In Barbara Giamanco, Quota, Women in Sales

When companies make a conscious effort to attract women, it’s good for the business on all levels. Women are often more consistent at exceeding quotas, and they’re strong leaders as well. But there’s another component as well: stepping up and standing out as women in sales.

On today’s episode, we’re talking with Barbara Giamanco, host of the Conversations With Women In Sales podcast. Her lifelong passion to help women in business has led her to try to impact the presence of women in sales by influencing the women and the businesses who hire them.

The case for women

In a global report called Gaining the Talent Advantage, researchers found that 62 percent of companies who have 45 percent or more women in their ranks drove higher-than-average levels of profitable revenue.

Having a more diverse team makes it easier for you to connect with people on multiple levels. There’s a case to be made for the money.

The problem isn’t simply that companies aren’t hiring women. Some women hesitate to lean in to new opportunities.

Barbara said that women often put their heads down and work, expecting that someone will notice their efforts. That may or may not be true.

On her Razor’s Edge podcast, men make up 98 percent of the people who request to appear. They have no problem asking to be noticed, while women aren’t as comfortable.

Women often doubt their expertise and downplay what they have to offer. They also fear that pointing out their own successes will be perceived as bragging.

Sharing your experiences is good for the entire sales community, including the men. What you’re doing could impact others in a tremendous way.

Where to start

Organizations can begin by prioritizing women in management and leadership roles.

Barbara is quick to point out this doesn’t mean giving them jobs.

Organizations should choose women who are good at their jobs. Look for talented women and nurture their careers.

Additionally, women need to acknowledge their desires to progress in their careers. Instead of assuming that people will notice your success and consider you for promotion, let your leaders know where your interests lie.

When positions open, the hiring parties likely already have candidates in mind. Let your leadership know that you’d like to be considered for other positions.

Volunteer for special projects. Familiarize yourself with departments outside of your own. If you recognize a recurring problem, ask if you can put together a team to seek solutions to the problem.

If you’re a leader with female employees who want to advance, include them in special projects and encourage them to volunteer for things.

Employees in every organization have a responsibility to ensure its health and success.

“Standing Out As Women In Sales” resources

Connect with Barbara on Twitter @barbaragiamanco.

Find her on LinkedIn, and connect with her blog at barbaragiamanco.com. You can also find her on the Women in Sales Hub.

Call her at (404) 647-4925, because she’s still a big fan of the telephone.

You can find her podcasts on iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, and multiple other platforms.

There’s a reason I continue suggesting the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happenfrom our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic blueprint of all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

I’m so convinced of its message that I’m offering a free excerpt of the book so you can check it out.

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Audio provided by Free SFX.

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