In Entrepreneur, Gig Economy, Marion McGovern

marion-mcgovern, The Sales EvangelistThe gig economy continues to grow as more people discover the freedom  and control it provides.

Gigs vary in duration and kind, and statistics suggest that more than 40 million people are involved in the gig economy on some level.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Marion McGovern shares her years of experience in the gig economy and the changes she has seen in the space over the years.

Marion’s newest book, Thriving in the Gig Economy, addresses the changing nature of the gig economy and helps readers make sense of the gig marketplace. Additionally, she addresses many of the challenges of this kind of work.

Misunderstanding gig economy

People often assume that workers opt for the gig economy because they are unable to get a “real job” but the truth is that 70 percent of those people choose to work that way most choose to be there.

The majority of workers actively choose it because it provides more control over the type of work they do.

Furthermore, while it originated as a money-saving effort for companies, it now means that companies can find the very best talent for their projects. Many Baby Boomers are retiring and joining the gig economy.

Errors in pricing

Marion maintains that there is an art to pricing your work.

If, for example, you’re offered a marketing project that you could do in your sleep, you might charge accordingly. If there’s a project that offers you a new experience and a chance to add a new skillset to your credentials, perhaps you charge less to make sure you get the deal.

Projects that require a distinct urgency might allow you to charge more.

Kinds of “no”

Working in the gig economy requires you to face rejection occasionally. No one hits a homer in every at-bat.

Rejection tends to be harder for creatives because the “no” feels more personal. Instead of interpreting that you don’t like my approach, we assume they don’t like our work.

Additionally, you also have to prepare to say “no” to clients. If a client offers you follow-on work that you don’t really care to do, you have to decide whether it’s worth the money to accept the work.

Multiple platforms

Countless platforms exist to connect talented people with projects. Start at the larger platforms and get involved. Rather than simply posting your info, interact on the site.

Go where your clients will be. Network. Join an industry group.

Don’t buy into the lie that you don’t have to market. Stay connected to your industry and the people within it.

Episode resources

Connect with Marion at her website, marionmcgovern.com or find her on LinkedIn or Twitter.

If you’d like to connect with sales professionals of all levels in many different industries, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. Our online group coaching program connects sales professionals who want to exchange ideas, learn and build accountability for themselves.

Our April semester is all about building value, and we’d be honored for you to join us.

Episode audio provided by Free SFX.

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