Tag Archives for " Building Relationship "

Sales From The Street, LinkedIn, Content

TSE 1164: Sales From The Street: “Should I Create Content on LinkedIn?”

Sales From The Street, LinkedIn, ContentI saw a question on Reddit recently from a seller who wondered whether or not to create content on LinkedIn. The seller worried that writing about topics like quota, rejection, or prospecting might sound too salesy and might hurt his pipeline. 

The truth is that many sellers have fear around the concept of creating content because we worry about how the audience will accept our ideas. 

Middle school prom

Not only should we post our own content on LinkedIn; we should also engage with other people’s content. 

Unfortunately, many of us treat LinkedIn like a middle school prom. We stand around the edge of the room watching each other, too afraid to dance. We might speak to a friend or two, but we’re afraid to look stupid, so we don’t dance. Instead, we let everybody else enjoy themselves. 

We don’t want to look stupid on the dance floor, so perhaps we look stupid on the sidelines instead. We’re afraid of the critics who might make fun of our efforts

True engagement

Engagement doesn’t involve moving around the room and saying hi to people at the dance. On LinkedIn, clicking “like” for a few posts doesn’t qualify as engagement. It won’t sustain relationships. It’s basically an indication of approval. 

Engagement requires you to bring other people into the conversation. If, for example, you’re in the water industry, and you see an article about the danger of water purification tablets, you can tag another colleague who wrote about the same topic. 

The author of the piece will take note of your efforts to bring someone else to his page, and your colleague will take note as well. 

Talk to people and work to create lasting relationships.

‘Salesy’ content

The question on Reddit came from a seller who worried that his prospects might tire of always seeing sales-related content. But consider your own news feed. Are you annoyed by the fact that you frequently see the same faces over and over again? Or do you simply choose to read things that are relevant and skip over the ones that are not? 

On the other hand, when one of those people shares something that helps you or connects you with someone else, that brand sticks in your mind. When you need help with something, you’ll remember the guys who showed up in your feed. 

When you post content and engage with other content, you stay top-of-mind with your audience. 

Audience

Make sure that you’re posting the right kind of content for your audience. Gear it toward your prospect. If you’re targeting salespeople, it’s ok to post sales content. But if you’re targeting decision-makers at Fortune 500 companies, don’t post about yourself. Post what the leaders in that industry want to know or read. 

Gear your content toward the people you want to attract. 

Don’t be paralyzed by the fear that your content won’t sound perfect. Understand who you’re targeting and who you want to attract. 

LinkedIn impressions

To understand how value-rich LinkedIn is, listen to TSE 1085 on our podcast. In it, my friend Steven Hart shared some LinkedIn stats with us based on the 48 Eyeopening LinkedIn Statistics for 2019.

LinkedIn provides 36 billion impressions per month. That’s 468 billion impressions per year, or 9 billion impressions per week. Users see content 9 billion times per week. 

Now factor in that there are 500 million people on LinkedIn, and only a fraction of them are active there. Of those, only 3 million people share content weekly. So those 3 million people who share content weekly are getting 9 billion impressions. 

The rest of us are afraid to share content, so we’re sitting on the sidelines.

Grab attention

Grab your reader’s attention, but be intentional about the stuff that you share. Post things that your prospect wants to read. You can certainly share industry-related content from magazines, but your content doesn’t always have to tie back. 

Consider these options for content:

  • Answer frequently-asked-questions about your industry
  • Share content that your industry would want to know about.
  • Share videos you create from your smartphone in which you answer questions.
  • Post complementary content that is indirectly related to your industry.
  • Repurpose your company’s own blog content.

Seek to be helpful. 

Challenge

Also, consider asking your own audience questions about what they are doing and what they’d like to see. If you tag people in a post and ask them about the CRM they use, you’ll initiate engagement. As more people comment, it will gain more visibility. If someone from outside your own connections engages with it, reach out to that person and request a connection.

Your challenge for the upcoming week is to share one piece of content every day. 

  • Monday: share an industry-related piece that includes something interesting.
  • Tuesday: answer a frequently-asked-question.
  • Wednesday: answer a common question using video.
  • Thursday: post complementary information.
  • Friday: share something your company has created. 

At the end of the week, if you don’t have any impressions, keep posting. You’re going to connect with new people. Ask your teammates for ideas if you can’t think of anything to post.

“Create Content on LinkedIn” episode resources

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. We want you guys to go out each and every single day to find more ideal customers and do big things.

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, Eventbrite, Networking, Sales Outreach

TSE 1117: How To Effectively Use Networking Events In Your Sales Outreach Efforts!

Donald Kelly, Eventbrite, Networking, Sales Outreach

We’ve all encountered the guy who attends events just to see what he can get for himself, but there are ways to effectively use networking events in your sales outreach efforts.

You know the type: his conversations are one-sided because he’s only focused on his next big opportunity, and he has no time to learn about your business. His pitch kicks in when he finds out you’re a business owner.

But he could have fixed his approach. And you can make sure you’re not like him in your outreach.

New clients

No matter what type of sales you’re in, you need to get clients in the hopper. The way you get new leads varies based upon your industry. Some demand door-to-door while others require phone calls. Today, we at The Sales Evangelist use social media and other efforts as well as networking events.

Typically, at networking events, I encounter potential clients or people who can connect me with other people who are potential clients. Outreach done well can be very rewarding. But as we mentioned in the teaser, you can’t become the obnoxious guy that others avoid.

He may not even realize he’s coming across that way. He has likely had just enough random success to believe that he’s effective. But he could perform a lot better and gain more leads and opportunities if he changed his approach.

Plan

Before you attend a networking event, do your best to find out who will be there. Will the people there tie in with your demographic? Will they represent your ideal customer?

It may be impossible to find out who will be there, but it’s worth the effort to try. If you know the organizers, ask them about the top companies that will be represented there. If they give you names, research them before the actual event. Use tools like LinkedIn to gather data about those companies.

Plan who you want to connect with at the event. Develop a short list. The spray-and-pray mentality that involves giving out 10,000 business cards doesn’t look good. Instead, be intentional about the cards you give out.

Broaden your reach

Identify people you’d like to do business with as well as those who can become potential partners for you. Then, consider those who may not purchase directly from you but who can introduce you to other complementary partners.

You could even consider connecting with those you consider competition. I’ve had a good working relationship with companies I compete with, and we were able to help each other out. Whether we’re pursuing the same customers or different ones, it doesn’t make sense to burn bridges unnecessarily.

It’s also good to identify people that you could potentially help.

Be genuinely interested

People don’t necessarily care about you but everyone cares about their own problems. We’re all trying to solve problems, so the obnoxious seller might do well to understand our challenges. Perhaps he should have been curious about our business and asked additional questions.

Then ask follow-up questions. We did a great episode with Bob Burg who gave us great insights on this issue.

It’s worth mentioning, too, that we’re having a local sales meetup where Bob will be the guest speaker. We’ll be talking about his book, The Go-Giver.

Bob recommends having a list of questions you can ask.

  • Why did you get involved in this business?
  • What’s the biggest challenge you are seeing?

This leads to deeper discussions that will help you identify issues.

Simple message

Be prepared for their questions. Don’t begin by telling them what you have to offer, but be prepared for them to ask. Give a simple clean message that’s no more than 30 seconds. Let him know what you do.

Consider something like this:

“We help small businesses who are interested in growth, build out a sales process that’s actually going to help them increase revenue. We do this through consulting as well as through sales training.”

This will lead to further discussion and it will open opportunities for you to talk more. It may even provide more time for you to pitch in front of the group.

Jason Lynette, who appeared in episode 1081, gave a masterful message about situations where you have more time to share your message.

Draw in the room

Jason told the story of a murder. A woman came into his office with a horrible fear of bugs. She was a high-powered attorney who backed out of the case of a lifetime because she saw a cockroach in the courtroom. Within 10 days after their first meeting, she killed a housefly with her bare hands.

Draw in the room. While everyone else shares what they have to offer, you demonstrate that you’re a human. Entertain them. Share a story. Prove that you’re someone they could work with.

Connection

Then you can ask whether or not they know others who might benefit from what you offer. Consider, too, whether you might be able to help them by identifying people who can benefit from their product or services.

After the event, connect with all of those same people on LinkedIn. Remind them that you connected and nurture that relationship. Then you can utilize those connections to build your business.

I shared this with you because I want to help. I don’t want you to be that guy at a networking event. I want you to find more ideal customers. I want you to build stronger value. I want you to close more deals, but most importantly, I want to challenge you each and every single day to go out and do big things.

“Effectively Use Networking Events In Your Sales Outreach Efforts” episode resources

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester. You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561) 578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. When you share your experiences with the show, others will read the reviews and give us a listen.

I truly appreciate you and appreciate your reviews and your subscription, and your willingness to tell your friends and anyone you know that’s in sales about the podcast.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Ethan Beute, Bomb Bomb

TSE 1116: How to Produce A 56% Lift In Cold Email Responses With Video vs Plain Text

Ethan Beute, Bomb Bomb

Ethan Beute from BombBomb equates good marketing to selling by teaching, and he explains how you can generate a lift in cold email responses with video.

Cold email response

BombBomb recently conducted a study with a large international tech company that revealed the power that video has in improving cold email responses. The company offers a freemium service but they weren’t sure how to convert the freemium users into revenue opportunities.

The company has teams in countries around the world and they were reaching out to create conversation and generate appointments. They contacted customers who had been using the free service for a while and asked for the opportunity to share some other ways they might be able to help.

BombBomb conducted a pilot program with them that included an AB test of video emails vs. plain text emails. They increased replies from these people by 56 percent. Imagine, then, if you can turn a percentage of those responses into scheduled appointments and then a percentage of those appointments into paid opportunities, that’s a tremendous impact.

BombBomb also found that the video emails created better appointments because the prospects felt as though they knew the seller better, which is a powerful dynamic.

The effort was voluntary, so there was no requirement to send a specific number of videos each day. The company sent about 1,000 videos in a three-and-a-half week period, and the people who sent the most videos were already the highest performers.

Cultural shift

Rollouts like this one represent a cultural shift to your sales team. This isn’t simply a new tool to add to the stack. This video effort allows sellers to communicate more clearly with their prospects and to increase conversion because the interaction takes on a more human characteristic.

If you’re considering deploying video into your team, consider the following:

  • Find people on your team who are already excited by the idea. Roll the video concept out to them and accumulate some early wins.
  • Share what they learned and what you learned with the rest of the team as you roll the concept into the larger group.

Ethan theorizes that the connection between the high performers and the willingness to use video traces back to their constant desire to become better. They likely listen to podcasts or read books. They invest in themselves and are open to new ideas and new practices.

Voicemail with personality

The pilot project involved initial touch emails, so it amounted to basically a voicemail with a face and a voice and a personality. It wasn’t simply an email signature. The sender was no longer faceless but instead became a real human being with real value to offer.

If you find yourself thinking you have far too many leads to manage this kind of outreach, first acknowledge what a great problem that is to have. Recognize that you don’t have to send personal videos. You can send out a triggered video that delivers the third time a user interacts with your product.

By using a trigger-point, you can capitalize on moments in your relationship with a prospect. Even if you don’t greet them by name, you’re acknowledging their presence and valuing their time.

Face-to-Face meeting

There are many elements that make video a winning play for sellers. To start, most sellers are far better in person than in other arenas. Most sales process drive toward a face-to-face meeting whether it’s in person or online.

Human contact is extremely valuable, so you should get face-to-face as early in the process as possible. That allows people to feel as though they know you before they ever meet you. You can save time by skipping the awkward slow-start questions about the weather.

You’ll help put your prospects more at ease.

Hesitation

This style of video works because it’s casual, it’s not scripted or polished, and it’s honest. It isn’t over-produced, but rather it involves just a webcam or a smartphone. You would send it in place of the email you typically send.

Although you can send nicer, more produced videos, that isn’t what we’re discussing. Those videos often feel as though someone is trying to sell you something, because they generally are. It’s a different style of communication.

Ethan hears all the time that the videos that earn the best responses are the simple ones. But as humans, we have a natural fear of rejection. We wonder if the video is good enough. We might even re-record it multiple times, which can lead to us spending 30 minutes to recording a 30-second video.

It’s a waste of time in this scenario because the video doesn’t have to do all the work. It simply has to introduce you and express your sincerity and enthusiasm.

If you find yourself thinking you don’t know what to say, that’s not true. What would you say if you were typing out an email? What would you have said in a voicemail? It can be as simple as creating a habit and developing a process.

Improve your process

Instead of writing three paragraphs to respond to prospects, you can use videos to walk them through mockups or demonstrations. One of our clients uses videos to demonstrate 3D printing without having to send a lot of stuff in the mail. You can save yourself a tremendous amount of time by responding via video and you’ll also come across as more human.

It’s also true that many people are better talking than they are writing. This offers an opportunity to say what’s on your mind without having to compose something.

Video is more fun for a lot of people because it’s more like a conversation. It offers better, warmer replies.

This is about human connection at its most fundamental level. It’s about connecting with people eye-to-eye, face-to-face in digital channels that we rely on every day.

Relationships through video

If you found anything here provocative, this is all rolled out in Ethan’s book, Rehumanize Your Business. We’ll help you with all the nuts and bolts of video communication.

You’re going to hit the send or post button multiple times today. Ask yourself on the next 3-5 sends whether it would be better to send something in person. Much of this is emotional and you can thank a customer or calm a customer down who is concerned or anxious.

Could you say it more clearly if you said it face-to-face?

“Lift In Cold Email Responses With Video” episode resources

You can grab a copy of Ethan’s book, Rehumanize Your Business. Find Ethan on all the social networks and at BombBomb. You can email him at ethan@bombbomb.com.

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump. If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

Tools for sellers

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

FSMSDC, Entrepreneur, Podcast

TSE 1105: Growing Your Business and Creating Value

FSMSDC, Entrepreneur, PodcastDuring our time at the Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council’s expo, we’ve met a number of people who understand the secrets behind growing your business and creating value.

Felix Bratslavsky works at Tampa General Hospital, a very large level-one trauma center that is number one in Florida for transplants. The organization has more than 8,000 employees but they still contract out much of their workload.

Gilda Rosenberg started a vending machine company 35 years ago in Miami and she slowly grew it to include major clients like universities, schools, and hospitals. She calls her relationship with  the NMSDC a love affair that resulted in referrals, connections, and mentorship that helped her to grow her business.

Partnerships

Tampa General has a minority business program that breaks out the four procurement categories from construction and professional services to general goods and services, and medical services and supplies. The hospital has a lot of contracting opportunities and a lot of partners within the state of Florida and even nationwide.

The Minority Business Enterprise program administered by the NMSDC recognizes for-profit businesses in the U.S. that are 51 percent owned, operated, capitalized, and controlled by minorities.

Felix says that MBEs that want to stand out should strive to be a partner. Add value, be cost-efficient, and know about the customer. Understand the customers’ goals, their missions, and where they’re headed. Bring the solution to wherever your prospective customer is going.

In the case of Tampa General, the hospital recently got a new CEO that is leading the organization down a different path. MBEs that want to engage should recognize that the business has changed paths and they should offer solutions that relate to the path the company is on.

Be an expert in your own business. Instead of coming to the prospect with a variety of items, they should know the situation well enough to narrow the solution down the best possible option and lead with that one.

Homework

MBEs must do their homework and focus on preparation if they that want to get noticed. Organizations receive hundreds of emails every day, so generic outreach will generally get deleted.

Learn the process to get on the vendor application and then build a relationship. Finally, come with solutions. Understand your business and their business well enough that you can have meaningful conversations about each.

If you want to be the next partner, you should already know who your competitors are, and who your prospect is currently using and why they are using that company. You should know whether a contract exists, and whether it’s up for renewal.

Companies that do those things win opportunities.

Differentiate

Differentiate yourself by being prepared. When there are so many companies doing the same thing and offering the same service, you have to stand out.

Maybe you stand out on price or on value or even additional services. Whatever it is, make sure that the corporations you’re pursuing know what sets you apart.

Finding the right people

Gilda recalls asking a bank for a $5 million loan for vending machines and being treated as though she was crazy. She said that her connections through NMSDC helped her learn how to negotiate the loan process as she interacted with banking people and how to create bids from connecting with hospital CEOs.

Her biggest challenge in the vending industry has been the labor force. Her first route driver stole from her, so she learned that she had to control inventories differently. As the industry grew into a technological one, she had to bring in geek squads.

She also learned how to find the human resources that support your mission and your vision. She said that finding the right manpower still poses one of her greatest challenges even today. The company struggles to find loyal employees who stick around because small companies struggle to sustain high turnover. The cost of training is simply too high.

NMSDC

She experienced a huge lift when she was introduced to the minority certification program. Then, she slowly grew her network and interacted with larger organizations where she landed contracts.

You must prove yourself to the client. She says the most incredible satisfaction comes from helping minorities nationwide. Her suppliers and equipment originate from minorities. And now newer companies want her to introduce them to other contacts.

Gilda calls her mission a mission to help other minorities. She also calls NMSDC the best college she ever went to. Although she studied economics in college, she grew professionally among the members of the NMSDC. She learned to nurture others.

Don’t think twice about joining the council because there’s nowhere better to network. The council’s handholding helps businesses by taking extra steps to get you to the right people. And knowing the right people can be the key to growing your business and creating value.

“Growing Your Business and Creating Value” episode resources

You can connect with Felix at (813) 844-3474 or at fbratslavsky@tgh.org or go to the hospital website. You can connect with Gilda at gilda@gillyvending.com. Learn more about the National Minority Supplier Development Council and its offerings at the website, nmsdc.org. If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Kyle Burt, LinkedIn, Sales Content, Social Selling

TSE 1103: Every Seller Should Create Good Content

Kyle Burt, LinkedIn, Sales Content, Social Selling

       

Every seller should create good content as a tool to gain leads, grow their business, and increase overall success. 

Kyle Burt first heard The Sales Evangelist podcast two years ago when we interviewed Alex Berman about using video in sales. Kyle, who once chose business school over film school, went home and started making videos. 

Massive success

Kyle quickly turned his video capability into massive success for himself. Before video, he was using cold calls, email, and “screaming from the tops of mountains,” knocking on every door and delivering cookies. When you’re starting out, you have to be willing to do whatever it takes. 

He realized that video provided a good strategy to get leads. But he shifted his focus to making videos because he wanted to make videos. He realized he had a level of value and a perspective that wasn’t being shared. 

Kyle recognized, too, that only the people in his bubble would understand the content he was posting because it was niche content. 

Coca-Cola

He established a weekly schedule because he knew he had to post consistently, and he introduced Whiteboard Wednesdays. It was a chance to introduce different technologies.

Maybe 20 videos later, he was on vacation in Cancun in 2017 when he got a LinkedIn message from the VP of technology for Coca-Cola. He assumed someone was pranking him, but in fact, the gig turned into a consulting opportunity with the company.

When Kyle realized the VP had seen the very first video he ever posted, the most awkward of the bunch, he knew that he was on to something with video. 

Objections 

In the case of objections, sellers often face their own objections to appearing in or creating videos. 

  • “I don’t look good enough for the camera.” 
  • “I don’t have the right equipment.” 
  • “There isn’t enough time to create videos.”

The important parts of the content are good audio and good content. 

Fear of the comments

In my own case, I’ve been slow to take advantage of YouTube because I’m a little bit afraid of the comments I might get. People can be nasty sometimes. 

The point is that there will always be the possibility of those comments. Someone once told Kyle he sounded like a little baby. He wasn’t even entirely sure what they meant by it, but he had to let it roll right off. 

You have to be ready to take it on the chin when you put yourself out there. You’re going to get some good and some bad. 

Internalize the fact that nobody has it all figured out, and then realize that people are genuinely good. Most people don’t want to tear you down, so don’t spend your time on the small number of people who have something negative to say. 

It’s worth noting, too, that stories only survive for 24 hours, so they won’t live forever. If you create a bad one, it won’t be around for long. Even with LinkedIn, the feed algorithm means that it might technically always be there, but it will be harder to find. 

Persistence

We spent two years trying to get Kyle on the show but we couldn’t make it work out because of different schedules. Our recording day is Monday because it’s what works best for my team, and sometimes we have to bypass opportunities if they don’t fit with that schedule.

In Kyle’s case, he was persistent. He got early access to LinkedIn Live, which as of this writing is only available to a few people, and he invited me to connect with him. After 18 months of no real interaction, he reconnected with me and we made it work. He grabbed my attention and we ended up recording with him on a day outside of our normal schedule. 

Disrupt the norm. Create good content that stands out. 

LinkedIn reach

My good friend Stephen A. Hart from the Trailblazers Podcast pointed out recently that there are 9 billion impressions on LinkedIn every week, which amounts to 468 billion impressions annually. Of those, only about 3 million users are creating content. That means there is a lot of space to create more free content. 

You can’t find that kind of visibility on YouTube, Facebook, or any other platform. Basically, there are a small number of creators and a huge number of impressions, so it behooves you to grab a piece of the video market. 

I happened to get into podcasting early when there were only a few sales podcasts. Now I’m a grandfather in the podcasting world. 

Much innovation seems to happen with consumers first. The business world moves more slowly because there are more considerations to think about. 

The marketplace dictates what it wants. 

Coffee With Kyles

Kyle previously collaborated with another guy named Kyle to launch a video podcast called Coffee With Kyles. Now he’s working on a solo style show that will primarily involve live video. It will allow him to eliminate a lot of the editing and create more interactive experiences. 

In the case of this podcast interview, our audience can’t interact with us right now as the interview is happening. When they are finally able to, it will change the game. 

The goal is to get more people engaged and online. When you go live, you can’t stop the show because something goes wrong. Kyle said he has gone live five times and has broken the system five times. 

Because of his persistence, he was one of the few to beta test LinkedIn Live, and it allowed him to connect with people and build relationships.

If you try to be known, you’ll miss the mark. If you create good content, you will be known. It’s all about who knows you. 

If you aren’t creating some form of content or interacting with content on social media, you are irrelevant. Figure it out quick. If you’re a writer, write. If you can do video, do that. If you can do audio, do audio. Figure out your lane and experiment. Every seller should create good content.

“Every Seller Should Create Good Content” episode resources

You can connect with Kyle on LinkedIn or at his website, www.catchcloud.com

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

FSMSDC, Small Business, Sales Growth

TSE 1100: Hyper-Growing Small Businesses

 

FSMSDC, Small Business, Sales GrowthGrowing a small business requires you to think like an entrepreneur, and we can avoid reinventing the wheel if we engage with experienced entrepreneurs to learn more about hyper-growing small businesses.

The Florida State Minority Supply Development Council connects us with successful entrepreneurs from a variety of industries, and many of them are using the council to grow their businesses. Every business, regardless of size, struggles with some kind of difficulty.

Today, we’ll hear from Ebony Smith and Abdullah Tharoo about how they’ve overcome the big challenges of entrepreneurship.

Accidental entrepreneur

Ebony started her career in oil and gas until she found herself facing an ultimatum from her management team. She was being moved to an office that she didn’t want to occupy.

She took it as a sign to take time for herself. And because of a non-compete clause built into her contract, she took a year off from work and went to coaching school to improve herself and become a better leader.

She quickly realized that the idea of coaching had some legs when a friend of hers called her in need of a coach. Although she only had a weekend of training under her belt, the friend recognized that Ebony had more coaching experience than she did.

She helped her friend return to the workforce after maternity leave and then moved forward from there.

The transition was difficult but she made the decision to invest in herself. She had great savings and knew how to be frugal. She also sold her house in a hot market, which gave her a cushion and time to learn her new profession.

Next level

She found herself at a business development conference trying to figure out how to get to the next level. Ebony knew that she wouldn’t make the same money she had made in her trading career until she became a great coach.

She focused on becoming a good practitioner rather than scaling the business. She said she needed to know what she didn’t know.

She wanted to become the coach that she needed when she was in corporate America.

She and other women at the conference decided to create a mastermind, and through that relationship, she discovered the value of certifications for coaches. Ebony also discovered that there were corporations out there that wanted to spend more than a billion dollars annually with small business.

Since then, she acquired all the necessary certifications for coaching and she said that people recognize her at events now.

The key is to tell people what you do. And then tell them again and again. Eventually, they’ll hire you for a small contract and then they’ll get bigger.

Community

Ebony points to her mastermind as one of the drivers of her growth and success. She also said that her four years with the NMSDC have helped her learn things she didn’t know she didn’t know.

Change of trade

Abdullah Tharoo operates in the credit card payment processing technology industry and he helps companies protect against the credit card breaches that often occur.

People often assume that companies like his gained their success overnight. He said he doesn’t have a scientific answer to explain his growth, but rather he keeps things simple.

About four years ago, he discovered a need to move into a different trade that would allow him to spend more time with his kids and his wife. He stepped back from the family business operating high-end jewelry stores.

He had previously thought that he wanted to really find a way to make a difference in people’s lives and save them money and help them grow. Abdullah recognized that technology was where everything was headed.

Great support

He knew he wanted to be involved in technology, so he did research and he engaged mentors. His family’s support played a huge role in his move forward, as did the mentors.

You need intelligent people outside your situation who can guide you to where you want to go.

He said that although he has been attending the NMSDC since he launched his business, there are some deals he hasn’t been able to close. Despite that, many of those companies have referred him to other people.

Your network decides your net worth. You must have a strong network because the people you walk with are the ones you’re going to become.

NMSDC

Abdullah said he continually returns to the NMSDC to do community service because he meets people there. He meets people who may not be able to directly give him business but who can guide him to the companies that need his service.

Warm introductions are so much better than cold calls. He said he doesn’t make cold calls anymore because he doesn’t have to.

He consciously makes the decision to give something back to the community that gives so much to him. He said people go out of their way to help each other.

A lot of people don’t want to join the NMSDC because they think they can’t reach these big corporations like Disney, NBA, NFL. But if you don’t aim high, you’ll never get where you’re trying to be. The NMSDC is the perfect instrument to get in front of these companies.

Network

He invests most of his time building relationships. Every day, he sets out to meet 10 new people before he goes to bed. On days when he’s behind in his meetings, he’ll sit on the sidewalk and shake hands with people because he hasn’t yet met the 10.

Then, he decides who he wants to keep in touch with.

Make friends who can help you grow emotionally, spiritually, and financially.

“Hyper-Growing Small Businesses” episode resources

You can connect with Ebony at her website, www.ebenumequationcoaching.com, or on LinkedIn @EbonySmithCoach.

You can connect with Abdullah at tharooa@paykoncept.com.

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

Tools for sellers

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Ideal Customer, Dr. Frances Richards, Black Podcast

TSE 1099: Sales From The Street – “My Ideal Customer”

Ideal Customer, Dr. Frances Richards, Black Podcast

 

Business owners and sales reps who try to sell to everyone will struggle to succeed until they decide to focus their efforts on the ideal customer.

Today, Dr. Frances Richards, whose company helps people reclaim their wealth by transforming their health, talks about the journey of finding her ideal customer.

Sales From The Street allows us to connect with a sales professional and hear about the biggest professional struggles that person faced. Dr. Frances is the host of a podcast called Black Entrepreneur Experience, where she interviews CEOs, innovative thinkers, thought leaders, and black entrepreneurs across the globe.

Finding a tribe

Her biggest struggle was finding her ideal customer, and connecting with the people that her message would resonate with. When you’re building an internet business, there are so many different ways to connect with people that it can sometimes be overwhelming for businesses that are trying to find their tribe.

She points to the fact that there are plenty of people telling you what you should do to connect with your ideal client, so it’s tough to know what to do. She said that people told her, “It’s all in the email list,” or “It’s all in social media,” or “It’s all in Facebook advertising,” or “It’s all in the messaging.”

Changing landscape

The hardest part, she said, is trying to determine what’s really relevant. And with the internet constantly changing things, the way you build a company in 2019 is different than the steps you might have taken in 2014.

The steps to find your ideal customer have changed. And when you talk about sales, certain steps are appropriate whether you’re online or offline. Building rapport, and building quality relationships, matters in every situation.

Authenticity

Dr. Frances said that in order to find her ideal customer, she had to block out all the noise and focus on authenticity. She started by deprogramming herself from the idea of working for someone else.

She said she had to adjust to the idea of working for herself and to lose all of the things she was accustomed to, like listening to the bosses tell her what she needed to do. Because she had done many different kinds of sales, she was able to change her mindset from employee mode to employer mode. Then she had to be true to who she really wanted to serve.

When she was an employee, she had to serve anyone. Once she started to define who to serve, then she started to attract her ideal customer as opposed to just doing cold calling.

To-do lists

She had an extensive to-do list of doing 10 posts a day, doing a Facebook live, doing a Periscope, posting on LinkedIn, and all of those other things. She was busy working on the business instead of in the business, which actually brings in income.

Once she prioritized how she would get sales and how she would bring value, she got out of the mode of being desperate. She was listening to her clients’ pain points and she set out to serve them. She went into the mode of serving and helping her clients, her fan base, her tribe.

Dr. Frances has turned down consulting contracts because she wanted to make it a win-win for all parties involved. She operates from a position of making sure both parties are a good fit.

Qualified clients

The shift to serving her clients resulted in more qualified clients. Previously she connected with clients who really couldn’t afford her service so it would have been a disservice to try to work together.

She started asking her prospects what they hoped to accomplish and if someone said, “I want to lose 50 pounds in 5 days,” she wouldn’t even try to convince the person to work with her since the goals were unrealistic.

She has found that when she gets qualified, bonafide clients, the two enjoy working together. The clients are getting results and she is building testimonies.

Ideal client

Just serve the people who really need what you have to offer. Be who you authentically are. There will be plenty of voices telling you what you should do.

Instead of following them, dig deep into yourself and discover what you’re really passionate about. What makes you sing? What makes you get out of bed every morning? That’s half the battle because your attitude dictates your altitude.

If you love what you do, you’ll do what you love. Dr. Frances uses the acronym DANCE to remind her to be authentic: Determine Action Now Creates Energy.

Dancers dance because they want to, not because someone forces them to. Instead of doing things you don’t like, do the things you authentically enjoy. Find your passion.

“Ideal Customer” episode resources

You can connect with Frances at drfrancesrichards.com and you can find her on Facebook and Instagram as Dr. Frances Richards. You can also find her podcast at Black Entrepreneur Experience.

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Jordan Ray, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1095: She is Too Young

The Sales Evangelist, Jordan Ray, Building RelationshipsRayJordan Ray has endured more challenge in her 21 years than most people experience in a lifetime, so when she goes into a large hospital to share the product she has developed, many people believe that she is too young and they fail to understand that she is making a difference and helping others.

It’s a common challenge that many people face, and I faced it in the early days of The Sales Evangelist when I was 30 years old and advising people who were twice my age.

Generations

When Jordan’s health failed at 17, she discovered a need for patients with chronic health conditions to accurately track their pain and symptoms. The log helps patients track their own experiences as a way to improve their treatment plans.

Jordan isn’t offended when people discount her because she’s young. As a softball coach for 15- to 18-year-old girls, she recognizes that she’s only three years older than her players, and she remembers what it’s like to be immature.

She said she doesn’t get frustrated by the fact that people assume she’ll waste their time because she’s too young. In fact, she attributes some of it to the fact that people make assumptions about her generation.

First impression

Though you only get one chance at a first impression, it’s possible to change the impression people have. Jordan points to the story and relationships as the keys to overcoming people’s assumptions about her.

She’s very big on building relationships because she understands that people who aren’t sold on her product won’t buy it no matter how hard she pushes. If they aren’t interested in her product after she shares her story and the value she offers, pushing won’t change that.

She considers herself good with people and she said that’s key to owning a sales company.

Building relationships

Jordan goes to a breakfast networking event every Tuesday where she’s the youngest person by about 25 years. She estimates that she has shared a sit-down with all 50 members of the group despite being too young.

Many of them like her story because she only shares a 30-second brief. She tells them enough of her story to leave them intrigued so that they want to have a follow-on meeting with her.

She begins the relationship by looking for ways to refer business to her prospects. Her goal is to serve them by helping them.

Biggest challenge

She admits that sometimes she feels like she doesn’t have enough to offer in terms of referrals because she has only been doing this for seven months. Compared to people who have been working for 40 years, her connections don’t feel very significant.

Jordan said that her years playing sports taught her to have very high expectations for herself so she struggles when she can’t match the referrals that others can.

While other people are helping her and giving referrals, she finds herself wishing she could do more to return the favor.

Business friends

Jordan laughs about the fact that her personal friends are in their 20s and her business friends are in their 50s. She said she loves keeping up with those people.

Though the sales are obviously nice, she understands that the relationships are going to last beyond one sale or one year. If she makes one sale, that can’t compare to a relationship with someone at a nonprofit who knows countless people and who will support her even as she supports them.

Persistence

She calls herself big on persistence. She got lots of no’s before she launched the company. Many people were convinced she should stay in school.

She recommends staying persistent and refusing to give up on your vision. You’ll get a hundred no’s, but you’ll get that one yes.

“Too Young” episode resources

You can connect with Jordan at www.limitlessmedicallogs.com.

You can also email her at jordan@limitlessmedicallogs.com and share your story with her or you can find her on social media @JordanRay.

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Brynne Tillman, Donald Kelly, LinkedIn, Social Selling

TSE 1088: 4 Pillars to Leveraging LinkedIn for Business Development

Brynne Tillman, Donald Kelly, LinkedIn, Social Selling, 4 Pillars to Leveraging LinkedIn for Business Development

You may believe that social selling won’t work for your company or industry, but if you take advantage of the 4 pillars to leveraging LinkedIn for business development, you’ll be surprised at how it can help you expand your reach.

Brynne Tillman is the CEO and “LinkedIn Whisperer” of Social Sales Link and the author of The LinkedInSales Playbook and she has spent more than a decade coaching people to unlock the power of the platform.

LinkedIn profile

LinkedIn has its own social selling index so if you visit getmyssiscore.com you get your personal score, out of 100, that will rate your social selling acumen. Your LinkedIn profile is where that lies.

Sellers make the mistake of using their LinkedIn profile as a resume when, in fact, it should be a resource.

Corporate Visions reports that 74 percent of buyers choose the sales rep that provided value and insight early in the buyer journey.

Your profile is their first impression of us, so do it right.

Value

Prospects don’t care about your mission, your passion, or your years in business when they first visit your profile. That may matter down the road, but initially, they care about value. They care about how relevant you are.

Write your summary almost like a blog post. What kind of value can you bring from the first time they read about you?

Identify the challenges that your buyers are facing. Provide three to five insights that will make an immediate impact. Strive to make a “vendor agnostic” impact, meaning that you share insights they can use even if they never buy from you.

Sellers often create this as a pitch and we tell them how to buy from us. What we should do instead is attract them to us. We want them to ask themselves how they can work with us.

This level of value will increase your credibility and move you much more quickly through the sales cycle.

Challenges

If you sell office furniture, determine who your buyer is and what her biggest challenge is right now. Maybe many companies are expanding and the big challenge is the inability to trade in old furniture to get new stuff.

Determine what helps you stand out and then educate your buyer.

Teach your customer how to buy office furniture in a way that leans toward you as the solution, but provide insights that can help them make better decisions for the company as a whole.

Take advantage of the 4 pillars to leveraging LinkedIn for business development in order to move your prospects toward doing business with you.

Pillar 1: Establish your professional brand

Your professional brand is your profile.

By positioning your profile to provide insight and value to your buyers, you are gaining credibility and creating curiosity.

You’re getting them excited to take your phone call. If they can learn something just by visiting your profile, they imagine that a conversation with you will be even more valuable.

Position yourself as the subject matter expert and thought leader.

Pillar 2: Find the right people

How are you leveraging LinkedIn to find your buyers and your influencers? If it’s true that there are 6.8 people who are involved in every large buying decision, how are we identifying all the right people within an organization?

Instead of limiting our efforts to just the champion, who else do we want to touch? How are we finding these people and engaging them?

The prospecting piece and the relationship building piece are the same. It’s a combination of providing great value and leveraging our network to get introductions to our targeted prospects and buyers.

Develop search strings which are literally the title of your buyers in whatever geographic location or industry you choose.

Pillar 3: Engage with insights

How are we sharing content, commenting, and engaging with content? How are we using hashtags to find the right content? Are we feeding our network with really valuable information that moves them closer to our solution?

It’s more than just liking or sharing. LinkedIn wants to see you engaging and sharing and commenting.

Avoid “random acts of social.” Anything we do without intention or purpose is rarely going to see success. Certainly, it won’t succeed on a consistent basis.

Pillar 4: Build relationships

Connecting and forgetting is the equivalent of collecting business cards in a stack on the corner of your desk. How valuable is it? That’s not a network.

There’s more value in truly connecting with a few people at a networking event and having meaningful conversations than there is in collecting a business card from everyone present. Bring that same thoughtfulness online.

Start a conversation. Learn about people. Ask questions. Get to know people a little bit. When you do, LinkedIn will be your most valuable networking tool.

Strategy

Establish what your goals are for social selling. How will you measure success?

If your goal is to have one new client a month, you need four proposals a month. In order to have four proposals, you need to have eight conversations. In order to have eight conversations, you need to have 16 introductions to your targeted buyers.

That means I need four introductions to targeted buyers each week. I must look at my KPIs to see if my 16 is converging to become 8, and then whether my eight is becoming four.

If I need four introductions per week, I probably need to ask for 20. That probably means I need five a day, which could mean five from one person or one from five people.

I need a good network of referral sources and great relationships with my existing clients.

Reaching out

Once you’ve identified those clients who can connect you to other people, you can start this way:

Mr. Client,

It has been a couple of years since we worked together. I hope you’re still loving your furniture. 

I noticed that you’re connected to a few people on LinkedIn that I’m trying to get in front of. Would you mind setting up a 15-minute call where I can read names with you and get your thoughts on whether they might be a good fit?

Two things happen here. If your customer needs more furniture, this is a great way to re-engage without being salesy. You’ll also talk through the list of connections to figure out a way forward.

You can either ask for an introduction or ask for permission to name-drop.

Building engagement

You must continually build engagement with your customers so that you maintain those connections even after the sale.

If you’re looking for new contacts, start with your second-degree connections because at least you have some people in common.

It doesn’t feel quite as cold that way and there are things you can do to warm them up before you actually reach out. Look at the profile. Click the “more” button on the profile and click the “follow” button. The person will get the notification that you followed him.

Look at his recent activity. Read it. Engage with it. If there is something there, begin a conversation by engaging with the information he shared.

Now you’ve engaged, followed, and the person keeps getting notifications about you. He’ll likely be curious because your name keeps appearing.

It’s a little bit like flirting.

Provide value

Don’t jump in and pitch immediately. Provide value.

Build relationships. Get a consistent stream of great content that helps your prospect understand the importance of choosing the right office furniture.

Once you’ve developed a conversation, you can offer a pitch when appropriate.

Don’t just build a network that doesn’t know you. Create content, but realize that it doesn’t have to be a blog post. Consider native video, podcasting, and interviews.

Don’t just generate noise, though. Use the 4 pillars to leveraging LinkedIn for business development to make sure it’s worth their click.

“4 Pillars to Leveraging LinkedIn for Business Development” episode resources

The best way to connect with Brynne is on LinkedIn. Let her know that you found her on The Sales Evangelist podcast and she’ll send additional resources. You can also grab a copy of The LinkedInSales Playbook.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Social Selling, LinkedIn, Microsoft, Carson Heady

TSE 1086: Why Social Selling is the New Sales

Social Selling, LinkedIn, Microsoft, Carson Heady

Social selling is the new sales because it utilizes all the techniques and tools that we’ve always enjoyed as sellers in order to help us build better relationships.

Although nothing will ever replace the face-to-face relationships that sellers have with their clients, social selling is a valuable tool. Today Carson Heady shares what he has learned over a 17-year sales career about prospecting and relationship building and how social selling helps with it.

Social selling

Social media can help you find the right person to talk to that can help you connect with the right people, get a meeting, and stay top of mind. It’s a great compliment to the business relationships we should already be forming.

Social selling isn’t a replacement for the things we’re already doing. It’s the application of the tools that enable us to get insights or see what customers and their organizations are thinking, doing, and talking about.

When I first started using social selling, I was guilty of blasting a bunch of messages on LinkedIn and pitching people there. I quickly realized that wasn’t social selling.

Social selling equates to brokering relationships but you’re doing it online. It isn’t sending mass emails to people sharing everything that you have to offer.

Results

Salespeople are interested in results, and Carson said that after studying reports about social selling, he has determined that it amounts to standing apart, being unique, and finding a way to differentiate.

Social selling is a very targeted and specific effort to cast a wide wide net to reach maybe 30 people in a single organization in hopes that you’ll land a single meeting. That effort resulted in one of the larger deals in Microsoft.

Relationships

Carson suggests following business journals and using Sales Navigator to help in your efforts. Following the trades to stay aware of new C-levels that join the organization.

Last year, Carson was the first to the table when a new C-level joined a company he was connected to and now Microsoft is helping to drive change within that organization because of the relationship.

The relationships drive the deals forward, and those relationships wouldn’t exist without the strategic utilization of social selling.

Innovate

We’re all just trying to do something different. We’re trying to get a response or a meeting by setting ourselves apart from the others who came before us and failed. We aren’t just sitting on the phone reaching out to people.

We have so much technology at our disposal that we have to be careful to be focused and tailor our efforts. If we don’t, we’ll likely suffer from diminishing returns.

Our past approach of “spray and pray” doesn’t work anymore.

You have to embrace the probability of success. In the past, people were willing to send out hundreds of notes with the understanding that they wouldn’t get a whole lot of reception.

Consistent

If you want to connect with a C-level at an organization, you don’t just go after them. You’ve got to start a few levels below where you’d like to end up. Once you’re able to talk to someone who is receptive, you can use that momentum internally to get in front of the right audience.

But you must be consistent in your approach. Prospecting never ends. You must revisit those prospects.

Not surprisingly, many clients don’t reply immediately like you’d like them to. Be persistent and reach out to the same folks, but change your messaging.

Offer a compelling reason for your prospects to respond.

Be aware, too, that you may catch someone on an off day. The prospect may be sick or he may have missed the email. He may be busy.

Be adaptable with your process. There are a lot of things that we believe are good philosophies as sellers, but when we try them for a bit they don’t work the way they want to. So we discard them. We tweak things a bit and we adapt.

Concise

Sometimes we send long elaborate emails in hopes that we’ll get a reply. Truthfully, sometimes we get the best responses from emails with only one sentence. People are busy and they don’t have time to read a 3-paragraph message. If you’re specific and you offer a single task, they can more likely respond.

Emails are not intended to close the sale. It helps you grab attention. Don’t try to sell an enterprise solution within a few sentences of an email.

Trying to sell in an email amounts to skipping steps in the sales process. You’re jumping straight into the second or third date without wining and dining the prospect.

Connection

When you’re seeking to connect with multiple people in an organization, your approach will depend on what you’re looking to accomplish. It will also depend on your unique connection to that person.

If you’re searching for a job, don’t reach out with questions about a job or an opportunity within the organization. Instead, try this: “I saw that we have mutual synergies and I’m looking to parlay my experience into your industry. I’d love to sit down for 10 minutes to pick your brain and get some advice.”

Determine your unique connection to that client and then approach using that angle.

When Carson reached out to 30 people in a single organization, he got replies from about 11 of them. Of those responses, he got one response that pointed him to a certain person in the company. He pursued it and landed one of Microsoft’s larger deals.

Your chances of getting a reply are small to begin with. Make sure you put your best foot forward. Reach out to all of the people who have a vested interest in what you’re doing.

Needs analysis

Our process exists for a reason. When it goes awry, and when we get overzealous, we skip steps and we put too much information out there initially.

Sometimes your connection can just be to share an article and engage in a real conversation rather than always sending a message about “following up.” You can also share or retweet the other person’s content as a way to engage.

There is no single bullet that fixes all. Be cognizant that there are a lot of tools that exist that will help you succeed.

The sales process is vital, just like it’s vital that we only use social selling to get a meeting.

Stay top of mind so your connections continue to see you. If the prospect knows that he owes you some information, it may stimulate the conversation to continue. It’s a non-threatening way to follow up.

Relationships are everything. If you lead with the goal of adding value you never have to worry about your sales numbers.

“Social Selling Is the New Selling” episode resources

You can connect with Carson on LinkedIn or Twitter, and you can grab a copy of his book, The Birth of a Salesman: The Transformation of Selling in America. You can also check out his blog, The Life and Times of Carson V. Heady.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Jason Linett, Sales Podcast, Sales Team

TSE 1081: Leave People Better Off Whether They Buy From You or Not

When you interact with your prospects, your goal should be to provide such great value that you leave people better off whether they buy from you or not.

We’ve been talking about value all month, and today hypnotist Jason Linett talks about how people can change their thinking to grow their business. Growth isn’t just about your platform but it’s largely about how you tell the story to your audience.

We often miss the power of a story and its impact on our potential customers.

Help prospects win

In almost every category, there are others out there who do the same work you do. Storytelling is the one thing that truly sets you apart from the competition so that you’re no longer just a commodity. Your customers can go find another business coach or web designer, and even another hypnotist.

Jason points out that he didn’t get married by approaching a pretty girl at school and announcing that they were going to have children together. Instead, they built a relationship through the natural progression that occurs when people get to know each other.

Look at the relationship building aspect of it. You know that you want to help people, so look for something that will help the customer. Find things you can set in motion that will help your prospects win.

Suddenly, there’s a collection of people out there who didn’t need your entire service but they are in the raving fan category. Some of those that you helped will move forward in the funnel in order to see how you can help them even more.

Ditching fear

Most people don’t seize this concept because they fear giving away too much. They believe that if they give away too much, people won’t buy from them.

Jason said that he has given away more than most people in his industry. He has also earned more than most of the people in his industry. He believes the two naturally go together.

Think of it as a difference of show versus tell. I can tell you what methods may be helpful and you can research them and dig into them in order to determine whether they might truly work, or I can get together with you and actually help you do it.

Many people want to try an at-home version before they commit to the live “being in the room” version.

Convince people to care

How do we get people to care before we ever really ask them to listen?

We need to think differently. It’s about listening to the audience and responding to their requests.

Jason calls hit pitch “The Hollywood Effect.” It’s based on the tendency of movies to launch you directly into some piece of the action, get you swept up into it, and then rewind to tell you the back-story.

He launches into a story about murder, and about a new mother who moved into a hotel after seeing a bug in her home. By the end of her first meeting with him, she killed a housefly with her bare hand.

Draw in the entire room. Get them to put down their food and listen to what you have to say.

Value-first mindset

Do the opposite of what everyone else is doing. If everyone else is doing things one way, let that be your cue to do it differently.

As you decide how to move forward, pick the option you are most comfortable with. That’s your first entry point and you should flesh that out completely and make it exactly what you want it to be.

Once that piece has become a machine that’s running itself, you can branch off to some other thing.

Finding the time

Jason suggests that there’s no such thing as “finding the time.” It’s a game we invented to trick ourselves into not doing things we’re absolutely capable of. Instead, we should use the mechanism of making time.

Consider putting everything on a scheduling platform. Make use of color-coding. Choose one color for the events that cannot be changed.

The number one tip is to listen. So often we catch ourselves trying to mind-read our audience instead of starting with the ask and discovering the customer’s greatest need.

Sometimes what they want is different than what they need. You’re selling what they want, so you’ll deliver what they want, but along the way, you can overdeliver by providing what they need.

“Leave people better off whether they buy from you or not” episode resources

You can connect with Jason at jasonlinett.com or on social media as Jason Linett.

You can also grab a copy of his book, Work Smart Business: Lessons Learned From Hypnotizing 250,000 People and Building a Million-Dollar Brand. Head to worksmartbusiness.com for a freebie called the Positive Influence Power Pack that will teach you specific strategies to influence yourself and others.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Harry Maziar, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Story Selling

TSE 1068: Nothing Happens Until Somebody Sells Something

Harry Maziar, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Story Selling

Selling is honorable, and we should be proud of the work we do because nothing happens until somebody sells something.

Today Harry Mazier talks to us about the importance of selling and how every organization must practice the fundamentals of selling in order to do it well.  It begins by understanding the importance of being a sales professional.

Relationships

The short attention span of today’s buyers means that there will always be room for relationships in selling.

It’s perhaps the best sales lesson you’ll ever hear.

Necessity

It sounds basic to say that nothing happens until someone sells something, but it’s true that if we don’t sell, we won’t eat.

Sales is the lubricant of our economy.

It doesn’t matter how good your manufacturing is, how precise your accounting is, how deep your R&D is, everything begins when someone convinces a prospect to say, “Yes, I’ll take some.”

When the deal closes, the gears begin moving and everything takes off from that point of agreement.

Failure

Fear of failure prevents people from selling. You might drive past a prospect’s business 12 times and always find a reason not to stop: no parking places, it’s too early, or it’s too late.

To get past that reluctance, you must suck it up and knock on the doors. Then, once you get in front of that customer, you must know what you’re talking about.

Emerson said that nothing great was ever accomplished without enthusiasm. You must be enthusiastic and excited. If you’re not excited about what you’re doing, do something else.

Be smart. Don’t tell them how much you know. Tell them how much they need to know to get where you want them to get. Selling is convincing someone else to agree with your opinion.

But don’t overstay your welcome by speaking too much.

There’s a story that Samson slew 1,000 Philistines with the jawbone of an ass, but twice that many sales are killed every day with the same implement.

Resource

Your role is to provide the necessary information and be convincing. The best salespeople don’t sell, they help people buy.

Selling is instructional and informational. Be a friend and a resource to your customer. Sales is an honorable profession that has taken a lot of hits — many of them self-inflicted.

Salespeople are a resource to our economy and they really are helpful to customers. People choose sales for a variety of reasons like interactions with people and independence. Of course, income opportunities are part of it as well.

Negative view

For a long time, sales was perceived as little more than one person taking unfair advantage of another. Salespeople have lived through that era and have established themselves as a resource rather than an impediment.

Avoid being self-deprecating. Don’t refer to yourself as “just a salesman.” Sell with integrity every day so you can improve and help your customers.

Don’t put artificial limits on your own success or settle for good enough instead of good.

Stories

Relevant stories can help sellers sell. Rudyard Kipling said that if history was taught in the form of stories, it would never be forgotten.

People love stories, so rather than giving facts, features, and benefits, incorporate a story into your sales presentation. Do it consistently and do it as well as you can.

Read and listen and stay attuned to the people around you. Harry recorded countless anecdotes in preparation for writing his book, Story Selling: Sage Advice and Common Sense About Sales and Success.

If you don’t use a story to provide proof, selling will be more difficult. But the story won’t stand on its own. You must give your very best effort.

Stories aren’t the answer alone. You must support it with your work and effort. Do the best you can every day.

Remember the 10 powerful 2-letter words: “If it is to be, it is up to me.” You can find excuses and blame, but ultimately it depends on you.

Sellers

Don’t think you’re not in sales. Everyone is in sales from the moment they get out of bed in the morning. You are persuading or influences, negotiating or communicating.

Don’t run from it. Embrace it and learn to be better. Grow by failing.

It’s not how often you get knocked down; it’s how many times you get back up. Get back up and learn what’s effective and learn to communicate.

Be true to yourself and embrace the opportunities you have as a salesperson.

“Selling From The Heart” episode resources

You can connect with Harry at harrymazier@gmail.com or at (404) 853-1063.

Grab a copy of his book, Story Selling: Sage Advice and Common Sense About Sales and Success

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Larry Levine, Selling From the Heart, Linkedin, Sales Book

TSE 1066: Selling From The Heart

Sellers have a bad reputation as people who are artificial and only concerned about themselves, but in order to succeed, you must focus on selling from the heart.

Larry Levine has spent 30-something years in the trenches of B2B work, and he recognized some glaring weaknesses in sales teams he worked with. He values authenticity and he points to it as a big disconnect for many sellers.

But it isn’t just sellers. Think about how many times you’ve run into a friend you haven’t seen in a while, and you toss out the phrase, “we should do lunch.” It doesn’t usually mean anything other than “I’ll see you when I see you.”

Sellers must pay attention to their words.

Use your words

The words genuine, authentic, value, and trusted advisor prompt the follow-on question: “What does that mean?”

Start by leading an authentic lifestyle. Think about this: When you say you’re a salesperson or an SDR, you’re already behind the 8-ball already in the minds of your clients and prospects.

For every great sales professional, there are 10 that give the sales world a bad name.

When you deal with the people in your personal life, are you genuine and true to who you really are? Most likely you are. So why can’t we play that same role when we’re dealing with our clients and prospects.

Building relationships

Many sellers maintain a certain amount of distance in their relationships with their clients. In his book, Slow Down, Sell Faster, Kevin Davis asked how it’s possible to sell something to someone if you don’t spend time figuring out who they are?

  • What makes that person tick?
  • What do they care about?

Sellers try to move their prospects through the sales funnel as quickly as possible instead of investing the time to understand. Listen with intent and help them do their jobs. You’ll be surprised to find that things actually speed up.

Vulnerability

If you don’t build a relationship throughout multiple steps and influencers, it will be difficult to sell anything. People will buy from people they know, like, and trust.

People are beginning to understand that it’s ok to bring your heart to the sales world. It’s ok to be genuine and real. But in order to do that, you have to be vulnerable, which goes against what we believe about sellers.

If you asked your prospects what they truly desire in a seller, what do you think they’ll say? Maybe someone who is honest and who can solve their problems. At some point, you’ll hear them say “I want them to be sincere and show up after the sale.”

Conversations

Have a conversation like you would with your friends.

Memorizing scripts may make you sound too robotic. It isn’t that scripts are bad, but we must make the verbiage in the script our own. If you can’t align to it, you’ll struggle with it.

Imagine if you understood the person you were reaching out to. What are the issues and challenges they are facing.

If you’re calling a VP of sales to set up a demo for software, find out the issues that VPs of sales struggle with. Offer three issues that are most common for sales teams. Ask your prospects which of those three topics he can most closely align with.

The truth is that even tenured sales reps are going about this the wrong way. Instead of the phone call being focused on setting a meeting, focus the call on starting a conversation.

Sales leaders

Time and patience matter. Your organization wasn’t built in a day. You took a series of small successful steps to get where you are.

The same is true for your sales process, but no one has time or patience for it. No one wants to slow down.

Larry recalls deciding one day to focus on quality over quantity. He focused on opening at least two new conversations with two people he didn’t know every single day. His phone skills improved and his mindset did, too.

Sellers who are allowed to focus on quality over quantity may find that they enjoy their roles a bit more because they are connecting with people.

Foundations

Larry’s first mentor freed him from the pressure of memorizing his prospecting script word-for-word, and instead encouraged him to understand the foundation of the script. Once you’ve done that, make it your own.

Get back to humanizing what we’ve previously dehumanized in the sales world. There’s a time and place for technology, but human-to-human matters. Technology can’t replace every human aspect.

Larry warns against being an “empty suit with commission breath.”

Once leadership realizes that there’s a human on the other end of the sale rather than just a bunch of dollars and they set out to solve problems, watch what happens to the level of your relationships and referrals and profits.

Avoiding sameness

In a crowded field, in order to rise above the sea of sameness and be seen in a different light and stand out from the sales wolfpack, the differentiating moment goes back to the human aspect.

People smell sincerity immediately. Instead of juggling personalities, be authentic.

Understand that credibility and clarity sell in a world of insincerity.

Create a transformational experience by having a conversation. As you transform your relationships, you’ll stick out like a sore thumb in a world of transactional conversations.

“Selling From The Heart” episode resources

Find Larry on LinkedIn @larrylevine1992 or on his Selling From The Heart podcast at sellingfromtheheart.net.

Grab a copy of Larry’s book, Selling From the Heart: How Your Authentic Self Sells YouHis website also offers an accompanying self-reflection journal.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Ty Bennett, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1061: You Can Love People Without Leading Them, But You Can’t Lead People Without Loving Them

Ty Bennett, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistRegardless of your industry or your product, relationships are the currency of your business, and though you can love people without leading them, you can’t lead people without loving them.

Ty Bennett is an entrepreneur who fell in love with the speaking and training development aspect of building a sales team and it led him to write books on the topic and start a training company called Leadership Inc.

Ty points out that we’re in the people business and we’re interacting with, networking with, leading and influencing people every day. The care, investment, and love you have for people will communicate that you have their best interest in mind.

Those relationships engender trust, foster accountability, and build a level of commitment that you want in your team. And love drives it.

Missing love

Many business books never discuss love, perhaps because it isn’t considered a business-centric word. Ty addresses this issue in his new book called Partnership is the New Leadership.

He interviewed a guy on his podcast named Tim Sanders who wrote the book Love is the Killer App but this hasn’t always been a business word. Traditionally it has referred to personal relationships but when it drives your actions and when you’re coming from a place of service and contribution, that’s where love exists.

Leadership is much more effective there.

Soft leaders

Some people believe that leaders can’t be perceived as soft, so they shy away from the idea of loving the members of the team. If you’re too soft, after all, you’ll be walked on.

If you were to line up 10 people and evaluate the production level of those people, you’ll find a relationship to how they feel about their manager. Statistically, most people will tell you that they hate their bosses, and also that people join companies and they leave bosses.

People also show up differently when they are in the right frame of mind; when they feel supported; when they feel heard; and when they have opportunities to win.

When people feel like part of a team, the commitment level changes drastically. #TeamCommitment

Training to lead

If you’re seeking to develop this kind of leadership without being perceived as soft, focus on being interested rather than interesting.

Rather than figuring out how to stand out and making it all about you, focus on the other person. Great leaders are those who truly care about other people and become adept at asking questions. They have a genuine curiosity about people. They want to know what drives them and what’s important to them.

As you get to know your people on a deeper level, it speaks volumes to your team members.

Now take things a step further and focus on hearing them. Don’t forget the idea that people support what they help create.

Give your team a voice. Welcome their feedback. Those efforts demonstrate that you care about what they have to say and you’re listening rather than simply issuing marching orders. You’re demonstrating that you’re confident enough in who you are to allow them to be part of the process.

We no longer live in the era of top-down leadership where I tell you what we’re going to do and you implement it. Social media has changed us psychologically and it has given each of us a voice.

Invest in people

Go above and beyond for your people. Do things that are not in your job description. Give more time, more energy, and more of yourself into your relationships. Reach out in ways that are meaningful to each person.

No doubt each of us can think of someone who has invested in us this way.

As leaders, those investments change our relationships. When you invest in people they become family.

Ask yourself whether people would ever say that about you.

This level of investment can be difficult because we’re busy. We have so much on our plates that it’s hard to think outside our own agenda.

It can also be tempting to focus on the things we have to do and ignore the things that we could do but aren’t required to do.

At the same time, we have to shift our mindset. Maybe we need to listen to a podcast or hear a story from a different leader. Maybe we need to find a leader who can open our eyes to different approaches. Perhaps read a book.

Following the manager

Although every industry is different, Ty interacted with sellers recently who told him that their loyalty was to their manager, not to the company. The product matters a lot less to them than the manager does.

If you’re seeking to become this kind of manager, start by carving out one-on-one time for your people as often as possible. Come in five minutes early and ask one of your people to come in five minutes early. Make time for it.

Find time to connect with your people with no agenda. It’s just to show that you care.

Ty also recommends reading The Go Giver, one of a series of books about adopting a giving mentality on the way to greater success.

Relationships change when people invest in them. When a leader invests, it will impact the relationship in a huge way.

“You Can’t Lead People Without Loving Them” episode resources

If you’d like to connect with Ty, you can find him at tybennett.com and on LinkedIn, and you can check out The Relevant Leadership Podcast.

Grab a copy of his new book called Partnership is the New Leadership.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

EMSDC, Sharon Manker, Donald Kelly, Networking

TSE 1054: Sales From The Street – “Building Diversity Into Your Network”

As you’re working to expand your reach and grow your network, recognize the importance of building diversity into your network so you’ll be better positioned to succeed in your industry.

I met Sharon Manker at the Eastern Minority Supplier Development Council ROAR Conference, which connects minority-owned and women-owned businesses with Fortune 100 companies. Sharon has worked in supply chain for two decades, in both the for-profit and the nonprofit sectors, in utility and now in healthcare. In her words, she negotiates for a living.

She also works to engage diverse suppliers in a woman-owned, veteran-owned, minority-owned system.

Small business challenges

Many small business owners lack the vehicle to connect with the right decision makers. They don’t know how to meet the people who actually influence the contracts.

When they discover their limitation, they often observe that they just didn’t realize how it impacted their work.

As a supply chain person, Sharon works to connect qualified suppliers to the businesses who need them. She also works to connect those same businesses with her business stakeholders.

To that end, she attends events and even hosts events that allow people to connect and build relationships. The trick is to recognize that as you’re working to connect with the decision makers, there are people along the way who can help you do exactly that.

Diversifying suppliers

When you aren’t able to attend these events, Sharon points to other opportunities to connect with people: chambers of commerce and councils, just to name two.

You’ll be positioned to find corporate partners there. You’ll encounter people who are actively engaged and ready to increase their supplier diversity.

Even if you attend these events and find out about developments that are 24 months away, future gains will happen. Put in the work now and build relationships now.

Benefits of partnership

Many corporations prioritize working with small businesses because they have committed to certain diversity goals, such as spending a certain amount of their operating expenses with diverse suppliers. In some states, in fact, this diversity is mandated.

This demands a pool of Minority Business Enterprises, Veteran Business Enterprises, and LGBTQ enterprises that can help meet the needs of those businesses.

It can’t be a last-minute effort, either. You don’t want to wait until you’re in an emergency situation to begin vetting partners. Those organizations must proactively work to find the best option in every category to provide the product or service they need.

Some corporations connect with small businesses simply because they value giving back to entrepreneurs and small businesses.

If you’re an entrepreneur or a seller listening to this, find groups like this to connect with, because if you can land a large contract, you can eat pretty well for a while.

If you balance your regular prospecting with your networking events while you work to connect with large corporations, you’ll more easily keep a steady flow of connections. #CorporatePartners

Strategic plan

Create a strategic plan for your business. In your case, your plan for success is that failure is not an option. Instead, when you fail, you learn a lesson, and you repeat that until you get to a successful outcome.

You can’t give up. You must stay positive.

There won’t always be immediate opportunities, but building a network of resources or opportunities provides some security. Then, if you don’t have a resource or an opportunity for those organizations, you could always help connect them with another partner that you’ve met and added to your network.

We’ve talked recently about the need to focus on a champion rather than only focusing on the decision maker. Your network will help you accomplish that.

You may bypass a champion on your way to connecting with a CEO, but the champion can be a much quicker connection. You can build a relationship with him more quickly, and then he can help you get to the CEO.

Intentional communications

When you’re building relationships, be mindful of your communications. Some people are very aggressive in their approach, but they often overlook all the other restraints that these decision makers are facing. They want to do a deal now, but they aren’t mindful of the other projects these professionals are working on.

There are hierarchies of communication in every organization. There are also barriers to entry. Your champions can’t advocate for you if you’re perceived as aggressive or pushy.

The vetting process may take weeks, and you must be willing to exercise patience. You don’t know about all the things that the organization is working on.

Be strategic. Recognize the structure in each organization.

People will notice the way you communicate.

Be prepared

When your network does call on you for your product or service, make sure you are ready and able to give your brief, to-the-point presentation.

Make sure you’re being active so you’ll stay positioned to meet other professionals. Make sure you’re open and willing and teachable.

Even if you aren’t a minority, realize that if 51 percent of the company ownership is minority, that classifies as a minority-owned business.

“Building Diversity Into Your Network” episode resources

You can connect with Sharon on LinkedIn where she shares tremendous amounts of information about supply chain.

We are currently in the Beta portion of our new TSE Certified Sales Training Program. The first section is about prospecting, the second is all about building value, and the third is about closing.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. If 2018 wasn’t the best year for you, check out TSE Certified Sales Training Program. We can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Peter Chun, Lucidchart, Salesforce, Sales Podcast

TSE 1053: How To Effectively Map And Create Multithreaded Relationships In Enterprise Deals

Peter Chun,

Sales constantly evolves and sellers who want to be successful must effectively map and create multithreaded relationships in order to close more deals. Peter Chun talks today about the importance of multithreaded relationships and the challenge for reps who must establish them.

Peter fell in love with the convergence of sales and data and has found a personal passion for it. He loves strategizing about how to close deals and about how to help your company scale and grow.

Evolving sales

The biggest obstacle for B2B sellers right now is the evolving face of sales. Buyers are more sophisticated, and they have more information at their fingertips. They do a lot of research before they even engage with a salesperson.

Additionally, the number of stakeholders within B2B deals is increasing, with research indicating that complex deals often include 6 to 10 stakeholders.

The big challenge, then, is finding and creating multithreaded relationships because too often they are single threaded. Many reps, either because of laziness or lack of awareness, fail to establish more than one relationship within a deal. They rely on a single relationship to get the deal done.

Multithreaded relationships

Being multithreaded doesn’t simply refer to your customers. It’s important that sellers create multithreaded relationships within their own companies as well.

Who else, besides your prospect, needs to be part of the conversation you’re having? Who else on your team has relationships that can be leveraged to build a solid foundation?

One of Peter’s reps teaches his reps to always do discovery because it keeps them aware of the details of the deal and helps them to stay relevant.

If you’re multithreaded, you have other contacts that can help you move a deal forward.

Unnecessary risk

Even when you believe that you have the juice to close a deal, you leave yourself open to risk if you fail to be multithreaded. You may, in fact, be connected to the right person, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t others who can help move the deal forward as well.

Many reps simply haven’t been coached to do this well. Sales leaders must coach them well and teach them how to have a multithreaded perspective.

In the case of a complex account, there may be hundreds of employees. There may be years of history between you and your prospect making it difficult to know where to even start.

Peter says that visually mapping the process will help you keep track of your efforts.

  • Who are you talking to?
  • Where does each employee sit?
  • Who does each employee report to?
  • What are the relationships within that organization?

Becoming multithreaded

In order to establish a multithreaded perspective, begin by figuring out all the people you already know. Start with who you’ve met or spoken to in the organization.

Step two is to identify all your targets or the people you’d like to talk to.

Third, add the executive team. Include the CEO and any executive leadership that you think is relevant to the conversation.

You can then figure out who reports to whom and who is pursuing specific initiatives. The goal is to drive consensus across the organization, so I must identify the leaders who can move this initiative forward.

Recognizing your prospects’ initiatives demonstrates an interest and it suggests that you’re more than an order-taker; you’re paying attention to the details.

Common mistakes

Some managers get so focused on their numbers that they fail to develop a real strategy. As soon as organizations allow their sellers to be a little more strategic, they’ll find that their activities are much more scalable.

Account mapping has been around for a long time, but now we have the technology to use a more systemized approach to it and tie it into our CRM.

Young sales leaders simply haven’t been exposed to enough deals to think that way. But great sales leaders think that way naturally.

Help your less tenured sellers learn to think that way.

It’s easy to get overwhelmed with this idea but begin with your top account. Implement the three steps with that account, will help you begin really moving your deals.

Build the discipline within yourself and your team to be multithreaded. Even if you’re certain it will close, you can still consider who else you have access to.

When you’re multithreaded, you have more options when your contacts go dark. Remember to focus on internal and external connections.

“Create Multithreaded Relationships” episode resources

You can connect with Peter on LinkedIn and you can sign up for LucidChart and check out their sales templates.

This episode is brought to you in part by our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, which teaches you to improve your sales skills, find more customers, build stronger value, and close more deals.

The next semester begins in April.

If you’re not familiar with the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, it’s a program designed to help brand new sales reps, as well as those who have been selling forever. The 12-week module offers videos you can watch at your own pace, as well as the option to join a group discussion. It’s broken into three sections: finding, building value, and closing. It’s amazing and it’s fun!

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

The episode is also brought to you by prospect.io, a sales automation platform that allows you to send cold emails in a personalized manner. To find out more about how it can help you automate your sales process, go to prospect.io/tse. Your prospecting will never be the same.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, Client Success, Sales, Increase Sales

TSE 1022: The Redheaded Stepbrother of Sales…Client Success

Donald Kelly, Client Success, Sales, Increase SalesThe Red-headed Step Brother of Sales … Client Success; we don’t pay attention to it. But, we should.

There were times, growing up in Jamaica, when we would have issues with getting water into our house. The pressure wouldn’t be strong enough or a pipe would burst, and we would have to take buckets down to the community water source and haul them back home.

Imagine me, Little Donald, carrying a bucket of water a quarter mile each way …and I’m sure I filled that bucket to the very top.

Naturally, some will spill out as you walk along, but imagine my surprise to see the bucket only half-full when I got home … A small crack in the bucket caused me to lose most of it.

What incentive would I have to go back for more? I needed to fix that bucket.

Client success is the same way. Nobody pays attention to it but it is critical to the organization’s success.

Client Success

Client success is the function of a company responsible for maintaining the relationship between the client and you, the vendor. The goal of client success is very simple: to make sure your clients are as successful as possible. This, in turn, improves your relationship with the client and the lifetime value of that client.

It helps the organization in many ways. As with my bucket example, client success is the source that helps to make sure the holes in the bucket are sealed. We don’t lose water – we don’t lose customers. [02:17]

Compare the lifetime value of your client to my bucket of water. The last thing you want to do is lose your customers after working so hard to get them. It would be such a waste to work for a year and a half to land an amazing client only for them to move on after only a year.

Multiply that scenario across multiple clients and you’ll find yourself in a whole heap of trouble: you need to fix that bucket. You need to address client success. [03:26]

I read a statistic in an article published by the Precision Marketing Group which states that 86% of buyers will pay more for a product if they receive a better customer experience.

This may not occur immediately but imagine a client does come on board who has an opportunity to purchase more of the licenses, or services, that you offer.

Let’s use furniture sales as an example. You sold a nice desk and chair to your client. In the future, what prevents him from going elsewhere if he needs another chair? [04:11]

Maintaining relationships

What if your client success team was able to actively work that account and learn the goals of the client? If you knew the client was planning to expand in six months, for example, would it not make sense for you to create an opportunity to help them reach that goal?

In some companies, sales takes care of this but it spreads the sales force thin. They are asked to find new people, build value, close deals, AND actively farm the account, fix problems, and keep the client happy.

You need new business to come in but you also need to maintain relationships with your current clients so they will return to you over and over again.

It is virtually impossible to do it all. Something has to give and, in all likelihood, new business will stop coming in. [04:58]

Again, 86% of buyers would pay more for a product or service if they receive a better customer experience.

Let’s say your product is at premium value and a buyer could go somewhere else next time to get it for less. If the buyer perceives a value in the sales experience he has with you, however, he will stay with you. [05:48]

Client Support

Client support, on the other hand, is basically a range of client services to assist clients in making cost effective and correct use of a product. This includes assisting in planning, training, troubleshooting, maintaining, updating, etc.

Using the office furniture example again, the client support team helps install and assemble the desk. The client success team does not.

In smaller organizations, however, sellers often do it all. Solving problems while also maintaining accounts can certainly be overwhelming. You can see how this could affect new net revenue. [06:32]

The emphasis on new business causes client support and client success to be pushed to the side: they become the red-headed step children of sales.

Customer experience

Another statistic from the Precision Marketing Group states that the companies who prioritize customer experience generate 60% higher profits.

Instead of hiring three new salespeople, would it not make more sense to hire two sales individuals and one client success individual instead? Hire a client success person to ensure that everyone brought on board by the sales team stays on board.

Instead of losing new clients each year, keep them for five or six years – even longer. Give them an amazing experience. Help them. Guide them and fix any problems they might have so they don’t feel neglected. [07:29]

It has been said that the client success team is just an appendage of customer support and it is not as important as sales. But we all know that it is much easier, and cheaper, to keep a client than to find a new one.

If you give your client a great experience, he will give to you in return with referrals and repeats sales.

The client success team can then create more opportunities for more sales.

The Pod Approach

A ‘pod’ is a term some companies are now using to refer to a three-system approach: one person from sales, one person from customer support, and a third person from client success working as a team. Together, they create a cohesive relationship that keeps new business coming in, solves issues, and works toward the success of the clients.

It makes a huge difference. [09:30]

Finally, I previously shared a story about my experience working for a software company where I didn’t really know what to do. I learned, however, from working with client success (known as customer support back then) the type of clients not to pursue, which helped me to recognize the type of clients I did want.

I was able to retain those types of clients, build stronger relationships with them, and close more deals.

Customer support helped the clients be successful. If they recognized a problem that I could fix for the client, they would bring me in. It worked amazingly.

I suggest considering such a system in your organization. If you already have one in place, be sure to evaluate its effectiveness. What is the lifetime value of a client right now? How much money can you expect from that client? Is there a process for upselling or cross-selling? [10:07]

Don’t waste your time and energy on a client only to have him fall through the cracks.

Don’t go home with a half-empty bucket.

Episode Resources for ‘The Red-headed Step Brother of Sales … Client Success”

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Prospect.io is offering three months at half-price.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

 

Donald Kelly, Stephen A Hart, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1000: The Sales Evangelist 1000th Episode with Donald C. Kelly

Donald Kelly, Stephen A Hart, The Sales Evangelist

It’s The Sales Evangelist 1000th episode and Stephen A. Hart from the Trailblazers.FM Podcast is conducting the interview while Donald Kelly answers the questions.

This podcast started five years ago after Donald attended sales training to try to improve his performance. He started seeing some gains, and he figured the very least he could do was tell other people what was working for him.

He realized along the way that he would get to interview great guests like Jeffrey Gitomer who would share a wealth of information and he was hooked. Donald wanted to share sales content that would help himself and others at the same time.

Blessings and opportunities

The greatest benefit to a podcast like this is the relationships you build. There’s a camaraderie and people want to help each other. [05:50]

Perhaps it’s because the medium is so new, but a lot of podcasters are connecting with each other to share experiences.

People have become like family, and many business opportunities have emerged from it.

There’s a whole crew of people in the background who help create the content, and it’s blessing people along the way.

After Donald jumped ship from his full-time job in 2015, this lifestyle business allowed him to travel and speak in different parts of the country, and it all stemmed from the training and consulting that has developed.

10,000 hours

The podcast is officially five years old, which amounts to about 10,000 work hours. According to Malcolm Gladwell’s theory that it takes 10,000 hours to become an expert, Donald is officially an expert podcaster now.

The story started when Donald was working at a software company in Boca. His plan was that at the three-year mark, he wanted to go back to grad school for an MBA. [10:11]

The other alternative was that he would launch a startup.

TSE started as a hobby because Donald had done B2C in high school and college. Now, he transitioned to B2B, but he didn’t know how to talk to people or set up business opportunities.

His company provided training and he discovered a love of teaching and an excitement about the content he had learned.

He paired his love of teaching and his desire to be the center of attention, and it was a perfect marriage. Edutainment allowed him to educate and entertain at the same time.

Birth of a podcast

Jared Easley introduced Donald to the world of podcasting despite the fact that Donald knew nothing about it.

He started by listening to Seth Godin’s Startup School, a podcast that featured Seth guiding 30 entrepreneurs through the process of launching a dream business. [11:46]

He was still debating startup or college, and he realized that a startup didn’t have to mean developing a product. Donald didn’t see how the podcast was going to make money, but he launched it as a hobby.

The platform existed six months before the podcast did, but Donald recalls that he had to get over the worry and just pull the trigger. He had to stop worrying about how it would sound and what people would say about it.

He eventually decided that he had something valuable and he needed to share it. When he got out of his own way, the money started coming in.

When Donald started producing content that benefited the people around him, people started to raise their hands and seek his help.

Lessons learned

Donald calls episode 1 cringe-worthy. He says he was nervous and afraid throughout it. He was self-conscious about his voice, and he didn’t own his personality. [15:29]

Donald also wishes he had done video much sooner. He was afraid of the comments people would make and that fear kept him from producing video.

Donald also wishes he had known that people don’t know what you have to offer until they know what you have to offer. He was afraid of sounding pushy, so he was apprehensive about sharing what he knew.

Take more action. Get out of your comfort zone. Get out of your own way.

Despite the late start to the video world, TSE is getting into video now, so it’s better late than never.

Rejection

Donald points to the burned-ship theory that dates to sailors who were either going to burn the ships and win the battle or die on the seashore. There was no escape.

If you’ve burned the ship, there’s no alternative, so you have to make it work. Those men are the master of their own destiny.

Although Donald could still be employable in the sales realm if necessary, he doesn’t want to use that as a parachute. [19:27]

The “no’s” can’t hinder him. He either has to conquer or die.

He realizes that the “no’s” aren’t personally directed at him.

Your “why”

Donald’s desire to provide for his family drives his passion and his motivation. He wants to make things happen so that his family never has to be in the predicament of being homeless again. [21:50]

Those dark moments such as the first lull in listenership can plague podcasters.

Although numbers are great for measuring, Donald got too focused on the numbers. He started to compare too much and he neglected his own community.

When the website was down for a prolonged period in 2016, he started to feel tremendous stress. For 1-2 months there was no new content.

He worried about losing listeners and the huge setback that might come. He wasn’t sure he would be able to continue because there were so many technical problems.

Valley

You can’t succeed in a silo. Name any company and you can almost guarantee that they had help from some outside forces. [29:17]

The term entrepreneur is deceptive because there’s really no single person who creates a business. Donald avoided asking for help because he was embarrassed and he thought he was supposed to know how to solve the problem.

Advice and discussion help people share their burdens and to recognize that they can benefit from other people’s input.

Top takeaways

People who succeed do so because they partnered with others for good. There are people who are willing to partner strategically to make things work. [31:57]

All of his guests who have had success did so because they found synergy in the people they worked with.

Look at Henry Ford and the number of companies that spawned from his invention. Tire companies, radio companies, and other companies developed because of it.

You can’t be a lone wolf and you must be willing to admit that other people might be able to do things better than you can.

TSE is writing for HubSpot now and has been mentioned in Entrepreneur and Inc. Magazine because Donald was willing to reach out.

Don’t be afraid to sell yourself. People in post-recording conversations advised Donald that he was charging too little.

Customers aren’t paying for one hour of guidance or coaching. They are paying for 15 years of experience. [35:23]

Be aware of your worth. If you undervalue yourself, no one will willingly pay you more. Ask for more than you’re comfortable asking for.

Always push yourself for bigger and better things.

Once you push outside of your comfort zone, you’ll evolve. You’ll find yourself doing things that once scared you.

Emotional rollercoaster

Preparation helps us avoid the emotional rollercoaster of sales. October Donald should be helping December Donald. Salespeople must plan much further out than they can comfortably do. [38:50]

If you know you need 5 deals, you should put 7 or 8 in your pipeline. Never ease up off the gas. Have a systematic approach.

When Donald coaches people, he helps them see beyond the now. He helps them develop a system that prevents lulls.

Healthy competition

Donald remembers wanting to be included on a list of top sales podcasts. [44:01]

He refers to the power of “coopertition,” where people become allies.

As a track athlete, he learned that when you’re turning back to see where other people are, you aren’t aerodynamic anymore. You lose your focus and you slow down.

Instead of looking to see where other people are, look toward the finish line. Compete against your own yesterday instead of competing against others.

Future of TSE

The Sales Podcast Network will continue to grow and offer a community of salespeople who will encourage one another. [50:57]

If TSE ever gets boring, maybe the day would come when it would be “sunset.”

TSE will continue to grow. The goal on sponsorship side will eventually separate so that the training organization will separate from the media company side.

TSE will seek to double its revenue, and ultimately the platform will be bigger than just a podcast.

TSE has been a huge influence in the podcasting space by encouraging those people who are in the community.

The Sales Evangelist 1000th Episode resources

Connect with Stephen A. Hart and check out his  Trailblazer.FM Podcast.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Donald Kelly, TSE Certified Sales Program, Sales Training, New Sellers

TSE 970: TSE Hustler’s League – “You Are Too Late”

Donald Kelly, TSE Certified Sales Program, Sales Training, New SellersOn today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, we’re talking about how you can exert influence into the buying process even when you are too late.

TSE Hustler’s League is our online group coaching program that brings together sellers from all industries and all abilities to share ideas.

Executives

I’m reading a book called Selling to the C-Suite: What Every Executive Wants You To Know About Successfully Selling To the Top, which suggests that executives often find themselves unable to get access to the information they need to solve problems.

When executives recognize a problem, they usually begin by doing research. Unfortunately, marketers and salespeople often focus their solutions on their product instead of on the challenges their prospects are facing.

Addressing their challenges requires a deeper level of understanding and thinking, and a deeper level of research.

We must share the content the executives want.

What and why

One executive in the book suggested getting involved in the what and the why rather than the how.

Most executives are focused on the future of the business. They are looking for partners who can help them do the same.

It’s difficult to accurately predict the future of a company on your own, but with the help of industry partners, it becomes easier.

Help those in your industry by being a forward thinker. Build a relationship with executives by connecting with them and helping them focus on the future of their businesses.

Decision makers

Studies show that 80 percent of decision makers get involved in the buying process early.

When they recognize a problem, they often hand the issue off to a lower-level teammate to help research it. That person will read blogs, search the Internet, listen to podcasts, and look for answers to the problem.

That means that many times, you’ll be interacting with a team member who isn’t a decision maker. He won’t be able to sign off on the deal; he’ll just want you to provide a demonstration so he can gather information.

Your job is to share your demonstration and your expertise as well as your current customers with that person.

You can best do that by providing information that will be helpful to the company during the research stage.

  • Create a video about the top three things holding small tech companies back from increasing revenue.
  • Offer a download addressing the five things every executive needs to know about growing a small tech company.

Help executives think of challenges they weren’t even aware of. When you do, you bring more to the table than just a product or service.

RFP

When you reply to an RFP, your request may be a formality. In many cases, a customer already has a vendor in mind that he’d like to work with. Your bid is simply an effort to see if any cheaper bids exist.

In many cases, the competitor may have helped create the RFP, giving the customer feedback about what information to include in it.

Uncovering challenges

Begin by talking with your current customers to find out what their concerns are. Ask what they’d most like to learn about over the next 5-10 years.

Once you have an idea, go to LinkedIn and create articles or videos answering some of those questions.

Since these are the challenges executives in our industry will be focused on, we’ll create content that will help them during the research stage. As we do, we’re aligning ourselves as trusted advisors and forward thinkers who can help the decision makers get where they want to be.

“You Are Too Late” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. Maximizer is intuitive, simple, and personable. Maximizer integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting and give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. We’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out TSE Hustler’s League and apply to see if it’s a good fit. We’re introducing some changes in our January semester, and we’d love for you to be part of it.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share it with someone else you think might benefit.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Phil Newton, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, unHustle

TSE 963: How To Help Business Owners And High Performers Hone In On Their Zone Of Genius, Work Smart And Make More Money

Phil Newton, The Sales Evangelist,In this episode of The Sales Evangelist, I talk to Phil Newton about how we can work smart and accomplish more by doing less.

It all began with a “sob story of events” when Phil was diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease, an intestinal disorder with an array of symptoms that prevent him from doing business the usual way.

He had to figure out how to get the most out of his time before fatigue set in; how to get maximum results from the least amount of work.

Phil calls it the ‘opposite of hustle.’

The Opposite of Hustle

Phil had to drop the tasks that weren’t moving his business forward so he could focus on the more productive areas: his areas of expertise that would bring in the results.

He outsourced the day-to-day minutia of the business. He streamlined.

Phil learned that trying to do everything, carrying the weight of every department and trying to know everything are the very things that keep top-performing sellers or top performing business owners from having the time to develop and use their own “sense of genius.”

The Sales Exclusion Department: Who do I NOT want to work with?

Phil used to help “anyone with a pulse” but in the end, no one benefitted.

The problem was that they weren’t the right people for the business and he ended up creating more problems in all areas of the business: refund rates increased, customer service issues increased, etc.

He had to decide: Who do I not want to work with? How do I not get them through the front door?

Instead of trying to generate new leads or new business with the shotgun approach of searching aimlessly among 1000’s of profiles, he focused on the 3-5 people with the most potential and nurtured those relationships.

Begin by deciding who your Ideal Clients are. Then drill down even further in the group to find who among them would be the Best Clients. Continue sorting until you have a handful of the Dream-Come-True Clients rather than just ideal ones.

Filter prospects

Establish your own personal brand and filter your network of prospects through it instead of sending them to the company website or the official sales page.

“If you are a sale professional, read on…..”

“If you are a business owner, read on….”

Short punchy messages like these will prequalify the person before you are on the phone with them or before they send you a message. It’s just a way to exclude the people who are not ready today.

Then, when they are ready tomorrow, or even if you go to another company or another department, they will know how to find you. You become the point of contact for whatever it is you sell, regardless of where you work.

Growing your Network

Achieving your personal best should be your focus rather than looking at the top of the sales leaderboard or worrying about who has the best sales.  The top performers are not any better than you, they just have a bigger network.

So work smarter.

Grow your network by targeting the right people instead of just more people.

Focus on the people who are ready to listen instead of trying to talk to everyone.

Put systems and processes into place to keep in contact with your network.

Then, when the people are ready, you are the first person they think of — the first person they contact.

There is a self-imposed pressure to hit the sales targets but if you don’t hit it, don’t worry about it. Instead, think about what system you can put into place so that you get it next time, and then maintain it.

Tap into your Existing Network

It is easier to build a relationship with someone you already know.

Have a conversation with the goal of building a foundation for doing business together and to establish a network of referrals rather than with the expectation of making a sale; as if you bumped into them in a coffee shop.

Then replicate that conversation.

The Golden Tickets

Customers who have said ‘Yes’ before are the ones to stay in contact with.

Phil likes to give them “Golden Tickets” or “freebies” — a 30-minute consultation, for example — that they can give to a friend.

Once Phil realized that his clients were referring business to him because it made them feel good to pass a deal on to their friends, rather than doing so just as a favor to him, it became easier to ask for referrals.

They feel fabulous for sharing, their friends benefit from the Golden Ticket, and Phil benefits from the referral. The network grows.

“Work Smart” episode resources

Phil believes knowledge should be free and he is happy to share! You can connect with him at his website, Unhustled.com, or check out his goodie bag for listeners of TheSalesEvangelist.com.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Be Human, Erick Hart, Sales Podcast, Donald Kelly

TSE 959: Sales From The Street: “Be Human”

Erik Hart, Sales From The Street

For this episode of The Sales Evangelist, I talked with Erik Hart, a Sales Manager for an Internet company, to discuss how he is able to help his team achieve not only sales results and, perhaps more importantly, person-to-person results by learning to be human.

The Numbers Game

Often times, especially with sales, it becomes such a numbers game that the person-to-person experience is lost. The human connection is lost.

We find ourselves churning through conversations and deals with a laser focus on strategy and metrics and we lose context.

Erik, for example, had a rep on his sales team with a great understanding of how to guide his clients through the various buying stages but it became such an exercise in ‘checking the boxes’ day after day that the rep felt totally defeated, unproductive and he failed to generate revenue.

Recalculate

Erik asked the rep to take a step back and to really think about: What kind of story did he want to be part of? What kind of difference did he want to make?

In doing so, the rep realized not only where he wanted to go but how he could get himself there, without just running on autopilot.

Simply put: Let things be a little messy!

The sales rep had organized himself into a rut by creating a very specific process when interacting with leads and clients.

The response to a potentially lower quality lead, for example,
was three phone calls and one email while a high-value lead would have other very specific tasks tied to it.

Eventually, the tasks became more important than actually having the conversations with the clients. He found himself speaking with clients but thinking about the next task – the next box to check – instead of making a human connection.

He was reading the script instead of being present in the moment; acting like a robot instead of really digging into the needs of the client. He failed to see them as people – and they could hear that in his voice.

The New Bottom Line

Taking a step back and re-evaluating his goals worked.

Overall improvement became evident in just three months; not only in sales but with increased engagement with the customers and improved morale.

The sales reps are proud of what they do again. The sales are great, but the intangibles are sometimes even better.

We all have our imperfections and personal baggage and business operations to deal with and they have the potential to become real struggles.

There is a futility to the task of trying to attach the minutia without really understanding the context.

Instead, think about what you want the conversation to be. What’s your story? Where do you want to be? What kind of world do you want to live in?

Let those answers be your guide. Let that help you reach your goals.

It can become an incredibly powerful experience. The minutia will take care of itself.

“Be Human” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Rebecca Brizi, Donald Kelly, Inbound Leads, LinkedIn

TSE 931: How To Use LinkedIn for Inbound and Developing Process

LinkedIn is a powerful tool for sales professionals, but you must have a strategy in order to use it well. If you have a plan, you can use LinkedIn for inbound and developing process.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Rebecca Brizi, strategic consultant to small businesses and solopreneurs, talks about using social media to grow your business and how to use LinkedIn for inbound and developing process.

A place for business

When you enter LinkedIn, everyone knows why you’re there. There’s no ambiguity; it’s very specific.

People join LinkedIn because they want to connect with and network with people who are relevant to their businesses.

Rebecca’s husband is a great example of how LinkedIn can supplement your marketing efforts, especially for small businesses that don’t have a huge team of people.

Her husband doesn’t want to have to set up and run and manage a website, so he uses LinkedIn the way most people would use their business site. In fact, she said, he’s not asking people to visit an external site; he’s inviting them to find out about him in a place they’re already visiting.

LinkedIn can do everything for your business that websites can do. It can serve as an online brochure, an online messaging platform, and an online content platform.

Network with people

The best way to network with people is to help them know, like, and trust you.  Once you’ve done that, you’re on your way to a solid relationship that can create great opportunities.

Treat LinkedIn the same way treat your face-to-face marketing. Start with a focus on what you can do for other people. Begin by discovering what you can do to help people.

  • Who do they want to meet?
  • What do they want to learn?
  • What sort of information could be of interest to them?

Work to connect with people and stay transparent about who you are and why you want to connect with people.

You’ll be effective as long as you’re working to make your interactions positive for other people.

Great prospects

Once you’ve identified someone as a great prospect, consider trying to learn from him first. Determine whether you can make introductions that could be useful to him.

You have to know what your prospect wants in order to sell to him something. You have to understand what the prospect wants from life and how your product or service fits into that.

Effective sales is always about the buyer rather than the seller.

The Chet Holmes Buyer Pyramid says that at any given moment, only about three percent of your audience is actively looking to buy what you’re selling. Seven percent are open to whatever it is you’re selling.

The other 90 percent are split into thirds:

  • 30 percent haven’t even thought about it
  • 30 percent have thought about it but don’t think they need it
  • 30 percent are never going to buy from you.

You begin with 70 percent maximum reach every time. So do you want to capture the 3 percent or the 70 percent?

Well-crafted pitch

There’s a certain amount of subjectivity in each relationship that helps you determine the right moment to make your pitch.

A well-crafted pitch is a little like a marriage proposal. You’ve built up to that point and you expect the answer to be yes.

Success is much more about the buildup than about the final pitch. Once you’re facing that moment, you know when the time is right. You have the right solution at a fair price, so the moment develops clearly.

Using LinkedIn

LinkedIn is somewhat self-promotional, and businesses should use it to publish articles, post PDFs, list services, and share recommendations. Additionally, you’ll interact with other people and their articles, you’ll comment, and you’ll ask questions.

Rebecca’s husband focused less on selling and focused more on helping his prospects buy. He crafted his website so that people could see themselves in the content on his profile.

Remember that people who are on LinkedIn are there because they want to network. They want to grow their businesses and learn for their businesses.

Start by getting on LinkedIn and emulate what you see other people doing.

Make sure your profile looks good and start small.

Determine which interactions give you the most value and replicate those tasks. Work LinkedIn into your natural flow and don’t let it interfere with other things you need to do for your work.

“Use LinkedIn for Inbound” episode resources

Connect with Rebecca on LinkedIn or at her website rgbrizi.com. All her contact information is there, so you can message her, email her, and ask questions or share experiences.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

This episode is also brought to you byMaximizer CRM. If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Dave Lorenzo, Networking, Sales Reps, Donald Kelly

TSE 924: Sales From The Street: “The 60 Second Sale”

 

 

The Sales Evangelist, Sales From The Street, Dave LorenzoWhat if you could make more money and get home on time for dinner every night? Sounds impossible, right? The 60-Second Sale might be the answer for sales professionals who want to achieve success without sacrificing their lifestyles.

Today on Sales From the Street, we’ll talk to Dave Lorenzo, author of The 60-Second Sale, about how to develop deeper relationships with prospects and align your business goals with your lifestyle.

Dave calls the book the ultimate system for building lifelong client relationships in the blink of an eye.

Business relationships

Dave compares his concept to love at first sight: a lightning-bolt moment of magic when two people are deeply connected. Likewise, his book is about making those moments and creating the conditions that allow you to close a huge deal in 60 seconds.

The secret is having the right relationship with the right person.

Regardless of your industry, and whether you’re B2B or B2C, the process works for everyone.

A lot of salespeople are struggling to figure out how they’re going to make enough money to take care of their families.

Dave’s answer to that is that every salesperson already knows enough people to make the money they need for the month. They know enough people to make their sales quota.

Connect with people

It may be true that those people have forgotten what it is you do, or they’ve forgotten about the value you can add, so you have to refresh their memory.

Start by making a long list of everyone you know and reaching out to them. Your goal is to make sure they know what you do and how you can help them.

Once you’ve done that, those people will be out looking for people they can introduce you to.

In the past, when I’ve given this advice to struggling salespeople, they usually get themselves back on track within a few days if they follow my advice. They usually have some solid leads and some even close some deals, and though those deals aren’t huge, they are usually enough to spark some confidence.

Once you get the first one, it gives you some momentum, and relationship sales is all about having the confidence to help people.

Sales mindset

Your mindset is the key to success in sales.

If you sell security systems door-to-door but one person tells you they aren’t interested because they already have a system, you shouldn’t take that as rejection.

You hand the person a card and ask them to put it in the kitchen drawer so that later down the road when the current provider fails to meet his standards, he can call you back about changing companies.

About 90 percent of your sales career hinges on your mindset.

Lasting impression

If you’re a member of the Chamber of Commerce, a couple of days before the next meeting, call the membership person who signed you up for the chamber. Let her know that you want to make two really good connections at the event.

Given that she knows about your industry, ask her to name the most valuable people for you to target.

She’ll make a couple of suggestions, then you ask her for an introduction to those people. She’ll understand, after all, that the reason people renew their memberships to the chamber is because of the ROI.

Any chamber person worth their salt will be happy to make those introductions, and once you have a great introduction, you’ll be able to have a productive conversation.

Maximize the conversation

After the introduction, you explain that you’re thrilled she introduced you and you’ve read up on the person’s company. Then ask the other person how she gets the most out of her chamber membership.

They expect that you’re going to make a pitch. When you ask about the chamber, you’re highlighting a commonality, and you’re asking them for help that isn’t related to their business.

Then, ask her how she got into the industry that she’s in now. You’re opening a chapter in her mind where she gets to talk about herself, and she’ll start to relax a bit.

She’ll think either one of two things: either this guy is really into me, or this is the worst salesperson I’ve ever seen in my life. Either way, she will let down her guard since she isn’t anticipating a sale.

Then you ask how business is. You ask how the economy is treating her. Ask her whatever you want to know about her business.

Then you can say something about goals and targets. When you do, you’ll be speaking the language of entrepreneurs and business people rather than sounding salesy.

Then you offer to introduce her to someone who can help her achieve her goals, or you can follow up with her later.

Sales leaders

A lot of sales leaders shouldn’t be in leadership roles. They simply get thrust there because they are the best salesperson.

Dave’s philosophy is to determine your best salesperson and then get out of his way. Remove all the barriers and let him sell.

Your best managers should be capable of three things:

  1. Removing barriers to free their best people to soar.
  2. Onboarding people and training them effectively so they know how to develop deep relationships.
  3. Coaching and mentoring people to maintain their attitudes and confidence.

The worst thing you can do to your salespeople is forcing them to do something unnatural, and the best thing you can do is challenge them.

Rule of thumb

Each industry is different.

For every 100 relationships you develop, about 10 will result in business in the short term. about 15-20 will result in business within the next 60-90 days. Over the next six months, about 35-40 percent of those relationships will produce business.

Be very intentional about the people you meet in a business setting.

Of everyone you’ve met in college or in your town, two-thirds of those people are going to either refer business to you or do business with you.

Dave has a list of 20 names in his office that will be future clients. He works every day to find people in those companies that he can call or email and he reaches out to them.

Get three pieces of stationery.

Send one to a client thanking him for doing business with you. Include a business card so that if someone needs your services, he can share your card.

Send another to someone who referred business to you in the past thanking them for their help.

Send the third to someone you want to work with who has been highlighted in the news, either online or in the physical newspaper.

Do three cards every day, even on Saturday and Sunday.

The 60-Second Sale” episode resources

You can connect with Dave at his website, DaveLorenzo.com. You can find all kinds of free stuff there, including about 300 articles and 500 videos.

Grab a copy of The 60-Second Sale: The Ultimate System for Building Lifelong Client Relationships in the Blink of an Eye

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

John Ferrara, Nimble, Social CRM, Donald Kelly,

TSE 923: How To Grow Your Sales Without Spending A Dime On Marketing

Imagine a world where you don’t have to spend any money on marketing. You have leads pouring in, deals close, and referrals pour in. Imagine being able to grow your sales without spending a dime on marketing.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Jon Ferrara shares the method he recommends to grow your sales without spending a dime on marketing.

Jon founded GoldMine CRM in 1989 and then sold it in 1999, and he has devoted his time since then to help other people improve their relationships. He also created a social CRM called Nimble.

No matter what industry you’re in, you have to find a way to get new leads into your funnel without spending so much money.

Great stories

Jon was looking for a way to automate the process of building relationships because he struggled with it as a salesperson and as a businessperson. He wanted to be able to connect more effectively with the humans around him.

The result was GoldMine, and it became exactly that for everyone it touched.

As an example, consider Jesus. Do you think Jesus spent any money on marketing?

He didn’t spend money. He shared words that empowered people and then those people became his teachers and preachers. Jesus created a movement.

If you’ll focus on helping other people grow and set yourself up as a trusted advisor, you’ll stay top of mind with your prospect. You’ll grow your sales without spending a dime on marketing.

Be an advisor

Advertising doesn’t work.

You won’t stay top-of-mind with your prospects by telling them how great you or your products are. Nobody cares about that.

Instead, teach others how to become better, smarter, faster, and set yourself up as that trusted advisor. Give knowledge away.

If you teach people to fish, they’ll figure out you sell fishing poles.

 

5 e’s

Your goal should be to:

  • educate
  • enchant
  • engage
  • embrace
  • empower

If you do that for your customers and your prospects, and for their influencers as well on a daily basis, you’ll establish your brand, grow your network and create a sustainable garden around your business that will help it grow.

That’s what Jon did with GoldMine. He figured out how to reach his prospects’ trusted advisor, in this case, Novell. Jon convinced Novell to use GoldMine, and then they started recommending it.

He started GoldMine with $5,000, without ever taking a dime of venture capital.

And that was only the first time he grew sales without spending money on marketing.

Jon used the one-to-many approach to reach his prospects.

Reach the influencers

If you could find a way to tell your great stories and get other people to tell your great stories around the clock globally, you could build a gold mine.

Most people focus solely on their customers and their prospects and they forget about the influencers who interact with those customers and prospects.

The secret to success is identifying the influencers of your core constituency.

If I was a business technology reseller, I could try to call businesses but they’d probably hang up on me.

Imagine, instead, if I built relationships with the trusted advisors of that small business person: maybe their accountant, their marketing consultant, or any one of their advisors.

If you can build those relationships, those trusted advisors will help you reach all those people on a daily basis.

We built a tool that helped the influencer grow, and they sold it as a solution and not only helped their customer grow but also grew themselves. It became a recursive cycle.

 

Amplify the message

Once you’ve built an army of evangelists, you have to amplify that message.

What does that mean?

Once you convince those influencers to sell to that base of trusted customers, they’ll likely ask you for leads.

If you don’t have money to advertise, how will you give people leads?

Jon went after the places where his prospects would be consuming information about how to be better and smarter and faster. He went after the business and technology publications and asked the editors and the writers how he could help them write more stories.

They needed stories about how businesses were using technology to grow, so he shared those stories. The term CRM didn’t exist then, but he helped define it.

He credits a combination of influencer marketing and guerilla PR that put GoldMine on the map.

Individual sellers

Your network is your net worth: your personal brand plus your professional network will help you achieve your dreams in life.

The more people you help grow, the more you will grow. To do that, you must set yourself up as a trusted advisor to your prospects, customers, and their influencers.

The simplest way to do that is to establish identity across all the brands where these people have conversations: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram, Foursquare, Google Plus, Crunchbase, and Snapchat.

Share content on a daily basis that inspires and educates others about your areas of products and services. No more than 25 percent of what you share should be about you or your product. It should mostly be inspirational and educational.

You’ve likely forgotten more about your products and services than your customers will ever know in their lifetime. Since you’re likely consuming content every day about your area, just share it with the prospects around you.

Identify the influencers, share content, and hashtag it appropriately, (#sales, #marketing, #social) and then @name. It’s like dropping lures outside your boat into the digital social river surrounding your business.

People bite on that.

Listen and engage

Then you listen and engage. You educate with enchanting content with the intent to engage, embrace, and empower the people that you connect to.

When you connect with someone, you don’t start selling. You listen and learn. Prepare them before the engagement ideally by Nimbling them.

You ask questions and then listen and learn to find ways to add value. And if you do that for another person, they’ll naturally ask how they can return the favor. And you repeat that process at scale for the rest of your life.

You’ll build a sustainable garden of prospects, customers, and influencers that will help you achieve what you want to in life.

Islands of information

The biggest problem with this whole cycle is if you do what I tell you to do, you’re going to get so overconnected and overcommunicated wit this audience that you’ll need a platform to manage it.

We’ve got all these tools in all these places like Facebook, Gmail, MailChimp, and dozens of other places, and contact management is broken.

You can only manage about 200 people in your head at a given time, and most people have 1,000 or 10,000 contacts. They need a golden Rolodex, a personal CRM.

Instead of Googling people, you Nimble them. and automatically sync every interaction you have so that you have a history of every contact and every followup.

If you’re listening to this today and you don’t have a personal golden Rolodex, go find one. If you try Nimble and you like it, I’m going to give you three months at 40 percent off if you use the code Jon40.

Salespeople aren’t detail people

Most people who are in sales are people people; they are relationship people, not detail people.

If you’re in sales, you need a tool to organize yourself. You might want to find another human being who is detail-oriented and become a team.

Jon believes that if you do what you’re good at in life and then surround yourself with people that are good at the things you aren’t good at, you can be much more successful.

Establish a brand across all the places that are straightforward. People buy from people they like, know, and trust. Going to my LinkedIn profile is like going to my business lobby; you won’t find out much about me personally.

Instagram is where you’ll find out more about me personally, and you can connect based on that. People don’t connect because they both love sales. They connect because they value the same things.

Don’t just share business stuff. Open yourself up on your social media.

“Grow Your Sales” episode resources

You can connect with Jon via email or Google his name to find him on a variety of platforms. Connect with him on the ones that feel most comfortable.

Find Vala Afshar on Twitter to see an example of sharing content that educates and inspires at scale.

Listen to episode 005 of The Sales Evangelist to hear Judy Garmaise talk about the importance of followup for salespeople.

When it’s time to follow up with your leads, Prospect.io can make your followup that much better. It has literally changed the way I prospect, and I love it.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRMis a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Donald Kelly, Leads, Patrick Shaw, Rapidfunnel

TSE 918: Using Technology To Convert Leads

The Sales Evangelist, Using Technology to Convert LeadsEvery sales professional understands the importance of generating leads. In addition to those leads, we must focus on using technology to convert leads.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, Patrick Shaw will talk to us about using technology to convert leads. If we use technology and software, we can work smarter and not harder.

Patrick is the founder and CEO of RapidFunnel, a mobile-based permission marketing app created for direct sales, small businesses, and franchises.

It isn’t enough to just have leads; we have to build relationships with and nurture our prospects.

We must have systematic ways to keep up with our prospects and our sales processes.

Converting leads

In the early days of his career, Patrick said he was guilty of putting dollar signs on people’s heads. He felt bad about it, but he also realized that the number of people he spoke to was directly related to the amount of money that he made.

Patrick started to wonder whether he could shift his priorities so that he could improve the quality of his prospect’s life and put his own needs completely to the side.

He wondered about making the process easier and more comfortable for both the salesperson and the prospect as well.

The conversion success rate often depends on the type of organization it is and where their leads come from.

Massage therapists, for example, believe in what they’re doing, but they don’t think of themselves as salespeople. They’re very uncomfortable coming off as “salesy.” They suffer from a very different problem than someone who is in sales.

Many times it’s a question of efficiencies. Are they creating real efficiencies? Do they have systems and processes in place that make them more efficient than the person trying to do the same task manually?

 

Four Disciplines of Execution

Patrick loves Stephen Covey’s book The Four Disciplines of Execution.

1. Focus on the wildly important. Whether you’re a salesperson or a company, what are your wildly important goals? Usually it’s involved around increasing revenue.

2. Act on the lead measure. If your wildly important goal is to increase revenue which comes through sales, then what’s the lead measure? For almost all companies, it’s prospecting and followup.

3. Have a scoreboard. If there’s no scoreboard, you don’t know where anyone stands during the game. When people have something wildly important, they’ve identified their lead measure and they have a scoreboard based on that lead measure. There’s a cadence of accountability where people hold each other accountable.

4. Develop a cadence of accountability. With a scoreboard, there’s a cadence of accountability where people hold each other accountable. it changes the dynamics of an organization.

The cadence of accountability can be difficult to create if you don’t have a scoreboard. At RapidFunnel, we measure the quantity of the exposure and the quality of the exposure. We can tell you the number of unique exposures you make, and the quality of that exposure based on the engagement of the prospect.

He does note that accountability is never about pointing out those who are failing but rather about highlighting those who are doing proper activity.

Using technology to convert

Technology often makes things more difficult because there’s only so much bandwidth. If someone has to create all their own content for a platform, they’ll be stretched thin.

The lead measure isn’t creating content and becoming a marketing expert. We want to make it simple for the sales reps to tell the company’s story.

You can’t automate a relationship, but here’s what RapidFunnel can do: it can tell you when your prospect is watching the videos that you sent him. It can tell you how long he watched and what he watched.

You can then pick up the phone and call him, and he’ll say, “Hey! I was just watching the videos you sent me.”

It’s discovery, and it’s personal, but it’s automated.

The key is to leverage technology that adds value without sucking you in time-wise.

The reason so many large organizations fail at social media marketing is because they add branding to their personal contacts. The very essence of social is relationship-based, and your prospects have a relationship with you, not your company.

Work on yourself

Whether you’re leveraging technology or not, work harder on yourself than you do on business. Spend 10-15 minutes a day getting your mind right, seeking clarity about your goals and your purpose.

Determine the value you’re trying to create in the marketplace because the answers will come when you do. Continually educate yourself and have a growth mindset.

You will leverage technology the right way as long as you focus on the bigger picture.

There are only so many hours in the day, and you’ve got to be judicious with your time.

 

“Using Technology” episode resources

If you’d like to connect with Patrick, you can find him at RapidFunnel.com and request a demo or more information. You can request a demo or simply request more information about the platform.

Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

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Dr. James Kelley, Authentic Leader Model, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 901: The Authentic Leader Model and Making Better Leaders

Dr. James Kelley, Authentic Leader Model, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

Authentic leadership involves understanding that everyone has a unique journey, and everyone brings some kind of baggage to the office. You don’t have to understand the baggage; you simply have to understand that they have it.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Dr. James Kelley, professor of marketing, talks to us about authentic leadership, his authentic leader model, and about how adversity creates better leaders.

Dr. Kelley hosts the podcast Executive After Hours, and he noticed a recurring theme that occurred during his podcast conversations: adversity changes people.

Growth from adversity

Dr. Kelley recounted the story of Joe Burton, who became the COO of McCann Erickson Worldgroup by the time he was 40 years old.

He was unbelievably successful, but he was miserable. He was aggressive with his employees, unhappy with his wife, and his body was physically breaking down.

When Joe inventoried his life, he realized he had lost his twin sister and his older sister within the span of two and a half years. He had also lost his dad about 12 years earlier.

The sheer amount of adversity caused him to reflect on his life, and it led him to launch Whil.com, a company that specializes in mindfulness. His own adversity transformed his life and made him more aware of his challenges, and it set him on a new path.

Likewise, Bridgette Mayer owns an art gallery in Philadelphia. She grew up in a crack house with six siblings until she and two of her sisters were adopted by a single family.

Her older sister committed suicide and the younger one landed in drug rehab. Bridgette, meanwhile, graduated from high school and then college, and then opened her own gallery.

So why did Bridgette succeed where his sisters hadn’t? She says it’s because she embraced adversity and reframed her challenges as opportunities. She had the right people around her at the right time to give her the right advice, and she was willing to listen.

Dr. Kelley believes that our adversity connects us to other people.

When he was in sales, he quickly learned that personal stories connect people faster than almost any other tool. Relatable stories like death or divorce create an instant bond that establishes immediate trust.

Dr. Kelley’s leadership model

Grab a piece of paper and a pencil.

Draw a medium circle and write the word ‘crucible’ inside. Now draw a circle outside of that, like you’re drawing a bulls-eye.

At the top of the outer circle write ‘self-awareness’ and leave the bottom portion of the outer circle empty.

Then draw one more circle on the outside of the first two, and write the words ‘compassion,’ ‘integrity,’ and ‘relatableness’ in that circle.

Dr. Kelley’s leadership research suggests that when people embrace their adversity or their crucible moment, their framing of that moment determines the effect it will have on their future.

Most people treat adversity as something that happens to them instead of viewing it as an opportunity to learn something new.

Those who frame adversity in a positive way, though it might take six months or a year, deepen their self-awareness.

They discover that they actually want to treat people with respect. They want to have compassion for people and relieve their suffering.

As your self-awareness grows, you move out into the model a bit, and you eventually discover that you’d like to live with a little bit more integrity and honesty. Because that’s how you want to be treated, you discover that it’s the best way to treat others.

You discover that as you have hard conversations that demand honesty, you build trust and loyalty, and you discover that relationships play a very significant part in your life.

As you learn to embrace relatableness, you seek ways to create micro-moments and meaning.

Without a growth mindset, you have self-awareness but nothing to do with it. When people embrace a learning mindset, that’s when they start to develop.

You become a much more authentic person and you spend every day trying to improve yourself for you rather than for anyone else.

Evolving people

You have to know that people have bad days.

If you see an empty water cup on an employee’s desk and you refill it, you’re demonstrating compassion and kindness.

Those micro-moments develop trust and compassion and integrity, and the return-on-investment is much greater than in companies that don’t embrace this culture.

If we take care of the employees first, they will take care of the organization.

Dr. Kelley believes that hiring a coach is the key to understanding your own adversity. He believes that evaluating your adversity and figuring out what you’ve learned that you can take forward is the key to success.

Being able to admit that you don’t know everything and surrounding yourself with people who can help you achieve your goals will help you better embrace your adversity.

“Authentic Leader” episode resources

You can connect with Dr. Kelley at his website, or email him at james@drjameskelley.com.  Find The Crucible’s Gift: 5 Lessons From Authentic Leaders Who Thrive In Adversity on his website or on Amazon.

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is our online group coaching program designed to help sellers of all levels. We help sellers who have been selling for years as well as those who are new to sales.

Last semester, we focused on building value, and we’re beginning a new semester in the fall. To find out more or to apply, visit the Hustler’s League.

If you’d like to learn more about video and how to include it in your sales process, check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

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Coffee Shop Meeting, Starbucks, Dunkin Donuts, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 882: The Coffee Shop “Meeting Trap”

Coffee Shop Meeting, Starbucks, Dunkin Donuts, The Sales Evangelist

Imagine being invited to coffee by someone who wants to hear more about what you’re doing. You arrive at the coffee shop, spot him, wave him over, and buy him a drink. After 30 seconds of talking about your project, he launches into a sales pitch. You realize you’ve been snared in the coffee shop meeting trap.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we discuss the negative consequences of misleading sales methods, and why the coffee shop meeting trap may hurt you more than it helps.

It happened to me a lot when I was a new seller, and I quickly discovered that I disliked it. We’re going to address why you shouldn’t do it.

You’ll be perceived as dishonest.

This kind of activity amounts to bait-and-switch. If I show up to meet with you about my podcast, but you turn it into a sales pitch, it makes you seem untrustworthy.

Because buyers are more prepared, they do their research before they connect with people. If you develop a reputation for this kind of behavior, people will begin to sniff it out and they’ll avoid meeting with you altogether.

Even if it lands you one successful sale, you’ll likely experience fallout in the future.

You’ll stand out for the wrong reason.

Bait-and-switch isn’t a new concept. People are aware of it and they’ll recognize it immediately.

My belief has always been that you should do the opposite of what everyone else is doing if you want to be successful.

You’ll burn bridges.

You should always respect people’s time.

If you mislead me into spending an hour of my day with you, without accounting for the travel time to meet with you, you wasted a portion of my day.

If you mislead me into spending time with you, I’m probably going to make a podcast about you.

There’s a better option.

Your ultimate goal should be to foster a relationship.

Look at the person’s LinkedIn and figure out what business he’s in. Figure out how you can provide value to him. Connect him with a potential customer, or write blog content about his company so that your own audience will learn more about him.

In this case, find a way to provide value to the person you’re hoping to connect with. If you know of someone who might make an ideal customer, research to find out whether you’re right.

Once you’ve discovered that the two are a good match, connect them.

In my case, I might begin with a phone conversation about what the prospect could talk about on a podcast. Once we’ve determined that, I’d invite him to appear on the podcast, which helps him.

Perhaps, as a result of the podcast, he’ll want to do something to help me.

Look for opportunities to collaborate.

Be genuine. Begin with a 5-minute conversation that allows you to get to know the other person. Seek to become friends and build lasting connections.

Do the things you know work: nurture the relationship, connect with the prospect, and bring value first.

If you seek to bring value first, you’ll create more opportunity for a lasting relationship.

We tell you these things because we want you to find more ideal customers, build stronger value, close more deals, and do big things.

“Meeting Trap” episode resources

This episode was brought to you by our friends at Wiley, publishers of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. It’s a blueprint for sellers based upon years of research about the things buyers hate.

We’re so convinced that you’ll love the book that we’re providing a free excerpt to our listeners here. We also have a free SlideShare available to help you become a sales leader.

Check out The Sales Evangelizers on Facebook, where a community of people shares their struggles and their experiences with selling.

Also check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

Stop Selling and Start Leading, Best Sales Books, The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly

TSE 880: Stop Selling & Start Leading-“Two-Way Dialogue”


Stop Selling and Start Leading, Best Sales Books, The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly

Sometimes, the relationship between seller and customer goes bad. Small mistakes grow into tension and the relationship starts to sour. In this case, it doesn’t matter who’s right or wrong. You must be the leader who initiates a two-way dialogue.

This is the final episode of our three-part series about the book Stop Selling & Start Leading, and we talk about connections and two-way dialogue.

Our first episode on Monday was about building trust and innovating as sellers, and the second addressed innovative sellers and their role in successful sales processes.

Even if you don’t listen to them in chronological order, listen to all three episodes so you’ll have the tools to move into a role as a sales leader and business advisor.

Stay in touch.

You worked hard to bring that client on as a customer. You promised all kinds of things, but you disappeared after the handoff.

Even when everything is going well in the transaction, sellers will notice your disappearance.

Ideally, meaningful connections survive long beyond closing the deal if you foster the relationship, and there are countless ways to do it.

Send your customer a birthday card; stop in to see how he’s doing; call to check in; send a message on social media when you see something that makes you think of her.

Better yet, recognize when your client achieves excellence. Find out when people in the company get awards and acknowledge the effort.

If, for example, one of my previous clients learned of my intention to launch a new podcast and reached out to congratulate me for it, that would be meaningful to me. It represents their acknowledgment of my work, and I’d appreciate it.

Come together.

When relationships deteriorate, both sides lose money. When both sides come together to address the problem, solutions often emerge.

Stephen Covey, in his book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, teaches that you must first seek to understand others. Once you understand their point of view, you can explain your own.

Be transparent. Show respect. When someone makes a decision you don’t agree with, don’t play the victim.

Understand your customer’s strategic plan as well as the impact of your decisions on your customers.

Be open to your customers’ ideas and get rid of the “us and them” mentality. Ask yourself what you can do to help them, and be humble.

Keep working.

In some cases, your initial efforts at resolution may fail, and some people might be tempted to walk away from the relationship.

Address issues head-on, and act like a leader. Change your thinking from a belief that you’re simply a salesperson to a belief that you’re the CEO of your territory. Help the business grow by mending broken relationships.

From the book Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen:

“Extraordinary performance isn’t possible unless there’s a strong sense of shared creation and shared responsibility. Exemplary leaders make the commitment to foster collaboration by engaging in these essentials.”

Grab your free excerpt of the book here, and view the SlideShare that explains many of the leadership principles you need to stop being subservient to your customers. If you prefer, download the SlideShare so you can refer back to it.

“Two-way dialogue” episode resources

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Our friends at Wiley have provided a free excerpt of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. Based on research and interviews with buyers, the book provides a blueprint for sales professionals. Read an excerpt of the book here. Grab your copy of the SlideShare.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

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Daimian Thompson, Donald Kelly, LeadFuze, Cold Email

TSE 866: Cold Email What Works, What’s Changed & What Not To Do


Daimian Thompson, Donald Kelly, LeadFuze, Cold Email

Email is a great form of communication. It allows us to reach out to people on their time without interrupting them like a call would, but the ease of it is the reason more people are doing it. Sales professionals must unravel what works, what’s changing, and what not to do with cold email; why they must zig when everyone else zags.

LeadFuze is a lead generation platform with two important functions: it helps you build a list of leads that match your customer profile, and it provides assistance to help you hone your conversations.

The goal of LeadFuze is to help sales reps and entrepreneurs start more sales conversations.

Understand the purpose

Buyers never buy simply because of email. You’re reaching out to a stranger, so even if you know it’s a good fit, you’re never going to convince them to buy from you with email alone.

The purpose of email is to start a conversation. You cannot go for the meeting too quickly. Sales reps tend to go from 0 to 100 without understanding that they have to earn the right to ask for a meeting.

You cannot sound like a brochure, and you cannot talk all about yourself. Unless you’re famous in your industry, people aren’t going to agree to talk to you just because you’re you.

Once you’ve started the conversation, you can move into your normal sales process, whatever that is. How do you do that?

It sounds cliche, but sales and dating are a lot alike. You’d never walk up to a stranger in a bar and suggest getting married and having lots of kids. The same is true in sales.

It’s not about you. It’s all about them.

Of course you understand your industry; but do you understand theirs? As you’re reading your emails, how many times do you use “I, we, us?” If you are, you’re doing it wrong.

Initiate the conversation

Retail stores must wait for customers to come to them. Sales reps don’t have to.

By the time your customer finds your website, he likely thinks he already knows the answers to all his questions and he has preconceived notions about what he should do.

Be the one to start the conversation.

Begin by looking at your existing customer portfolio to determine who your ideal customer is. Realize, too, that if most of your business exists in one industry, but you don’t like that industry, it’s ok to pursue others.

Send 4 to 5 emails over the course of a few weeks. Keep them short and deliver value.

Email 1: “When I’m talking to VPs in this industry, they generally tell me that they struggle with one of two problems. Which is the biggest problem for you?”

Email 2: (This is not a pitch.) Provide a solution to Pain A from your original email and give a free resource.

Email 3: Provide a solution to Pain B from your original email. Give a free resource.

Email 4: “Is there a problem we haven’t discussed yet? I’d love to discuss it with you to see if I can help you solve it.”

Set realistic expectations

Sales reps tend to diagnose too quickly. We forget that everything worth doing takes time.

We won’t become number one on Google the day after we study SEO. It’s a little like going to the gym: it takes time.

Instead of doing a few hours of cold email one day a week, spread it out over the course of the week. (Again, think of it like going to the gym.)

Keep your pipeline full with a little bit of effort every day. Do simply practices repeatedly. Keep the patterns that work.

When you come into a brand new job, it isn’t lead rich. If it was, the person before you wouldn’t have left.

In the first 90 days, sales reps are a whirlwind of activity. It’s the most productive period in any job.

Because you don’t have any business, you’re completely focused on business development. Once a deal emerges, you stop working on business development because you’d rather be working on the deal.

Sales reps create their own feast or famine cycles because they stop working on lead generation once they see a deal developing. Instead, make it part of your daily calendar.

Use the acronym WIIFM to drive your pitch. When your prospect is listening to your pitch, why should they care? They’ll ask themselves, “What’s in it for me?”

“Cold Email” episode resources

To connect with Damian, email him at Damian@leadfuze.com, or go to the LeadFuze website.

Business development is hard for all sales reps. I recommend the book Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley because it’s a fantastic blueprint of all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

I’m offering a free excerpt of the book so you can check it out for yourself.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. Video Jungle offers top-notch, state-of-the-art advice about video.

Email me for more information about our newly launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. You can also email us about our new business development services.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

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Christopher Ibezim, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 844: Sales From The Street: “My Prices Were Too High”

Christopher Ibezim, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

What do you do when your competitor’s product is cheaper than yours?

Today on Sales From The Street, we talk to Chris Ibezim about what happened when he realized his prices were too high, and how changing his mindset helped him overcome the challenge.

Begin with research

Chris’ biggest challenge in sales was figuring out how to handle selling a product that was significantly more expensive than his competitors’.

He started by researching why his product cost more, with a goal to determine what made his product different.

He discovered that the way to demonstrate value was to understand the differences between the two products.

Compare your product to your competitors’ product so you can understand what makes yours different. Don’t use the word better; instead, let your customer decide that.

Educate your customers

If a customer has an opportunity to buy a car for $5,000 or a car for $10,000, it’s easy to assume you’ll buy the cheaper car.

But what if the more expensive car is a Ferrari? Although it’s more expensive, it has far greater value.

Your job is to educate your customer about your product, and explain why it’s worth the price.

When you’re confident in your product, when you provide the right information, and when you set the right expectation, you’ll find the right customer.

We’re all in the relationship business. Everything comes after you build the relationship because people buy from people they are comfortable with.

“My Prices Were Too High” resources

You can find Chris on Instagram: @klozemore and on Facebook.

Learn how to lead your buyers instead of being subservient. The book Stop Selling & Start Leading, offered by our friends at Wiley, provides a blueprint for your customers and what they are seeking. Read an excerpt of the book here.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

The podcast is part of our newly-launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. To learn more, email us at SPN for more information.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Rom JB, Tutoring, Facebook Selling, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 841: Seek To Serve When Using Social Media

Rom JD, The Sales Evangelist, TutoringSocial media is here to stay. The faster sales professionals learn to use it, the better off they’ll be. The trick, according to Romual Jean-Baptiste, is to seek to serve when using social media.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, Rom explains how he uses social media, why he uses social media, and why you must incorporate it into your own sales process.

The truth, he said, is that we really have no choice in the matter. Everyone around us is using social media, and it’s a necessity that we evolve to it.

The more we resist it, the more of a disservice we’re doing to ourselves.

Identify your ideal customer.

Rom is a certified special educator whose company provides in-home tutoring for clients in New York City.

His ideal customer is a married working mom who is busy with her career, her family, and her social life. She uses social media extensively to interact with her friends, share things with her family, and ask questions.

Everything Rom does on social media is based around Lisa.

He completely surrounds himself with her life so he can understand how she sees the world. He joins women’s groups, reads content targeted at women like Lisa, and goes to live events and interacts with women like Lisa. He even tries to predict her favorite restaurants.

Rom said he constantly learns new things about Lisa because she is always evolving. As a result, his marketing and his use of social media must do the same.

He has determined that, once you understand your ideal client, you’ll be able to market effectively.

Interact with your prospects.

Once you understand who you’re marketing to, watch them to see how they use social media.

Rom discovered that his prospects are in their 30s, so they are primarily using Facebook, although they are also moving to Instagram. Because his prospects are moving, he’s going with them.

He also said he is careful not to spread himself too thin, choosing instead to focus on a couple of different platforms instead of trying to master them all.

In Rom’s case, he follows the school calendar and other related events to provide value to prospects.

If they ask a question about education, he answers it. If they accomplish something, he congratulates them. If the end of the school year is coming, he posts about summer learning. During back-to-school, he shares information about that.

By understanding who he’s going after and the problems they face, he is able to provide content relevant to the pain they are facing.

Invest in the people you’re trying to reach.

People tend to overthink social selling and incorrectly assume that the goal is to push their own agenda.

Instead, Rom said, take the time to invest in your ideal customer. Understand her. Provide value to her.

When prospects are considering whether to pursue tutoring, Rom works to land their cell phone numbers because he calls text messaging the “Holy Grail” of social selling. (People respond faster to text messages than email, in his experience.)

Once he has the number, he sends an infographic to their phone with a list of questions they should consider as they continue their research and decide which tutors to choose.

  • How flexible is your schedule?
  • How will you track my child’s progress?
  • How will you inform my child’s teacher about his progress?
  • Do you have a money-back guarantee?

This guide helps them make an informed decision about tutors, even if they decide to go with another company, and it’s directly on their phones so they can access it as they interview prospective companies.

Seek to serve when using social media.

Use time to improve your ROI.

It boils down to the platinum rule: treating people the way they want to be treated.

And though it may seem too time consuming to keep up with all of your clients via text message, Rom said the return-on-investment is incredible. If you are able to scale the unscalable, the sky is the limit.

It might seem too time consuming to send a Mother’s Day text to each one, or to acknowledge a child’s birthday, but people do business with people they know, like, and trust. Your clients will always be loyal, and they’ll refer you to other people.

“Seek To Serve When Using Social Media” resources

If you’d like to connect with Rom to hear more about how he tripled his revenue in less than two years with the help of social selling, connect with him on Facebook.

There’s a reason I continue suggesting the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic blueprint of all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

I’m so convinced of its message that I’m offering a free excerpt of the book so you can check it out.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Dale Dupree, The Sales Evangelist, LinkedIn, Social Selling

TSE 836: Make Social Selling A Part of Your Day to Day Life

Dale Dupree, The Sales Evangelist, LinkedIn, Social SellingIf you don’t already make social selling a part of your day, you should. The millennial generation has connected everyone on social media. Using those platforms to sell should be a natural progression for all sales professionals.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, we’re talking with Dale Dupree, the Copier Warrior, about using LinkedIn as part of your sales process.

Create Curiosity

Your social media pages are your own personal web pages. Your goal is to make sure that people who visit your page can tell what you’re all about.

Make sure they can accomplish the things you want them to accomplish when they get there.

Spark interest for your connections. Create something of value.

If you can create undeniable curiosity, you’ll fly through the sales process in ways you never have before.

Dale recalled a customer who walked away from a 20-year relationship with another company to do business with him.

The customer told him that no one had ever created the kind of curiosity that he had. No one had ever made the sales process enjoyable like he did.

Avoid Pitching

When you first reach out to someone on social media, they’ll likely visit your profile and decide whether to connect with you.

If the very first thing you do after connecting is pitch them, you will have blown an opportunity.

It won’t matter that you have a cool product that no one has ever heard of because you will have blown your chance to connect.

Pitching them should never be the very first contact you make. You’ve built no credibility.

Social media is purely an outreach piece.

Build Community

Dale did the same thing with his LinkedIn community that he does with his in-person sales community.

He created content that motivated people to interact with him. He went local with his outreach and targeted people around him the same way he would with traditional prospecting efforts.

His social media platforms allowed his connections to view his bio and his work history, and learn more about him and his business.

He posted regularly about the connections he was making with people to promote the idea of fellowship.

He boiled it down this way:

Don’t neglect the less-obvious employees in any company either. Rather than simply connecting with the decision makers, connect with the people they work with as well.

Share Stories

People love a good story, so articulate yours well. Tell them how you got where you are. Ask them to share their stories.

It creates interest, and it encourages people to get to know one another.

Don’t be sales-y.

Salespeople are the enemy because there are a million of them, and you’re just one more in the crowd. Your prospect already has plenty of them.

Make people smile. Have fun. Get familiar with the people on social media.

If you do it well, when they meet you in person for the first time, they’ll know you as “the LinkedIn guy.”

Make social selling a part of your day.

Episode Resources

You can connect with Dale at CopierWarrior.com. You can also find him on LinkedIn and other social media platforms as well.

Our friends at Wiley have provided a free excerpt of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. Based upon research and interviews with buyers, the book provides a blueprint sales professionals. Read an excerpt of the book here.

Once you’ve applied the concepts you heard here today, message me or email me and let me know what your results were.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

The podcast is part of our newly-launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. To learn more, email us at SPN for more information.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

 

 

Jared Easley, Podcast Movement, Twitter, Prospecting, Social Selling

TSE 828: How To Use Twitter To Grab Prospects Attention

Jared Easley, The Sales Evangelist, capture prospects' attentionDepending on how you’re using it and what you’re trying to accomplish, Twitter is alive and well. In fact, Jared Easley, known as a “noticer,” believes  Twitter is full of people who are starving for true connection, and he believes you can use it to grab prospects’ attention.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, we’ll discuss techniques for using Twitter to build connections and create an army for yourself.

Genuine connections

If you reach out to someone and express interest in what they’re doing, it will almost always be received well. When you’re willing to have a dialogue, people respond.

On the other hand, think about your own reaction when someone tries to cram something down your throat. 

Connections that only involve an attempt to sell or self-promote will almost always be ignored.

The issue isn’t automation, because automation can be done well. The issue is a stack of posts queued in your account that only promote a sales opportunity or a link to sign up for something.

The good news is that Twitter has become proactive in its efforts to clean up some of the mass automation and is policing that kind of behavior. Furthermore, those kinds of interactions won’t benefit you on Twitter.

What will benefit you on Twitter is a genuine connection; a willingness to concern yourself more with the other person than with yourself.

One-to-one

Some people mistakenly believe that one-to-one contact doesn’t work on Twitter. We tend to get so caught up in numbers that we miss the chance to start small and measure whether our message will resonate with just a few people.

The truth is that those who genuinely connect with other people will find that their message compounds, and ultimately they reach more people because they were willing to invest in one-to-one connections.

Jared recently put Twitter to use during a trip to Las Vegas. He started with a keyword search  and narrowed those results down to the people in Las Vegas. Then, through a campaign of @ mentions, rather than direct messages, he reached out to podcasters in the area and invited them to a free meet up.

The outreach worked because he wasn’t asking them to buy anything or come see what he was doing. He simply invited them to meet other podcasters. As a by-product, Jared had the opportunity to interview a few of them for his own podcast.

Although there’s no guarantee that any of those relationships will ever result in a sale, you will have created rapport. You used one-to-one messaging in a way that wasn’t spammy.

As a result of the positive experience you created, the prospect will be more likely to think of you in a positive way.

Grab prospects’ attention

You can also use Twitter to find targeted lists of people.

The Google Chrome extension TWLETS allows you to find a public Twitter list, download it as a CSV file or spreadsheet, and then use that data to connect with people.

You can ask relevant questions of the people on the list, such as “What inspired you to begin podcasting?” or “What microphone do you recommend for podcasters who are just starting out?” Rather than bulk messaging, you can come up with a short list of questions that you spread out among the people on the list.

If you’re operating alone, you’ll likely be ignored. The people who don’t get ignored are the ones who create an army of supporters by building genuine connections.

Once you have demonstrated your interest in what your prospects are doing, reciprocity will kick in and they’ll develop an interest in what you’re doing.

We challenge you to adopt one principle and apply it today. Look for opportunities to notice your prospects. Watch and “notice” them in order to figure it out.

Episode resources

Connect with Jared at podcastmovement.com or on Twitter @jaredeasley. Pick up a copy of Jared’s book, Podcasting Good to Great: How to Grow Your Audience Through Collaboration.

Our friends at Wiley  have provided a free excerpt of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. Based upon research and interviews with buyers, the book provides a blueprint sales professionals. Read an excerpt of the book here.

Once you’ve applied the concepts you heard here today, message me or email me and let me know what your results were.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

The podcast is part of our newly-launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. To learn more, email us at SPN for more information.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

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Relationship Selling, Sales Basic, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 827: Sales Basic 101…Keep The Relationship Going

Relationship Selling, Sales Basic, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistYou don’t want your customer to feel duped. If you spend months working your sales cycle only to disappear after your customer commits to the purchase, she will likely feel like you only cared about the money. You must continue the relationship.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, we’re going to talk about the steps you can take to make sure that your customer doesn’t feel like you only cared about the sale.

Continue the relationship.

I understand the need to keep your pipeline fed. The numbers game says that the more doors you knock on, the more opportunities you have to close a deal.

I want you to understand the need to move your prospect into a role as a client who is a happy, raving fan. I want you to understand the long-term approach.

Especially in industries with long sales cycles, you develop a certain level of intimacy with your prospects. You know about her family, about her work situation, about many issues that are personal for her.

Now imagine that she has paid for your product, and she’s ready to start finding solutions and implementing the product, and you’re completely gone.

The truth is that everyone must focus on their area of expertise. The implementation team doesn’t want you micromanaging their part of the puzzle.

So how can you help your new customer transition to the next department without feeling forgotten?

Take small actions.

1.  Prepare your new customer for the next step in the cycle. If the implementation team will take over and help them begin using your product, prepare her for what that might look like.

Give her a map of what to expect over the next few weeks.

2.  Send some sort of acknowledgement as a “thank you” for the business. If your industry allows it, consider sending a gift of appreciation.

Let her know how much you appreciate her business.

3. During the on-boarding process, check in on a regular basis. Perhaps call once a week just to make sure that everything is going as expected.

Ask if there’s anything you can do to help move the process along.

4.  Move the conversation from email to something else. If you continue your relationship on LinkedIn, you can provide a recommendation for your customer and she may just return the favor.

5. Do something nice for your customer “just because.” If you see a book that makes you think of her, send it with a note.

Besides, if you have an opportunity to upset or upgrade later, you want her to know that you’re still around.

Episode resources

Salespeople can be leaders instead of being subservient. Our friends at Wiley  have provided a free excerpt of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading which provides a blueprint to help sales professionals lead in the way that customers prefer. Read an excerpt of the book here.

After you’ve tried some of the ideas here, I’d love to hear how they worked for you. Email me and let me know what your results were.

Tell others you know about our podcast, and subscribe if you haven’t already. Leave us a review wherever you consume this content so it will be easier for others to find us as well.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

TSE Hustler's League, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Rapport, connect with prospects

TSE 810: TSE Hustler’s League-“You’re Not Like Us”

TSE Hustler's League, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Rapport, connect with prospectsWe do business with people we know, like, and trust. When we connect with prospects, we increase the odds that they’ll feel that way about us.

Often, though, as sales professionals, we skip the connection step and go straight for the sale.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, we discuss ways we can connect with prospects so they begin to see us as someone who is like them.

Create value to connect with prospects.

Whether we’re beginning with cold outreach or warm leads, we must address unconsidered needs: something the prospect hadn’t thought of before.

If I can share something the prospect doesn’t already know, he’ll consider that valuable, and it will build connection.

Craft a message to connect with prospects.

A member of a political party may overlook their dislike for the party candidate because he believes strongly in the party’s message.

Sellers who craft a message prospects can believe in will more readily convert them to customers.

Use more than words to connect with prospects.

We communicate 7 percent of our message through words. The other 93 percent is through vocal tones, volume, and body language.

Without personality, our message won’t translate.

A salesperson called me on behalf of a company that I’m providing coaching for, and she read a script to me. It was monotone and uninteresting, and if I hadn’t known the company, I would have hung up.

Words weren’t enough. I couldn’t relate to her.

Use nonverbal skills to connect with prospects.

Match the pace of your speech to the person you’re speaking to. If he’s from Texas, slow down a bit. From New York? Pick up the pace. If he talks quietly, you do the same.

If the prospect is sitting with crossed arms, use mirroring to try to persuade him to open up his posture. Change your own posture to something open and your prospect may do the same.

Episode resources

We share these messages with you because we want you to build value, be happy, and close more deals.

Most importantly, we want you to go out every day and do big things.

Our group coaching program, The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, offers sellers of all experience levels and all industries a chance to learn from one another, share experiences, and benefit from weekly online coaching sessions.

Our next session begins April 26, and it will focus on building value in an effort to close more deals. To see if you qualify, visit The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League.

Sound provided by Free SFX.

Marty Wilson, Rapport, Negotiate

TSE 803: Can Being Funny Improve Your Rapport Building Skills & Negotiation?

Sales professionals rarely use humor to improve rapport and improve negotiations. For some reason, when we walk through the doors at work, we’re all business.

Research shows, though, that people who incorporate humor into their business are more successful. We gravitate toward people who seem more like us, and humor helps accomplish that.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’re talking with Marty Wilson, a pharmacist-turned-stand-up-comic who understands the power of humor in sales transactions.

Our brains naturally separate people into “us” and “them,” a throwback to the tribal days of humans. Each of us considers a small group of people part of the “us” group; the rest are “them.”

Humor builds rapport and helps people identify us as part of their group, so we’re no longer part of the “them” group.

Use humor to improve rapport

We’re all sales-savvy because we’ve been sold to so often. When we perceive someone selling something to us, red flags go up.

Sales professionals must convince people to “know, like and trust.”   You can’t afford to be boring. The market is overcrowded, and you must somehow make yourself memorable.

Accomplish that by building rapport. Humans trust people who can smile when everyone else is stressed. It suggests psychological stability, and we gravitate toward it.

Funny makes ideas stick. We remember funny commercials and funny jokes because funny implants in our brains more easily than facts.

People listen to your message after you build rapport.

Don’t take yourself too seriously

There are three things you can always laugh at:

  • common enemies
  • shared frustrations
  • yourself

When you can laugh at things happening behind the scenes, customers believe that you understand the industry. If you tell funny stories about the things your customer laughs about behind closed doors, you become an “us” instead of a “them.”

Car salesmen, for example, might joke about the price of oil or government regulation in the car industry.

Take what you do seriously, but don’t take yourself too seriously. When you can laugh at yourself, or even at the difficulty of the negotiation process, it suggests an inner peace.

Acknowledge the obvious

Acknowledge the fact that negotiations are the most difficult part of the sales process. Make a good-natured joke about your sales competitors.

If you can prompt even 10 percent of the people in the audience to laugh, you’ll increase your likability, even among the people who didn’t laugh. Using gentle humor to acknowledge the stress in the process will make you truthful and trustworthy.

Episode resources

Marty Wilson has a new book out called More Funny, More Money plus a free Masterclass about using humor to increase revenue. You’ll also find information about private coaching, video courses, and Marty’s TED Talks.

Connect with Marty at martinwilson.com for keynote speaking engagements and a collection of informational videos.

If your sales results aren’t a laughing matter, consider joining The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online coaching program focused on building value and closing more deals.

Our new semester begins April 26, and we have a few seats available. We’d be honored if you’d join us.

If you enjoy this podcast, be sure to subscribe so you don’t miss any episodes. Then, leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and most importantly share it with other people who can benefit from the lessons we share.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Take Away, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 789: Sales From The Street-“He Was Doing The Take Away”

Take Away, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistSelling to a seller can be especially difficult. I know this because I once found myself working a deal with a client in which he was doing the sales take away. I was so desperate for the sale that I failed to create scarcity.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, I’ll share with you how a client early in my sales career exploited my desperation and his experience to put himself in control of the transaction.

I realized what was happening in the midst of the experience, but I still went along with it because I didn’t want to lose the deal.

As sellers, we must create a sense of value and exclusivity. We don’t want to communicate to clients that we need them but rather we want to create the sense that they need us.

In this episode:

  • Learn the single rule that will set you apart from all of your competitors.
  • Discover what dating and sales have to do with one another, and the principle that applies to both of them.
  • Identify phrases you can use in your take away to create a sense of scarcity for the client.
  • Uncover why conversations are more valuable to clients than sales pitches.

If you aren’t already doing these things, I encourage you to test the ideas. You’ll see for yourself how it builds value and creates relationships.

If you want even more valuable information, our TSE Hustler’s League is an online group coaching program that provides accountability, connections, and a chance to learn from me in a wonderful community of sellers.

If you feel like you’re struggling to infuse enough value in your sales conversations, check out our April semester of Hustler’s League.

Our messages are designed for sellers of all levels, whether you’ve been selling for 15 years or 15 days.

 

Email, Prospecting, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 788: How to Ask For Something in an Email

ask, email, prospectIf you’re going to invest time writing emails to potential clients, it’s important to know how to ask for something in an email. Better yet, it’s important to write emails that get responses and even clients. 

In today’s episode, we discuss the steps you can take to ensure that your emails are working for you. In our interview with magician-turned-trainer Tim David, we discuss the importance of human connection. We also specify how to ask for something in an email.

Before you send another email:

  • Discover the three-word closing that will increase your response rate (as well as the words that don’t work).
  • Identify why effective research really is an important part of communication.
  • Learn the biggest mistake sales professionals make in email communications.
  • Uncover why humor generally doesn’t work in emails.
  • Understand the role alliteration can play in your emails that connect with prospects.

Prospects can smell copy/paste communications, so the most important thing you can do is to prioritize personal connection.

Prospecting

Begin the work of connecting with your prospects in the subject line, and don’t stop until you reach the close. Seek a balance between curiosity and clarity: be clear about what you’re offering, but give them a reason to keep reading.

Use what you’re learning about how to ask for something in an email. 

Be conversational and personal. Write an email that connects with prospects and lets them know that you know who they are.

Different things motivate different people at different times to open emails. As a result, focus on what motivates people to open an email instead of focusing simply on techniques.

Ultimately, communication is always about relationships.

Episode Resources:

Check out The TSE Hustler’s League    https://staging1.thesalesevangelist.com/hustlers/

Tim David’s free report featuring 61 science-based influence strategies   https://moreinfluential.com

True Influence by Tim David   http://booklaunch.io/timdavid/trueinfluence

Tim David on LinkedIn     https://www.linkedin.com/in/timdavidmagic/

 

 

Donald Kelly, TSE Hustler's League, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 630: TSE Hustler’s League-“Be One With Your Prospects”

Donald Kelly, TSE Hustler's League, The Sales EvangelistBuilding rapport is critical in sales. We all know that, I’d assume. It even sounds basic, right? However, not all of us necessarily do what we already know. And you may have probably done some of this stuff but don’t just realize you’re doing it so you have to be intentional as well.

Therefore, it’s important to understand how you can build that rapport with your customers by being one with them.

Empathy

You need to understand and share the feelings of other people.

Help them recognize the problem.

  • Ask the customer what they want or the problem they need to solve. Otherwise. get the third party to ask the client about it or how they enjoyed the experience with you. Sometimes it’s easier for people to open up this way.
  • Write down the problem you got from their honest feedback and not what you think they want.
  • The best way to craft your message that the buyers would believe in is to be someone they like and offer a message they want.

Strategies for rapport-building:

  • Build this habit and do it over and over again until you’re already doing it without thinking because it’s now habitual.
  • Rapport is a closed and harmonious relationship in which the people or groups concerned understand each other’s feelings or ideas and communicate well.
  • Majority of our communication is non-verbal. Hence, the non-verbal part is also essential in our messaging.
  • Treat people they want to be treated. People buy from those they know, like, and trust.
  • Use the terms they use. Look at where they go and spend their time on. For example, subscribe to a trade magazine they read to be able to comprehend and digest everything they could be doing.

Episode Resources:

Maximum Influence by Kurt Mortensen

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Jeff Lee II, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 624: Sales From The Street-“I Didn’t Like Following Up”

Jeff Lee II, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistToo scared to follow up? In today’s episode on Sales from the Street, fellow Floridian Jeff Lee II shares with us how he overcame his biggest challenge of following up.

Jeff and I initially connected on LinkedIn. He is currently the Teams Sales Director at a startup called Cybrary, an open-source cyber security and IT training platform. With four-year experience in sales now, Jeff previously worked for companies including Dell, Oracle, and Latista.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Jeff:

Jeff’s major challenges:

  • Picking up the phone and calling strangers all day long
  • The follow up process which involves continual rapport-building

Strategies Jeff did to overcome the problem:

  1. Build rapport after the call

Continue to make follow-up schedules. Let the prospect know when you’re going to call back for followup. Even if they reschedule, keep sending something in their face to have their attention.

  1. Create a follow-up schedule.

The idea here is to be highly visible to your clients. Jeff calls this as “increasing the deal velocity” where the speed to close will increase as long as you’re able to keep them in the loop of what’s going on.

  1. Set reminders for yourself to follow-up.

Create tasks in whatever CRM you’re using. Just stick to the schedule and tell yourself to stay on top of that.

Results Jeff saw after implementing these strategies:

  • More businesses closed and people coming back
  • Jeff is talking not to prospects anymore but friends now and people who enjoy his company and how he sells himself as a person.

Jeff gives away this bonus strategy when you’re making a demo:

Make sure you’re telling a story. Storytelling is very important for them to understand why you’re here, where you come from, what you provide, and why it will make them better today after they purchase.

Jeff’s Major Takeaway:

Fundamentals are key. Make sure you’re on point and your messaging is clear.

Episode Resources:

Check out their website at www.cybrary.it and reach out to Jeff through email at jeff@cybrary.it or connect with him on LinkedIn.

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

 

Donald Kelly, Rapport, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 592: Is Rapport Building a Waste of Time?

Donald Kelly, Rapport, The Sales EvangelistLife is a big ole sales process. No matter what stage of life we’re at, being a student or a kid, we all have to persuade individuals and do some kind of persuasion in our life. Today, we talk about the power of persuasion and how you can increase that factor and become more effective with your persuasion skills.

Back in episode 366, Kurt Mortensen talked about the idea of persuasion and how you can increase your persuasive abilities. He has a book called Maximum Influence: The 12 Universal Laws of Power Persuasion.

There are different instances in life that we need to persuade people. Students persuade their professors or a guy is trying to get a girl or vice versa or you’re trying to get your mom to allow you to do something, or you’re trying to persuade your wife to let you go out and hang out with the boys.

Focus on Human Tendencies

As a seller, you’re trying to persuade people to make a decision that’s in their best interest that’s going to give value to them. And business persuasion is a powerful skill. In our day and age, we focus so much on the digital side and emailing and social selling that we tend to lose track of those human tendencies. We don’t realize we’re still dealing with human beings on the other side of social media. They are human beings and they have human tendencies.

Kurt emphasized this study in his book that your ability to persuade is 85% of your success in business. And based on this, I’m going to hit up on some of these skills you can implement.

Rapport Building

This has been said a million times but this needs some repeating – People do business with those they know, like, and trust. When you go to a networking event, you immediately look for people you can connect with. And people like to connect with people who are like them.

Treat others the way they like to be treated.

If your customers like strawberry ice cream and you don’t like strawberry because you love vanilla, you don’t have to lie but just don’t state your opinion about it. You want to make sure you build that connection with that individual.

Find a commonality to build that relationship with.

Kurt mentions in his book that any time a buyer can see something about themselves in you, the chances of you winning increases significantly. When you try to go to LinkedIn and do the research, your goal is not just to find random facts but things you can build off of, which are things you have in common. What is something you can present or bring up in the conversation that’s going to make him or her connect with you instantaneously?

Four Key Areas in Connecting with Your Customers

  • Morality
  • Background
  • Appearance
  • Attitude

Humor

Bringing in humor to your conversation is another great way of building rapport with your customers. Don’t worry about telling jokes. Just be yourself. Try to share good, funny information if you can. That can break the ice and people love to connect with individuals like that.

Body Posture

You want to send out that message that you’re confident in who you are.

Touch

Especially for a lady, this is easier for you to do. You can tap somebody on the shoulder and that touch makes that connection between you and the customer. Do that handshake.

Mirroring

When you’re mirroring somebody, you’re not necessarily mimicking them but you want to reflect what they’re doing. If they have their legs crossed, do it as well. This gives a subliminal idea that you are like them.

People subconsciously examine for ways to connect with an individual. Your job as a seller is to persuade them through your appearance and body language. About 93% of communication is nonverbal so don’t just chat there but also focus on some of the things you often overlook.

Today’s Major Takeaway:

Don’t sell the way you buy. Sell the way your buyers buy. If you can do this, you’re one step closer to become a power persuader and become more effective with your win rate and closing more deals.

Episode Resources:

Episode 366: Turning a No into a Yes (Interview with Kurt Mortensen)

Maximum Influence by Kurt Mortensen

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Join the TSE Hustler’s League. This semester, we’re focusing on being buyer-centric and how you can make sure you increase your close rate.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Sales Equity, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Tom Cates

TSE 446: Why You Need To Build Equity With Your Clients and How

Clinet Equity, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Tom CatesToday, you’re going to learn about how you can build equities with your prospects and clients as well as how you can make sure you’re able to best utilize and optimize them. We have Tom Cates on the show today as he delivers some valuable insights into leveraging equity in your own sales process. It’s not just about the numbers, relationship is key.

Tom Cates is the Founder of The Brookeside Group, a 15-year consultancy firm that helps people be the best B2B salespeople. A year and a half ago, they built salesEQUITY, a software company that offers resources to small business all the way up to Fortune 1000 companies.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Tom:

Tom’s coolest sales experience when he was the customer

Who are your competitors?

Understand what it means to be differentiated in the marketplace today. Actually, you’re not only competing with your direct competitors but you’re also competing with everybody your client bumps into.

What is Sales Equity?

Equity is what’s left out over.

3 Types of equity:

  1. Product equity
  2. Brand equity

When you’re equally great, you’re all equally average. Nobody is going to pay you more for having a great brand when your competitors have a great brand.

*Both product and brand have been so commoditized that it’s so hard to differentiate on these aspects.

  1. Sales equity

Most of the time, people do business with people they like. How can you measure that relationship aspect? This is where sales equity comes in. How much equity are you creating by being the salesperson or account manager or the people in the deal? Who are the people involved in the deal?

Get ahead of the pack.

Most often, we find ourselves at the average with everybody else. In every industry, there is a standard of competition. Most salespeople are around that average. So you need to get your buyers to care.

The 6 Dimensions of Relationship:

  1. Integrity

Does your buyer believe you’re reliable, dependable, and you’re going to do what you promised?

  1. Competency

Does your buyer believe you have the people, the skills, the products, the know-how, the experience to do what you’re promised?

*These two dimensions are called “satisfiers” which are not going to cut because these form part of a transactional relationship.

**The next four are very important as they bring out “aroused motivation.”

  1. Recognition

Have you done something to make that buyer think you care about them as an individual and that you care about their business or you just treat them like a number? Don’t forget there is a human being on the other side of that desk.

  1. Proactivity

Does the buyer believe you’re looking out for their best interest and you’re bringing new ideas to the table? Make sure they don’t encounter surprise down the line.

  1. Savvy

This is the flip side of competency. What competency suggests from the buyer’s point of view is, “Do I think you know your business?”. Savvy, on the other hand, makes the buyer think, “Do I think you know my business?”

  1. Chemistry

Do you like working together? Do you enjoy and communicate well? Are you clicking?

Strategies to build that competency and savvy-ness:

  1. Invest first in the relationship.

If you want your customers to trust you, somebody has to go first and you can do that by investing in the relationship. Understand their company and the politics of it. Understand their industry. Also, understand the individual person. You have to put in the time.

  1. Grow your business organically.

Many companies focus on new acquisition first, then cross-selling to the existing clients, and retention last. What you need to do is reverse this and instead, focus on retention first, then cross-sell, and worry about new acquisitions last. For most companies, growing organically is a much easier and more profitable way to go.

  1. Know your math when it comes to your retention rate.

If you have 80% client retention rate, you lose 20% of your clients every year. Say, your average client sticks around for 5 years. Improve that to 90% rate by changing your average client from 5 to 10 years. If you go from 90-95%, go to 20 years. If you go from 95-95%, go to 25 years. That 1% from 95-96, add it 5 additional years of average buying from your clients. You’re actually just getting started when you’re in the low 90’s.

Tom’s Major Takeaway:

Invest in the relationship. Understand your buyer. Demonstrate those 6 dimensions of relationship and then you begin to grow.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Rom through email at tcates@salesequity.com or visit www.salesequity.com to know more about their products and services as well as some valuable resources related to the 6 dimensions of relationship. Find out your blind spots and how you can get ahead of the pack. Tom is also on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Consultative Selling, Value, Asking Questions, Listening

TSE 406: How Can I Sell In A More Consultative Manner?

Consultative Selling, Value, Asking Questions, ListeningToday, you’re going to hear more about how to go about Consultative Selling. What it is, how to get started with it, and how to really rock it without sounding like an FBI agent.

So I’m bringing Ryan Ayres on the show today to talk more about the consultative selling approach. Try to see if this is something you need to be doing to help you win more customers. Basically, it all boils down to giving clients real value and doing the things that stick to who you really are as a person.

Ryan Ayres is a business coach and virtual COO. He helps business owners who struggle with running their business be able to run their business better. Ryan gives “deep coaching,” which is a one-on-one (by referral or invitation only) coaching. Wherein what starts out as business really turns into some core things they work on together.

He is the host of Focus 53 Podcast where he dives into business processes and people talking about sales, the processes, and micro-processes around sales and running better businesses.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Ryan:

What is Consultative Selling?

Lead with value and your concern is wholly based on you becoming the person they know, like, and trust by being transparent, delivering great value, and prescribing fixes for them. The real, real value is when it doesn’t benefit you all the time because that allows them to trust you.

How consultative selling can benefit you:

  1. Give your customers a quick win on the consultative side.

This turns your customer’s perception of what you are from a salesperson into a trust advisor. When you assume this position for them mentally, you could be anything to them and ask you even questions outside of business because they trust you.

  1. Be true to yourself and be authentic.

People can sniff out when someone is being fake at a certain point in time. If you’re being that, they’re going to be on guard and you can’t add as much value to them as you want.

How do you get started with consultative selling:

  1. Do this early and often and don’t be a know-it-all.

Do consultative selling in nearly every conversation. Don’t be a know-it-all telling what the customer should do or not. Do it with best intentions.

  1. Get as much information as you can.

You’re not doing this to “leverage” it to try to find an in but because as much information as you can have, the better the conversation is.

  1. Understand why they allowed you to get on their calendar in the first place.

Find out through a series of questions what their true need, problem, or challenge is and work through how you can both solve it or the things around it that influence it.

  1. Being consultative means telling them instances of how you were able to solve a similar problem without mentioning your product or service.

Your clients want to hear how you’re going to fix your weeds, they don’t want to hear about your weed killer. When you offer solutions and things that they know aren’t yours, it builds that trust. Simply offer information and consulting services and be true to yourself.

  1. Be candid about it if you see you’re not a good fit.

Sometimes when you’re candid in not being a good fit, they may even adjust what they need to match what you provide. Now you’re switching roles as they’re trying to sell you on working with them.

  1. Have a cheat sheet or a guiding board.

Make a list of all the things you want to cover. Be careful not to be reading off a piece of paper as they may not necessarily like that.

How to be a consultative seller (without sounding like an FBI agent):

  1. It takes practice.

Be with people. Some people are naturally easy to talk to but if you think you’re not good at it, make sure you practice.

The key is talking about their weeds and problems and the things you’re doing in a way that your weed killer is not really the conversation and they forget where you’re from and what you’re selling.

  1. Have many entry points to get to those weeds vs. just pitching.

Hold the conversation with them on 5 or 6 or 10 different topics. It can be about the relationship side of the organization or their favorite football team.

Biggest pitfalls people make in consultative selling:

  1. Coming off as a know-it-all

When you act as if you have the answer to every problem they have, that turns people off.

  1. Not being prepared
  2. Not having a vetting process for your prospect.

Understand who you’re talking to before you just go in there and let it rip. Again, you just don’t give the weed killer to the weeds they don’t want you to look at in the first place. Let them lead you to their problem and make sure you have your duck in a row.

Ryan’s Major Takeaway:

Make sure you do your research and that whatever you’re doing is really true to who you are. Whatever your approach is, make sure you feel good about it. You’ve done it, have taken some practice, leaned into your edge, and taken some practice swings.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Ryan through his website www.Focus53.com and check out Ryan’s Focus53 Podcast where he dives into business processes and people talking about sales, the processes, and micro-processes around sales and running better businesses.

Please support us in our Indiegogo campaign, a movement to inspire others to Do Big Things. Simply go to www.DoBigThings.net.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

TSE 381: This Is The Best Way To Build Relationships With Prospects

Kim Avery, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Sales Podcast Building lasting relationships is one of the cornerstones of success in sales. However, this is something that many salespeople still have a problem with. Dig this: 80-90% of relationship problems come from misunderstanding the differences that are biologically hardwired in our bodies. Today, we talk more about building and strengthening relationships which is vital in sales.

Kimi Avary is a Relationship Navigation Specialist working with the masculine and feminine dynamic in relationships that goes awry when you don’t understand them. Kim helps men and women understand each other better so they stop putting assumptions about each other because they’re different. In this episode, Kimi shares how you can create strong bonds with your prospects so you can move forward in your sales process.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Kimi:

How sellers and entrepreneurs can develop lasting, strong bonds with others:

  1. Notice how you’re making an assumption about another person.

Go back to that inception point of making that assumption and choose to be curious instead. When you make assumptions, you decide what the person needs and doesn’t need and that creates problems. Instead, be curious about what it is they truly desire.

  1. Understand that women talk more, men talk less.

When a woman is speaking to a man, bullet point their comments and questions and practice listening. When a man is speaking to a woman, give her more details. Tell a few more stories. Be a little bit less bullet-pointed. Men often use short answers while women look for all the details.

  1. Always ask if you can get a time to talk.

Respect their time. Get on the schedule and keep to the time frame.

  1. When you’re in a networking event, you’re there not to sell but to prospect.

When you’re going to a networking event, you’re prospecting and looking for a good person to set an appointment with. Say what you do short, sweet, succinctly, and clearly. Set another time for you to talk.

  1. Set appointments in your calendar and not just wing it.

Get that appointment in your calendar and send them your calendar link. Frame this in a way that this is an opportunity for you to dive into their needs so you make sure you’re a match and if not, then you can send them to somebody who is a match.

  1. Follow a script and focus on your intention.

Every word out of your mouth needs to be scripted and focused on your intentions. The first meeting is about telling them what you do. Then go to the next step of your selling process and the next. Ex. first meeting > calendar link > build trust and rapport through curiosity questions > find out what their needs are. Scripts are not robotic. They should be fluid.

Kimi’s Major Takeaway:

Be curious about the other person and really listen. Ladies, don’t chime in right away. Give the guys an opportunity to think about what it is they want to share with you. Provide a space for them to speak and that will deepen your bond with them.

Episode Resources:

Check out Kim’s Complimentary Relationship Breakthrough Session (for personal and professional relationships). Go to www.kimiavary.com/win. Fill out the form and receive a calendar link.

Please support us in our Indiegogo campaign, a movement to inspire others to Do Big Things. Simply go to www.DoBigThings.net.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Register Today! 

Do BIG THINGS, West Palm Beach, Florida, EMKO, Donald Kelly, Travis Thomas, The Sales Evangelist, LIVE YES AND

Juan Cano, Beachbody, Sales Podcast, Donald Kelly

TSE 277: Sales From The Street-” I Was Doing It Wrong”

Juan Cano, Beachbody, Sales Podcast, Donald KellyToday’s guest is Juan Cano, a member of TSE Hustlers League and founder of Lose It With Juan, a beachbody fitness and nutrition coaching program that combines fitness and nutrition along with personal attention from your personal coach in order to take you from where you are to where you want to be.

So I brought Juan on the show today as he shares his thoughts and insights into what he’s doing to find success.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Juan:

Juan’s major challenge that he faced:

Being so shy about selling things and finding the way to break the ice.

Strategies Juan took to overcome the challenges (which you can very much apply too!):

  1. Approach people how you would approach a friend.

Find out what your friend needs and model your business approach toward them. Show that you’re there to help and not to sell.

  1. The 10 x 10 Method

Reach out to ten people everyday before 10am. Open a dialogue and put in a little hook about what you do to draw more genuine interest in you.

  1. Build long-term relationships and show them value.

It’s not about “buy me.” It’s about giving them value.

Connect with Juan through his website loseitwithjuan.com or on Facebook where he offers a free fitness group for men only.

Juan’s Major Takeaway:

Go out there and work the process. Be the process and results will happen not only sales but also in fitness and in life.

Episode Resources:

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Sales Person, Top Producer

TSE 232: I’m Having A Hard Time Being Authentic.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Sales Person, Top ProducerHow can you “fake it till you make it” but still be authentic? Many sellers have an issue with being themselves while trying to put on a professional sales role. Sometimes they feel they need to act a certain way, dress a certain way or become someone they are not. Well, in this episode I share my feelings on how to maintain authenticity while still being professional. Here are the major points I discussed:

  1. Have Confidence In Yourself 
    • “What others think about you is none of your business”
    • Develop values and beliefs that will become your compass and guide
  2. Be Genuine
    • Your sales role should reflect you as a person
    • Don’t lie as a means of trying to connect with prospects
  3. Master The Art of Being Present
    • People like to be heard (listen before you speak)
    • They like to know they matter by feeling they are being listened to
  4. Ask Questions About Them
    • Ask questions that will engage your listeners
    • Call them by name…this is a simple, but powerful principle

Here is a book I recommend: 

Listen to it here: Audibletrial.com/tse

be yourself everyone else is already taken mike robbins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

Value Base Selling, The Sales Evangelist, Scott Hendricks, Calibrated Power Solutions

TSE 192: Sales From The Street- “Lead With Value”

Value Base Selling, The Sales Evangelist, Scott Hendricks, Calibrated Power Solutions“While the sale may be important, what’s really important is actually the next sale.” – Scott Henricks

From knives to trucks, Scott Henricks certainly knows what he’s talking about. It doesn’t really matter what you sell, it’s how you sell it.

Scott is a general manager for a diesel performance company specializing in engine re-calibrations for Duramax and Cummins trucks. Today, Scott shares with us some challenges he encountered and how he overcame them to give him the results that he aimed for.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Scott:

Scott’s sales challenge:

Becoming a specialist from one product category to another product category and doing it quickly

Strategies Scott applied:

  1. Forums: A place where you will find enthusiasts and subject matter experts. However, you need to utilize forums correctly. Know what you’re talking about. Do it right.

The benefits of forums:

  • It becomes a “sales force multiplier”
  • You can quantify and find prospects through data you can gather
  1. Learning from Dave Kerpen’s book: Likeable Social Media
  • How to build your own set of evangelists
  • How to get people on board with your product
  1. Bring value first.

Help people instead of selling. By helping the right people, these people are going to start selling for you and doing it from the goodness of their hearts.

Get in touch with Scott by visiting their website www.calibratedpower.com or send him at email at scott@calibratedpower.com.

Scott’s Major Takeaway:

Don’t be afraid to help. Even if no one’s asking for it, just get out there. Spread knowledge and try to find people who are enthusiastic about your product. Get involved with them and they’ll take care of you.

Resources mentioned:

TSE 123: Interview with Greta Schulz

The Sales Evangelizers, Donald Kelly, Sales Facebook Group

TSE 191: “It’s NOT In Our Budget!!!”

Donald KellyHow can I handle “We don’t have it in our budget?”.  Many times as a seller we come across the illusive statement, “It is not in our budget”. As a seller, it’s inevitable that you will hear this statement at one point or another. When I hear this, four things come to mind:
1. You didn’t qualify properly…
  • It’s important that you have a sales process that enables you to weed out non-buyers and not waste time
  • Set the rules before you play the game with each prospect
  • Here are some potential questions to ask so that you don’t get the budget questions
    • “Typically our system runs for $4K per year. Is that in your budget for this project?”
    • “What is your budget for this project?”
  • Find out who else will be a part of the decision-making process or what other departments are being affected by the purchase. Perhaps they can have a joint budget for the project.
  • Many times people are afraid of losing something so they hold onto someone who shows slight interest so you go through hoping that they will see something that will peak their interest later.

2. They are lying….

  • Some people lie and are just trying to get rid of you. Just cut your loses and move on.
  • “Is it okay if I ask you a question without you getting upset with me?” “Is price really an issue or are you just not interested?”
    • Or, many times when people say it’s not in the budget it’s because:
      • “I did not explain it right and they don’t see the value”
      • “Really interested, but just have no money”
      • They are not interested and wanted to say it in a nice way……Which one is it?

3. They really don’t have a budget….

  • They really don’t have the money to dedicate at this time. They have other pressing projects and it’s not on the top of the list. These are the folks I would have my marketing folks do a hyper focus on with educational material. I would also keep in touch with them periodically, but not waste too much time. What information could I offer that will be of tremendous value over the next several months?

4. They really have a need and don’t have the budget.

  • This would require us to look at doing a partial payment at the end of the fiscal year and the remainder in the next year. They can pay part now and part later.
    • “How much would you be able to allocate now to start off with?”.
  • Maybe they don’t need all the features right now and you can add it as they go over the next several months. If you do this approach, I would put specific dates in the agreement for the next payment due date. (Story of Charlotte County School). Another option is to do a “pilot” approach. Can you offer a 3 month pilot at a reduced rate to have them sign up and try it out?
  • I wouldn’t offer it for free, I would have them pay something. I was taught by a friend that even if they pay $1.00, they feel a sense of commitment and you’re able to tell true motives and sincere desire. Just like the partial payment, offer specific dates for the trial period and conditions.

Feel free to check out this episode.

The Sales Evangelizers, Donald Kelly, Sales Facebook Group

Jim Jacobus, DISC Profile, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 126: Learn How DISC Profiling Can Help You Sell!

The Sales Evangelist Podcast We are joined today by our guest co-host Todd Ervin. Todd lives in Wilmington, Ohio (just north of Cincinnati) with his wife and 2 sons.  He works as a Regional Sales Manager for Crouzet Motors, a French electro-mechanical company, covering the eastern half of North America.  He enjoys waterskiing, boating, softball and anything else outdoors. (See image to the left)

Today’s special guest is Jim Jacobus, who is a very knowledgeable when it comes to DISC profiling, our main topic for today’s show, as well as its importance in the realm of selling.

Jim has 17 years of experience as a major account rep. In the last 22 years, he has been a consultant, speaker, and trainer in a broad variety of fields, primarily in the sales field, designing large-scale sales training programs for clients like Halliburton, Price Waterhouse Coopers, ExxonMobil , Mercedez-Benz, and Cadillac to name a few. When properly done, Jim believes that sales is the most honorable profession on the planet.

Jim also manages a website called The Sales Gladiators, a content marketing site that provides an armory of resources which salespeople need so they become better equipped in the sales arena.

Here are the highlights of our conversation with Jim:

The Sales Gladiator’s four primary buckets:

  • Sales process
  • Value-based selling
  • Partner-Adviser Relationships
  • A-Players Only Core Skill

DISC Profiling:

  • Measuring personality/behavior styles
  • A great tool for understanding communication style, how people go about doing things and manage them, and how to motivate people
  • DISC does not, can not, have not, will not ever predict PERFORMANCE. It does have awesome applications when it comes to becoming more effective in selling.

What DISC stands for: DISC Profiling

  • D – Dominance
  • I – Influence
  • S – Steadiness
  • C – Compliance

 

How to take advantage of the knowledge of the personality styles:

  1. Understand your own style.

D above the midpoint: Handles problems head on; my way or the highway; risk-taker

D below the midpoint: More cautious and reserved; let problems work their way out; consensus type of person

I above the midpoint: More outgoing personality to influence people

I below the midpoint: Influence people; backs figures, data, logic

S above the midpoint: More cautious, slower to do things

S below the midpoint: C’mon, c’mon, c’mon! Let’s go, let’s go, let’s go!

C above the midpoint: High attention to detail; high compliance with rules

C below the midpoint: Less attention to detail

  1. What are the strengths that come with that? What are the challenges that come with that?
  2. Understand the style of your client.

This is important for you to learn how to deliver the things about your product or service they’re most interested in.

DISC profiling as manipulative:

  • It all comes down to your motives and why you’re learning this stuff.
  • Caring about your customers more than you care about your back-pocket.

Personalities having harder or easier time in the sales world:

  • Highly technical personality styles tend to be lower relationship skills: Low I’s, high C’s
  • Low I’s, high C’s tend to struggle more with connecting to people than High I’s or Low C’s
  • High S’s are more laid back and make better connections
  • High I’s tend to not be great listeners

How understanding DISC profile can help you make more money as an entrepreneur/seller:

On a management standpoint: Your job is to sell your employees on doing what’s in their best interest first. What’s in the company’s best interest comes second.

Take whatever your finite territory is and create a multiplier of four when it comes to your ability to effectively connect with and sell to that client.

Learn to speak these four different languages (meaning, understanding these four primary categories) primarily because you care about the client and you want to serve them as effectively as possible.

How a manager can use DISC in hiring:

Behaviors do not predict performance.

Current projects Jim is working on:

Marriage retreat and upcoming podcast

The Sales Gladiators – monthly sales training and webinars, coaching call, podcast, blogs, etc.

Jim’s Major Takeaway:

Accept people how they are created. We are all created phenomenally, to do phenomenal things, not the same things, not the same way. Embrace how you are created and start to figure out how to get the most out of that. Embrace who you are created to be.

Episode Resources:

The Sales Gladiators

Jim’s podcast: In The Sales Arena

To inquire more about DISC and get a hand of these resources, send Jim an email at jim@thesalesgladiators.com

Best way to stay in touch with Todd:

Email him at todmon26@cinci.rr.com

 

 

know Like and Trust; Selling; Podcast; Sales Training

TSE 122: Three Effective Ways To Be Known Liked & Trusted

know Like and Trust; Selling; Podcast; Sales TrainingWe have all heard it before that people buy from those they know, like and trust! Yes, I totally agree with this statement as well, but there is one problem HOW? How does one build relationship with a perfect stranger to the point where they know, like and trust you? Well, this is why I’m doing this episode.

After really thinking about this topic, analyzing my past business/personal relationships, I came up with three ways we can easily build relationship with others to get known, liked and trusted. Now, obviously strong relationships takes time and effort but doing these three things will help you see incredible results.

  1. Smile more with your prospects
  2. Mirroring
  3. Being relatable

Smile more with your prospects: 

There is something contagious about having a smile on you face. Studies show that when you smile, others will naturally return with a smile. A smile also makes you look more excited and confident in what you are doing. This translate to the prospect that you are passionate about your offering, thus generating a sense of curiosity in the prospect to learn more. Now, I’m not telling you to go out and smile like a circus clown. But a nice warm smile will go a long way to help prospects take down their defensive guards.

Mirroring:

According to the great Wikipedia“Mirroring is the behavior in which one person subconsciously imitates the gesture, speech pattern, or attitude of another”.  So how can mirroring help you get known, liked and trusted from your prospects? Well, people tend to like others who they feel a connection with, someone who is like them. When you mirror, it reflects that you are in sync with others and are like them in some way.

This subconsciously allow the prospect to open up a bit more. However, don’t get the idea that you should copy every thing the other person does, but pay attention to the mood of their body language and reflect that in your posture. If their legs are crossed, you should cross your legs as well. Maybe a hand gesture on their face or the tone of their speaking. There are many different ways you can do this. Try it with family members and friends and see how much fun it is.

Be relatable:

This is also a very simple thing you can do and it relates very closely to the idea of mirroring. Essentially it shows that you are human and can sympathize with them. So many times well meaning sellers go into a meeting so cocky that it becomes a turn off. They put themselves above their prospects and makes the prospects feel inferior. Many times this happens when the sales person start using buzz words and terminology that the prospect does not understand. And once that happens, the meeting with be over and the sales persons will be dismissed with a statement live “leave some literature and I will get back to you”.

Don’t be that type of seller! Speak the prospects language. Explaining your product or service in away that relates to their business. Give examples that tie to their industry, success stories of companies like them. Before you meet with them, do some research via LinkedIn (social media) and see if you have anything in common. This is a great way to take down the barriers that prospects have up initially.

Overall, the more people feel you are relatable (like them), the more they begin to trust and open up to you. Doing these simple activities of smiling more, mirroring your prospects and being relatable, you will increase you chances significantly to being known, liked and trusted. Try it and let me know how it works for you. Drop me am email at Donald@thesalesevangelist.com. You can also join in on some of our other sales conversation in our private Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers. Either way, I can’t wait to hear from you. In the mean time, remember to DO BIG THINGS!