, which actually brings in income.

Once she prioritized how she would get sales and how she would bring value, she got out of the mode of being desperate. She was listening to her clients’ pain points and she set out to serve them. She went into the mode of serving and helping her clients, her fan base, her tribe.

Dr. Frances has turned down consulting contracts because she wanted to make it a win-win for all parties involved. She operates from a position of making sure both parties are a good fit.

Qualified clients

The shift to serving her clients resulted in more qualified clients. Previously she connected with clients who really couldn’t afford her service so it would have been a disservice to try to work together.

She started asking her prospects what they hoped to accomplish and if someone said, “I want to lose 50 pounds in 5 days,” she wouldn’t even try to convince the person to work with her since the goals were unrealistic.

She has found that when she gets qualified, bonafide clients, the two enjoy working together. The clients are getting results and she is building testimonies.

Ideal client

Just serve the people who really need what you have to offer. Be who you authentically are. There will be plenty of voices telling you what you should do.

Instead of following them, dig deep into yourself and discover what you’re really passionate about. What makes you sing? What makes you get out of bed every morning? That’s half the battle because your attitude dictates your altitude.

If you love what you do, you’ll do what you love. Dr. Frances uses the acronym DANCE to remind her to be authentic: Determine Action Now Creates Energy.

Dancers dance because they want to, not because someone forces them to. Instead of doing things you don’t like, do the things you authentically enjoy. Find your passion.

“Ideal Customer” episode resources

You can connect with Frances at drfrancesrichards.com and you can find her on Facebook and Instagram as Dr. Frances Richards. You can also find her podcast at Black Entrepreneur Experience.

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Replacement picture, fear of rejection, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1094: Sales From The Street – “Replacement Picture”

 

Sellers have built up tension and fears which prevent us from reaching our true potential, but if we create a replacement picture of what success will look like, we’ll move toward positive change.

Mark Panciera is a third-generation funeral director, so he says he has a caregiver’s heart, but he has grown into being a sales maven. He’s a partner of the Pacific Institute, a performance consulting firm with an international footprint, where he helps leaders tap into their potential to drive greater personal and professional performance.

Meaningful change

All meaningful, lasting change starts within ourselves and then works its way out. That equates to mindset or habits, attitudes, beliefs, and expectations. It’s focusing on the beliefs that are propelling us to our greater good or our higher purpose.

It’s about the pictures that we hold in our mind.

Sometimes as sales reps we get focused only on closing the deal. Even before that, we may routinely tell ourselves garbage that keeps us from reaching our potential.

What grows naturally

Think about what grows naturally in a garden: weeds. Likewise, we have a natural inclination. We’ve got this chatterbox in our minds that acts as a little committee telling us what we can and can’t accomplish.

  • Don’t try new things.
  • Don’t leave your comfort zone.
  • You’ll be ridiculed if you fail. 

Mark was full of trepidation when he moved from the caregiving role to transacting business with leaders around the globe. He realized that his self-talk was holding him back.

Mark couldn’t imagine that he could teach them anything that they didn’t already know.

He had to feel the fear and then move anyway. Mark needed to run toward the roar. It’s more easily said than done, but he realized that he had a choice to become more transactionally oriented or to stay where he was. He could either do it or not.

Adult choices have adult consequences. You will have consequences to your choice to make a solicitation or do an outreach or dial just one more time despite a bunch of “no” answers.

Higher purpose

Mark knows that ultimately his higher purpose is served because he will be a caregiver to a larger audience when he transacts business.

He chooses to say yes to that purpose because beyond the fear or resistance or limiting beliefs or self-talk is the replacement picture that emerges when he serves his higher purpose.

When you’re helping people and giving them the tools to think and perform differently, create a “want to” mentality instead of a “have to” mentality. When people are forced to do something, they subconsciously push back on those efforts. It’s even true when you’re forcing yourself to do something.

So don’t push yourself. Create a “want to” mentality. Have some fun doing it. Most importantly, move toward that replacement picture of what success is going to look like.

Burning the boats

If Mark hadn’t moved toward a replacement picture, he wouldn’t have a new career. He stretched himself out of a major comfort zone. His replacement picture was stronger in this new realm.

He had to rebrand himself to do outreach because in funeral services people come to you. Performance consulting was a different story. He had to create a “want to” mentality for himself so he could create a different mindset. Mark had to recast his habits and attitudes toward selling.

He had to feel the fear of something he had never done before and run toward the roar.

Imposter syndrome

Mark wrestled with imposter syndrome because he moved from caring for the dead to breathing life into leaders around the globe. He felt like a poser.

He worked feverishly once he painted the replacement picture to garner the knowledge necessary to built a skill set of competency in this realm. Mark surrounded himself with the right consultants, coaches, and leaders and poured himself into reading, listening, and going to conferences.

Because we think in pictures, he had to see himself in a new picture and then move toward it.

Armor

Make sure you’ve got your armor around you and don’t take it personally when you hear a “no.” Even if the people around you like family or friends don’t understand what you’re doing, be convicted based upon your own mindset.

You’re going to deal with cognitive dissonance which will cause you to feel like you’re out of order.

But just as your muscles will feel fatigued and tired when you exercise, you’re going to feel fatigued if you move to a higher level of performance.

Moving through fear

Imagine going to a networking event. Some folks have resistance in their minds to interacting with strangers and possibly being rejected. We worry about forgetting people’s names or not being invited in. We might be a little clunky with our conversations.

If you think about the negative things, that’s where you’ll end up. It’s like a kid learning to ride a bike. If you tell them to watch out for cracks they’ll become so worried about the cracks they’ll end up there.

So now take that same concept to a networking event and realize that if you focus solely on the things you don’t want to happen, you’ll manifest them because the brain doesn’t know the difference between something vividly imagined and an actual experience.

Instead, replace those pictures with how you want things to actually go.

  • I’m going to connect with someone with a cool story.
  • I’ll hear a great speaker.
  • I’m going to learn something wonderful.

And in the end, even if none of that happens, you’re going to celebrate the fact that you actually acted. That success will give you the energy to move forward the next time at the very least.

Faith and brain science

As a person of faith, I often pray, “Help me to be led to someone today who can benefit from my product or service.” It puts me in the mindset to find someone who needs my help.

Whether you believe it’s mysticism or something else, you can drive synaptic firings of your brain and create new neural pathways. You can manifest a morphing of your brain.

Changing habits

People often ask how long it takes to change a habit, but Mark believes it has to do with quantity of repetition rather than quantity of time.

All habits are based on behaviors which are based on beliefs. Go back to the core thinking that drove your beliefs, that drove your behaviors, that drove your habits.

Conduct a self-examination. Do you do a lot of creative avoidance? Do you do a lot of research?

Distal vs. proximal

You can’t get 50 cold calls at once but you can start with the first one. Realize that there are proximal goals and distal goals. The 50 cold calls you need to make are distal goals that are in the distance.

At the end of the day, you need to have that 50 done, but look at the proximal goal to make sure you’re accomplishing them, and then celebrate them once you do.

If you’re looking at 50, how many do you need to make per hour? Game your own system. Create habits around that.

Stop with the creative avoidance and get after the first 10 because those first 10 will motivate you and move you toward the next cup of coffee or the walk around the office.

Build momentum

You only steal second base by getting your foot off of first.

Make the first call and commit within your first 10 minutes in the office in order to build momentum. Then jog around the block and keep your energy up.

Admiral William McRaven gave a commencement speech at the University of Texas in which he encouraged students to make their beds first thing in the morning. If you do, you can never look back on your day and fear that you didn’t succeed at something.

Focus on your strongest picture and if you’re compelled to believe that what you’re selling can make people better then focus on that. Find your why or your north star.

Once you have that prize in mind, get after it.

“Replacement Picture” episode resources

You can connect with Mark at (844) 200-8649 or email him at mpanciera@thepacificinstitute.com or find him on LinkedIn.

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Chad Sanderson, Sales Email, Prospecting, Donald Kelly

TSE 1079: Sales From The Street – “Brief Compelling Stories In Sales Emails”

 

Many sellers understand the challenge of using emails to reach out to prospects, but Chad Sanderson tells us that using brief, compelling stories in sales emails can leave a memorable impression on a prospect who is inundated with noise.

Chad has worked as a marketer, seller, sales leader, and entrepreneur, so he understands the perspective of everyone listening to this podcast.

Email issues

Chad points out that most emails suck. We’re all connected to our devices and we’re constantly inundated with impressions through Facebook messages, videos, emails, LinkedIn requests, and even WhatsApp or Snapchat messages.

That doesn’t even include impressions you get while watching television.

The only way to effectively break through the noise is to put yourself in the other person’s shoes. Everything is moving at a ridiculously fast pace, so if you never slow down enough to truly consider the other person, you’ll probably fail to truly connect.

You must connect with people in a way that’s valuable from their perspective.

Onslaught

As if the crowded inboxes aren’t enough, it’s also true that many of the emails people send are just drudgery. Chad points to one company that has been pursuing him for several months, and as he mapped the cadence of the messages, he noted that the messages never included anything from his perspective until about email 14. The messages were always about the company.

He said it happens all the time because sellers don’t realize that approach doesn’t work.

And though he tries to be kind because he works in this world too, he sometimes has to unsubscribe because the messages aren’t valuable.

To make the idea simpler to understand, think about this in the context of your friends. Everybody has at least one friend that will not stop talking about themselves.

Even in a social setting, people will eventually move away from that person. It’s true in sales, too.

People business

We seem to assume that the rules are different in sales. We forget that we’re in the people business and that relationships matter in sales just as they do outside of work.

Sales has always been a discipline. It has always been tough. It has gotten tougher because now everyone can get to everyone else and everyone believes they have something important to say.

Slow down and take a deep breath. Think about your general target audience. Instead of thinking about Donald or Chad, think about reaching out to podcast hosts who focus on B2B revenue generation.

Then you’ll have a little bit of context. You still won’t know those people, but you’ll have a good place to start. But you have to be able to reach out to prospects at scale.

Personalization

Chad read a report last week about a company that ran a test of 7,000 emails, personalizing half of the emails to the challenges the person would face based upon their role. Think industry/company personalization rather than individual personalization.

They found that the open rates were four to five points higher on cold emails that were crafted to highlight challenges the receiver was facing.

Some people argue that isn’t personalization, but what we really need to do is understand the conext these people are working in and then show them something that will tap into their curiosity circuit.

The next level of personalization involves those who responded to the first round of communication.Instead of researching 100 people I only have to research the 10 who indicated interest in my product or service.

Stick to the rule of thumb that you’ll do 15 minutes of research on an industry, 10 minutes of research on a company, and 5 minutes of research on an individual. If you can stick to that and not be distracted by dog videos or Tiger winning the Masters, you’ll be able to effectively personalize your messaging.

Make them curious so that they’ll be waiting for the next email.

Telling stories

Chad related the story of a friend who went into a Men’s Warehouse to get a tux. Then he used the experience to reach out to the CEO of the company to highlight how his company could help fill in some of the organization’s gaps.

Using his own individual experience, he crafted an email that was still only six or seven sentences long so that it fit on a mobile screen.

In a B2C environment, share how that brand made you feel or how an individual made you feel. In a B2B environment, tell a story about how you’ve helped someone whose situation was similar to the person you’re targeting. Explain how you were able to help him turn his situation around and tell him about the results you were able to produce.

Tell him about the person who is like him.

Although you don’t know him yet, you know someone who is like him, so tell him that story.

If you want to understand story structure better, grab a copy of Creativity, Inc, a book about how Pixar creates stories for its movies.

Be human

Very few people can write an email the very first time that communicates well and fits neatly on one mobile screen. You’ll likely need multiple drafts to get it right.

Communicate to your audience that you’re paying attention to them and what they are dealing with. Acknowledge awards they won and acknowledge articles you’ve read about that address a problem they might be having.

Consider Barb Giamanco, who reached out to female chief marketing officers to recruit help with a project. She emailed each of them by acknowledging an award each had received.  Then she asked for their perspective on a project she was working on.

The emails indicated that she was paying attention to the CMOs’ careers. It acknowledged a problem that the CMOs might be having and a desire to address it. It wasn’t until the very end of the email that she even mentioned her own intentions.

Be authentic and genuine.

Realize, too, that once you get an email dialogue started, you have to have the skill set to keep it going.

Think about your prospects as human beings. Slow down and think about your target.

“Brief Compelling Stories In Sales Emails” episode resources

Check out Chad’s podcast B2B Revenue Executive Experience and you can find him on LinkedIn, but you must send a note with your connection request.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Joe Sweeney, Donald Kelly, Understanding People

TSE 1074: Sales From The Street – “Understanding What Makes People Tick”

Joe Sweeney, Donald Kelly, Understanding People

Human behavior plays a huge role in sales and understanding what makes people tick is one of the most important concepts sellers in all industries should seek to learn.

Joe Sweeney has worn a variety of different hats over the course of his career, but he loves human behavior and he says it’s the key to success in sales.

Buyers

You must understand why someone would buy your product. Joe’s philosophy, as described in his book Networking Is A Contact Sportis that networking, business, and sales are about giving and serving rather than getting something.

People ask about the number one mistake that salespeople make, and it’s believing that the process is about us. We think it’s about our product. It’s not.

Joe gives talks all the time and he starts by saying, “You don’t sell anything. What we do is help people get what they want.”

Instead, sellers tend to take the opposite approach and we talk about ourselves and our product. But your buyer doesn’t care about that. All he cares about is whether your product can solve his needs and relieve some of his pain points.

Criticism

Joe said he spent a portion of his life criticizing other people because he represented a lot of high-net-worth people who did stupid things.

When, for example, he encountered a woman outside a hospital dying from emphysema and smoking a cigarette, he made the connection. The pleasure she got from nicotine was greater than the pain she experienced from emphysema.

The takeaway is to get good at understanding what makes people tick without criticizing them. All human behavior makes sense, even when we don’t.

  • Don’t be critical of their actions.
  • Understand people’s needs and wants.

Keep everything simple.

3 Common Needs

Although we could all likely point to hundreds of needs, we really have three basic, common needs.

  1. We need to belong to something bigger than ourselves.
  2. We need to love and to be loved.
  3. Finally, we all want to know that our life has meaning and that we’ve made a difference.

The greatest sales companies in the world have understood that.

Perhaps our greatest need is the first one: the need to belong to something bigger. It’s counter-intuitive today because with all the social media we falsely believe we’re all connected but the truth is that we’re less connected than we’ve ever been.

Stated another way, we’re more isolated now than ever.

Need to belong

The company that really understands this concept is Harley Davidson. Its number one competitor is BMW which far surpasses Harley, but Harley outsells everyone.

The Harley Ownership Group, or HOG, makes its owners part of something bigger. It’s about belonging.

Remember the old TV show Cheers? Its tagline captures this desire. Sometimes you wanna go where everybody knows your name.

In this technology world, we pretend that we’re connected to a massive network but we aren’t.

Need to be loved

Coca Cola marketed to this need with the ad about teaching the world to sing. It was kind of a kumbaya moment with people holding hands singing together.

They portrayed the feeling that if you drink Coca Cola, you’d feel all this love. Coca Cola understood the Maya Angelou quote: People will forget what you say. People will forget what you do. People will never forget the way you make them feel. 

Joe asks his groups, “What are you doing to answer the needs of these people? The belonging needs and the love needs.”

Need to make a difference

We all want to know that our lives have meaning, and Mastercard captured that with the ad campaign that assigned prices to different products.

Fishing poles, $29. Worms, $3.25. An afternoon fishing with your teenagers, Priceless.

Most of us approach the sales process with the sense that we have to tell people about our benefits. Instead, we should take two steps back and work to understand what makes people tick.

Understand needs

Work to understand your buyers’ needs. The greatest companies do it and I recommend that your listeners do the same.

If you’re going to be really good in sales, you should wow people.

If you sell office furniture, what would differentiate you from the competition?

Find something personal, and then do something memorable. Little things in sales mean everything. #BeMemorable

Imagine that you have a customer who likes Egyptian art. At the close of your interaction with the customer, hand him a piece of Egyptian art that you printed out. It cost you nothing, but none of the other competitors will have done that.

Making money

Joe suggests that sales isn’t about making money. Although that’s a by-product of sales, it’s really about creating an environment where we can service people. You can do the same thing in education and in government.

Morph your sales job into a servant leadership role.

Joe’s sister-in-law told him that she always assumed that business was a bunch of greedy people trying to make money. There was a negative energy around sales.

Joe reframed it as a positive thing and created a forum where people can serve each other and get what they want in life.

Daniel Pink wrote a book called To Sell Is Human all about humanizing sales. I needed that as a young seller when I was guilty of seeing CEOs as something other than human beings. I didn’t see a woman who runs a business and has two kids in middle school.

Sales development

Joe said he hates networking and what it represents. We tend to think of an alpha male chasing someone down with a business card. It’s about understanding pain points and needs and then responding to them.

Many salespeople are too aggressive and competitive because we feel the pressure. Instead, we have to reframe networking and sales.

It’s not about us, but that’s a tough concept in this narcissistic culture.

Joe suggested using a 5-10-15 process in which he holds a minimum of 5 meetings, 10 pieces of written correspondence, and a minimum of 15 phone calls.

It’s less about the numbers and more about the system. Your listeners could start with a 2-4-6 system. Make a plan that keeps you accountable to yourself.

We’re basically all independent contractors and this kind of system will create internal accountability.

“Understanding What Makes People Tick” episode resources

You can connect with Joe at joesweeney.com/networking where you can access inexpensive online training programs. They can help your listeners move the needle in their business and sales lives but also in their personal lives.

You can also grab a copy of his book, Networking Is A Contact Sport.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Reddit, Why Should I Buy?

TSE 1064: Sales From The Street – “Why Should We Do Business With You?”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Reddit, Why Should I Buy?One of the most important questions you’ll answer is “Why should I do business with you?” and it’s vital that you get it right when you do.

When the question comes, you’ll be tempted to point out how long your company has existed, how great your product is, and how great your customer service is, but those answers won’t likely work.

Sales From the Street tackles actual problems that sellers are facing and allows a sales rep just like you to provide an answer that worked for him.

Loaded question

People frequently get on Reddit seeking advice about how to answer this question. I love checking in there because it gives me a great opportunity to connect with sellers and share my own insights and expertise.

They frequently listen to the podcast after our interaction and it presents a great opportunity to grow my business. If you haven’t checked Reddit for a page related to your own industry, you definitely should.

“Why should I do business with you” is a loaded question, and I’m going to answer it in two different ways.

When I was a young seller, I was quick to point out the features of my product and to preach about why we were the best company, but it never addressed the client’s true issue.

Initial conversation

Your answer to the question will largely depend on whether this is the first time you’ve spoken to this person. Do you have a relationship already, or this your very first contact?

If you’re speaking to the customer for the very first time, he may be testing you to see how you’ll respond. You could play a seller’s version of whack-a-mole and blindly try to guess the right answer, but as a sales professional, that’s not how you want to operate.

Instead, take control of the situation. Your first priority should be to find out why she is asking this question in the first place.

You can respond with a listicle or with a question of your own. Or, consider this:

“You know, David, when people ask that question it’s usually one of three things.

  1. To see if we have the proper expertise
  2. Testing whether I’m quick on my feet. 
  3. To determine whether we can solve their problem.

Which one of those are we dealing with David?”

His answer to your question will help you understand how to proceed.

Take control

Ask questions about the sales process that will help you determine what the customer is seeking. Take charge of the sales process by controlling the conversation.

If the prospect is wasting your time and has no intention of hiring you, you’ll determine that more quickly rather than wasting time on a deal that will never close.

If the prospect is interested, he’ll answer the question and you can continue from there. Pose a question in response to his question.

Ask him why he’s inclined to ask that. If he indicates that his company has encountered other sellers who couldn’t solve its problems, then you’ll know how to respond.

Address the concerns

“I don’t ever want to do business with you if I can’t solve your problem. We want to make sure we’re a fit. I don’t want to waste your time or mine.”

“If you are open to it, I’d love to see what you’re doing now to see if we can help you just like we’ve helped many other companies in the past.” 

You can even mention at some point that you’d love to be honest enough to acknowledge if the two of you aren’t a good fit. That will keep you on the same page.

Your customer expects you to rattle off a list of features and benefits. They expect you to be a submissive seller.

They may not realize that as a professional seller, you’ve helped a lot of people, and you’re an expert at doing so. You’re going to stay calm and confident.

Surprise the customer

If, on the other hand, this is a customer that you’ve worked with for some time, he may be truly trying to determine whether he should work with you. Your goal is to communicate to him that you’re the best at solving his particular problem.

You’ve done it for thousands of other clients, you’ve run the protocols, and you know you’re the best. You can turn the tables on the customer at that point.

“Why should you not do business with me?”

Be confident. Make sure you understand why the customer is asking the question.

“Why Should We Do Business With You?” episode resources

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Jonathan Dale, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Pricing

TSE 1034: Sales From The Street – “How Low Can You Go?”

Jonathan Dale, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, PricingSalespeople often adopt a commodity selling mindset instead of a value-based mindset, which leaves them making less money than they could have made. They find themselves asking, “how low can you go?

Jonathan Dale works with RS&I, a nationwide company with nine branches throughout the United States. They have become the largest distributor and sales agent of dish networks. Anyone wanting the ability to resell dish networks must go through RS&I to do so.

They also own HughesNet, one of the largest satellite internet providers.

Jonathan manages the Vivint portfolio. As a sales leader, he teaches sales reps how to keep the sales process simple by breaking it down.

Jonathan has had so many different experiences with both sellers and partners. It brings a whole other level of complexity to his role as a sales leader.

Focus on value

He remembers knocking on doors to sell home security systems for a company called Pinnacle. It is where he learned the ‘Art of the Sale.’ Although he didn’t particularly love it, he admits that he did learn from it.

The following year, after several failures, he fully understood the sales process and realized he was a salesperson. It required taking a step back and looking at sales in a whole new way.

Jonathan believes that salespeople commonly place a stigma on sales, or have a mindset about it, that prevents them from being successful.

It is a mindset that they have to sell based on price.

Jonathan’s biggest struggle when training new reps in the home security industry is teaching them to become more of a value salesperson versus a commodity sales rep.

He wants them to pitch the overall value of the service rather than diluting the service.

Let the customer decide what the spending habits will be.

The opportunity for a sales rep to make the most money is when the customer is comfortable with where he wants to be.  Often times, as sales reps, we want to fit each customer into the same size box.

Yet, at the end of the day, if we try to force that fit, we lose money. Forcing our clients into a package that they do not need only leads to chargebacks.

Don’t compete on price

Jonathan works with over 350 different retailers that take Vivint as a secondary, tertiary, and even fourth line sale. It is a struggle to get them to understand that he doesn’t want them to compete on price.

Instead, he wants them to have a conversation about the value of the service and let the customer decide if the product fits their needs.

Sales reps, however, are prone to touting the price because it seems easier.

Jonathan made an interesting transition two years ago which was actually detrimental for a few months.

He moved from home security sales – a totally valuable sale – to satellite sales which was more of a commodity. He realized he was losing money because he wasn’t committed to the value of the product.

Often times, sales reps want to take the path of least resistance – the easier sale. If you can provide the customer with benefits, instead of simply selling features, you create value in your product. By allowing the customer to then determine his spending habits, your earning potential is maximized.

Don’t lead with your own wallet

When I sold training classes for $10K a class, the most money I had ever had in the bank at one time was $3,000. It made no sense to me. I just couldn’t understand why someone would spend that much money. As a result, it definitely limited my ability to sell.

I needed to realize that my clients would get a huge return on that $10K investment – that there was a value to what I offered.

We don’t know their spending habits or capabilities.

Instead, believe that your product is the best in the industry regardless of what the competitors offer. Know that your prospects will pay for it because it is the best product available.

Keep it simple

Keep it simple, silly!  K.I.S.S is an acronym that Jonathan keeps in mind when he teaches the retail process to his sales reps.

Look at the product in total.

Do not ‘product spew,’ meaning, do not lecture your prospects on every single detail of the product because that is not what they need.

Instead, sell the benefit of the product.

Increase the value of the product by explaining the ways it can serve the customer.

When the question of price arises, turn it back around and ask the customer what he feels it is worth.  If all went well – if the sales rep has created significant value in his presentation – the customer will be pleasantly surprised when presented with the cost because he has placed an even higher value on it.

Commodity selling means to provide the customer with the necessary scenarios to imagine for himself the benefit of your service.

Know that value should exceed cost

Everyone wants to know what’s in it for them. They want to know the biggest return they can get on any investment. As sales reps, keep that in mind. The sales pitch has to continually revolve around it.

When the customer can see the value – when he understands what is in it for him –  he will buy.

At a recent door-to-door conference, Jonathan was looking for a new accountant when he approached an accountant booth a few rows away from his own booth. They told him everything he wanted to hear. Without even knowing the cost, Jonathan was ready to sign because he immediately understood the value they offered. It was a no-brainer.

In the end, the new accountant service was more expensive than the old service he had been using, but to Jonathan, the value exceeded the cost.

Keep up with the evolving world of sales

As a sales leader, Jonathan spends a lot of time on the road. He ‘gets down in the trenches’ with his sales teams to introduce new ideas and to show them how to make changes that, despite sometimes being more difficult at first, will bring in more money in the long run.

He sets the example for his team.

In sales, we sometimes get into a comfortable rut regardless of results. We can’t afford, however, to continue down a road that does not deliver results.

The sales industry is continually evolving and changing. New ideas and new processes are constantly created. You have to study and keep up with the times.

Have fun as well. The sales process can be a fun way to learn about how people think. Figure out how people think and use it to your advantage. Be forward thinking in your sales approach.

“How Low Can You Go?” episode resources

The best way to reach Jonathan is via email at Jon.dale@rsiinc.com.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. If you put in a lot of hard work in 2018 but weren’t able to close many of your deals, we can help you fix that. We have a new semester beginning in April and it would be an honor to have you join. Visit thesalesevangelist.com/CST.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Phil Sweeney, Selling to Everyone, New Customer

TSE 1024: Sales From The Street: “Selling To Everyone”

Phillip Sweeney,Selling a product or service that expands across multiple industries is possible when we realize that selling to everyone takes a team effort.

Phil Sweeney worked in sales while in college because he enjoyed talking with people and problem-solving. Now, just two years after graduating, Phil is still working for Negotiatus, a fast-growing tech start-up business he first joined while in school.

There were only a handful of employees when Phil first signed on. Now they are at 60 employees and Phil is loving every minute of it.

Selling to everyone

It was exciting, as a salesperson, to have totally green fields ahead in terms of being able to work with, and sell to, any company. Phil had to quickly learn how not overextend himself.

He had to learn how to hone in on the ideal customer profile. He had to understand who had the biggest need for the platforms he offers.

When Phil first joined the sales team in its infancy, the company really could sell to everyone. It was a huge undertaking. They were also faced with the challenge of being a new company with little success to promote.

They were shooting from all cylinders to determine where the biggest impact was in terms of the types of companies that they were attracting. From there, they were able to focus more and more on those types of clients.

Phil dedicated blocks of time to the task. For 2-3 hours each day, he would not take any calls, schedule meetings, or go anywhere.

Ideally, using blocks of time outside of selling hours, Phil would focus solely on who he was going to call the next day. He used many of the brilliant resources now available such as Sales Navigator, to find the people he needed to find and to learn more about them prior to the call.

Sharing the ideal customer profile

Now that he is part of a larger sales team, he is having conversations not only within sales but also with success teams and operating teams to understand, in their opinion, which clients have been the most successful and easiest to work with.

When selling to everyone is possible, it is easy to find yourself going nowhere fast. It is hard to know the correct verbiage for each industry. Selling in the medical industry, for example, is much different than selling in the automotive industry.

It can be hard to land a good appointment until you narrow your focus to the industries that work best for your company.

Divide and conquer

Success begins when the teams can focus and then specialize across multiple industries. Phil believes it is important to identify as an expert in whichever field or department you are selling to.

Only then can you hone in on the pain points in order to solve those problems.

Phil is closing sales now within 1-2 weeks of his first meetings because he has established himself as the expert in the field with the ideal solution/product. The need for his product is real and he is positioned to offer the main solution to satisfy that need.

First and foremost, Phil recommends setting goals and dedicating time to the task. Most salespeople work in teams, so use that to your advantage. In Phil’s team, they announce the number of new contacts, for example, that they hope to reach in the next two hours; it is written on a whiteboard for all to see – and then they get to it.

At the end of the time period, they check in on each other. Did they get it done? Or do they need to work longer? They hold each other accountable.

Get familiar with the industry. Share tips and resources. Google Alerts, for example, is an excellent tool to stay on top of specific topics in a particular industry which can help you at every stage of your pipeline.

Put in the time at the top of the funnel and it will pay off when it comes time to close the deal.

In this manner, Phil’s sales team is leading the pack with a 115-150% quota attainment on a month-to-month basis. As a company, they have seen month-to-month revenue growth between 15-30%.

Stay hungry, stay humble

Everything is measured by the week or the month; even the hourly way of team progress is measured. It all resets to zero at the end of each period, so don’t hang your hat on a certain closed deal or a really good day of selling; stay humble.

You’ve got to start each day mentally fresh and hungry again.

“Selling to Everyone” episode resources

Reach out to Phil via email at PSweeney37@gmail.com, or give him a call at 631-901-2685.  He is also active on Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn as PhillipSweeney.

Additionally, Phil is part of The Sales Evangelist Facebook group and would love to connect with you there.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

This episode is brought to you in part by our TSE Certified Sales Training Program which teaches you to improve your sales skills, find more customers, build stronger value, and close more deals.

The next semester begins in March.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

 

Ian Wendt, Door-to-Door Sales, Summer Sales, Fear and Mental Toughness

TSE 1019: Sales From The Street: “Fear and Mental Toughness”

fear and mental toughness, Ian WendtSalespeople need mental toughness to weather all the ups and downs of the industry, as well as the pressures and difficulties when things aren’t going well.

Sometimes clients choose another seller. Sometimes a customer ends the relationship. In other cases, we do everything we’re supposed to do, and the deal still won’t close.

Today Ian Wendt talks with us about one of the most difficult moments in his career and how he got through it and continued his journey.

Teaching instead of selling

Sales is full of challenges, and it requires a certain amount of self-motivation. For Ian, though, the greatest challenge was when he decided that he didn’t want to knock on doors.

He realized that while he was really good at selling, he was even more valuable as a teacher. He needed to find a way to make himself valuable enough that he could teach other people how to sell and how to be mentally tough, which was what he was really passionate about.

It’s sometimes tough for people to build a sales career that doesn’t involve knocking on doors. Finding a way to make the transition felt daunting to him.

He was haunted by the fear of what would happen if he couldn’t make it work.

Ian shared a quote from the book Can’t Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds by David Goggins that goes like this:

“Most people don’t even start if they don’t have a guarantee.”

That was Ian’s mindset at the time of the transition.

Pulling the trigger

Ian decided to sell for one more summer, and his regional manager used him to do some training. When Ian went to certain offices, those groups started seeing huge spikes in their performance. He was helping them close significant deals and move the needle.

He started tracking his results so he could demonstrate his value.

Ian asked for the opportunity to run a training program, but his leadership told him there was no such position available in the company.

If, however, Ian could prove the value in his training, the company would consider creating one.

Ian is a big believer that you don’t negotiate until you bring value, so that’s what he set out to do. He was determined to produce something he could negotiate with.

Tracking results

Ian started tracking the offices, reps, and leaders that he was training. He tracked their metrics and their increases and the improvements in their completion rates for about three months.

He visited about 11 offices and trained more than 60 reps.

Once he had a binder full of information, the leaders called him in to ask what he was doing. They were seeing improvements and they wanted to hear how he was doing it.

He got the leadership on board and he created a pitch for his proposed training. They jumped on board with his idea and moved toward getting started.

Unseen struggles

One of the biggest struggles for Ian was that he wasn’t directly selling anymore. He was investing his time and efforts into these offices and these other sellers, so he wasn’t selling a ton of accounts.

He got a few sales, but he went from making a lot of money to making very little. Ian overdrafted his account at least four times, which was unheard of for him.

He was battling the stress of the downward mindset.

As a result, he now teaches that stress is the number one factor in negativity and negativity is the one thing that will destroy a sales career.

Those reps that operate in fear can be completely debilitated.

What if?

What if I’m moving the needle but this doesn’t pay out? Or what if I have nothing to show for all my work? Worse yet, What if I don’t make enough to live off of?

Ian lived with exactly that fear during the summer he spent training other sellers. He was plagued by the internal debate over whether to return to the regular sales or to keep trying to develop his training idea.

Results

Ian put himself in a position to do work that he loves. Now he’s over all of the training and content creation for his entire company, and he gets paid really well for it.

He’s grateful every day that he was able to create his own future. He recently spoke at a conference where he reminded the audience that sales will always be hard. But, he said, if you can master it, you can really control the outcome of your life.

You can find a way to do work that you love and position yourself to look forward to the work week.

He loves the opportunity to share what he has learned with other people, and he loves being surrounded by people who are constantly trying to develop themselves.

“Fear and Mental Toughness” episode resources

Ian is in the process of developing a consulting and coaching program. In the meantime, he’s doing some side work with individual organizations and people.  Connect with Ian via direct message on Facebook @ian.wendt, LinkedIn @ianwendt, and Instagram @iwendtster.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never, ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Doyle Buehler, Donald Kelly, Break Through Digital, Prospecting

TSE 964 : Sales From The Street: “Selling And Monetizing Your Brand”

 

Monetizing Your Brand, Sales From The Street, Doyle BuehlerOn today’s episode of Sales From The Street, we talk to global entrepreneur Doyle Buehler about monetizing your brand.

Doyle helps businesses organize their work and their strategies so they can do good work.

Many sellers don’t actually own their own businesses but they operate a business within a business. They are intrapreneurs, and many salespeople miss this truth.

Common mistakes

Many entrepreneurs who utilize online marketing make a mistake that Doyle calls the “3 percent.”

Businesses out there assume that everyone wants to buy from them, but that’s far from true. Many studies suggest that about 3 percent of people at any given time are interested in purchasing your product or service.

By understanding the buying process, you may find that 30 percent of customers will never buy from you, but that means that about 67 percent of customers will eventually buy from you when the time is right.

The salesperson’s job is to tap into that 67 percent to figure out where the customers are in the process. How far away from buying are they?

You may find that 3 percent are ready, 7 percent are really close, and 60 percent can be moved toward buying from you.

Expand your market

We thrive on instant gratification. It’s a natural tendency for us as humans. But our buyers are like us in that they probably aren’t going to buy something until they’ve done a lot of research on it.

It’s important for us to get past the instant gratification and stay aware of the 67 percent who will eventually buy from our business.

We must keep our eye on those people:

  • The ones who are getting ready to buy
  • Those who are learning about the product
  • The ones who are defining their needs and challenges

Those are the people you want to start talking to. Those are the people whose attention you want to get.

Getting their attention

The know, like, trust triangle is the essence of getting their attention.

Do they know you and understand who you are? This is where personal branding comes into play.

Do they like you? Can they sync with you? Do you have synergy with your audience? Accomplish this by producing great content.

Do they trust you? This component isn’t always as important for widgets but it’s vital for larger purchases.

How do you talk to the 67 percent of people who are starting the journey? If you’re providing content and a platform and ecosystem to support them in their journey, they’ll come to you when they are ready to buy.

Main strategy

If, for example, a listener is regularly engaging with a podcast, where do you take that conversation next? You can promote it all over the place and get people to listen to it, but what’s the next step?

There’s a whole schema to this: what gift can I give to a potential customer so they’ll get to know, like, and trust you?

A gift is easy because there’s no risk. How will you create a community and get them involved?

How do you continue to scale and escalate that conversation?

A lot of people don’t have these in place.

Zero moment of truth

Google did research about 10 years ago that revealed that your buyer behavior breaks down into the need for 7 hours and 11 touch points. Some people would add four platforms.

So how do you get your prospects to spend that much time with you?

It’s a cool concept because it says that if you can spend more time with them, you’ll move them toward a final sale.

Core strategy

Many times, companies don’t have a core strategy or a workflow to their advertising. When they don’t get the results they want, they spend more money, which isn’t always the right answer.

Companies must be smart about how they spend their money.

Doyle’s recommended structure, described in his recent book called Breakthrough — Unleash Your Remarkable Brand Value, Influence, and Authority: Evolve Your Strategy and Marketing, lists seven workflow steps to help companies organize their digital ecosystems. They will end up with a platform that helps them build the know-like-trust triangle with their customers.

Keep your eye on the longer term, strategic mission of your business and what you’re offering in terms of value.

If you don’t understand your own strategy or your brand value, you’re going to spin your wheels because you won’t know what to do.

Build a strong platform but start with a strong strategy.

“Monetizing Your Brand” episode resources

Grab a copy of Doyle’s book, Breakthrough — Unleash Your Remarkable Brand Value, Influence, and Authority: Evolve Your Strategy and Marketing. You can also go to www.breakthrough.digital to check out the book.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Carissa Hill, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Time Management

TSE 949: Sales From The Street – “You Do Have Time”

Carissa Hill, Sales From The Street, The Sales Evangelist, You Do Have Time

Everyone has the same amount of available time every day. When people lack the time to systemize their businesses or hire and train new people, it’s because they aren’t using their time in the right way. They aren’t prioritizing the things that are important.

On today’s episode, serial entrepreneur Carissa Hill shares how to grow your business and then systemize it, and prove to yourself that you do have time.

Carissa wrote a book called You Do Have Time because she wanted to help people understand that when they use their time the right way, they’ll have plenty of time to accomplish the important things that need to be done.

Changing focus

Carissa’s journey began when she was trying to run three stores by herself and she realized she was taking on too many things.

She focused on all the wrong things instead of focusing on the things that would truly grow her business.

Carissa was operating a chain of hair and beauty salons and she found herself micromanaging her team. It kept her from getting the results she wanted, just as it does to other people.

Business owners might, for example, invest time in getting more social media followers instead of working to truly learn marketing, and sales, and conversion.

Right things

If you want your business to continually grow, you must focus on lead generation and sales. As soon as you take your foot off the pedal for marketing and selling, it will slow down.

As you grow, you can scale that by hiring salespeople or automating things. You can offer launches to groups of people rather than selling one-to-one.

Many sellers and business owners allow fear to dictate their actions. Fear of rejection, fear of the next level of success, and fear of the unknown prevent people from taking the next steps.

Many people run Facebook ads that generate a lot of success, and then, instead of hiring someone to help them continue to grow, they’ll turn the ad off because they are too busy.

When they get out of their comfort zone, they’ll return to the place where they are comfortable rather than pushing out of it.

People fear uncharted territory and additional work and the second- and third-order effects that come with success.

Overcoming fear

Carissa said the key is to help clients find clarity about the things they are truly afraid of.

What is the worst thing that will happen if you take this step?

When Carissa started making YouTube videos, she was terrified of negative comments. That fear kept her from generating videos for a long time until she intentionally addressed what she would actually do if she got negative comments.

Once she had a plan for the worst-case scenario, she was able to move beyond the fear and try making some videos.

Don’t allow the fear to linger in your brain.

The other step is to decide whether you’re prepared to stay in the place you’re currently in. If you aren’t willing to stay here, then what will you do to get yourself out of this place?

The truth is that you could be helping many more people if you got beyond the fear that is holding you back.

Eliminate clutter

Answer this question first: Are you crystal clear about where all of your time is going?

Many people don’t know the answer to that question, so the best place to start is with a time-audit system. Keeping a time audit means that you write down everything you do and how long each task takes you, for a total of seven days.

Once you’ve done that, you can pretty quickly identify the wasted time in your day. The simple act of writing down your tasks will kick yourself into gear because you’ll create accountability for yourself.

You’ll discover the time you’re spending on social media, even if it’s just in 5-minute increments. You’ll identify all the things you’re doing in a week, and you’ll likely find tasks that aren’t creating any return on investment and that aren’t enjoyable for you.

The first thing Carissa did was outsource her housecleaning because it took hours of her time and she didn’t enjoy it. She recovered the hours she once spent cleaning her house so she could focus on other things.

Once you’ve completed a time audit, put a smiley face or sad face next to each item as a step toward figuring out the tasks you want to keep and the ones you could let go of. Find things to outsource or automate.

Make a “Things Not To Do” list to identify the things you don’t want to do. Focus on those things that will move the needle.

Streamline

Carissa discovered early in her coaching career that she was spending a lot of time on sales calls because she thought that was the only way to sell. She got tired of it because she couldn’t scale herself.

She tried an online launch style because she determined that her ideal prospects had all the same concerns and objections. By getting numerous people on one call, she was able to streamline her process and save herself a lot of time.

She found herself having the same conversation over and over, so she addressed those questions and issues in a PDF. She offers it as an info pack to her prospects, who can contact her if they need more information after they’ve reviewed it.

Facebook ads

You’ve got to have a really good offer and if people want it, they will buy it. Offer something that sells someone’s problem.

Offer content that is so good that you should really be charging people for it. Don’t hold too much back from your prospects.

If you can get people results in advance without costing them anything, you’ll create the sense that the paid info must be really good if the free stuff is already producing results.

Time

You can’t get time back. The way you spend your minutes, your hours, and your days is your entire life. You can always make more money but you can’t make more time.

Get really clear about what you want out of your life. Determine what is most important to you.

Instead of reaching the end of your life wishing you hadn’t spent so much time scrolling on your phone, do things that actually help people. Spend time on things that you enjoy.

Ask yourself this: Is this the highest and best use of your time?

Post that question somewhere that you’ll see it frequently and you’ll improve the way you spend your time.

Focus on delivering what people really want. Focus your energy on that so you can help people well.

“You Do Have Time” episode resources

Connect with Carissa on her website or her Facebook group.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers and provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out TSE Hustler’s League and apply to see if it’s a good fit.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

CoVoideo, John Simpson, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 944: Sales From The Street: “Video Cold Outreach”

Your prospects are inundated with cold communications every day. Your job is to make sure that your communications don’t wind up in someone’s spam folder. Personal communication is an important part of modern-day sales, and video cold outreach is an important tool.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, John Simpson, Director of Business Development at Covideo, talks to us about the value of video cold outreach.

Why video?

How sick are you of boring emails?

How many unsolicited emails end up in your spam folder?

The most important part of prospecting is building trust and helping the person on the other end of the email realize that you’re authentic. Being able to put a face with a name is a game changer.

Video is a strong value-add if you do it as part of your sequence. It’s not true, though, that video solves every problem.

Typically, the first outreach won’t include a video. It will be a simple value statement to someone who has never met us. Usually, it’s to a sales leader who might benefit from our product.

If we get no response, we’ll send another email, and then we’ll send the video. As soon as we get the view notification, we’ll pick up the phone and call them and try to determine whether we’re a fit.

Video is an attention grabber. `

Emails

The point of all this isn’t that emails are bad. You should absolutely still use emails.

You must have a strategy for your emails, and they must be part of your overall sales process.

The point isn’t that videos are always the right answer. The point is that everyone fails from time to time, and when you do, you have to re-evaluate what you’re doing.

Those failures can help you identify other avenues that you can take.

If you’ve mailed a prospect multiple times and he’s not responding, shoot him a video. Shoot him a text.

You’ve got to do something that stands out and sets you apart.

Sequence

Covideo discovered through trial and error that sending a video in the first cold email wasn’t usually best.

People weren’t responding to their efforts, so they changed their sequence and saw results. They learned from their failures.

In certain industries, they found that it was ok to send a video immediately. It depends on the person and the industry.

If you’re pursuing a CEO you’ll likely take a different approach than you would if you were pursuing a salesperson at a logistics company.

Conversation

Anytime you’re reaching out to someone, your goal is to start a conversation.

Instead of just spitting about your product, slow down a bit. Give yourself time to simply chat.

Instead of shoving your product down his throat, provide a solution to the problem. The concept of “always be closing” in Glengarry Glen Ross doesn’t exist anymore. The buyer has changed.

We sometimes try to put too much information into our emails and videos. Instead of trying to include a whole bunch of info, we just have to get to the next step in the conversation.

It’s always about progress.

Connection

Video allows you to engage all of your senses, where email only involves our sight.

When we engage with video, we use our hearing, our sight, and we’re cognitively responding to the body language in the video. Using multiple senses leads to a deeper connection.

We tend to misinterpret emails because we sometimes add tone. That won’t happen with video because people can see how excited you are to work with them. Video gets rid of the unknown.

The problem is that people have dozens of reasons for why they don’t do video: they’re uncomfortable, it won’t work, they don’t like the way they look.

Typically, though, video use builds organically through an organization. As people see coworkers succeeding with video, they inquire about what is helping them be successful.

No matter your industry, no matter what you’re doing, no matter what you’re selling, you should be willing to put new things out there to break the monotony.

Video mistakes

Don’t write a script for your video read it from a teleprompter, it will typically feel pretty awkward. Be yourself. Talk like you’re talking to another person.

You don’t “act” while you write emails, so you shouldn’t do it while you’re making a video.

People like to connect with authentic people rather than with a persona.

Make sure the lighting is good and check that there’s nothing distracting in the background.

“Video Cold Outreach” episode resources

Covideo provides a mobile app, a Google plugin, and a web-based recorder making it super easy to use. Because you aren’t actually sending a video file with your email, it diminishes the chances of your email being kicked back as spam.

Grab a free trial and try your hand at creating video cold outreach, or you can email John or connect with him on LinkedIn.

This episode is brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Prospecting, Podcast, Video, New Sales Leads

TSE 919: Sales From The Street:”Starving Artist”

Prospecting, Podcast, Video, New Sales Leads

The notion of the starving artist has been around for many years, but many entrepreneurs spend a lot of years “starving” as well. For sales professionals, when we don’t have processes in place to keep our funnels full, we can find ourselves “starving” as well.

On today’s episode of Sales From the Street, Arty Goldstein and John Antonacci from Video Jungle Podcast are interviewing me about this very topic, and what we can do to make sure we aren’t starving artists in the sales world.

The podcast will sound a little different because John and Arty are interviewing me on their show. I’ll share my ideas about processes and systems that can keep you from starving in the sales industry.

Trial and error

Much of my early strategy as a sales rep was trial and error. I messed up a lot, and I’m guessing many of the listeners will relate to that from their own experiences.

Many freelancers assume there’s a big magic formula to success, but I’ve discovered that the simplest bet is to be a personable person.

After that, differentiate yourself. In order to be successful, do the opposite of what everyone else is doing. If everyone else is going one way, figure out if you can go the other way and accomplish the same thing differently.

My idea of hustle is to do whatever it takes to make things happen. Think outside the box: what can I do to be different and out-hustle, outwit, go around, or go over to connect with people?

 

Creating value

Sales has changed a lot since its early days of cold-calling and bartering. At the same time, though, it’s still largely the same.

It’s an exchange of value. What can I give you in exchange for the thing you give me? It translates across all platforms and all mediums.

In the context of video production, you’re creating value. At The Sales Evangelist, I want to help new and struggling sellers find more ideal customers, build stronger value, and close more deals.

I struggled with those things when I was new to sales, but I figured out that if sellers can understand those three areas, they’ll never be hungry.

No salesperson should ever be broke, so if you’re broke, something is wrong. If your organization’s sales process is broken, it will churn and burn people.

Launching the podcast

My buddy Jared Easley, co-founder of Podcast Movement, hosted me on his podcast and he told me I should be doing my own podcast.

I decided to try it and see where it would go. My dream was to influence people the way Pat Flynn does and to impact people’s life.

Apple Podcast has made it so easy that initially, I didn’t advertise much. I asked all my cousins, family members, friends, and anyone who had the ability to get to a computer to go and rate my podcast.

That launched me into the New and Noteworthy category in 2013, which got me some more visibility.

When I landed Jeffrey Gitomer as my first guest, that pushed me into a world where people were looking for sales. At the time there were only like four sales podcasts that were really doing anything well at that time.

To be honest, I’m different than other people out there. Many of them at the time I launched were white guys, and I was a young black guy.

The result is that mine is the number one podcast in Jamaica.

 

Sales history

I’ve been actually selling since I was about six, although I clearly don’t count that in my professional selling history.

In Jamaica, there aren’t 7-11’s on every corner, so people set up little tiendas in their houses and they sell things. My family had a little shop and I sold stuff there.

I wasn’t afraid of talking about and dealing with money because I’ve been doing it since I was very young.

Fast forward to college where I figured out that I really like to be in front of an audience and to teach. After college, I started selling professionally and I figured out that I wasn’t good at b2b selling.

I got training and saw a major improvement, and discovered that I could share that with other people who were in the same boat. When I did, I saw an increase in my sales and I started actually making money.

I launched the podcast in an effort to help other rookies learn about sales and to speak about effective selling.

The Sandler Sales Training Organization taught me a technique that I’ve carried with me to this day, and it’s this triangle principle.

Attitude, techniques, and behavior. Your attitude is what you bring to the game and your techniques are things like how do you ask questions. Your activities are the actions you carry out every day like phone calls, prospecting, emailing and dialing.

That fundamental principle helped me realize the importance of procedure. If you’re winging it, you’ll have a hard time being consistently effective.

If you never practice or follow a pattern, you’ll never be as successful as you could be.

Video as marketing

Video is one of the most important things at our disposal. You can say so much more in a video than you can say anywhere else.

The second largest search engine in the entire world is YouTube.

Video allows you to follow, see, and learn. You can educate people using video.

People also like a personable approach, as evidenced by the demand for reality TV. People want to see something that’s real instead of something that’s highly produced. When there’s a dog barking in the background, that’s real.

Marcus Sheridan told a story of marketing people who were sending him physical resumes to apply for jobs. He challenged them to send video instead to share their capabilities and work history.

Salespeople have awesome leverage in the form of video and we shouldn’t cling to past ideas simply because we’ve always done it that way.

Differentiate yourself simply by using video. A lot of people won’t do it because it’s work.

Also, tell a story. That part will never get old.

Sharing secrets

Some people are going to be do-it-yourselfers. You can’t change that.

When you create value by telling them what to do and teaching them how to do it, they’re going to trust you. They’ll understand that you know what you’re doing, and they may eventually come to a place where they’d rather have you do it for them.

You might give away enough information to help them solve a single problem, but when they encounter something bigger, they’re going to come back to you.

You have to plan. People often overlook planning.

You also have to outperform your yesterday. No matter how good you are today, if you can beat what you did yesterday, you’re always going to thrive.

Keep learning. Read. Listen to The Sales Evangelist. Never stop learning.

“Starving Artist” episode resources

Do you want more tips and tricks from the video? Videostrategy.org is the place to go for thoughts on production best practices, creative brainstorming, strategy and distribution tips, client relations, and much more. Go to video strategy.org.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. Video Jungle offers top-notch, state-of-the-art advice about video, which is a great way to offer relevant content on LinkedIn.

Email me for more information about our newly launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. You can also email us about our new business development services.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Inbound, New Clients, Sales, SDR, BDR

TSE 914: Sales From The Street:”How To Handle Inbound Leads”


Inbound, New Clients, Sales, SDR, BDR

We cannot develop quality inbound leads without a process that nurtures and prepares our customers. As a sales professional, it’s important to know how to handle inbound leads so that you’re working in tandem with your marketing team.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, I’m putting myself in the hot seat to discuss how to handle inbound leads, especially in the case of smaller organizations.

Just like you can’t rush to cook frozen chicken, you can’t rush to land an inbound lead.  You have to invest the right amount of time and the right preparation for both to turn out the way you’re hoping.

Qualified leads

When leads come in, we sometimes expect to make things happen quickly. Like the story of trying to cook frozen chicken, we forget about the seasoning, the marinade, and the temperature. We forget about the amount of time that the chicken has to cook.

When we’ve taken those things into consideration, that’s the same as a sales qualified lead. It’s defrosted, marinated, cooked, and ready to be eaten.

Prior to that point, it’s a marketing qualified lead: it’s a prospect who perhaps downloaded something but isn’t necessarily ready to buy. In the context of our cookout, it’s chicken that isn’t defrosted or marinated yet.

Marketing has identified a person who raised her hand to say she’s interested. Maybe she downloaded a white paper or signed up for a webinar. They’ve initiated the process and they have asked to speak to someone.

Now it’s time for someone to take advantage of the lead.

Too often, though, we jump too quickly. Instead of nurturing the lead, we jump down their throats in an attempt to close quickly.

 

Integrated efforts

A great CRM is the core of a great combined sales effort.

When you can enter information about the prospect and then track whether he opened the email, read the email, or reacted to the email, that’s the ideal situation.

If sales and marketing are working together, sales can come in an take over as soon as the prospect raises a hand to say “Yes, I’m interested.”

When a lead falls into your funnel, you have to reach out to that person within five minutes.

You may recall our friend David, who we’ve been following since Monday. David was tasked by his boss to find financial software for the company, so he’s in the research part of the process.

Let’s assume David enters the funnel by downloading a piece of content. When we email him a day later to ask if he’s interested in a demo, he indicates that he is.

Now sales gets the marketing qualified lead. You must call him within five minutes.

Otherwise, he’ll presume that you aren’t interested in taking care of me. Because I’m doing research, I might find someone else who is willing to help me when you wouldn’t.

Remember that your prospect is busy. I know that you are, too, but you can at least acknowledge the person.

Worst case, you must call him within 24 hours.

A sales qualified lead is chicken that is defrosted, marinated, cooked, and ready to eat.

Flow process

Many companies make the mistake of not having a flow process. That simply means that from the time I get a new sales qualified lead to the time this person says, “Yes, I want to buy,” many companies have no plan.

We might think we have a plan, but if we aren’t measuring it and tracking our efforts, how can we know what’s working and what isn’t?

We must have predictability behind our efforts.

The whole point of it is to let them know that you’re aware of their existence and that you’re here to help.

Predictable processes enable us to understand how the buyers buy and what the buyer’s journey looks like. Your cadence can evolve over time, but you must have predictable efforts so you can test your processes.

Each industry’s process will be totally different, and the buyer’s journey will be different, so you will tweak your process along the way.

A process will allow you to determine that, when you reach out within the first 5 minutes, 95 percent of those people eventually buy.

Nurture campaign

If your prospect isn’t ready to pull the trigger even after your flow process, then put him back into the nurturing process. Studies indicate that even bad leads often become clients in the long run because they were nurtured well.

What seems like a bad lead could end up being a customer if marketing is able to continue nurturing. Don’t throw away bad leads if there’s a chance they can still develop.

Send them information related to the product they were pursuing. You can hopefully, over time, help them develop a greater interest in your product.

I share stuff like this because I want to help you find more ideal customers. To build stronger value. I want you to close more deals, but most importantly, I want you to go out each and every day and do big things.

 

“How To Handle Inbound Leads” episode resources

Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. Video Jungle offers top-notch, state-of-the-art advice about video which is a great way to offer relevant content on LinkedIn.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Carl Allen, Buy Your Competition, Sales Growth, Sales Leader

TSE 909: Sales From The Street:”Buy Your Competition”


Carl Allen, Buy Your Competition, Sales Growth, Sales Leader
There’s a difference between having a lifestyle business and having a business that’s truly scaling and growing. In order to grow, you have to have customers. The secret is to buy your competition.

On today’s episode of Sales From the Street, Carl Allen talks about how to massively grow your sales by acquiring another business. He’ll explain why he believes the key to overcoming your challenges might be to buy your competition.

If you’re new to the podcast, our Sales From the Street episodes feature stories of people who have faced challenges and overcome them.

Carl decided he was tired of working for other people and he wanted to do his own thing. He only had one skill set, which was to buy and sell businesses, so he decided to do it using other people’s money.

Selling businesses

Carl has been selling businesses for more than 25 years.

When he got the call during an overseas trip saying that his pregnant wife was in the hospital, he had to jump on a plane to get back home. In the moments after his son was born, he realized that he needed to do something else.

Carl decided that, instead of doing it in a corporate setting, he wanted to buy and sell his own small businesses. He knew that his tools and experience could be applied to small businesses.

He found that lots of people were asking him to coach and mentor them and teach them how to buy and sell businesses, so he built a global system to teach entrepreneurs how to do it.

Carl teaches entrepreneurs who work for other people as well as those who want to own their own businesses. He teaches them to find deals, negotiate them, and to do it all without investing their own money.

He also teaches small business owners how to double their sales by buying competing businesses or complementary businesses.

1 + 1 = 3

It’s getting harder and harder to organically grow sales because of the tremendous amount of competition.

Carl advises small business owners to stop chasing customers and trying to sell them more stuff. Instead, consider buying a competitor or someone in your supply chain that has some synergy and that can double or triple your sales.

The first business Carl bought was generating about $2 million a year, and his competitor was doing $2 million a year as well. They had a conversation, and Carl acquired the business, literally doubling his sales overnight. Organically, the same growth would have likely taken about 10 years.

Sometimes, instead of buying a competitor, you can buy a business in a complementary sector and cross-sell.

Carl, for example, owns a software company, and he’s about to acquire an IT company to sit alongside it. He’ll sell software to the IT services customers, and sell IT services to his software customers.

When the businesses combine, there will be opportunities for cost consolidation and synergy between the two.

He calls it the 1 + 1 = 3 model. In the end, he’ll have software revenues, services revenues, and the two together.

Acquisition myth

When Carl started in 2008, Facebook wasn’t prevalent and people weren’t marketing on LinkedIn. Growing his business would have included local advertising, trade show events, and good old-fashioned cold calling, referrals, and networking.

There’s a huge myth about acquisition and it’s this: if a business is worth a $1 million, you must have $1 million to acquire it.

The truth is that you can buy a small business without spending your own money. The big private equity guys on Wall Street do it all the time. Carl applies those same principles and tactics.

If you’ve never bought a business before, there’s clearly a learning process, which is why Carl built his academy.

He teaches:

  • How to do dealer regeneration
  • How to find deals that fit your requirements
  • How to have effective meetings
  • How to negotiate and structure a deal
  • How to raise financing
  • How to get the deal transacted

In his dealings, 99 out of 100 business owners don’t know how the process works.

He built his academy to empower business owners to scale their businesses differently.

Psychology of the deal

When you decide that you’re interested in acquiring a business, the best way to start is by approaching your competitors with a cleverly written letter which builds rapport, trust, and credibility.

Most likely, someone in my network will know you or will know someone who knows you, and I’ll get to you that way.

The key is in the psychology. You’re looking for the distressed owner whose business is stable. You need a seller with a strong motivation to come out of the business.

They might be ready to retire, or they might be bored, or they might be sick, or they might have run out of ideas. In fact, the biggest pocket of opportunity in North America right now is retiring baby boomers.

The Wall Street Journal published last year that 10,000 baby boomers retire every day, and 19 of those own a small business. Previously, one of their children might have taken over the business, but those tendencies have changed massively.

Their kids want to go to college now, and they don’t want to take over the family business.

These boomers don’t have an exit strategy.

Only 1 in 13 small business that tried to sell actually do.

If you have good business history, and good employees, and good customers, then you don’t want to close the business.

You’ve got to understand why the business owner wants to sell. Ultimately, it’s the best way to understand the pain they are feeling right now.

You’ve also got to find out how they do their marketing. Very often, we find that they aren’t even marketing. They are relying on word-of-mouth.

That means when I do employ marketing, we’re going to see growth.

Leveraged buyout model

We’re solving that problem with the leveraged buyout model.

You might ask yourself why a business owner would allow you to buy the business without spending your own money. In many cases, it’s their only option. They either sell to you, or they turn out the lights, close the doors, walk away, and let everyone down.

Instead, a safe, trusted pair of hands take the business to the next level and give it a new lease on life.

The first step for anyone interested in this model is to check out Carl’s 90-minute training webinar. He has a proprietary 10-step model that he has honed over 25 years, and he has created a sort of masterclass training for people who are interested in the model.

If you’re an entrepreneur and your dream is to start a business, don’t. Don’t start a brand new business, because 99 percent of them fail. Instead, buy an existing business that’s already doing what you’re looking to do, and use the company’s own resources in cash to acquire it.

If you’re an existing business owner and you’re struggling to grow your business organically and your marketing isn’t working effectively, scale your business by acquiring a complementary business.

Buying businesses solves everyone’s problems, and it’s a buyer’s market.

“Buy Your Competition” episode resources

Connect with Carl at Facebook.com/ninjaacquisitions, and find his evergreen, automated training, at www.ninjaacquisitions.com/free. It’s a webinar-style training with lots of tools and downloads users can access.

Today’s episode is brought to you by Maximizer CRM, a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. It’s powerful and intuitive.

Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities. Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

 

 

Josh Smith, Value, STACKED, Sales Book

TSE 904: Sales From The Street-“Building Value Pre, During & Post Meeting”


Josh Smith, Value, STACKED, Sales Book

We all understand the importance of building value for the prospect. It’s important to know, too, that it’s an ongoing process. We should focus on building value before, during, and after the meeting.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Josh Smith, author of How to Guarantee Qualified Sales Meetings With Real Decision Makers, explains why building value is such a massive part of the sales process, and why it must occur from the beginning to the end.

How can I prepare?

Sales reps often begin with the very best intentions. Despite their plan to provide value, they find themselves quickly resorting to features, benefits, and pitching a product.

Position yourself as an additional member of the team who gives them content and education, and who helps them overcome business challenges. Providing value builds trust and credibility.

Josh said he likes to start with LinkedIn, and he sends them valuable content that helps them realize that he is different from other sellers. He focuses on content that is relevant and specific to the prospect.

Where do you find this kind of content?

Narrow down your prospect list to one industry. Determine a narrow audience that you want to hit with your messaging. Set up an account on Google Alerts and identify some keywords that I want to be notified of. Google will email me any time a relevant piece of content emerges.

It’s automated, and I can send it straight to my prospect knowing that it will be relevant.

Consider using Feedly as well. It’s a content aggregator that allows you to type in information about who you’re trying to reach and it will aggregate specific content that you know will be relevant to the prospect.

Building value up front with relevant helpful information will help me build trust before I even tell them what I do. Do it for about 30 days. You can pitch them sooner than that if you want, but this is a consistent process that helps you develop qualified leads who trust you.

Set yourself apart

The difficulty is that a lot of sellers have adopted this same approach to prospecting. The challenge, then, is to make sure that your information catches their attention.

Pay attention to industry events that your prospects might attend. Look at the topics and the tracks that the industry is discussing to get a really good idea of the challenges facing the industry.

It’s not a huge problem if you’re sending information that’s similar to what someone else is sending. As long as the content you send provides value that will help move them along with a challenge that they are facing, it will give you a way to start a dialogue. Additionally, if you’re really quick with Google Alerts, you might still send the content before others do.

If you haven’t already asked them, find out what kind of content your customers in a given industry find valuable. Once you’ve identified that, you can start addressing those topics with your new prospects.

Also, make sure to measure and optimize what you do. When you send content, track its effectiveness. Determine which content earned you responses and which didn’t.

Provide value in the meeting

Your goal is to position what you do as more valuable than what others are doing. Create urgency around your solution.

The more credible your urgency story is, the better it will be. When you first meet the prospects, set the expectations from the start rather than waiting until the back end.

If you go all the way through your pitch before revealing that you’ve only got two spaces left, you lose some credibility. If you wait until the end of the pitch to say you can only offer this price today, you’ll lose credibility.

Move everything that you traditionally do at the back end of the pitch to the front. It creates believable urgency.

“I’ve only got two spots left and that’s exactly why I wanted to talk to you.”

Ask hard questions. “Why haven’t you already found a solution to this problem?” You can provide a more valuable pitch by knowing the answers to the hard questions.

Treat the person’s time with respect. By asking hard questions, you’re eliminating unnecessary information and providing the best solution for them the very first time.

Provide value after the meeting

This is the most important part because it’s where conversions can happen.

Offer a bit of free consultation after the meeting. Now that I understand the challenges they are facing, I can put together an overview of the meeting including some free suggestions that will help them move forward: 3 or 4 action steps.

Do it within 24 hours, because very few people are doing this.

Follow up with video. Josh’s conversions have doubled since he started following up with video.  Send a video of you talking about the meeting and the expectations. Video allows them to see you and see your energy.

“I just had a thought after our discussion of something we could do to help. Let’s talk next week.” It gets them back on the phone, and given that it takes an average of 12 touches to close a deal, that’s important.

Wistia is a fantastic platform that helps you shoot video even if you aren’t a video editor. You record it, upload it, and then send it, and it’s completely free. It provides data about when they watched it and how long it played for so you’ll know how effective it was.

Make value in your sales process. Be an honest advisor.

“Building value before, during, and after the meeting” episode resources

Connect with Josh on LinkedIn or Instagram. Grab a copy of his book about how to generate qualified leads with decision-makers using LinkedIn.

Pre-order your copy of How to Guarantee Qualified Sales Meetings With Real Decision Makers and start seeing immediate impact in your business.

Check out Feedly to keep up with content that is important to you. It’s a free platform that gathers important stories that will help you build value for your prospect.

Google Alerts allows you to set notifications for content that relates to your prospects. It will help you provide valuable content that helps your prospects manage challenges and solve problems.

Today’s episode is brought to you by Maximizer CRM, a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities. Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Barth Getto, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Leadership

TSE 899: Sales From The Street-“Your Legend”

Barth Getto, Sales From The Street, Sales LeaderLeadership is difficult. Even when the people you’re leading have something in common, it’s tough to lead a varied group of people. Leading a group of independent, free-thinking employees presents a unique challenge, but it’s one that allows you to leave your mark.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Barth Getto, president of Empowery eCommerce Cooperative, talks about the challenges of leading a varied group of people well. Barth, who leads a collection of independent entrepreneurs that sell in the eCommerce space, says you must learn to motivate and encourage.

Lead by experience

First and foremost, it’s much easier to lead a group of people when you have experience doing their job. If you’re the VP of sales, it will be easier to lead a sales team if you’ve sold the product yourself.

People look at you differently when you’ve walked in their shoes.

You also have to set very specific goals and hold people to those goals.

Salespeople want to be told when they’re doing well. They don’t mind being told when they are doing poorly if they’re being measured fairly.

Realize, too, that you can motivate so much better by giving positive feedback than you can by giving negative feedback.

Be a confident leader

When you’re a leader who isn’t worried about losing your leadership position, that confidence allows you to operate differently. You relax a little more.

Some managers see capable people as a threat to their own positions. They fear that if they give too many public accolades to another person in the organization, they’ll lose their job to that person.

Barth said his goal is to make sure his employees are so well-versed in how the company runs that they won’t miss him when he leaves.

As a leader, the leaders he raises up are his legacy. He trains them and gives them all the tools they need to succeed. It’s a selfless idea: striving to benefit everyone instead of just yourself.

Every time he has left a company, it has done well in his absence.

Seek group input

There’s no such thing as a perfect decision. The best you can hope for is to analyze all the information you have and make the best decision you can.

No one has all the answers to any issue, and that’s especially true in eCommerce.

It is possible, however, to improve your odds by including others in the process.

Be direct

Issues are easier to identify when you have a good CRM in place and a good tracking system so you can provide examples to your team members.

When issues arise with people on your team, tackle them head-on. People who know you care about them will be open to discussions about their performance.

Allow them to be part of the discussion. Ask them where they believe the problem is occurring. Treat it more like a consultation than an accusation.

Again, this is why experience in their job gives you credibility because you’ve personally done the work they are doing.

Also realize that sometimes releasing people from a job that isn’t a good fit is a kind act.

Enjoy the work

Building leaders is rewarding work, especially when you lead a varied group of people. Barth compares it to watching a child grow.

As your team gels and solidifies, you watch the organization move forward and find more success and learn from its mistakes.

The goal, he said, is to watch people blossom and then step out of the way to let them lead. In short, when you lead well, you’re working yourself out of a job.

Once you’ve had success, it’s easy to find another organization that needs your help, and then you get to have the experience again.

Be positive. Give your team a shot in the arm. Do things together outside of just selling.

Understand how your people like to have information shared. It’s easy to have a conversation with someone who knows you care about him.

“Your Legend” episode resources

Connect with Barth via email, barth@empowery.com. If you’re a listener in the eCommerce space selling through any major marketplace, Barth would love to talk with you about becoming a member of the cooperative.

The costs are nominal but the benefits are huge. The co-op provides a support network — a sort of safety net —  and helps you sort through the wild-west aspect of eCommerce.

Grab a copy of the book Turn the Ship Around that Barth mentioned during the podcast.

If you think you might benefit from more stories like these, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights. We’re beginning a new semester this fall, and we’d be honored for you to join us.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Marketing, Sales, Thiefaine, Podcast, Prouduct

TSE 894: Sales From The Street-“Learn Marketing”

 

Thiefaine Magre, The Sales Evangelist

 

 

 

 

When sales are good, life is good. So what do you do if you’re a brand new business that isn’t making enough money to pay the bills? When larger companies believe you’re too new to trust, you must learn marketing in order to help others get to know your business.

On today’s episode of Sales From the Street, Thiefaine Magre, COO of Prouduct, talks about making the transition from a guaranteed position to an emerging business, and how he realized the need to learn marketing.

Once Thiefaine and his partners understood the importance of marketing, they made some key moves that propelled their sourcing business forward.

Name recognition

Thiefaine recalled being confused by the fact that, when he earned a guaranteed paycheck with a skate company, he was able to find plenty of customers. Then, when he branched out on his own, he wasn’t finding sales.

Despite the team’s hustle, they weren’t generating sales.

They quickly realized the need to learn marketing in order to help people recognize the business.

Thiefaine realized that his previous success stemmed from the fact that people recognized the name of the skate products: they saw people riding the boards around town and at competitions.

Despite their efforts at cold-calling, reaching out to friends, contacting other businesses, and asking for referrals, nothing helped.

Everything changed when the team landed an interview on John Lee Dumas’ podcast.

Credibility

Thiefaine calls that podcast appearance the tipping point for Prouduct.

Not only did John Lee Dumas mention the company, it turns out he had his own product that he thought might benefit from sourcing help. As a result, there was a separate conversation after the podcast centered around helping John source his own product.

John’s listeners heard about the relationship and reached out to Prouduct for their own businesses.

That single podcast, Thiefaine said, launched countless leads, and earned them millions of dollars. The referral and testimonial that resulted from working with John gave the company credibility.

It also gave Prouduct access to John’s already significant audience.

Marketing tactics

Thiefaine recommends taking advantage of as many marketing tactics as possible in order to maximize your company’s reach.

He believes that traditional channels like TV or national media don’t often benefit companies who aren’t highly funded, because they aren’t equipped to deal with the potential influx of business.

If you want to do podcasts, choose very focused podcasts that are in your area. Same with blogs. Begin with the ones that reach your target customer and grow into a more general audience from there.

Referrals

Behind marketing, referrals have been the largest source of revenue for the Prouduct team.

Thiefaine points out, though, that previous customers aren’t the only source of referrals.

Other entrepreneurs have been a great source of business for the company, and he believes the same can be true for you.

When entrepreneurs get together to share ideas and experiences, it’s a perfect opportunity for a prospect to hear about the work that your company is doing.

In their case, the Prouduct team was sourcing a business that creates teepees, and the business owner shared Prouduct’s information with a fellow entrepreneur.

The referral likely generated almost half a million dollars in sales.

The key is to hang on until you get your break. Keep trying different things until you find your opportunity.

“Learn Marketing” episode resources

Connect with Prouduct for more information about sourcing your product and protecting against supply chain failure.

You can also connect with him on his website, ThiefaineMagre.com.

We bring on guests like Thiefaine because we want to help you be more successful. Research podcasting to find out whether it’s a good fit for your and your organization. Whether you appear on other episodes or create your own, podcasting might be a good option.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

Grab your free excerpt of the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic blueprint for all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

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Dave Costa, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 889: Sales From The Street-“Talent vs. Performance”

Dave Costa, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, LinkedInWorking with a talented group of people doesn’t guarantee success, because talent and performance are altogether separate. Sometimes sales leaders find themselves leading a team whose performance doesn’t equal its talent. When potential is left on the table, how do you teach your team the value of talent vs. performance?

On today’s Sales From The Street, Dave Costa shares how he encourages his team to improve every day, and why — in the battle of talent vs. performance — talent alone isn’t enough.

Dave works in software sales in the human capital management space, and he defines success for his team as improving every single day.

Talent isn’t enough

Talent can only care you a certain distance. It’s true in sales just like it’s true in sports.

Number-one draft picks falter more often than not because they don’t understand the need to create opportunities that help them continually improve.

Dave calls it mental management. He says that when you deal with extremely talented people, the skillset isn’t the problem. Although there is always room to improve, the challenge is motivating them to make an extra call or set an extra appointment.

He refers to it as mental warfare, and he said many reps fail because they get out-worked or out-hustled. Sales leaders, then, must master the art of discovering what drives your sales reps to push through; it’s the art of hitting that nerve that drives them.

At the end of the day, no one regrets doing one more set at the gym. People who push themselves are always glad they did.

Funnels aren’t sexy

Many reps get so caught up in trying to close what’s currently in their pipeline that they lose sight of the top of the funnel.

Dave calls prospecting a decision you make every single day to achieve a result. He stresses focusing on whether you’ve achieved the result you needed rather than sticking to metrics only. Did you get the result you needed to push yourself farther and hit your goals? 

Your prospecting controls everything:

  • How much is in my pipeline?
  • Can I close more deals?
  • How stressed will I be?
  • What will my results look like?

Performance matters

The mental warfare becomes a factor when sales professionals hear “no” before they hear “yes.” Without the right mental game, you’ll be overtaken by the highs and lows. You’ll collapse under the stress.

There will be days when others succeed while you struggle, but you must rise above your circumstances. No one else will do this for you, so you must make it happen.

For Dave’s team, the move to change its mindset has impacted its overall growth. The team’s averages have increased by 2 meetings per rep per week. For an entire team, that’s 16 adds per month, and those numbers can pay huge dividends.

When we push ourselves to set one more meeting or make one more dial, that deal could be the one that changes your year, or even your career.

In sales, we’re often in a position to make life-changing money or to do things that change our situations. If you take the mindset of constantly improving every single day, overall success will come.

Push yourself to be impressive in everything you do. If you’re not, what’s the point of doing it?

“Talent vs. Performance” episode resources

Dave would love to continue this conversation with our listeners on LinkedIn.

You can connect with us at The Sales Evangelizers on Facebook, where a community of people shares their struggles and their experiences with selling.

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is an online group coaching program designed to help sellers of all levels. Whether you’ve been selling for 15 years or 3 days, we’ll give you all the coaching and guidance you need to perform well.

The course is only $167 a month for three months, and it will connect you with sellers in all regions and industries who can share their struggles as you share your own.

This episode was brought to you by our friends at Wiley, publishers of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. It’s a blueprint for sellers based upon years of research about the things buyers hate.

Grab your free excerpt of the book here, and view the SlideShare that explains many of the leadership principles you need to stop being subservient to your customers. If you prefer, download the SlideShare so you can refer back to it.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Michael Simmons, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 884 : Sales From The Street-“Your Own Avatar”

The Sales Evangelist, Sales From The Street, Mike SimmonsWhen Mike Simmons made the move from individual contributor to leader, he tried to implement his own approach to the sales process. He eventually realized that his scripts and his processes wouldn’t work for everyone on the team. He discovered that each person needs a unique set of guiding principles.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, Mike shares the importance of guiding principles in the sales process, and how you can establish your own set of guiding principles.

Don’t duplicate.

Very often in sales, people copy the things they see working for other people. In my own case, I assumed that I should copy the people around me because they were finding success.

Taken to an extreme, Mike recalls seeing the same email used by multiple people, complete with the same typos as the original.

It took time for me to realize that I needed my own unique seller persona in order to connect with my customers, which is just as valuable as a buyer persona.

This isn’t to say that we shouldn’t learn from each other; of course we should collaborate and combine our efforts.

Instead of simply copying others’ work, adapt their work in a way that is unique to you.

Don’t trust your preconceived notions.

Mike shared a story about his experience selling fitness equipment on a day when a customer entered the store in raggedy sweatpants.

He joked with his coworker about whether the guy would actually buy anything.

His coworker later said he almost didn’t get the sale because the customer heard Mike’s sarcastic comment and was put off by it. Mike learned on that day not to judge a book by its cover.

In fact, because he does his best work in board shorts and flip flops, he has learned not to let preconceived ideas limit his success.

Recognize patterns.

Mike became aware of guiding principles when he discovered Ray Dalio’s book Principles: Life and Work.

Our own patterns and tendencies evolve over time, and they are specific to our personality and outlook.

If, for example, you don’t really care much about relationships, it’s hard to be a solution-oriented sales rep who is focused on relationships.

“Mike Simmons” episode resources

Connect with Mike to learn more about Catalyst Sale. Launched to help sales leaders connect the right people at the right time, Catalyst Sale seeks to help sales executives engage all their available tools to cut through the noise  of a crowded sales arena.

Find Mike on Twitter, where he points out that he doesn’t schedule Tweets; when you see him Tweet, he’s doing it live and in-person. You can also find him on LinkedIn, and as well as on the Catalyst Sale Podcast.

When you reach out, mention The Sales Evangelist Podcast so he’ll know the context of the connection.

He also invites you to call him at (480) 772-7448. Before you call, though, text him to let him know you heard him on the podcast and he’ll return your call.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

Grab your free excerpt of the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic blueprint for all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

They’ve also created a SlideShare free for you to use or download.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

 

Anna Talerico, Beacon 9, Donald Kelly, Hiring

TSE 874: Sales From The Street: “Growing Account Executives”

Anna Talerico, Sales From The Street, Growing Account ExecutivesWhen Anna Talerico needed account execs, she discovered the hard way that growing account executives is much easier than finding them. Prior to the discovery, she spent a lot of time recruiting AEs without a lot of success. She kept hiring the wrong people.

On today’s episode of Sales From the Street, Anna Talerico tells us how growing account executives breeds more success for companies that do it well.

Anna co-founded Beacon9 to help SaaS companies grow faster and more efficiently. She shares her experience today so that we don’t have to reinvent the wheel; we can learn from her experience and apply what she learned to our own situations.

Find the right people.

In the beginning, Anna said she wasn’t as strategic as she could have been. She hired SDRs but discovered they were never going to become AEs. Some weren’t good fits for the company. Some just didn’t have the right skillset to become AEs.

She realized she had to find people who would be ready to be AEs within a year. Anna also recognized that they needed a specific kind of person.

The difference was night and day when she shifted her recruiting efforts.

Within a couple of months, she could see that her SDRs were developing. It wasn’t going to take two years for them to move into the new role; they were getting there much more quickly.

Breed more success.

When she focused on hiring entry-level people or people with some experience who were interested in sales, Anna found that there were plenty of diamonds-in-the-rough available.

Though it took a couple of years to implement the process, she found that they were successful where they hadn’t been before. She found people who weren’t ready to be AEs, but who had the skillset to learn the job.

The company found success and hit their quotas.

Then she discovered that her success bred more success because as she was recruiting new SDRs, she could demonstrate a path of mobility.

She took a holistic approach to the process, and it all came together. Anna called it rewarding to watch a program that they incubated produce effective AEs.

Have a process.

The biggest hurdle in sales recruiting is developing a repeatable process. Before you recruit, you must determine who is likely to be successful.

  • What are the characteristics you’re looking for?
  • What background would you like recruits to have?

Judge every candidate through the same lens so that everyone is viewed and measured the same way.

You cannot use an ad hoc approach. You have to know what skillset you’re looking for and be rigorous in following it.

“Growing Account Executives” episode resources

Connect with Anna Talerico at beacon9.com, or on Twitter @annatalerico.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Our friends at Wiley have provided a free excerpt of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. Based on research and interviews with buyers, the book provides a blueprint for sales professionals. Read an excerpt of the book here.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

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Dan Cook, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 869: Sales From The Street:”Scaling My Sales Team”

Dan Cook, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

When it’s time to scale your team, there are dozens of things that can go wrong. How do you make sure you hire the right team members? What if they don’t work out? How can I make sure the people I bring are really good.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, we’ll discuss how to scale your team and make sure you can function and perform effectively. Dan Cook of Lucid Software shares how he created a sales team where there wasn’t one previously, and how he overcame the challenges that emerged.

Lucid Software grew from 35 employees in 2014 to almost 400 employees today. At the start of his endeavor, Dan was the only sales rep, and now the team includes almost 100 reps.

Figure out the sales process.

Before Dan could begin to grow the sales program, he had to figure out what it would look like first. He played the role of sales rep, figured out how to build a pipeline, discovered how to close deals, and documented every step of the process.

He got the green light to grow the team, and then he began the process of determining whether his success was repeatable. Could the four reps he hired repeat the same kind of success he had as a sales rep.

When things weren’t working, Dan was left wondering if the problem was the people he had hired or the system he had put in place. He had to figure out how to help them perform better.

Then, as the sales team grew to include more reps and more managers, the challenges of scaling grew in importance and sophistication.

Troubleshoot your system.

In the early stages, Dan’s priority was troubleshooting: finding places in the process that didn’t work and determine what the problem was.

Along the way, he discovered that every person is different. Each has a different level of experience and each “grew up” in a different setting.

As a result, each has a comparative advantage in certain areas.

Dan discovered his advantage was in the process and strategy side of building a sales program. He discovered that he did not have an advantage in software sales and tactically managing the different components of the sales process. So in things like prospecting, pipeline creation, negotiation, and closing, he wasn’t the strongest guy.

He quickly learned the need for self-awareness, and the ability to identify people whose strengths can complement or supplement your own. He recruited people who had experience managing sales teams who could supplement the places he wasn’t strong.

Establish the right culture.

You must recognize that you don’t have all the answers, and that your ego can get in the way of helping the team.

Dan stresses the importance of creating a culture that allows people to ask questions. He seeks a balance between inspiring confidence in his leadership while still acknowledging that he doesn’t know everything.

Dan allows his employees to ask dumb questions, and he has worked to get rid of the competitiveness that prevents people from asking questions. He strives to help his managers be humble instead of defensive.

If you set the right sales culture and build the right sales team, your results will follow.

Be reflective and ask good questions about what you’re good at and where you know you need help when you scale your team. Be willing to hire people who complement you. When you do, you’ll create a culture that leads to positive outcomes.

“Scale Your Team” episode resources

You can connect with Dan on Linked In, or email him at Dan@lucidchart.com.

Lucid Chart is a diagramming application that launched in June. Lucid Chart allows users to build account maps to better understand who they’re selling to. It streamlines collaboration between teams within a company.

On this 4th of July, declare your independence from mediocre selling. The buyer-based ideology presented in Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley will help your prospects see you as a leader. When they do, people will purchase from you instead of your competition.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. Video Jungle offers top-notch, state-of-the-art advice about video, which is a great way to offer relevant content on LinkedIn.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content. Share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

 

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Sales Tool, Sales Team, Dimitar Stanimiroff, Agile Sales, Heresy

TSE 864: Sales From The Street: “Drink Your Own Kool Aid”

Sales Tool, Sales Team, Dimitar Stanimiroff, Agile Sales, HeresySales From the Street gives us an opportunity to hear from other sales professionals about the challenges they face and how they approach them. Today’s challenge is scaling a sales force.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Dimitar Stanimiroff explains how he handled building and scaling a sales force while he was still managing his own quota.

Stanimiroff is the co-founder of Heresy, a sales platform designed to help increase collaboration and improve agility among sales teams.

Scaling a sales force

Dimitar realized that hiring is a full-time job, and training people is intense as well. Trying to do both of those things while still hitting his own target would be extremely challenging. His challenge was scaling a sales force.

He started by introducing a regular cadence in an attempt to improve efficiency. Beginning with the idea that there are about 23 sales days in a month, he broke the month down into smaller components.

Instead of forecasting for an entire month, his team operated in blocks of five sales days. At the beginning of each new block, the team would meet to discuss past performance and evaluate how well they were doing. They also looked for places to improve.

In the end, each person committed to a certain amount of revenue for the next block, which gave him a good understanding of how the team would perform.

The meetings gave him a chance to share his own experiences with the product since he had been selling it for six months. They also gave his two new hires a chance to share their own knowledge.

Improving trajectory

Dimitar realized that he needed a way to leverage his own time. Because the two guys he hired came from very different verticals, he needed to share his own knowledge and best practices with them.

By giving them good visibility on the company’s mission and progress, he created a collaborative culture. Instead of operating with one sales manager, they established a framework of sharing.

Each time the company added a new cohort, the trajectory was quicker because they were very good at generating knowledge. Each generation of team members ramped up more quickly than the last.

Changing the culture

Most sales organizations fail to recognize that the industry is built on faulty assumptions. The notion that most salespeople would sell their own mothers for a profit is perpetuated by Hollywood.

If you believe this is true, the only place to manage such a group is with a heavy hand. That kind of environment will create tension and competition and will prevent reps from seeing each other as teammates. It will also increase attrition.

Without that culture, you won’t have as much knowledge to share because you have fewer people contributing to the conversation.

Sharing knowledge, on the other hand, is your company’s biggest lever when it comes to scaling your team.

“Drink Your Own Kool-Aid” resources

Connect with Dimitar on Twitter @stanimiroff and on LinkedIn. You can also email him at dimitar@heresy.io.

Consider giving a copy of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading as a thank you gift to someone who provided a referral. It’s a blueprint for sellers based upon years of research about the things buyers hate.

We’re so convinced that you’ll love the book that we’re providing a free excerpt to our listeners here.

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is an online coaching program designed to help sellers of all levels and all industries improve. It’s an opportunity to share ideas and interact with other sellers from around the world.

Also check out The Sales Evangelizers on Facebook, where a community of people shares their struggles and their experiences with selling.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Just Catamarans Inc., The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Thomas Chambers,

TSE 854: Sales From The Street:”Communicate”

Just Catamarans Inc., The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Thomas Chambers,

Every sales professional knows the challenge of convincing a customer to choose your organization over your competitors’. We all understand the value of learning to communicate in order to be successful in business.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, Thomas Chambers shares the challenges he faces in his role as VP of sales for a yacht brokerage. He discusses the need to communicate often with customers and sales agents, and his belief that there’s no such thing as too much communication.

Finding balance

In Thomas’ industry, the sales agents are 1099ers: independent sales reps who “eat what they kill.”

Sometimes, though, agents put a lot of work into a transaction and get nothing from it because the loan doesn’t close for some reason.

He compares his industry to the real estate industry, in which sales don’t happen in a day. In fact, the entire process can take 6 months to a year.

There’s a balance, then, to keeping employees accountable to their goals, and encouraging them when they struggle. They have to keep their eyes on the long game, and develop patience and perspective.

Communicating frequently

Because half of Thomas’ employees are in different locations, he instituted weekly sales meetings to keep everyone on the same page. It gives his team a chance to discuss pipelines, boat listings, marketing initiatives, industry events, and relevant news.

The meetings give his agents a chance to communicate consistently, and to provide feedback.

The meetings have increased his agents’ trust in his leadership and grown the relationships.

He also prefers sharing ideas as they occur to him rather than waiting for their weekly meeting. Additionally, he is able to help them focus on increasing their online footprint.

As a result of their collaboration, many of his agents have started their own YouTube channels and improved their online presence.

“Communicate” resources

You can connect with Thomas and Just Catamarans at justcatamarans.net. You can also find the company on Instagram, Facebook and YouTube.

There’s a reason I continue suggesting the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic blueprint of all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

I’m so convinced of its message that I’m offering a free excerpt of the book so you can check it out.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Jaron Rice, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 849: Sales From The Street:”We Had To Be Different”

Jaron Rice, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

Jaron Rice found himself facing a challenge that he didn’t create. His industry had a horrible reputation for being less-than-transparent, and even deceptive. In order to succeed, his struggle was two-fold: he had to find new prospects, and he had to be different.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, Jaron explains how he worked beyond the negative stigma and grew his business to be the highest-rated merchant services provider in Maryland.

In its fourth year, Magothy Payments helps businesses become more profitable by lowering the cost of credit card acceptance. Jaron had to build a brand that was different than the traditional banks people were accustomed to dealing with.

Seeking Customer Feedback

Jaron called his introduction into the industry a sobering reality because so many doors were slammed in his face.

In order to understand the stigma, he started by surveying previous clients that he knew from other industries he had worked in. He asked them about their payment processors; specifically about the things they liked as well as the things they didn’t.

He never asked them to do business with him. He simply asked for their feedback.

What he discovered was that they all hated his industry, but they liked him, and they said they would be willing to do business with him.

He reached out first to business owners who knew him; local businesses that were familiar with his face because he spent money with them. Once he brought them on as clients, he was determined to continue providing value.

Understanding the Business Model

The payment processing industry is marked by attrition. Businesses generally change credit card processors every 10 months, averaging out to 22 percent attrition each year.

Over the course of five years, businesses turn over their entire client base. As a result, they strive to make as much money as possible within that period of time.

Jaron’s company turned that model on its head, deciding instead to make less money knowing that they would keep client accounts much longer.

In the company’s first four years, its attrition is less than three percent. Although they aren’t making as much money in a short period of time, they’re making more money in the long run. Additionally, their existing clients are bringing them new business.

Building strategic partnerships

Jaron’s company absorbed all the risk in order to attract new clients and overcome the industry’s negative reputation.

Rather than requiring contracts, Magothy allowed month-to-month transactions with no termination fees. That made it vital for the company to make sure it was providing value to its customers.

At the end of each client’s first full billing cycle, the company conducted an analysis to compare the initial proposal with the client’s actual results.

Once the company demonstrates its ability to do what it promised, Jaron asks his clients for online reviews and referrals.

In less than four years, the company has accumulated 225 accounts, most of which exist within a 10-mile radius of Jaron’s office. The company welcomes 8-12 new clients each month purely from referrals and networking.

The company’s reputation of trustworthiness and value has turned clients into evangelists. Next, Jaron is seeking to build more partnerships like the one he enjoys with the Better Business Bureau because those relationships yield lots of new accounts.

He emphasizes the importance of knowing your own value, especially for small businesses whose temptation is to simply undercut the competition.

Don’t be afraid to walk away from a deal that isn’t making you any money.

“We Had To Be Different” resources

Connect with Jaron on LinkedIn or at his website, www.magothy.biz.If you’re in the Maryland area, contact Magothy Payments to learn more about the state’s highest-rated merchant services provider.

Jaron’s story provides that we can all strive to be better and overcome challenges we’re facing. We have to apply what we learn though.

Our Facebook group The Sales Evangelizers brings together sellers of all abilities and all industries to compare notes and learn from one another. The odds are good that there’s a discussion that will benefit your own sales efforts, and it’s all free.

I’ve spent a lot of time talking about the book Stop Selling & Start Leading because I believe so strongly in the message it has to share. It’s a blueprint for sellers based upon years of research about the things buyers hate.

We’re so convinced that you’ll love the book that we’re providing a free excerpt to our listeners here.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Christopher Ibezim, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 844: Sales From The Street: “My Prices Were Too High”

Christopher Ibezim, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

What do you do when your competitor’s product is cheaper than yours?

Today on Sales From The Street, we talk to Chris Ibezim about what happened when he realized his prices were too high, and how changing his mindset helped him overcome the challenge.

Begin with research

Chris’ biggest challenge in sales was figuring out how to handle selling a product that was significantly more expensive than his competitors’.

He started by researching why his product cost more, with a goal to determine what made his product different.

He discovered that the way to demonstrate value was to understand the differences between the two products.

Compare your product to your competitors’ product so you can understand what makes yours different. Don’t use the word better; instead, let your customer decide that.

Educate your customers

If a customer has an opportunity to buy a car for $5,000 or a car for $10,000, it’s easy to assume you’ll buy the cheaper car.

But what if the more expensive car is a Ferrari? Although it’s more expensive, it has far greater value.

Your job is to educate your customer about your product, and explain why it’s worth the price.

When you’re confident in your product, when you provide the right information, and when you set the right expectation, you’ll find the right customer.

We’re all in the relationship business. Everything comes after you build the relationship because people buy from people they are comfortable with.

“My Prices Were Too High” resources

You can find Chris on Instagram: @klozemore and on Facebook.

Learn how to lead your buyers instead of being subservient. The book Stop Selling & Start Leading, offered by our friends at Wiley, provides a blueprint for your customers and what they are seeking. Read an excerpt of the book here.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

The podcast is part of our newly-launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. To learn more, email us at SPN for more information.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Clarence Butts, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Story Mapping, Use Data to Tell Your Story

TSE 839: Sales From The Street-“Use The Data…Tell a Story”

Clarence Butts, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Story Mapping

 

 

You have a story to tell: a history of your sales performance and your successes; a list of solutions you’ve provided to your customers; the lessons you’ve learned over the course of your career. You may not realize it, but you can use data to tell your story.

Today on Sales From The Street, we talk with Clarence Butts about the role data can play in your sales process.

Find decision-makers

One of Clarence’s biggest challenges in 25 years of sales has been locating the people who can make decisions and finding the project managers he can establish relationships with.

Somewhere along the way, he discovered that putting the information he had into a map helped him have a visual representation of where those opportunities were. It helped him determine where to invest his time, his energy, and his effort.

He discovered that once you know where they are, you can concentrate your time and effort into building relationships and developing contacts.

In his current territory, for example, he knows who the project managers are, and they know him. So even if they move from one project to another, they understand what he has to offer. They maintain relationships with him even as they transition to other projects.

Motivate yourself

Lots of companies will give you time at the front end of a new role to establish relationships and build networks. After that, you’re on your own.

That kind of pressure motivates some people, and frustrates others.

For Clarence, his initial motivation comes stems from the things he hopes to do with his family. He enjoys the fruits of being able to travel with his family. That motivates him to get out of bed every day.

His other motivation is chasing his competitors.

Finally, when he is able to enjoy the fruit of his work, that energizes him to keep working.

Use data to tell your story

As different locations scramble to attract Amazon’s next headquarters, many of them have used data to sell their regions. They use Story Maps, statistics, and other data to convince Amazon to choose their city.

Digital Territory wants to make the same capability available to the average salesperson. They’re seeking to bring the cost of the technology within reach of the individual sales rep so he can use data as part of his sales process.

Episode resources

There’s a reason I continue suggesting the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happenfrom our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic blueprint of all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

I’m so convinced of its message that I’m offering a free excerpt of the book so you can check it out.

Emailme for more information about our newly launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. You can also email us about our new business development services.

You can also join our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers to connect with sales professionals from all walks of life.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

 

Michael Sardina, Twitter, Social Selling, Donald Kelly

TSE 834: Sales From The Street: “Selling With Twitter”

Michael Sardina, Twitter, Social Selling, Donald Kelly

One of the challenges sales professionals face when selling with Twitter is staying focused on the task at hand. There’s so much noise and there are so many distractions that it’s difficult to avoid falling into the entertainment trap of social media.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we talk to Michael Sardina about selling with Twitter, and the challenges he faced when he first started social selling.

Be intentional

It’s difficult to stay focused on social media.

If people don’t guard against it, social selling gives them an excuse to spend an entire day on social media.

Conversely, if you base all your social media activity on what’s good for your business, your social media will start working for you.

Michael focused his communications on only those people who were related to his specific business needs. He started following people who were related to his specific business.

When he discovered people in his industry that he thought might be interested in what he was doing, he started following them.

He made  a list of those people he was trying to target: project managers and leaders who might make good prospects someday.

Pay attention

He started by noticing what his connections  were already doing on social media.

If they posted something, he made a point to like it or comment on it. If something relevant popped up in his feed, he either reached out via Twitter or direct message.

Michael said he realizes now that most people think social selling is too salesy, but that’s largely because they’re doing it wrong.

Engage often

After Michael made a point to start noticing what people were doing on social media, he started getting messages from people asking how he could help them.

He started responding to their messages and having conversations simply as a means to get to know people. That kind of engagement allowed him to get to know people in a way that didn’t revolve around sales.

He called them lighter touches.

Then, when it was actually time to promote something, people already knew him, so communication felt less salesy. It was easier to contact them because he had invested the time to connect with them outside of sales.  Selling with Twitter was suddenly more natural.

If you start helping people, they’ll respond to you and you can engage and have conversations with no expectations.

Identify people in your industry and follow the people you want to connect with on Twitter.

Episode resources

Connect with Michael on Twitter at Michael Sardina and on LinkedIn.

Salespeople can be leaders instead of being subservient. Our friends at Wiley  have provided a free excerpt of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading which provides a blueprint to help sales professionals lead in the way that customers prefer. Read an excerpt of the book here.

Tell others you know about our podcast, and subscribe if you haven’t already. Leave us a review wherever you consume this content so it will be easier for others to find us as well.

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Donald Kelly, Take Charge, Creative, Outreach

TSE 824: Sales From The Street: “Take Matters Into Your Own Hands”

Donald Kelly, Take Charge, Creative, Outreach

The very best thing you can do for your sales pipeline is to get your content in front of your prospect even before they need it. The most effective way to do that is to take matters into your own hands and utilize social selling to reach your prospects.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’re sharing our own story of social selling and why we fought so hard to employ it. Like every episode of Sales From the Street, you’ll hear about the struggle, how we overcame it, and what the results were.

Resistance to social selling

At one of my previous companies, a coworker and I recognized the power of social media for sales professionals who were trying to reach prospects. What we noticed, though, was that our leaders weren’t on board with the idea.

In the early days of LinkedIn, management assumed that if you were on LinkedIn, you were looking for other jobs. Since then, the platform has transformed into a place where sellers can build relationships and find opportunities.

The truth is that very often your prospects don’t know who you are; and being the best-kept secret should never be your goal.

Your ideal customers need to know who you are, because they know who your competitors are.

The marketing department didn’t like the idea. They said any social selling would have to be consistent and uniform. (Translation: they didn’t like the lack of control.) They recognized that we should be doing something, but no one wanted to implement change.

Our markets were shrinking and our opportunities were dying.

Your own pie

My coworker and I offered to help write content so it didn’t all fall to marketing. Although everyone acknowledged the need for social selling, no one wanted to let us have a piece of the pie.

So my coworker and I created our own pie.

We created a blog and started generating content about our product. We shared the content with our prospects in the form of blog posts.

The important thing is that we took control of the problem and addressed it ourselves. We never did close lots of deals as a result of it, and we didn’t make millions, it helped us realize the need to embrace social selling.

I’ve done the same thing with The Sales Evangelist, using my podcast as a means to connect with people. Early on, I noticed that one of my prospects had been interviewed for a pretty popular magazine. I asked him to appear on the podcast, and he eventually introduced me to other people.

Your own brand

Every seller must have his own brand online, even if it’s only your LinkedIn or Twitter pages. If you’re in the healthcare space, tailor your accounts to that industry.

Create content that helps you connect with your prospects, whether it’s a blog or a podcast or something different.

Just like there are many possible routes that will get you from New York to Los Angeles, there are many ways to utilize social selling to reach your audience.

Don’t be a one-trick pony, and don’t abandon the things you’re already doing. Simply add social selling to your process to help you reach your audience more quickly and efficiently.

Episode resources

If you haven’t already established your own brand, personal brand strategist Stephen Hart specializes in helping service-based professionals and entrepreneurs build their own personal brand.

Successful sellers find ways to think outside the box, because prospects want you to lead them rather than sell to them.

This is why I’ve recommended Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen, brought to you by our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a blueprint for sellers, giving you a first-hand look at what buyers want and the things they hate. Click here for an excerpt of the book.

Check out the Video Jungle Podcast to hear best practices for video and film production and to learn the art of selling your product with video. The podcast is part of our newly-launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

David Burkus, Friend of a Friend, Donald Kelly, Best Sales Podcast

TSE 819: Sales From the Street-“Networking Done Right”

David Burkus, Friend of a Friend, Donald Kelly, Best Sales Podcast

Most of the networking advice we hear is doomed to fail because it’s a story of one person in one situation. When we try to put their ideas into practice, it feels inauthentic.

Instead of copying someone else, we need to redefine what it means to network on our way to discovering what “networking done right” looks like. On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, David Burkus helps us change our mindset about what networking is so we can better take advantage of our existing networks.

You don’t have a network. You’re in a network.

We spend so much time trying to figure out how to connect with a stranger in a span of 7 seconds that we neglect the network we’re already in.

The biggest mindset shift is this: you don’t have a network, you exist inside a network.

If we redefine our thinking about networks, we can invest our time in learning how to navigate the network we’re already in instead of trying to figure out how to bring strangers into it.

David defines a network as a three-dimensional entity that you’re the center of. It includes your close connections as well as your weak or dormant connections.

Your goal should be to pay attention to the fringes of your network: those people who are one introduction away from being closer to the center of your network.

He calls it transitivity, and it’s an awareness that A knows B, and B knows C, so perhaps A and C can be connected.

Networking isn’t limited to events.

There is ample research to suggest that unstructured networking events such as Chamber of Commerce and other gatherings aren’t beneficial.

Realistically, most of us might try to make a few connections, but we spend the bulk of our time with people we already know who are similar to us. Instead, we should look at the totality of the network we’re already in.

Most people should begin by identifying their weak and dormant ties. Weak ties are those that you don’t know well. Dormant ties are people you know who were once stronger connections but who fell by the wayside. None of them are strong connections.

Begin by asking them who they know in the sector that is relevant to you. It’s less assertive than asking them who might be interested in your product, and you’ll get a larger list because it’s less specific.

If you ask a variety of people and the same few names keep cropping up, those are your referrals. There’s a strong likelihood you’ll click.

Identify hidden networks.

Begin with an accurate map of your entire network, and include everyone.

We tend to put people in buckets based upon our connection to them: those we work with and those we know socially for starters. Realistically, though, many of our connections have more than one tie.

If, for example, you work with a person, that’s a uniplex tie. If you work together, have kids in the same school, and work out at the same gym, that’s multiplicity. You have multiple connections.

As you’re identifying your connections, then, don’t ignore someone just because your only shared interest is college football. As you’re building a map of your entire network, you never know who is in his network.

Find structural holes.

People tend to gather in clusters around similarities like industry, work history, or ideology.

Historically, the greatest value in our network exists when we can connect two of those clusters.

If you can reach out to another cluster and bridge the gap between two groups, you can create value.

Make it a habit to reach out to your weak and dormant ties. Pay attention to people you aren’t as close to.

Don’t trust your networking to fate. Most of us already have a route to meet everyone we want to meet within our existing networks.

Episode Resources

Check out David’s book, Friend of a Friend: Understanding the Hidden Networks That Can Transform Your Life and Your Career.

Learn more about growing your network, becoming a better leader, and developing creativity at his website, www.davidburkus.com.

Check out the Video Jungle Podcast to hear best practices for video and film production and to learn the art of selling your product with video. The podcast is part of our newly-launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries.

Email us at SPN for more information.

Pick up your copy of Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley.

Check out a free excerpt of the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen, and discover why some of the things you’ve been taught to do in sales may be the very things your prospect hates.

Audio providede by Free SFX.

Ericka Eller, Stress, Salesperson, Health

TSE 814: Sales From The Street-“Stress Can Affect Sales”

Ericka Eller, Stress, Salesperson, HealthSales professionals engage in a constant hustle and grind to achieve their numbers and meet their goals. What they may not understand is that the prolonged stress can affect sales.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, Ericka Eller emphasizes the need for sales professionals to use their time intentionally and the practical ways they can do it.

Eller works as a business development strategist and a certified wellness coach, and she works with high-achieving people who want to boost their success by managing their health.

Personal struggle

It was her own struggle with stress that led her to understand the importance of focusing on health.

She realized that it’s difficult to burn the candle at both ends and still perform at the level you’re trying to maintain. As the leader of a sales team, a coach, a mom, a wife, and an active church member, she found herself constantly thinking of work and responsibilities.

The pressure caused internal and external stress which led to lethargy and a heaviness she couldn’t escape.

Her family suffered the most because there aren’t expectations and deadlines there. Families demand no deliverables.

She became irritable and found herself missing family events. Her family didn’t recognize her, and she didn’t recognize herself.

Combatting stress

She realized she had to step back from the pressure to allow her body to recuperate.

The answer to her problem was scheduling and planning.

She plans her food prep so she can create healthy meals for her family, and she schedules her workouts. She bought a package at a local studio and writes her workouts into her calendar.

Finally, she enlisted help from health professionals to make sure her body was functioning as it should.

Where to start

Create a plan to deal with your stress. Vague plans won’t work because they don’t help you control your activities.

Instead, develop a specific plan. What does your day look like? What things must you prioritize?

Planning your day allows you to avoid the feeling of overwhelm and to find the energy to accomplish your goals. When you know that stress can affect sales, you can control your stress to increase your productivity.

Clarity returns. Ideas return. Energy returns.

Episode resources

Ericka recently blogged for us at The Sales Evangelist about the steps you can take to prevent stress from crippling you.

You may not realize you have some of the symptoms or their effect in your work and home life.

If you want to connect with her, find her at erickaeller.com, where she has a special opt-in available.

For those sellers who aren’t sure how to balance your sales schedule, The Sales Evangelizers group on Facebook is a great place to interact with sales professionals from many regions and many industries.

Our group online coaching program, The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, also provides an opportunity to interact with other sellers, and also provides weekly coaching sessions for sellers of all levels.

Our next group begins April 26, and we’d be honored to have you join us.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Donald Kelly, Lazy Selling, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, sales basics

TSE 809: Sales From The Street-“My Creative Lazy Ideas”

Sometimes the sales basics feel mundane.

Sometimes we burn ourselves out making phone calls and sending emails, and we feel like we’re spinning our wheels. Without regard for how effective it is, we want to try something different.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, I share my own experience with burnout and the hard lessons I learned from it. I was looking for an easy way out and avoiding the things I knew I needed to do.

Don’t abandon sales basics.

In college, I worked in an IT training company that offered training classes. I was tired of making phone calls and sending emails and I wanted to try something new like guerrilla marketing.

I assumed the marketing department was the problem, and I figured there was a better way to get our company name out there.

After doing lots of research, I launched ideas for computers at bus stations, as well as A-frame signs and banners; and I got very few leads.

It turns out the problem wasn’t the phone calls themselves. The problem was that my phone calls weren’t effective.

I didn’t speak the language of the decision-makers I was contacting. I didn’t understand my ideal customer, and I didn’t know how to differentiate.

When I finally sat down with the technicians to understand what the clients liked about the training and the problems they were trying to solve, I had a better understanding.

Be consistent, AND creative.

I would never suggest that you shouldn’t try new things. Do research in your off-time to discover what others in your industry are doing. Put your own spin on it and tweak it until you get it right.

When you’re consistent at something and you improve and tweak it, you’ll see results.

Make sure you budget your time effectively. Call your prospects when they are most likely to be available. I was calling home phone numbers in the middle of the day when most people were likely to be gone.

Over time, I learned what worked and I gained decent clients and I acquired good experience.

Try unique things that tie to your industry. Understand how to help your prospects and recognize them as humans.

Episode resources

People often tell us to fail quickly and then move on, but what if we don’t have to fail at all? What if you could get a jumpstart by learning from other people’s challenges?

Doesn’t it make sense to figure out where other people went wrong so you can avoid repeating their mistakes?

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is a group coaching program that offers training sessions every week, and a chance to hear from sales professionals from other industries. We offer group accountability and an exchange of ideas.

We’d love for you to check it out, and we’d be honored to have you join us.

The April semester will focus on building value so you can see better results and close more deals.

We’d also love for you to subscribe to the podcast, and if you haven’t already, leave us a review wherever you’re listening.

Evangelize for us by telling other people about the podcast.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Take Away, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 789: Sales From The Street-“He Was Doing The Take Away”

Take Away, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistSelling to a seller can be especially difficult. I know this because I once found myself working a deal with a client in which he was doing the sales take away. I was so desperate for the sale that I failed to create scarcity.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, I’ll share with you how a client early in my sales career exploited my desperation and his experience to put himself in control of the transaction.

I realized what was happening in the midst of the experience, but I still went along with it because I didn’t want to lose the deal.

As sellers, we must create a sense of value and exclusivity. We don’t want to communicate to clients that we need them but rather we want to create the sense that they need us.

In this episode:

  • Learn the single rule that will set you apart from all of your competitors.
  • Discover what dating and sales have to do with one another, and the principle that applies to both of them.
  • Identify phrases you can use in your take away to create a sense of scarcity for the client.
  • Uncover why conversations are more valuable to clients than sales pitches.

If you aren’t already doing these things, I encourage you to test the ideas. You’ll see for yourself how it builds value and creates relationships.

If you want even more valuable information, our TSE Hustler’s League is an online group coaching program that provides accountability, connections, and a chance to learn from me in a wonderful community of sellers.

If you feel like you’re struggling to infuse enough value in your sales conversations, check out our April semester of Hustler’s League.

Our messages are designed for sellers of all levels, whether you’ve been selling for 15 years or 15 days.

 

Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, Sales, TSE

TSE 784: Sales From The Street-“Whatever It Takes”

Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, Sales, TSE

Do you give up easily on your prospects when you’re not able to get a hold of them? Do you walk away when someone says “No?”

In today’s episode, I share about a principle that can help you make more effective decisions and get you to the next level in your selling career.

“WHATEVER IT TAKES” PRINCIPLE

What separates top-performing sellers from the rest is their tenacious drive. They have the “whatever it takes” mentality. They have a deeper desire. They want to be the best.

HOW YOU CAN APPLY THIS PRINCIPLE

  • Call again until you get a hold of them.
  • Send snail mail or thank you cards.
  • Change the way you do your presentations.
  • In a demonstration, call and speak to everyone who’s going to be a part of that demo. Make it more effective and meaningful.
  • It takes more work but the results will pay off in the long run. Don’t just go in there and do the bare minimum. Get out and make it happen! Don’t just listen, apply it.

EVALUATING YOURSELF AND WHAT YOU CAN DO

  • Are you doing whatever it takes to stand out?
  • Have you been reaching out to your prospects on social media?
  • Are you reading their books?
  • Have you been doing your research about them?
  • Have a “Why.” Let this be your fuel that gets you up and moving.
  • Be competitive.
  • You can do a lot more. Push yourself to the next level. Make sure you put everything in, whatever it takes!

Episode Resources:

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

The 12 Week Year by Brian P. Morgan and Michael Lennington

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, Leadership

TSE 779: Sales From The Street-“Personal Invite”

Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, LeadershipNot getting the results you’re looking for? Are your activities not getting a lot of turnout? 

In today’s episode, I share about how my involvement as a bishop in our congregation has taught me to personalize my message, my struggles, and how this non-traditional sales situation has helped me in my career as a sales professional.

ROLES OF A LEADER IN AN ORGANIZATION

As a leader in any organization, you have to grow your organization. Sell the concept. Continue to bring people back and keep them inside your organization.

Send emails to different groups. Invite them to activities.

BUT WHAT MAKES THE BIGGEST IMPACT?

  • Personal invitation – Send personal text messages to individuals and not to multiples. Make personal phone calls. Take the opportunity to know each individual.
  • Role assignment – Get people involved in your activities. Say for example in a sales demonstration, have them invite other people.

THE POWER IN PERSONALIZING YOUR MESSAGE

Figure out a way to capitalize on personalization. Drop a personal email when it’s someone’s birthday. Share something valuable when someone gets promoted.

Notice a greater increase in your activities’ attendance. Get bigger results!

Episode Resources:

The 12 Week Year by Brian P. Morgan and Michael Lennington

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Sales from the Street, Productivity, Donald Kelly, Sales

TSE 774: Sales From The Street-“I Felt Unproductive As Well”

Sales from the Street, Productivity, Donald Kelly, Sales

As part of the Latter Day Saints, I have learned so much from my missionary service. In today’s episode, I’m sharing with the lessons I’ve learned from that experience that we can relevantly apply to sales to increase your productivity.

Plan some time for things that don’t necessarily work out.

If you don’t have something planned, every single hour and minute of the day, there are probably still some things that you’re not able to get done.

Plan Effectively

Time blocking

  • This means putting the most important things in first and set enough time to those that are the most effective.

For example:

Set aside time to do 10 calls before 10am. Put that time period and make it as a sacred time. Do all you can to not deviate from it.

Buffer

  • Put some time in as a buffer. Place some empty spots during your day so you’re able to shift things around and you have some room.
  • Those are not dead times, instead, it’s something you can use if anything comes up in the day.
  • Leave some room for error during your day. Leaving some empty spots during the day can make you feel more productive at the end of the day.

For example: 

Put a 30-minute block in between one activity and another since there may be some things you need to do in between.

Episode Resources:

The 12 Week Year by Brian P. Morgan and Michael Lennington

15 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management by Kevin Kruse

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Facebook group The Sales Evangelizers

Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, Sales Tips

TSE 759-Sales From The Street -“Focus and Measure”

Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, Sales Tips

This podcast just started out as a hobby until people began coming and asking me to teach them and speak to different events. It was a sideline. But as things were growing, I knew this was serious.

Hence, there had to be plans and strategies in place. In short, I jumped ship and left my full-time software job.

Today, find out what I did to grow this business through “focus and measure.”

The Challenge

I was getting speaking opportunities, sure. But I was actually playing on the defensive game, waiting for the opportunities to come as opposed to attacking the speaking opportunities.

The Missing Ingredient: Focus

So I realized what was missing from all of this was focus. I wasn’t just not focused, but I also failed to measure the results from it.

The Strategy:

“When performance is measured, performance improves. When performance is measured and reported, the rate of improvement accelerates.”

The Goal

Every week, our goal is to be able to apply to three to five conferences. So at least I’m aiming at having one speaking gig per month.

The Result

Currently, we’re actually getting three speaking opportunities getting booked per month.

What You Can Do:

Figure out how many appointments you need to get per week or products sold per week.

Keep yourself accountable and measure against that.

Figure out areas you can improve on.

Focus and measure!

Episode Resources:

The 12 Week Year by Brian P. Morgan and Michael Lennington

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

David Tabb, Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, Sales

TSE 744: Sales From The Street-“Door-to-Door Selling”

Today’s guest is David Tabb. He is a franchise owner for Welcomemat Services, a marketing company that specializes in new mover mailing. He does door to door sales.

And in his industry, this is what works effectively. In this episode, he’s sharing some insights which you can apply to you own process, no matter what industry you come from.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with David:

Why Door-to-Door:

Some businesses are not actively looking for business because they’re so busy operating their business they just want you to come to them.

Challenges with door-to-door sales (and what you can do!)

1. Developing your rhythm.

Keep a log next to you and have 2-3 hooks you can use and develop. Write them down and see what their responses look like.

2. Creating lists

Creating lists will also create that accountability factor. Have your target list for that day. Having that list will allow you to get going.

3. Simplifying the process and being able to get to the decision makers.

4. Will they say yes?

Of course, but you yourself has to see it. You have the data that you’re doing well so go out and talk the people. Open the door everyday as many times you can. Get through gatekeepers and decision makers. Just keep having conversations and you will get to a yes. That’s guaranteed!

5.Taking care of your body is critical.

Make sure that you’re also taking care of your body. Do some walking. This will help your prepare and get that mind work. Walking gets your mind moving. Park at the end of the parking lot.

6. Asking for help

Allow the person to help you get what you want and it’s a lot easier to get them to do it. This can be a game changer for you the way it did for David. Just be genuine about what you’re looking for.

David’s Major Takeaway:

Track what you do and just keep working on it. It always changes. Every situation is a new opportunity. Don’t walk in with a set game plan for every situation because that probably won’t work. Be adaptable and track what you’re doing so you can find your rhythm, especially when you’re starting off. This will lead you to bigger and better deals and percentages across the board.

Episode Resources:

Connect with David on www.welcomematservices.com or connect with him on Facebook Welcomemat Fort Lauderdale.

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Tired of PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same.

Sales from the Street, Sales Coaching, Donald Kelly, TSE

TSE 729: Sales From The Street-“I’m a Sales Coach”

Sales from the Street, Sales Coaching, Donald Kelly, TSEDo you feel you’re taking too much? Or that you’re not being laser-focused on the market that you serve?

Today, our guest, Cynthia Barnes, is a B2B, women sales coach. She’s back here on the show today to talk about a struggle she face, how she overcame it, and the results she got.

Cynthia Barnes is a Metro Detroit-based executive sales and leadership coach and thought leader. As a visionary and intense leader of highly successful sales teams, Cynthia has learned that the key to reaching the Top 1% is a high level of precision combined with relentless execution.

Cynthia is Founder and CEO of Barnes Sales Institute, an executive sales coaching firm for women sales professionals and the driving force behind the National Association of Women Sales Professionals— a national sales organization that provides professional development and advocates for the advancement of women sales professionals.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Cynthia:

Cynthia’s biggest sales struggle:

  • Not being crystal clear on the target market she serves and the services she provides
  • Trying to service customers in the level they expect you to service them even if it’s actually not your expertise (For instance, they expect you to to do marketing even when you’re expertise is in sales)

Strategies Cynthia Did to Overcome Her Struggles:

  • Cynthia is a darn good sales coach. So she knew she needed to be able to stay in her lane.
  • This takes humility and conviction, knowing that you are good at what you do.
  • It takes focus to say you’re not going to do something else.

Focusing on the Right People:

  • Stay in your lane and the right people and the right opportunities are attracted to you because you’re in your lane, your silo, your own vertical.
  • For instance, Cynthia only coaches women sales professionals. She doesn’t coach men and B2C clients. She is a B2B, women sales coach.
  • When you brand yourself as an expert in your field, there’s not enough “manpower” to handle all the people that reach out to you.

Cynthia’s Major Takeaway:

Do what you do and do it really well. Be crystal clear on your messaging, who you are, what you serve, and who you serve. Then the right people will come to you.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Cynthia Barnes on LinkedIn or send her a message at hello@nawsp.org

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Tired of PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same.

 

Felipe Lodi, Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, TSE

TSE 724: Sales From The Street -“Live Local Events”

Felipe Lodi, Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, TSERegardless of which part in the organization you are, everyone is in sales.

Today’s guest is Felipe Lodi, an entrepreneur and sales professional. He’s sharing one of the biggest sales struggle he had, how he overcame it, and the result he has seen from it. 

Felipe is big on providing not just education, but free education through live local events.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Felipe:

Felipe’s biggest sales struggles:

  • Creating awareness
  • How to generate the trust

Strategy he applied to build trust:

  • He began providing free events with different themes.
  • Their customers went to their events for free and they started to see them as a go-to company for education.
  • As a result, they started to buy from them months after.

Why they chose events:

Free events are not common

Big results they’ve seen from free events:

  • They were counting for referrals before. Now, they have a good flow of subscriptions coming. They no longer do cold-calling.
  • Because they provide free education, more and more people come to them.
  • People are now aware of the brand just because of the events.
  • 28 events and one year later, they are now expanding to other countries in Europe.

Felipe’s Major Takeaway:

Try to keep a small team because it’s much better to communicate when you have your team on the same page. Educate people for free. Giving stuff for free is the new marketing. Don’t sell. It must be hidden. It must be in disguise. After all, they already know you have some products you’re selling.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Felipe on LinkedIn and Facebook. Find out more about his company on WorkFlowICT.

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Tired of PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same.

Dustin Dauenhauer, The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Prospecting

TSE 719: Sales From The Street -“Don’t Say No for The Prospect”

Dustin Dauenhauer, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistThink closely. Do you ever find yourself saying no to yourself before the prospect even said no to you. Don’t say no for the prospect. Don’t decide for the prospect.

Today’s guest is Dustin Dauenhauer.  He is a member of The Sales Evangelizers Facebook community and he’s going to share with us some struggles he faced related to sales and what he did to overcome them.

Dustin is an account executive for Southwest Now Magazine and the Co-Founder of Defining Moments, Inc. They help aspiring authors, musicians, and artists reach their dreams and get their project out there.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Dustin:

Dustin’s Struggle: FEAR

He was afraid to go in to make the sale. He would even be afraid to go in and make the sale. He’d walk up to the door, turn around, and walk away.

Strategies to Overcome Fear:

1. Be intentional with what you think about on a daily basis.

Stop that mindset of deciding for your customers. Confront your thoughts intentionally and deal with it. Remind yourself of your “why.”

2. Make a goal.

Make a goal to confront your fear. Realize the value your product/solution brings. Don’t go in for the sale right away. Build a relationship first. If you’re used to visiting 20 locations, double it up to 40. Then follow up emails or calls. The more you do it, the less fearful you become.

3. Take action.

If they say no to you, tell them, “When you’re ready, we will be here.”

Dustin’s Major Takeaway:

Success is on the other side of fear. Your goal is not only to sell them but to befriend them and genuinely care about what they’re doing. Be intentional about thinking what you’re thinking about.

Episode Resources:

Know more about Dustin on DefiningMomentsTV.com and follow him on Twitter and Facebook.

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Tired of PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same.

Pete Mockaitis, Sales from the Street, How to Be Awesome at Your Job, Donald Kelly

TSE 714: Sales From The Street-“Fail Really Early”

Pete Mockaitis, Sales from the Street, How to Be Awesome at Your Job, Donald KellyScared of failing too soon? The irony of this, however, is that failing sooner in sales or in your business is actually the quickest way for you to achieve that you want.

Our guest on this episode of Sales from the Street is Pete Mockaitis. He’s an entrepreneur and his is a fellow co-podcaster.

He hosts the show, How to Be Awesome at Your Job Podcast. And today, he talks about the principles behind building a business out of your passion and why you should strive to fail early and often.

Building Your Business Out of Your Passions

  • Just because it’s your passion doesn’t mean it’s going to get you paid.
  • Some passions are not appropriate for trying to build a business or a product or a livelihood out of it.
  • Ask yourself if people really want this thing.
  • Acknowledge the reality that if you don’t have the product market fit, you’re not going to go very far.

Strategies for Finding Your Business:

  • Find a new product
  • Apply that product differently in that it solves a more compelling problem.
  • Change your market.

Fail Early

  • This is where the concept of Minimal Viable Product comes in.
  • Start off lean.
  • Make sure it’s not just something you want but what everybody wants.
  • Start basic and test it out. Then see what the market wants.
  • If you fail, learn from it.
  • Find out what the customers want. So when you fail early, you can easily move forward.

Results Pete has seen:

  • Their podcast hit over a million of cumulative downloads in just over a year.
  • They hit some nice iTunes rankings.
  • Pete has been featured on The New York Times.

Episode Resources:

How to Be Awesome at Your Job Podcast

Shoot Pete at email at pete@awesomeatyourjob.com or on LinkedIn.

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

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Sales from the Street, Donald Kelly, Sales, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 709: Sales From The Street -“You Can Learn To Sell”

Sales from the Street, Donald Kelly, Sales, The Sales Evangelist

Not everyone is born a seller. But any one  can learn how to sell.

If you think you’re never going to be good at selling – stop right there. Stop making excuses. Because you can improve if you commit yourself to it.

Today’s guest is Chuck Allen, a commercial and residential roofing sales rep based in Texas for a roofing company, America’s Choice Roofing. He has been doing this for about five years now.

He’s sharing with us his biggest struggles and some strategies he applied that have now made him a million-dollar sales individual.

Chuck’s Biggest Struggle:

His transition from roofing supply to residential and commercial sales

Chuck thought it was easy to go from being an order-taker to doing the actual sales.

Although he knew the product so well, he had a hard time explaining why their customers would want the product.

He went two months without selling a roof. His bank account went rock bottom. He struggled and he second-guessed everything he did.

This was a humbling experience for him, finding out that he wasn’t a great salesman. And at that point, he decided to do something to improve.

Some Strategies to Learn How to Sell

1. Write down your weaknesses and strengths.

Chuck taught himself how to sell.

Be brutally honest with yourself. Chuck realized his weaknesses:

  • How to convey the value to customer
  • How to make people comfortable with him

2. Enrich your knowledge.

Read books. Listen to podcasts. Get some sales training. Learn as much as you could from as much people.

3. Practice.

Learn how to do presentations that can keep people’s attention. Explain your process and company. Do not lose them in a pool of technical jargon.

4. See what successful people are doing.

Follow successful in your field and in sales in general just to see how they do it. This allows you to adapt your strengths to theirs.

5. Have confidence in yourself.

Understand that no matter what the question is, you’re going to have an answer for it.

Chuck’s Major Takeaway:

Believe in yourself and believe in your products. If you don’t, nobody else will. People can tell when you’re genuine. You have to truly believe in your heart that what you’re doing is going to be the greatest benefit to the person you’re trying to work with. And nobody on earth can provide a better solution to that problem than you can.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Chuck Allen on Facebook, on Twitter @ChuckAllen2, and LinkedIn.

America’s Choice Roofing or give them a call at 855-5-MYROOF.

Tired of the same old, boring PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same. Tell your story the way you want to tell it.

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, TSE, Sales

TSE 704: Sales From The Street-“I Am The Bottleneck”

Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, TSE, Sales

Today, I’m going to share with you a challenge that I had, specifically that fear of closing the sale, and how I was able to overcome that.

I actually realized that I was the one getting in the way of my sale. So I knew I had to  surpass that.

A lot of sales people are afraid to close since their fear of getting rejected overpowers them. But there are things you can do to get overcome this fear and to get comfortable once you get to the closing part of the sales process.

Strategies for closing the sale:

1. Build as much value.

Help your buyer solve the problem and make that decision.

2. Get them to the next level.

They’re not going to be mad at you.

They need your help so bring them to the next level.

Don’t Make Closing an Event

Closing is just a continuation of the entire sales process. So don’t think of it as a separate entity.

Stop making it as this big thing in life.

Guide the prospect into the next part of the process. And just keep on moving.

Episode Resources:

Tired of the same old, boring PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same. Tell your story the way you want to tell it.

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

TSE 699: Sales From The Street-“Selecting Great Customers”

Customers come in all shapes and sizes. So how do you go about selecting great customers?

Today, I’m sharing with you some great insights into how to maintain awesome relationships with clients and build new relationships.

You Have Control

You are on the front line so basically you have the ability to select the customers that you bring into the organization.

7 Components to Look At When Selecting Customers

1. It’s a client wherein you like the product they offer.

2. Look at the end result. Think from the customer’s outlook.

What causes to get the job well done? Look at the attributes of the customer and what the ideal customer looks like? Work backwards.

3. The leader has to be involved in the process.

4. Someone who has a clear idea of their objective.

A good metrics is that they should have clear KPIs.

5. Willing to roll up the sleeves and hustle

6. Look at the organization’s culture.

Check out Glassdoor and you’d see what the sales reps are saying about the company. You’ll have an idea of their leadership style.

7. See what their customers are saying about the organization.

Episode Resources:

Tired of the same old, boring PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same. Tell your story the way you want to tell it.

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

TSE 694: Sales From The Street-“What You Must Know Before Taking A Commission Only Job Part 2”

This is part two of the other day’s episode where we talked about things you should consider before taking a full commission job. The first six have already been discussed back in Episode 692 and so I’m going to discuss the last two points today.

  • Work Ethic

If you haven’t done a full commission job before, you’re going to get screwed up without the right mindset. You want to get that money at the end of the day.

Figure out what their ramp up week is. It’s typical scenario that they’re going to train you. And you have to pay for rent. And if you didn’t make any money that week, they’d float you for that week but only for a certain number of weeks.

Then you need to figure out way and when you start getting money, you pay off the money. Say, the ramp up period is a couple of weeks, which means you start paying for your own stuff afterwards.

So be willing to work hard and be willing to wake up early. Be willing to stay up late and do what you need to get some leads. Have that why. Otherwise, don’t do it.

  • Planning

If you don’t close any deal, you get nothing. So if you’re not able to plan your days effectively especially if you’re doing cold-calling, you’re not going to make it.

Make sure you plan out your days and put everything on the calendar. Be totally organized. And if do this, you’re going to be successful.

I’m telling you. It can happen. But you’ve got to hustle. You’ve got to put in the work.

Get Your Mind Right

This includes studying and getting access to knowledge. Read books. Watch videos. Listen to podcasts. Because you need that daily inspiration.

Set apart 30 minutes a day to get your education in as well as some time to get that motivation in.

The path to depression is quick. It’s easy to doubt yourself. And you may think about going back to your job waiting tables. But nothing worthwhile is ever easy.

You have to put some hustle in. But you also don’t want to reinvent the wheel. So go with an organizations that already have all these eight things in place.

Episode Resources:

Tired of the same, old PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same. Tell your story the way you want to tell it.

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

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