Tag Archives for " Listening "

Client Relationship, Andy Racic, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1196: Sales From The Street – “Are You Firing Me?”

Client Relationship, Andy Racic, The Sales Evangelist

One of the scariest questions to ask in this field is, “are you firing me?” You might have asked this yourself, out loud or in silence, but regardless of how, it’s nerve-wracking just the same. 

Andy Racic has been in professional sales for nine years and most of those years were spent serving HR professionals. These days, Andy is with a software company called Tango Health. They offer B2B software and outsourcing solutions to help professionals across the country. 

The beginning

While Andy was living in Houston, he was working for an agency recruitment firm called Michael Page. The agency recruitment space is 100% sales: that is 90% sales and 10% consulting. They were in the business of the oil and gas market and despite the difficult times in the business, their agency was able to establish a good relationship with their clients. Out of the blue, one of their clients asked him to help find a recruiter. 

That was an alarming thing to hear because to him it sounded very much like looking for their replacement. It was a source of concern because the market was going downhill so their company was looking for ways to keep their clients and continue serving them. 

Andy ran that client inquiry to his manager and they dug into it. They discovered that the company was having a big project that would involve a lot of hiring for them. The company was looking at 30-50% growth and they were looking for more people. Andy and his manager went back to the drawing board and built an entire recruitment process outsourcing model for that company. 

They then made the call and presented the model for them and convinced them to trust them a little bit more instead of hiring another recruitment agency that they hadn’t worked with before. 

Putting the best foot forward

There were doubts about whether what they did would work. The market was changing and the client could have gone in a different direction instead of working with them. Still, Andy and his team did what they could. 

Andy’s team did a thorough briefing on the situation with their client’s internal stakeholders and presented a team that would help in the recruitment process. He gave them the background of each individual along with their track record and the reasons why they’re a good fit. 

They won their trust and worked with the company, so to speak. Andy’s agency found a lot of people for them and delivered good results for them. 

When a problem arises, salespeople can always go back to the traditional process of evaluating the problem and going deeper to understand that challenge. You need not have that “Are you firing me?” moment when you learn to take measured steps and prevent such a situation to arise. 

A good salesperson needs an open mind whenever he hears information because the snippets of information may make or break your business or the deal. Be on the lookout for what’s going on and dig in until the third level questions to ensure that there are no assumptions on your side. Make sure that you make the best out of any situation. 

When you’re talking to a client, listen intently to pick up something especially when things go south. Stay present when the client is speaking rather than making them repeat what they said because that’s how you win a deal. 

“Are You Firing Me?” episode resources

Are you firing me? Listen more to what Andy has to say about that. Get in touch with Andy Racic via his LinkedIn profile. Make sure to customize your messages for a more positive response from Andy. You can also connect with Donald via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook

This episode is brought to you in-part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a program designed to help sales reps get from where you are now to where you can be in the future. This course is an aid for salespeople to become better in asking the right questions, presenting solutions, and closing deals. 

Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

Read more about sales or listen to audiobooks at Audible as well and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

If you like this episode, do give us a thumbs up and rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. We produce high-quality podcasts weekly so make sure to subscribe to get more of these sales talks that matter! Share this with your friends and teach them how to subscribe as well. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Listening, Meetings, Donald C. Kelly

TSE 1185: Why Do Salespeople Talk So Much?

Listening, Meetings, Donald C. KellyWhen I asked The Sales Evangelist community what they wanted to know about sales, one of the questions that emerged was, “Why do salespeople talk so much?”

It annoys a lot of people, primarily because if you talk too much, you’re probably listening too little. 

Persuading people

Somewhere in the growth of the sales industry, sellers convinced themselves that talking would persuade buyers to make purchases. We believed that if we talked more, they’d hear us more and they’d more likely believe us. As a result, they’d say “yes” more. 

Unfortunately, that just isn’t true. 

Many people don’t realize that the greatest salespeople listen more than they talk. You’ve likely heard the adage that you have two ears and one mouth, so you should listen twice as much as you talk. 

If you pay attention, you’ll likely discover that the best salespeople are those who use their speaking opportunities to ask questions. They seek to understand their buyer’s perspective and to stimulate conversation that helps them gather important information. 

Stimulate the buyer

Let’s go back to the scenario we discussed earlier in the week. If someone owns a car that costs them a lot of money every month for repairs, you could ask that person questions to help him realize that he has a problem. If you walk him through the math and help him understand how much that amounts to every year, he may find that he could be driving a much newer car for the same price.

Good sales reps will ask questions that will help him realize the problem on his own. 

  • Why are you spending that much money on your car?
  • If I could show you how to spend one-fourth of that amount and get a reliable vehicle and still have money to save, would you be open to learning more?

He’ll likely be willing to at least learn more. 

Features and benefits

Without even discussing features and benefits, you’ve inspired him to consider his situation. You said nothing about the radio, or the seats, or the transmission, or the exterior of the car. You helped him persuade himself to explore the possibilities.

Many sellers dislike the awkward moments in meetings when things get quiet. Each side wonders what the other is thinking and, as humans, it just feels wrong for us to sit in silence. We assume the buyer is thinking something negative. 

A Harvard study found that when people talk about themselves, it triggers the same pleasure sensations as food or money. The study also found that volunteers who were offered a chance to earn money by answering questions about other people passed up potential earnings in exchange for a chance to talk about themselves. 

Why do salespeople talk so much?
We’re more comfortable talking about ourselves because we’re confident about it. The conclusion is that sellers who want to fill an awkward silence will likely talk about themselves.

Meeting prep 

Sellers who prepare for meetings would more likely understand the situation and the buyer and his company. As a result, they’ll be more confident in their understanding of the customer’s challenge. They’ll ask appropriate questions that help the buyers travel down the path to making a decision. 

Write some thought-provoking questions prior to the meeting. Challenge your prospects’ way of thinking. If you feel awkward about a specific question, you should probably ask it anyway. 

If your prospect seems to be avoiding a topic, see if you can find a way to bring it up anyway. The conversation will either progress toward conversion or your prospect will decide he isn’t ready for change. 

Study the customer and his company. Learn about the potential problems they are facing and figure out a way to solve them. 

“Why Do Salespeople Talk So Much?” episode resources

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. We want you guys to go out each and every single day to find more ideal customers and do big things.

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Janet Clark, The Sales Evangelist, Sales Process

TSE 1184 Sales From The Street: “The Heart Flow Sales Process”

Janet Clark, The Sales Evangelist, Sales Process

Sales is a process and every salesperson has to master the heart flow sales process before expecting results. 

Janet Clark’s company, The Freedom Shift, is a sales matchmaker. Janet matches high-ticket salespeople with coaches and consultants who want to expand their sales team. She is also helping the coaches with their lead generation and figuring out their qualified leads because this part of marketing can be difficult. 

Before she built her company, Janet started in corporate sales selling B2B. She built sales organizations for big telecommunications and internet-based companies. It was only five years ago that she started selling high-ticket transformation programs for top-level coaches and consultants. 

B2B selling and transformational selling

In B2B selling, a salesperson is selling somebody in a corporation and spending somebody else’s money. Their decision is still laced with emotion but it’s more of making the right decisions so as not to lose their jobs. 

In transformational selling, a coach or consultant is selling to a company owner who makes a decision to invest in himself to reach a new level of personal growth. A coach or consultant talks to a person who spends his own money. There are a lot of emotions involved in making the decisions of doing high-ticket investments yourself. 

The key to connect with people is to reach them from the heart, hence the heart flow sales process. Every letter in the word Heart Flow stands for one of the steps in the sales process. 

Factors to consider 

Two things need to happen before someone invests in a high-ticket program. Number one, the prospect has to know that the program works. They need to feel a level of trust in the person delivering the program. The second factor is for the prospect to consider whether the program will work for him.  

Marketing and the qualifying piece answer that question. Talking to the prospect about the program and how good it is alone wouldn’t result in a closed deal unless the conversation goes deeper and they figure out where their fear is coming from.

The Heart flow process is not hardcore selling and it’s not manipulative. 

Most people need a push and not manipulation. Sometimes, they need to borrow the confidence of the salesperson in order to make big decisions. There is a fine line between being confident and pushing somebody a little beyond their comfort zone and doing something manipulative. 

People who make investments need to see results and they won’t get the results they want when you bring them in the program in a coercive way. 

The Heart Flow Sales Process

Heart 

Heart Flow is divided into three sections and as mentioned earlier, every letter stands for a step in the process. 

  • Hello
  • Explain
  • Ask
  • Recap
  • Teach

Hello is the greeting. It’s when you sit with your clients and figure out who they are. This is where you build rapport. Next, is to explain how the call is going to go. Set the stage right away and do an agenda before the call. It is important to take the prospects through the process in order to steer them in the right direction. 

Ask, because fact-finding and interviewing are two important parts of the sales process. Learn to ask the right questions and the typical objections in the program you are selling. When you realize that the person is not a qualified prospect, you go to the next section. 

Recap the things that they’ve said to ensure that they know you’re listening and absorbing the information they gave you. 

Teach is the transition point where you start giving them some information. It’s important to teach them something that they’re not aware of and give them that eureka moment. Teaching them little things that they don’t know or might have known in a way that is an Aha! Moment. 

Flow

The next section is Flow. 

  • Feeling
  • Layout the offer
  • Own the silence
  • Wrap it up

Feeling is asking them how they feel about what you’ve said. This step makes them reflect on the things you’ve said and respond accordingly. This brings you to the next section, layout the offer. 

This is where you explain to them that what you just taught them (in the Teach step) is incorporated in this program. Layout to them the elements and the components that make the program work. It’s more of the benefits and results of the program rather than the times of the day you’re going to do the coaching calls. 

Own the silence and don’t make the mistake of owning the talk after you’ve laid the offer. It’s important to mute yourself and let them come up with what they’re thinking. 

The last step is to wrap it up. Answer their questions and move forward into getting them into the program. There is science to the sales process and a way that it needs to flow. There’s also an art to sales so that every person brings their own artistic way of doing the process. The heart flow sales process allows you to be creative but still keep the process flowing so that you can stay on track. 

Refrain from reading a sales script and do it in a natural format but in a guided way. 

Sales should be a normal conversation with people where you’re helping them through the process of making a decision. #SalesHacks

“Sales From The Street: The Heart Flow Sales Process” episode resources

As a salesperson, make sure that you’re doing this for the right reason and not just to make a commission. Connect with Janet Clark. You can find her on Facebook, High Ticket Sales Collaborative or visit her site, The Freedom Shift. You can also shoot her an e-mail if that’s more convenient for you. 

This episode is brought to you in-part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a helpful guide for sales reps and sales leaders to improve their pitches and presentations. It has 12 courses and you can get the first two modules for free! 

If you like this episode, don’t be shy and give us a thumbs up and rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. We produce podcasts weekly so make sure to subscribe to get more of these sales talks that matter! Share this with your friends and teach them how to subscribe as well. 

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

If you’re a reader who loves reading and listening to books, you can also check out Audible as well and explore this huge online library with thousands of books. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

For sales concerns, you can shoot us your question anytime. Connect with Donald via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound

 

Sales Questions, Paul Cherry, Ultimate Sales Pros, Donald Kelly

TSE 906: Questions That Sell-The Powerful Process to Discovering What Your Customer Really Wants


The Sales Evangelist PodcastSelling is always a challenge. When sellers are confused about what they’re selling or about what their customers want, selling is impossibly hard. Learning to ask questions that sell will absolutely make a difference in your sales process.

Paul Cherry talks to The Sales Evangelist audience about identifying the customers’ pain issues and getting them to verbalize and vocalize their concerns. He helps us understand how to craft questions that sell.

A veteran of sales for more than 20 years, Paul has written a book called Questions That Sell: The Powerful Process for Discovering What Your Customer Really Wants, and he’ll share a bit of his wisdom here today.

Revamp your questions

Paul’s experience suggests that the more seasoned we are at sales, the more likely we are to fall into the trap of talking, telling, educating, or solving problems. We want to get to the point.

Empathy and building relationships won’t go away, no matter what century we’re in.

The biggest mistake sellers make is failing to understand the customer’s business. And because it’s such a common problem, it can become a differentiator for sellers who are willing to take the time to discover what their prospects are looking for.

Whether they’re brand new or highly experienced, 87 percent of sellers ask questions that deal in the present state:

  • What projects are you working on?
  • What problems are you facing?

Ten percent of sellers ask questions dealing in the future:

  • What are your goals?

About 3 percent ask questions related to the past:

  • How has our service been in the past?

If you want to change your sales approach, get out of the present, because you’re boring people.

Don’t overlook the past

The secret to selling, though, is getting into the past, but sellers overlook it because we assume it’s dead; there’s no money there.

The truth is that the past is where experiences, challenges, frustrations, and hurdles reside. People are often willing to disclose past issues because it’s done. They feel more comfortable talking about it now that it’s over.

A key indicator is this: what challenges would you share with other people to enlighten them to your industry?

Paul points to two main reasons that salespeople won’t discuss the past.

  1. They don’t want to dig up pain issues that their company has caused the customer.
  2. They want to be respectful of the customer’s time by getting to the point.

The truth is that this conversation isn’t about the seller. Furthermore, Paul says that sellers routinely waste time talking about things like sports, hobbies, and other chitchat for 20 minutes.

If you want to stroke someone’s ego and really get them to develop a connection, start in the past.

Ask questions in a better way

Instead of the usual who, what, when, where, why questions, develop more engaging questions.

If, for example, you want to know if the person you’re speaking to is the decision-maker, how do you ask that? It’s an important question, but it’s a risky one because you chance offending or belittling the person.

Could we ask that same question in a more comfortable way with a descriptive opener, like “describe” or “tell me.”

Describe your decision-making process for me.

By asking descriptive openers, you address multiple questions with one question. In this case, you might find out who’s involved, how decisions are made, what priorities are involved, and when decisions are made.

I get more insight asking a single question, and it doesn’t feel so much like an interrogation.

In the case of disrupting an entrenched competitor, we tend to ask questions like these:

  • Who do you use now?
  • What do you like about them?
  • Is there an opportunity there?

If the prospect is fairly content, you will get pushed out. You’re wasting time.

Instead, try this:

  • Tell me about some of the changes going on in your marketplace.
  • Tell me about the criteria that was important when you chose this vendor. Has that changed?

When you ask about change, people won’t give you a knee-jerk response to stay where they are. If you can get them to talk about change, you can address voids or disparities that the current vendor isn’t addressing.

Thoughts for new sellers

New sellers are often in a great position because they don’t know what they don’t know.

Begin by asking about the challenges the customer is facing, as well as what’s working and what’s not. Realize that where there are problems, there are opportunities.

  • What changes is your organization experiencing right now?
  • How are you looking to differentiate yourself from the competition?

Start at 10,000 feet before you dive deep and start asking your prospect how you can help. Salespeople want to go right to 500 feet but the customer isn’t there yet. It feels like you have your hand in their pockets.

Avoid the temptation to ask a question and then zone out when your customer starts talking. It’s tempting, after we’ve asked a question, to focus on the next thing we’re going to say or ask instead of hearing what the customer has to say.

If you’ll simply listen, the customer will give you the next question to ask.

If the customer mentions he’s thinking about pursuing new projects. Paul suggests using what he calls lock-ons. Which word will you lock on to? Listen to the verb.

In this case, he is thinking of pursuing new projects. Lock on to that word and structure new questions around it.

  • Describe your thought process.
  • What criteria are you considering?
  • What are you hoping to see?

Your whole job as a sales professional is to understand emotional drivers.

Remember the following three things to make selling work:

  1. Ask the right questions.
  2. Engage the right people.
  3. Qualify the right opportunities.

Focus your energy and resources on people who are receptive and motivated for change.

If the customer did most of the talking, it’s a great call. If you did most of the talking, not so great.

“Questions That Sell” episode resources

Grab a copy of Paul’s other book, The Ultimate Sales Pro: What the Best Salespeople Do Differently for more wisdom from Paul’s long history in sales.

Connect with Paul Cherry at his website, and download his 75 Best Questions to Close More Business. You can also request a 20-minute consultation at no charge.

Buy a copy of Neil Rackham’s book Spin Selling for more information about getting into a customer’s pain issues.

Maximizer CRM allows us to mold and personalize our CRM to our needs. Customize it to your needs and focus on helping your sellers close more deals.

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

TSE Hustler's League, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 625: TSE Hustler’s League-“The Golden Message”

TSE Hustler's League, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistSo you think your message is good, huh? But is that what your customers want? Do you speak to their challenges? Are you able to solve their problems? Well, it better be more of a solution-provider rather than a product pitch.

Today, I’m sharing with you yet another snippet of one of our past training focused on creating the message your buyers will understand and believe in.

But first, there are precursors to your message that you need to take note of because they’re going to judge you on all of this before you even start chatting and get down to the nitty-gritty.

  1. Mirror the behavior and terms

Mimic the behavior of the prospect you’re talking to. For example, if their legs are crossed, eventually cross your legs as well. Mirroring the behavior of your clients has a psychological effect on them and this is supported by studies. The same goes for using the same words they use again. People like people who sound like them, look like them, and talk like them.

  1. Physical appearance

The way you look is important. Sometimes, you need to look two steps ahead of your customer. If they’re wearing a shirt, wear something nice and decent like a suit. Look like them in order for them to trust you.

  1. Tonality and Tempo

Mirror the customer’s tone and their pace of talking. If they talk quickly, mimic and talk quickly. But don’t mimic their accents otherwise you could get into trouble with that. Sometimes people speak louder and sometimes they speak softly. Speak to the volume they’re speaking so they see you as like them.

How you lead them to opening up:

Sometimes you can get people to do things by leading them. For example, if they have their legs crossed or arms crossed, also keep your arms crossed and then after a few minutes, start opening up and eventually, your clients will start opening up too.

Ask meaningful questions and the attention goes back to the customer. The questions you ask can allow your customer to talk more.

The Unconsidered Need

Is there something else they still don’t recognize they need? Are you familiar with the correlation of their retention rate and revenue growth?

Crafting the Golden Message

  • Name two characteristics that show your expertise.
  • Use pain words to help emphasize the challenge or issue at hand?
  • Teach them the problem you’re able to solve specifically for them.
  • Don’t just tell them you’re a sales individual, tell them you help people and small companies with xyz.

Episode Resources:

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Help us spread the word out by leaving us a rating or review on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play or whatever platform you’re using.

 

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 535: TSE Hustler’s League-“Become An Expert In The Details”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Are you keen to details? Or are you just too assuming your prospects will understand? Today’s snippet taken from our past training session over at the TSE Hustler’s League is focused on being expert in the details. Where in your sales process can you better focus on the details?

A few areas where you can focus on details:

  1. Qualifying

Get a better grasp on not only their statistics but really dive more into the challenges they’re facing. This way you can put together an even more compelling solution. You can be technical, but if you’re able to do a better job of getting the details out of them, every account would be a slam dunk for you.

Do a better job on the front end by really uncovering all their pain and most importantly, getting them to feel it. Help draw out emotions from them.

  1. Presentation

Make sure your prospects understand your product and what that means for them, exactly what value you’re bringing to the table. Make it seen in their mind why it’s important for them to have your product or service. Paint a picture by telling a story.

Stop assuming your prospects already know these things and they understand. Go deeper into details and when you do that, you get better results.

The Principle of the 5 Why’s

This was originally conceptualized by Toyota but this principle has been used by a lot of companies today because it’s so effective. The idea behind this is to dig into the details. For each problem, ask why five times so you can go deeper to the core root of the problem until you can offer a solution.

For example:

A person drives into work and gets a flat tire. Most people say you need to get the tire fixed. Instead, ask yourself…

  1. Why did you get a flat tire? (I hit a pothole.)
  1. Why did you hit a pothole? (I was driving fast and I didn’t see the pothole.)
  1. Why were you driving fast and didn’t see it? (I was late for a meeting.)
  1. Why were you late for a meeting? (I didn’t set my alarm clock.)
  1. Why didn’t you set your alarm clock? (Because I was lazy and went to bed early so I didn’t have the time to set it.)

The deeper you go, the better you understand. The root problem here is that this person is unorganized. For sure, there’s going to be another issue other than the pothole.

Today’s Major Takeaway:

Dig down into the deepest level of your customer’s whys. Go into the details.

Episode Resources:

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, TSE Hustler's League

TSE 530: TSE Hustler’s League-“Questions Your Customers Want You to Ask – Part 2”

Donald Kelly, TSE Hustler's League This is Part 2 of the snippet which I’ve pulled out from one of our sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League where we talked more about appropriate questions your customers would want you to ask so you can get to the real pain of your prospect and make sure you’re able to bring the best value to the table. (If you haven’t yet, please check out Part 1 of this episode where I already shared some strategies for asking the right questions.)

More strategies for asking the right questions:

  1. Find out the people who are part of the purchasing community.

Most companies have multiple individuals in their buying process. Find out their time frame and their budget.

Example:

Who else is a part of making the decision or selection?

  1. Put on some “softeners” or buffer to your questions.

This means saying a little phrase to serve as a buffer right before asking the question or just to show them you are listening.

Examples:

 

  • It sounds that this has been affecting the business for a while, what is the time frame for implementing the solution?
  • Out of curiosity, what is the time for this project?
  • Off the record, do you guys have a budget for this?
  • Out of curiosity, what is the budget range you’re looking at? I want to make sure we’re a good fit.
  • Besides price, what are the most important criteria when it comes to selecting a company?
  • If you don’t mind me asking, why is that so important?
  • Off the record, why didn’t you select the vendor the last time you did this project?
  1. Talk about the price range.

What is the projected budget for this project?

  1. Ask questions that elicit them to speak to their why.

As mentioned last week, try to dig deeper into their real pain by adding the softeners mentioned above to your “why” questions.

  1. Come prepared to answer them.

Think about the questions your prospects are going to ask. The questions they’re going to ask you are probably the same ones the other prospects are asking you on initial meetings as well. Coming to the meeting with an understanding of those questions makes you look more professional. Practice.

Episode Resources:

Coaching Salespeople into Sales Champions by Keith Rosen

TSE 525: Questions Your Customers Want You to Ask – Part 1

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Help us spread the word out by leaving us a rating or review on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play or whatever platform you’re using.

Donald Kelly, Building Value

TSE 512: Sell Me What I Need, Not What You Want

Donald Kelly, Building ValueI want to share with you an experience I had when I was shopping for a computer monitor over the weekend. And this salesperson who approached me was probably a fan of Glengarry Glen Ross’ Always Be Closing!

Things he did wrong:

No questions were asked about how he can help me with. Anyway, I just went with what I wanted.

Then the salesman simply pushed their promotion for me to sign up for a credit card but that was a total turnoff because in the first place, I didn’t need that.

He didn’t dive into questions to find out what I really needed. There was no education on his part. There was no value added at all, but only wanted me to add another credit card to my wallet. Again, it’s what he wanted, not what I wanted.

So when I told him I wasn’t interested, he jumped into offering me a $20 discount, which was a dishonest way of selling.

As sellers, we need to make sure we take care for our customers. How do you make sure you’re bringing value to the table?

[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

Principles I want to underline when you’re selling:

  1. Seek first to understand than to be understood.

Go into the prospect’s shoe and go into their situation. Understand their challenges. Realize that prospects are now more educated when they come to the table. Do not push your own agenda.

  1. Your Call-to-Action:

What can you do to add more value? If you were to offer a promo such as a credit card, you could approach it in a way that you tie it into the needs of the customer.

Do you have some tips related to customer-focused selling? I’d love to know more about them!

Today’s Major Takeaway:

Give your customers what they want and not what you want to sell them. Do this and you will always get what you desire since they will know, like, trust, and love you.
[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

Episode Resources:

Say goodbye to long, boring proposals and check out PandaDoc. Create electronic proposals to your prospects. Sign and receive payments without leaving your CRM. To get a quick demonstration and a free trial, go to www.thesalesevangelist.com/panda

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, PandaDoc

[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

 

Value, Conversation, Listening, Asking Questions

TSE 510: TSE Hustler’s League-“What Is Value?”

Value, Conversation, Listening, Asking Questions Today’s snippet taken from one of the past training sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League is focused on building value.

The extent to which a good service is perceived by a customer to meet his needs or wants is measured by a customer’s willingness to pay for it. The company depends more on the customer’s perception of the worth of the product than on its intrinsic value.

[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

Establishing your value:

  1. Ask for more than what you’re comfortable asking for.

Follow the 10x rule and bump up what you ask for 10x. Sometimes your customers will value something a little bit more.

  1. Educate your customers.

It’s your job to educate customers on the value you’re bringing to the table so they can make that important decision.

Ways to find out what your customers value most:

  1. Ask what is important to your customer.
  2. Get the customer to understand the potential pain without using scare tactics.
  3. Tailor your presentation and solution to what’s important to them.
  4. Ask them questions in a way that you make it seem you’re not selling but instead they’re buying.
  5. Figure out how you can establish value.

Again, people need to see the value first before they even decide to buy. Sometimes they don’t know about you, so you need to provide education.

[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

Episode Resources:

Say goodbye to long, boring proposals and check out PandaDoc. Send proposals that not only will your customers enjoy and love but also have time to be able to do more selling. Perfect combination! To get a quick demonstration and a free trial, go to www.thesalesevangelist.com/panda

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, PandaDoc

[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

Chris Orlob. Sales Hacker, The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly

TSE 466: 5 Things We Learned From Analyzed 25,537 B2B Sales Conversations Using AI

chris-orlobDo you think you’re listening enough during your sales calls? Think again because you’re probably talking more than you think. How about talking to your customers in a way that calms their fears? Have you thought about that?

My guest today is Chris Orlob, senior director of Product Marketing at Gong.io,. They conducted a study where they analyzed 25,537 conversations of B2B sales reps which enabled them to identify the patterns, trends, and insights leading to the highest win rates, most revenue, and shorter sales cycles.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Chris:

A brief overview of the study they conducted:

25,537 sales calls which were conducted on platforms like GoToMeeting, WebEx, and Join.me

Average call duration: 43 minutes

Customer Data Demographics: Mid-market SaaS (Software as a Service) companies

Methodology:

  • Map the call recordings to the appropriate CRM record.
  • Attach the calls to their outcomes (win rates, sales cycle length, revenue the calls generated)
  • Separated speakers of the call between customers and reps and transcribed them from speech to text
  • Ran Gong’s AI in conversations analytics engine through the data to find the insights

The 5 Insights They Discovered:

  1. Ideal talk to listen ratio
  • The highest performing sales reps on average talk 43 of the call while the prospects talk 57% of the call.
  • Most sales professionals overestimate how much they’re listening.
  • The average sales rep speaks 65%-75% of a call but most think they’re only speaking around half the time.
  • If your prospect is only taking 22% of the time on average, figure out how you can bring them to an average of 33% of the call talking and you will drastically increase your win rates by about 32%.

Key takeaway:Talk less and listen more.

  1. Pricing trends

How often should pricing come up:

  • 3-4 times in a sales call: Highest win rates
  • Less than 3x or more than 5x: Win rates tend to shrink

Note: Treat this as a buying signal, not as a sales technique.

When should pricing come up:

  • Average-bottom performers: Talk about pricing at random points in the call
  • Top performers: They heavily skew their pricing discussions between the 40 and 49 minute mark of the average sales call.

Key takeaway: Establish value before discussing price

  1. Timeline trends

When customers respond with these words:

  • “probably” – good sign as win rates increase and forecast accuracy jumps by 73%
  • “we need to figure out…” – bad sign and a lot of work should be done since this phrase is correlated with forecasting accuracy and low win rates
  1. How performers use risk reversal language

Sales people say things to calm the fears or perceived risk of buyers upon the point of purchase like:

  • You can cancel it anytime.
  • You can opt out of contract if you’re not satisfied
  • Money back guarantees
  • No long term contracts

Key takeaway: Ease your buyer’s fears by talking about these. This may increase your cancellation rate but your win rates will increase so much.

“There are only two things in business that make money – innovation and marketing; everything else is cost.” – Peter Drucker

  • Business is about product and marketing; the rest is an expense.
  • Sales is marketing at the front line. Salespeople are the instruments of a marketing strategist and the most valuable ones.
  1. Coaching salespeople with real calls

Salespeople who used Gong.io drastically increased their win rates because they were coaching reps at the conversation level  or call recording level.

“Sales conversations are the most pivotal, high-leverage moment in the sales process.” – Chris Orlob

Key takeaway: Coach your reps or yourself at the call recording level. Review calls. Submit feedback and do some self-reflection.

Chris’ Major Takeaway:

Talk less and listen more and use risk reversal language and your win rates will go up.

Episode Resources:

Learn more about Gong.io at www.gong.io and connect with Chris Orlob on LinkedIn.

Chris Orlob’s article on Sales Hacker: We Analyzed 25,537 B2B Sales Conversations Using AI – Here Are the 5 Things We Discovered

The ONE Thing by Gary Keller and Jay Papasan

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

 

Dave, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Best Sales Podcast

TSE 369: Sales From The Street-“Ask The Right Questions”

Dave, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Best Sales Podcast Asking questions is an integral piece of sales in order for you to uncover your prospect’s true challenges. But how much of your time do you actually spend on developing questions that will allow you to move forward along your sales process? We have an interesting topic on today’s Sales from the Street as Dave Specht shares with us value-packed insights on the power of asking great questions.

Dave is an entrepreneur, author, speaker, and creator of some awesome mobile applications such as Inspired Questions for Family, Inspired Questions for Farmers, and Inspired Questions for Family Business..

Dave is also the Founder of Advising Generations, a consulting practice that works with multi-generational family businesses looking to transition their ownership and management to the next generation.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Dave:

Dave Specht, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

 

Dave’s biggest challenges:

  • Thinking highly of himself and telling clients what to do
  • People didn’t want to be told what to do

Strategies Dave employed to overcome this challenge:

  • Developing questions
  • Focus on questions instead of having all the answers and being the smartest guy in the room
  • Focus more on providing the right questions so you can get to the heart of what their challenge really is

How to develop questions:

  1. Identify pain points and challenging spots.
  2. Start going backwards and develop questions to help them solve those problems.

What are the questions that can unlock this person to be able to allow them to move forward for their benefit?

  1. Questions have to be genuine to help them figure out and clarify what’s important to them. You become their ally and resource beyond the product you sell then you get the opportunity to implement the solution.

Dave’s Major Takeaway:

Spend an equal amount of time working on and writing down questions as you do learning and understanding your own product.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Dave Specht through email at dave@advisinggenerations.com or go to www.inspired-questions.com to check out the mobile apps he created with all different sets of inspired questions.

Check out our Indiegogo campaign by visiting www.DoBigThings.net

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Join TSE Hustler’s League for $1.00

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

Wayne Herring, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Sales Training

TSE 349: Sales From The Street- “Make It Clear”

Wayne Herring, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Donald Kelly Today’s episode of Sales from the Street focuses on the importance of clarity when doing your sales. I’m bringing in Wayne Herring to share with you how clarity has become a challenge for him and what he has done to achieve it so he can better his sales performance.

Wayne Herring has a coaching and consulting business where he helps companies build their own salesperson recruiting process to help them transition from being the primary seller to building the team.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Wayne:

Wayne’s biggest challenge:

Not being clear on who you help and how you help them that resulted to ambiguous conversations and not getting the deals.

Strategies Wayne implemented to improve:

  1. Give enough information that they can clearly and definitively say no
  2. Be clear about who you help, how you help, and what you do.
  3. Explore objections when the prospect is not ready.

Wayne’s Major Takeaway:

Make sure you have clarity on who you serve and run your value proposition past somebody else who is not going to shoot you straight even if they hurt your feelings just a little bit.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Wayne Herring on LinkedIn and visit www.strongersalespeople.com/tse to download a checklist of things you need to think about before you hire your next salesperson.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Join Today For $1.00

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Donald Kelly, Being Bold and Confident, Best Sales Podcast

TSE 339: Sales From The Street-“Being Bold & Confident”

The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Donald Kelly, Being Bold and Confident, Best Sales PodcastToday’s episode on Sales from the Street is about being bold and confident. Oftentimes, behind a prospect’s objection is an underlying core problem that you need to dig deeper into. And oftentimes, you don’t necessarily have to lower your price and undervalue what you offer just so you can get the prospect to buy. When such situation arises, you basically just have to come out bold and confident. And this is something that Randy Miguel has figured out to overcome his major challenge in sales.

Randy is the Vice-President of Ket-Go Digital Media that works with small and medium-sized businesses to help them with their online marketing and sales training.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Randy:

Randy’s biggest struggles in sales:

Dealing with trust issues

How to gain your prospect’s trust:

  1. Give them direct answers.

Give them the information as simply as you can. Talk to them straight. Explain to them in a way they can understand.

  1. Be confident.

Look them in the eye as you tell them you’re able to help them. Sometimes customers don’t care about all of the details. They just need the assurance that you can help them.

It’s not just about the price!

Don’t just easily lower your price the minute you feel your prospect is stepping out of the door and you feel you’re no longer in control of the sales process. It’s not just about the price. And even if it is, price can be overcome. In fact oftentimes, price is always never really price but their lack of trust in you or lack of knowledge about the product itself or the service.

Randy’s Major Takeaway:

Have confidence in what you’re selling to be able to be straight with people and give them the short answer of “this is going to help you.” That’s more important than any haggling of price will ever do.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Randy at www.ket-go.com or send him an email at randy.miguel@ket-go.com.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

Joel Boggess, The Sales Evangelist, Relaunch Show, Donald Kelly

TSE 298: Go For The No!

Joel Boggess, The Sales Evangelist, Relaunch Show, Donald Kelly It’s been 25 years since Joel Boggess sat behind his very first microphone doing traditional radio in the mid 90’s and television, until he eventually ended up in the podcasting world, where he has become the podcast expert that he is today. His show, the ReLaunch Show has turned into a flame thrower with over a million downloads and getting recognized in publications like Inc Magazine and Huffington Post. In a nutshell, they help podcast and content creators share their voice so they can build their business.

Today’s episode offers tons of great value to the table as we talk about a unique, better, and more strategic approach to getting your customers to say yes by “going for the no.” Listen in to find out what this is all about.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Joel:

Focusing on the idea of going for the no:

  • Opposite to the traditional approach where you need to get your prospect to say yes at all times to get them into the habit of saying yes in time that you need to pitch the sale
  • Ask them questions that would be a no for them but a yes for you because you know the solutions.
  • Position questions in a way that they’d say no so you can give them a response of “No problem. We’ll take care of it.”
  • When you get a smile and a nod, then you’ve got it! They believe you have the solution.

People buy outcomes, not features.

  • Tie in your questions towards that goal or outcome the customer wants.
  • Sometimes we love to show prospects the trinkets of a product which could slow down the sales process.

Joel’s Major Takeaways:

  • Don’t complicate the sales process. Don’t do anything to slow down the sales process. Just go for a no.
  • Practice, practice, practice. Know your content. But also know the prospect’s pain, problem, or challenge. And if you know it better than they do, they will automatically assume you know the answer.

Episode Resources:

Get in touch with Joel through their website ReLaunch Show to check out their shows and free resources.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Join Today!

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

Prospecting, The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Best Sales Podcast

TSE 267: Tough Questions Salespeople Should Be Asking

Prospecting, The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Best Sales Podcast What happens when a prospect tells you they don’t have the budget for it? What…cat got your tongue? Well, I’ve been down that road before and getting derailed from how you wanted your conversation to ideally flow can seem pretty daunting.

So I’ve listed some tough questions that you can load in your arsenal so the next time a prospect throws some tough objections at you, you’re always ready to navigate your course towards success. Ask them appropriate questions that will get them to think.

11 Tough Questions to Ask Your Prospects

  1. If you had a termite issue with your house, would you throw a coat of paint on it?
  2. If there was one thing you could do to grow your company that you’re not doing today, what would it be?
  3. When somebody tells you they don’t have the money right now but you know that if they do this, it can change their life and business, here’s what you can say:

That is exactly why you need to borrow, beg, or do whatever needs to be done to get the money so you can get this particular product.

  1. What is impossible to do right now, but if you could do it or get it done, would it fundamentally change your business for good?
  2. Let’s say you want to raise the productivity level of your team by 15%, what would they need to do today that they’re not currently doing?

Possible follow up question: What impact would that have on your bottom line?

  1. If you really feel that this could change your business, could you find a budget for it? (Go quiet and usually they will figure out an answer.)

Possible follow up questions:

  • Have you calculated the cost of doing business with the lowest bidder? (If the prospect selects the lowest bidder)
  • What about the cost of their service department? How is it if you calculated that into your business?

Help them understand all those other costs. Point those things out to make them think a little more.

  1. Do I really have a shot at this or is XYZ a sacred cow?

Possible follow up question:

What do you like so much about them if you don’t mind me asking?

(Understanding why they’re the sacred cow will help you find a weak spot in their armor and capitalize on that)

  1. Do you really want to think it over? Or is it safe to say that it is over?

Usually people know what they want to get. You can’t just be pushed around. You have more prospects to go after so cut it clean.

  1. You mentioned you’ve not had a good experience with your current provider. If you would have worked with us, what are you hoping would be different?
  2. Given all we talked about, what do you see as being different if you were to move forward with our company?
  3. If we were to work together, what does success look like for you? Or what does it look like for your project?

20 Tough Sales Questions

 

20 Tough Sales Question Every Salesperson Should Ask

Get access to your questions now! 

We value your privacy and would never spam you

Episode Resources:

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Join Today

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

Selling to Women, Donald Kelly, Liz O'Donnell, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 148: Learn The Secrets of Selling to Women

Selling to Women, Donald Kelly, Liz O'Donnell, The Sales Evangelist All women represent!

Picture this: A company that consists of all men creating a product for women.

Do you see a big disconnect here?

Women are massive decision-makers when it comes to consumer-purchasing and here are large consumer companies creating these products when they don’t even have women in their marketing or management teams. As a result, they don’t have a clear picture of who their audience is because they’re not represented.

As salespersons, you need to understand that women are not all the same. They all have different roles to play and needs which you need to tailor to. So pay attention!

Liz O’Donnell is just the perfect guest for today’s episode as we talk about the importance of women in the business scene, the principles of selling to women, and understanding the demographic. By day, Liz is the head of the digital practice for a public relations firm working with big brands, startups, consumer companies, and B2B companies. By night, Liz lives out her passion for writing. Imprinting on the blogging world since 2009, Liz manages a blog called Hello Ladies that tackles issues women should know about and helps them balance their crazy lives.

Today, Liz talks about the importance of women in the sales industry as well as the importance of understanding the roles of women and their needs.

Donald Kelly, Liz O'Donnell, The Sales Evangelist, Selling to Women

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Liz:

Getting to know Liz:

  • Working at a public relations firm by day
  • Running her own blog, Hello Ladies
  • Writing her book, Mogul, Mom, $ Maid: The Balancing Act of the Modern Woman

Understanding the demographic of selling to women and their needs:

  • Women are making 80-90% of all consumer-purchasing decisions.
  • Many big consumer companies don’t have women in the marketing sales or management team
  • Women are not being represented in companies

Selling to women vs. selling to men

  • Where are your customers at? Roles are more important than gender.
  • Generally speaking:
    • Men like to be presented with data and facts.
    • Women look for a connection, the narrative piece, and how it ties into the story of their life

Strategies when approaching female executives:

  • They are informed customers.
  • Don’t sell to them like you sell to retired women
  • Roles are more important than gender

How salespeople can better understand these roles:

  • Listen and read the situation.
  • Recognize people who are an “easy sale” and close

On women selling to women:

  • The potential for a connection
  • “Make sure you don’t assume the woman you’re selling to is the woman you are.”
  • Get straight down to the individual and connect.

Sales that tailor to the women’s needs:

  • Take time to understand how they live or how they prioritize aesthetics vs. durability

Flirting as a way to connect:

  • Feeling appreciated but not to the point of crossing the line

Liz’s Major Takeaway:

Not all women are mothers. Not all women are the same. Understand their roles and needs.

Current projects Liz’s working on:

Focus on women balancing their careers with their aging parents

Her next book is about catering to not only the aging but also for the people caring for them

Get connected with Liz at www.helloladies.com

Episode resources:

Liz’ blog: Hello Ladies

Books mentioned:

Mogul, Mom, $ Maid: The Balancing Act of the Modern Woman

Lean In

Sales Process, Selling, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 123: Sellers with a Formal Sales Process Generate More Revenue

Sales Process, Selling, The Sales EvangelistHaving an effective process is crucial in sales. Today, Greta Schulz talks about sales processes, why you need to have them, and how are you going to be able to stick with them.

Greta Schulz is an entrepreneur, consultant, and a motivational sales speaker.  She is the founder and president of Schulz Business, a sales consulting firm that provides sales training programs to small businesses. Having an extensive experience in sales, marketing, training, and sales management, Greta primarily helps people to stop selling.

For several people sales somehow ends up being a negative experience for them. Greta seeks to be able to shift that mindset in people, teaching entrepreneurs and salespeople the beauty of giving customers the option of saying ‘no’ as a doorway to better opportunities.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Greta:

Greta’s coolest experience when she was the customer comes from the purchase of her first BMW.

  • Getting people to come to the conclusion of buying without force
  • Changing sales interaction through asking good questions

Sales process, defined:

  • It is not memorizing scripts
  • An outline of what you’re doing and where you’re going while injecting your own style and personality

Why people don’t use a process

Poor communication as a huge problem:

  • Listening for an opportunity to close

Key principles of a sales process:

  • Setting ground rules to make people comfortable and give them an option to say no
  • Ask neutral, engaging questions until you get down further

Bringing up price in the process:

  • Less with cost, more with emotion
  • Price is subjective
  • Get their issues on the table first and find out how these affect them
  • Paying for nice vs. necessary
  • Bringing up money either too early or too late

The right place to talk about money: after issues, before proposal

Giving them a range of prices:

  • To give them an idea of where you are
  • To get their reaction

Staying disciplined to the process:

  • A process always allows you to know where you are.
  • Having motivators to stick with it
  • Knowing that you achieve success at the end of the process
  • Having confidence in each step of the process

The importance of being in control of the process

  • You are in control since you’re asking the questions.

Current projects Greta is working on:

Sales Success Kit – everything Greta teaches in a box (CDs, DVDs, workbooks, cheat sheet pad, online training, etc.)

To find out more about Greta, visit www.schulzbusiness.com

Greta’s Major Takeaway:

Set those ground rules at the beginning and make sure that you let people know that NO is okay.

 

 

Barry Doctor, Product Camp, Marketing

TSE 120: Key Practices Salespeople Can Learn From Marketers To Increase Sales

Barry Doctor, Product Camp, Marketing

Sales and marketing are two different aspects, but they need to go hand-in-hand if you want to achieve explosive sales success. However, there seems to be a disconnect between the two and that’s where many new salespeople are having difficulty. They have failed to bridge the gap between marketing and sales. Sometimes, we get too caught up in focusing on just one customer when sometimes we need to take a step back and look at the bigger picture.

In this episode, we invited Barry Doctor over to discuss how you can bridge that gap between sales and marketing, how to think like a marketer to achieve sales success, and some strategies you can apply to pin down your market segment.

Here are the highlights of our conversation with Barry:

Barry’s coolest sales experience as a customer with Comcast 🙂

Marketing vs. Sales

  • Sales people are focused on individual customers; marketers look more at a bigger picture
  • Marketers focus on the buyer and the buyer’s journey

Applying the “n = many” mentality in your sales effort

  • Create the buyer’s persona
  • Find a market segment that sticks

How to find your market segment:

  • “Measure twice, cut once”
  • Do your research
  • Understand your market
  • Select a narrow target as your market segment
  • Build more market segments in the future, but focus on the niche first
  • Understand your buyer and what your buyer wants

How sellers can more prepare and think like marketers:

  • Look at the big picture
  • What market segment are you targeting?
  • What does the buyer persona look like?
  • Find the right buyers to be more efficient
  • Take objection not as a roadblock but an interesting point
  • Ask the buyer what they really need
  • See if there is a broader market demand; otherwise, sell at a premium, higher price

Losing a business to gain more business:

  • Follow the voice of the customer in the market
  • Stop shooting in the dark
  • Make use of analytics and research to have better understanding and positioning
  • Talk to the deals that you’ve lost and those you’ve won

Strategies to better understand your segment:

  • Get someone or a neutral third party to call (preferably a professional that can have an executive level conversation)
  • Look at how many deals you do a month. For example, call 30 out of 100 deals you’ve won and 30-50 out of deals you’ve lost
  • Gaining rich-source data: testimonial snippets, understanding the trends

Tactics of great sellers that reflect their understanding of marketing:

  • Getting the customer’s attention
  • Doing the opposite of what everyone else is doing

Current projects Barry is working on:

ProductCamp, an “unconference” because it’s self-organized by volunteers for volunteers, who are local practitioners working with products to help learn from and teach each other. It is an event for product managers and marketers.

Event details:

What: ProductCamp South Florida

Who can join: Product managers and marketers

When: March 14, 2015

Where: Boca Raton, South Florida

Connect with Barry through LinkedIn.

Barry’s Major Takeaway:

Take the time to understand the journey that the buyer is going on. Then you can lead them to your salesperson by putting marketing out there on the internet to be found, making information freely available to help them make the right decision to buy your product.