Category Archives for Value

Building your sales value

TSE 1264: You Can’t Sell Value If You Don’t Value Yourself

Building your sales valueSalespeople come from a variety of industries but the one thing they have in common: They all sell value. It can be a challenge, however, to sell something you don’t have yourself. Simply speaking, as salespeople, we can only sell value if we value ourselves. 

Jenean Merkel Perelstein is a business and sales anthropologist who uses scientific techniques to help salespeople close the cultural gap between them and their prospects, clients, and the organizations they are working with. Her job is to help them understand the cultural approach and take advantage of it. 

Defining value 

Value often gets mixed up with values which are the standards or qualities we deem as worthwhile. Value is what we put out into the world, what we offer in exchange. It then becomes part of the larger conversation about money, prosperity, and playing in this market economy. The value becomes part of the interwoven concepts that have to be considered together. 

When we stand in strength with our values, it means we understand the true qualities and the true standard that we deem worthwhile to offer in the marketplace. If you’re not stepping into that sense of value and you haven’t done the thought process of figuring out what it is in the first place, then you’re basically starting the conversation a little bit behind. 

Knowing your worth 

You need to know your beliefs and what’s possible and not possible for you. This includes knowing your attitudes, state of mind, and feelings. All of these things build together into a larger concept of knowing your worth and taking ownership of your work. Doing that will enable you to come forth and articulate the worth and value of whatever you are representing. 

Regardless of the words you speak, the cultural interactions you have with other people will be part of the underlying conversation. The energy you exchange in your conversation can expose whether or not you are operating from a place of desperation or a lack of confidence. Clients see this right away.  If this is you, there is foundational work that needs to take place.

People that have been unsuccessful for a long time start to wear an air of desperation. It becomes harder for them to meet another client or go to another meeting. If you are managing this type of person, there’s an opportunity to talk to them about standing in their strength, taking ownership, and changing their direction. Salespeople have to look at the value they offer, not just transactional value, but value as human beings as they bring what makes them unique and special into the conversation. 

Build your value

As an individual, you can start building value by looking at your own personal strength inventory. Look for the red flags that are holding yourself back from being able to understand and articulate your value. 

Jenean looks at all this through an anthropological lens, the cultural lens. She sees each individual as a culture of one and looks into the attributes of that culture. Starting there helps her client understand their own personal strengths and enables them to build on how to shore up their foundations. 

Doing this on yourself will then help you to start recognizing the cultural attributes of your prospects, future clients, and the organization that you’re hoping to go deeper with. You’ll be able to see the gaps between your cultural attributes and their cultural attributes. The closer you can close the gaps, the easier the sales conversations will be. 

Attributes that make up a culture

There are four primary attributes that make up culture: attitudes, behaviors, beliefs, and values. The first,  attitudes, can change quickly. Attitudes affect your state of mind and your feelings. The attitude can change based on your mood and outlook. The second attribute, behaviors, needs to be consistently evaluated for opportunities to change based on the needs of the client.  Beliefs, the third attribute can be conscious or subconscious. The brain operates within our beliefs to protect us and to keep things normal. Evaluate if it’s these beliefs that are creating a ceiling to your success. The fourth attribute, values, is what could bridge the gap between you and your client. 

Jenean asks her clients to journal a deep inventory of these attributes around their career, finances, thoughts about their abilities to make money, and how they take care of their relationships. When you have these attributes in common with another person or group, then add on norms and traditions, you have a culture. Every workplace has its own culture.

Do an inventory 

Knowing your value means doing an inventory of what makes you special and unique, and what you may struggle with. Once you do that, you will begin to recognize where you are holding yourself back. You can then identify the work you need to do to get better and articulate your value in future meetings.  

There are times when the work culture is dominated by someone who is highly regarded. Sales leaders and people who have stayed in the company for a long time can influence the culture, even when their outcomes aren’t good. A toxic influence can mess up the productivity of the sales team. Start digging and see if the culture enhances the productivity and the positivity of your workplace and team.  If not, it’s worth investigating the origin. 

As a salesperson, you also start identifying the people of influence in your target organization so you know the people where you can make the greatest impact. 

Keep a success journal

Jenean shares that it is important for salespeople to keep an ongoing success journal. Culture teaches us not to be arrogant so we tend to dismiss compliments and praise. The brain, however, remembers and listens. The success journal is an opportunity to recognize when you’ve done a good job.  It offers the brain evidence that you’re capable of.  

When we don’t validate ourselves internally, we can start telling our brains that we don’t value our successes.  To compensate for that, we can start looking for external validation, which will eventually let us down. Keeping a journal of your successes will help you overcome these inevitable obstacles. It’s imperative to occupy your brain with these successes to help you move forward and push through your boundaries. Reading your success journal right before a sales conversation will compel you to focus on your successes and you’ll find that the conversation will go smoother and yield better results. 

“You Can’t Sell Value If You Don’t Value Yourself” episode resources

Create your personal inventory now. Visit the official site of Stand In Your Strength for a free resource on how to start making your own inventory. If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald about it. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning this March and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

The Sales Evangelist, Seize attention, Ron Tite

TSE 1210: How to Seize Attention and Build Trust in a Busy World 

 

The Sales Evangelist, Seize attention, Ron TiteAs salespeople, we look for ways to seize attention and build trust. While prospecting and building trust among clients is critical, it’s also one of the most difficult tasks in sales. 

Ron Tite is the founder and keynote speaker of the Toronto-based agency, Church+State as well as the author of Think Do Say: How to Seize Attention and Build Trust in a Busy, Busy World.  Being an executive creative director at a large multinational ad agency, Ron has extensive knowledge about traditional agency marketing, advertising, and design. In addition to that, he’s also an experienced comedian, using that in his own entrepreneurial journey. Ron is also an investor who appreciates the need for sales to do business. 

The desperate need for attention 

Salespeople are looking at the ecosystem correctly but are using the wrong tactics to make a breakthrough. They’ve been chasing metrics that don’t deliver to build long term businesses

There are so many thought leaders, evangelists, and LinkedIn lead generators who are going about it in the wrong way. Seeing this drove Ron to eventually build his own agency.

With a growing number of salespeople, the sheer number of sales reps and clients are overwhelmed by pitches. 

Time Square is a great metaphor. Everybody is in Time Square. Big corporations and companies use traditional means, such as using billboards, to get attention. Meanwhile, there are smaller sellers on the streets that are doing things differently. They are more aggressive, targeted, and their pitch can be customized. These are the people who sell practically everything in Times Square, from ripped off t-shirts to street meat. Every one of them trying to get attention. 

However, the challenge doesn’t stop there, it continues. Now you’ve got their attention, how do you earn their trust? 

Other salespeople are still using the automated messages they used in the 60s when talking to potential clients. They could have customized their message and tailored it but they didn’t. They need to revamp their style with three phrases in mind: based on what you think, based on what you do, and based on what you say. 

Set yourself apart

As a salesperson, the ‘based on what you think’ approach considers the things you firmly believe regardless of what you’re selling. This is important because you aren’t selling a unique product. There are others selling the same product so what you think is what makes you unique. Ask yourself,

Do you believe that:

  • relationships are the key to success?
  • you should deliver the most value?
  • your role as a salesperson is to connect people with the right opportunities?

 ‘Based on what you do’ are the things you do to reinforce your beliefs. The last part, ‘based on what you say.’ 

Salespeople can be hesitant about sharing their products/services with others because they don’t want to come off as “pitch slapping.” It’s important to deliver the right message through their actions and behaviors by talking about what they do in an authentic way and transparent way. 

Don’t create smoke and mirrors and say nice things just to make a sale. People are sensitive to that approach and they can see it a mile away. Use the following questions as a guide to starting your conversation. 

  • Who do you do it for?
  • What do they want you to do?
  • Who do you do it with?

For so long, salespeople have used many strategies to seize attention and build trust but still find it difficult to have a breakthrough. They need to customize their sales pitch and talk to clients according to their needs. There is no need to cheat the system. Rather, they have to speak to potential clients in the right way.

Invest in being good 

Comedians come and go and they try a variety of tactics to make people laugh. However, nobody has sustained a career in comedy by doing anything other than being really funny. It is the same thing in sales. You can try other platforms in the course of your sales career but it won’t work unless you show your humanity and have the best interest of your clients and prospects at heart. Jumping from one platform to another may give you some benefit and short-term metrics but it won’t sustain your business in the long run. 

Ron’s first project when he launched his agency was with a client he already knew. The marketing director discovered Ron was running his own agency and she gave him his first project. The trust didn’t come from Ron chasing tactics. It was due to Ron’s honesty in the business. 

Red Bull is a great company that bases its marketing on the three things mentioned earlier. The company firmly believes that life with an adrenaline rush is a better way to live. They reinforce that belief by encouraging activities where their audience can have an adventure. Their advertising reinforces this message by showing people grow wings after drinking their product. 

Red Bull reached out to one of Ron’s friends Matt, a chef, to star in their videos. The company said they shared Matt’s values and attitude and they wanted him on board. Despite Matt’s respect for the brand, he couldn’t push it through because he didn’t drink Red Bull. The company respected his response because they align with people based on values. They know that many respond and convert because of that approach. The number of converts exceeds those who don’t respond favorably so that’s what they focus on. Still, they just don’t walk away from people who don’t buy their products. 

Looking for ways to seize attention and build trust may be difficult but resist the desire to scheme in order to turn the system in your favor. Do the hard work, roll up your sleeves, and find out as much as you can about the prospects you have. Above all, be a real human being using real conversations. It doesn’t matter if they don’t convert because that’s not your goal. You are there to add value and help solve their problems. When you focus on that, enough of your prospects will convert in time. 

Hiring the right people

A section  Impossible, a book by Mark Roberto, highlights coachability as the number one value managers need to look for when hiring. Salespeople need a desire to learn and have the ability to change and adapt. It’s also important to delegate clear responsibilities to the sales team. Each sales rep can specialize in the activity in which they excel. Don’t rush the hiring process or skip steps. Hire who can do the prospecting, not just close. Don’t hire somebody and expect them to save the business or figure things out on their own. 

“How to Seize Attention and Build Trust in a Busy World” episode resources

Get in touch with Ron Tite via Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram. For other sales concerns, you can also reach out to Donald via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Use these practical sales tips and let him know how they work for you. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

The episode is also brought to you by Sales Live Miami. It’s an event put on by a group of friends and it’s designed to help sellers and sales leaders improve their sales game. It’s going to be this November 4-5, 2019 in Miami, Florida. We hope to see you there! You can find more about this event on The Sales Evangelist website. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

TSE 1200: How To Elevate Your Sales Game 

Value, Closing, The Sales Evangelist,As a salesperson, you might have asked yourself the ways to elevate your sales game. 

Dug McGuirk is a national trainer with Tony Robbins. He is a peak performance strategist to help people get a clearer picture of where they are right now in their sales organization including the results they’re experiencing as an individual salesperson or as a team leader. 

He and Tony help individuals see their role in the organization. 

Salespeople can’t change the market, the economy, the way the organization works, and the standard of practice. Tony and Dug want salespeople to see the clear picture and help them realize their true potential. 

Elevate your sales game 

Salespeople are always looking for ways to elevate their sales. The first step to do that is to analyze the things that might be holding back the sales. Sales reps must look at the pattern when they’re stuck. Do not have the tendency of beating yourself up and taking the fall when things go wrong or when you’re stuck. 

Assess the activities that have been holding you back as a salesperson and be aware of them. Look at the pattern of thought, the pattern of activity, and the pattern of focus. These may be small things that you’ve stopped doing like making your bed in the morning, praying, meditating, exercising, and whatnot. 

Most of us are running away from the pain but in order to succeed, we need to go through the pain.  

The best time to get a sale is right after you just made a sale. Listen to the power of momentum. You sell one and own it. Do not doubt your ability to sell, just get on with the selling and be carried by the momentum. 

Believe in yourself

That belief in yourself is so vital in sales. It doesn’t matter that you’re shut down several times or that your presentation is put to a stop. You just have to keep going. 

Sell yourself first and have that confidence before you go off selling to other people. Salespeople have a moral obligation to help others even when they’ve said no for the first few times. You need to get over that objection in order to deliver the message. 

A great salesperson needs to get into that state of gratitude before going into the next steps in sales. You need to be truly present and get clear visualizations of your goals. You also need to believe in your product and the services you sell. 

In sales, your network is your net worth. 

Nothing replaces a full-on immersion and meeting people. The prospects are everywhere so you need to be always selling and offering. Look for strategic partners and find the opportunities and the people who are willing to invest their finances and their energy. Salespeople have skills and it’s up to having the right training to be able to unleash those skills. 

Challenges in sales 

We live in a fast-paced society and everyone wants to speed up the process. Many are caught up in technique hopping when things go wrong. There are three pillars of extraordinary results to address this issue. The first is the strategies and the second is the action plan such as making phone calls, using technology and digging into LinkedIn, Instagram, and other social platforms. All these strategies are not going to work if they’re not implemented and acted upon. 

What most people do is they take action but they do it half-heartedly. This compromises the third pillar which is the mindset. They spend thousands on a strategy and then they move on to the next strategy. They move from one strategy to another and then if it still doesn’t work, they blame the system. 

Don’t do it with the belief that the strategy isn’t going to work in the first place. 

When you do your pitch, don’t do it half-heartedly. When you mail prospects, don’t send a blanketed e-mail because they’ll know that you didn’t put any effort into it. Make a personal email that shows them you care. 

Be willing to get vulnerable 

Salespeople who are crushing it on their sales are the ones who are willing to be vulnerable. They are the ones who are willing to be authentic and putting themselves at risk on a personal level. This is how they connect with potential clients. 

As a salesperson, you need to understand the value that you offer and come from a place of service rather than expecting. 

You learn things as a sales rep when you push through the pain. Look at challenges in new perspectives and work your way around them. Master your ability to perceive what’s going on and change your relationship with the situation at hand. Push yourself ahead with every No you get.

When you’re facing a slump and you’re wondering how to elevate your sales game, you need to evaluate your mindset and be present. Realize how valuable you are and use that to connect with clients on a deeper level. 

There will be more on this at the “Unleash the Power Within” event that’s going to happen at the American Airlines Arena on November 7-10. 

  • Day 1: Turn fear into power.

What stops people from referrals? FEAR. 

What stops people from prospecting? FEAR. 

What stops people from door-knocking? FEAR. 

Turn fear into power and work the muscle of state management. The first day is all about building your confidence as a salesperson. 

  • Day 2: The power of influence 
  • Day 3: The conversation

“How To Elevate Your Sales Game” episode resources

If you’re interested in going, reach out to Dug via his email dug.mcguirk@tonyrobbbins.com or call him on his phone number (646)523-8230. You can also send the word D-U-G to 64600, and you’ll get a link to all his contact information. 

For other sales concerns, don’t hesitate to reach out to Donald via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook

This episode is brought to you in-part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a program designed to help sales reps get from where you are now to where you can be in the future. This course is an aid for salespeople to become better in asking the right questions, presenting solutions, and closing deals. 

Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

Read more about sales or listen to audiobooks at Audible as well and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

If you like this episode, do give us a thumbs up and rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. We produce high-quality podcasts weekly so make sure to subscribe to get more of these sales talks that matter! Share this with your friends and teach them how to subscribe as well. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Sales From The Street, LinkedIn, Content

TSE 1164: Sales From The Street: “Should I Create Content on LinkedIn?”

Sales From The Street, LinkedIn, ContentI saw a question on Reddit recently from a seller who wondered whether or not to create content on LinkedIn. The seller worried that writing about topics like quota, rejection, or prospecting might sound too salesy and might hurt his pipeline. 

The truth is that many sellers have fear around the concept of creating content because we worry about how the audience will accept our ideas. 

Middle school prom

Not only should we post our own content on LinkedIn; we should also engage with other people’s content. 

Unfortunately, many of us treat LinkedIn like a middle school prom. We stand around the edge of the room watching each other, too afraid to dance. We might speak to a friend or two, but we’re afraid to look stupid, so we don’t dance. Instead, we let everybody else enjoy themselves. 

We don’t want to look stupid on the dance floor, so perhaps we look stupid on the sidelines instead. We’re afraid of the critics who might make fun of our efforts

True engagement

Engagement doesn’t involve moving around the room and saying hi to people at the dance. On LinkedIn, clicking “like” for a few posts doesn’t qualify as engagement. It won’t sustain relationships. It’s basically an indication of approval. 

Engagement requires you to bring other people into the conversation. If, for example, you’re in the water industry, and you see an article about the danger of water purification tablets, you can tag another colleague who wrote about the same topic. 

The author of the piece will take note of your efforts to bring someone else to his page, and your colleague will take note as well. 

Talk to people and work to create lasting relationships.

‘Salesy’ content

The question on Reddit came from a seller who worried that his prospects might tire of always seeing sales-related content. But consider your own news feed. Are you annoyed by the fact that you frequently see the same faces over and over again? Or do you simply choose to read things that are relevant and skip over the ones that are not? 

On the other hand, when one of those people shares something that helps you or connects you with someone else, that brand sticks in your mind. When you need help with something, you’ll remember the guys who showed up in your feed. 

When you post content and engage with other content, you stay top-of-mind with your audience. 

Audience

Make sure that you’re posting the right kind of content for your audience. Gear it toward your prospect. If you’re targeting salespeople, it’s ok to post sales content. But if you’re targeting decision-makers at Fortune 500 companies, don’t post about yourself. Post what the leaders in that industry want to know or read. 

Gear your content toward the people you want to attract. 

Don’t be paralyzed by the fear that your content won’t sound perfect. Understand who you’re targeting and who you want to attract. 

LinkedIn impressions

To understand how value-rich LinkedIn is, listen to TSE 1085 on our podcast. In it, my friend Steven Hart shared some LinkedIn stats with us based on the 48 Eyeopening LinkedIn Statistics for 2019.

LinkedIn provides 36 billion impressions per month. That’s 468 billion impressions per year, or 9 billion impressions per week. Users see content 9 billion times per week. 

Now factor in that there are 500 million people on LinkedIn, and only a fraction of them are active there. Of those, only 3 million people share content weekly. So those 3 million people who share content weekly are getting 9 billion impressions. 

The rest of us are afraid to share content, so we’re sitting on the sidelines.

Grab attention

Grab your reader’s attention, but be intentional about the stuff that you share. Post things that your prospect wants to read. You can certainly share industry-related content from magazines, but your content doesn’t always have to tie back. 

Consider these options for content:

  • Answer frequently-asked-questions about your industry
  • Share content that your industry would want to know about.
  • Share videos you create from your smartphone in which you answer questions.
  • Post complementary content that is indirectly related to your industry.
  • Repurpose your company’s own blog content.

Seek to be helpful. 

Challenge

Also, consider asking your own audience questions about what they are doing and what they’d like to see. If you tag people in a post and ask them about the CRM they use, you’ll initiate engagement. As more people comment, it will gain more visibility. If someone from outside your own connections engages with it, reach out to that person and request a connection.

Your challenge for the upcoming week is to share one piece of content every day. 

  • Monday: share an industry-related piece that includes something interesting.
  • Tuesday: answer a frequently-asked-question.
  • Wednesday: answer a common question using video.
  • Thursday: post complementary information.
  • Friday: share something your company has created. 

At the end of the week, if you don’t have any impressions, keep posting. You’re going to connect with new people. Ask your teammates for ideas if you can’t think of anything to post.

“Create Content on LinkedIn” episode resources

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. We want you guys to go out each and every single day to find more ideal customers and do big things.

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

TSE 1138: How To Close A Deal With A Prospect Who Goes With Your Competitor

If I’m working with a prospect who unexpectedly decides to hire a different company, it might sound impossible, but it’s possible to close a deal with a prospect who goes with your competitor. 

David Adley is an outbound sales manager at Bonfire, a digital platform for selling custom apparel. Bonfire works with nonprofits, influencers, and anyone who wants an easy solution to selling an awesome shirt online. 

Sales journey

David started selling knives door-to-door during college and he discovered he had a passion for it. When you’re succeeding, you’re having fun. 

He worked as a sales rep for a music company, and because he was a music major in college, he assumed it would be the perfect marriage of two things he loved. He was playing in a band at the time, and he had to make a decision about his priorities, so he picked music over sales. 

For almost four years he gigged with a band before taking the job at Bonfire as a customer success rep. He was basically making ends meet while doing the rock star thing.

David grew into his role. Because the CEO knew he had sold knives in college, he invited David to take a shot at growing the sales team. He took the leap, and that’s where his journey began.

Fund-raising

Bonfire operates in cause-based fundraising as well as the influencer space. Early in David’s career, he worked with a big client named Crusoe the Celebrity Dachshund. He’s a big deal in the animal influencer game and he has hilarious content. 

He’s also the big fish in David’s story, which is about learning empathy, timing, and persistence, three things that sellers need if they are looking to up their game. The company was still small then and he didn’t want to mess up the opportunity. 

He asked the CEO for help, and together they conducted discovery together. The CEO, Brian Marks, shared wisdom with him, and they discovered that Crusoe wasn’t actually a great fit for the platform at the time. They weren’t equipped to give him everything he needed to have a successful apparel campaign. 

The company was geared to fund-raising at the time and wasn’t really built for influencers. 

Surprise advice

Brian advised David to provide pro bono graphic design work to Crusoe and then told David to recommend that Crusoe sell his designs on a competitor’s platform. Typically custom graphics take about three days, but they turned this one around same-day because it was such a great opportunity even though they couldn’t work with him.

David said he couldn’t imagine sending a potential VIP seller to a competitor, but this is where he really started to learn persistence. After they sent Crusoe away, it was still his responsibility to keep Bonfire top-of-mind for him. He did that by actively checking in during opportune moments, like when he won an award for best animal content creator. 

David congratulated them and checked in with his manager frequently. 

Great rapport

They developed a great rapport despite the fact that they never sold anything on Bonfire’s site to this point. Eventually, when Bonfire relaunched its site with more accommodating features for influencer clientele, the timing was perfect. 

Crusoe’s manager got back to them during a periodic check-in and was anxious to give the company a shot. The new website was officially about three days old at this point, so David was still a little nervous about bandwidth at this point. 

Eventually, the account was the highest-selling campaign on the site up to that point, and it pushed the company to its brink in those early days. He calls it a thrilling experience for everyone involved. 

Nurture the relationship

Almost two years passed between the time when David sent Crusoe to his competitors and then welcomed him to Bonfire as a customer. He did it by nurturing the relationship and staying in contact with his managers. He let them know about the changes at the company, and eventually, it made sense for them to work with Bonfire. 

Crusoe never forgot how the company hooked him up in the early days. As a young rep, David had been so focused on closing that he couldn’t fathom making this kind of decision. The CEO, on the other hand, was looking out for Crusoe’s best interests, and he did what a good sales rep should do: he empathized.

He wasn’t so hungry for a deal that he tried to close something that wasn’t a good fit. He put himself in the client’s shoes and did what was right for the client. Then the client paid it forward. He never forgot the solid favor the company did. 

It was a long, remarkable lesson that resulted in a relationship that still exists today. 

Building value

When sellers build value, loyalty results as a natural by-product. Very often we get shortsighted because, in the sales space, we tend to focus on what we need right now. We don’t allow ourselves to think about the future. The result is that we often think only of ourselves. Many new reps especially get so quota-driven that we lose sight of our customer’s needs.

David said he’s thankful he was able to learn the lesson early in his career because it allows him to detach himself from deals and to teach his reps to do the same. 

Bonfire measures success as a campaign that sells more than 200 apparel items. The Crusoe campaign sold more than 3,000 items, which is about 15 times more than the typical revenue. 

Scaling sales

David’s realization that you can’t simply scale a team by taking your own personal success and applying it to everyone was his biggest challenge as a sales leader. He isn’t data-driven by nature but operates more by the seat of his pants. He uses a throw-it-at-the-wall-and-see-what-sticks approach. Then he repeats what succeeds. And while that worked for him in a young startup environment where there wasn’t a blueprint, it doesn’t work to scale. 

He had to develop a data-driven approach because not everyone can sell like he can. He had to overcome the notion that everyone should do what worked for him. The truth, as he discovered, is that there are lots of awesome personalities and skill sets that can sell effectively. Diving into the data to discover why those personalities could sell effectively was huge.  

Tracking data

They started by establishing a baseline metric for success. Once you’ve determined what your team is doing every day, you can hone those skills to arrive at the place where you’re closing more deals or launching more campaigns. 

David once operated according to a gut-feel to determine how many messages to send out, but they couldn’t rely on that. They needed to establish a number of new outreach messages a day. In this case, it was 25 new outreach messages a day, with the intention to convert 35 percent of those into demos. If 10 percent of those convert to launch campaigns, a BDR can launch three a week and be set up for long-term success. 

The key was drilling down those numbers to figure out what needed to happen at each stage of the pipeline. Telling new reps what they need to do in order to be successful makes a big difference. If they hit those benchmarks, they can feel really good about their trajectory. 

David said he wouldn’t have learned the lessons about empathy, timing, and persistence if he hadn’t been willing to ask for help. Many new reps want to put their heads down and prove themselves. He said that the best reps ask tons of questions and aren’t afraid to fail. Success occurs when you put yourself out there, ask for help, and then apply the lessons you learn effectively. 

How To Close A Deal With A Prospect Who Goes With Your Competitor” episode resources

You can connect with David via email at David@bonfire.com. You can also connect with him on LinkedIn and check out Bonfire.com. Find his music at Griff’s Room Band. You can also connect with his mom, who is a professional storyteller, at Characters By Kim.  

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump. If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. 

Tools for sellers

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Bob Burg, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1128: Developing A Go-Giver Strategy!

 

Bob Burg, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistThe most financially profitable way to do business is to shift your focus from getting to giving, and by developing a Go-Giver strategy, you’ll constantly provide value and good things will begin to happen. 

Bob Burg is a salesman who has written a series of books about the Go-Giver, a parable about the principles behind the kind of success most sellers are hoping to achieve. Through encounters with a series of different people, the main character, Joe, discovers that his focus has been in the wrong place. 

Giving too much

Giving means providing value to others. Though it’s typically not possible to provide too much value, begin by determining whether your focus on providing value will set you up to be taken advantage of. There are plenty of people who are takers and who focus only on themselves. They feel entitled to take without giving anything back. 

If you’re providing value to someone like that, there’s a good chance things won’t work out.  Realize, though, that there’s no natural connection between being a go-giver and being taken advantage of. Understand, too, that if you’re being taken advantage of, it isn’t because you’re too nice; it’s because you’re allowing it to happen.

Being a go-giver doesn’t mean being a martyr or a doormat. It simply means your focus is on bringing value to the marketplace and to others. 

No one will buy from you because you need the money or you have a quota to meet. They’ll buy because they will be better off buying from you. 

Focus on value

The only reason people should buy from you is because they’ll be better off after they do. That truth allows the salesperson or entrepreneur to focus on bringing immense value to the marketplace and to the prospect’s life. When that happens, the prospect will prosper greatly. 

Money is simply an echo of value. Focus on the value rather than the money. Value comes first and the money you receive is a natural result of the value you provided. 

Human nature is self-interested. It allows us to create more human beings. 

Successful people deal in truth. They don’t deny inconvenient things, but rather they acknowledge truth and then work within it to make things better. 

Start by acknowledging and understanding self-interest. Then put it aside with the understanding that we’re better off dealing with others when we suspend our self-interest. The other person is only going to buy because of their own needs. 

Value without attachment

Although people often suggest you should give without expecting anything in return, Bob doesn’t exactly agree with that. Instead, give value without attachment to the result. We want people to expect good things. If you’re in business serving other people, you should expect to profit greatly because you’re bringing value to the marketplace. Just don’t be attached to that result. 

Give value because it’s who you are and what you do. When that happens you create a benevolent context for success. You develop great relationships with people who feel good about you. They know you, they like you, and they trust you, and they want to be part of your business. 

Develop an army of personal walking ambassadors who will refer business to you. 

Starting point

Imagine you decide at this point to change your ways. Start by asking who the people are in your network and what you can provide to them that will help them by bringing value to their lives. Then make a plan for meeting other people that you can develop know-like-and-trust relationships with. 

We’re human beings and we’re different types of people. The reason the Go-Giver took off is because it allows you to be yourself. You can be the person who wants to bring value to the marketplace. 

Most people choose a certain line of work because they believe in the mission. They believe in what they’re doing. We’re happy when we’re living congruently with our values. 

Go-Giver origins

Bob recalls his parents working to make people’s lives better. Then, when he started in sales, he found himself selling a product that offered great value, but he was focused largely on the sales process. Like Joe in the book, he was a seller who wasn’t living up to his potential. 

He returned from a non-selling appointment one day to hear advice from a guy in his organization. The typically-silent guy told him that if he wanted to make a lot of money in business, he should establish a target outside of making money. 

Target serving others, so that when you hit your target, you’ll get a reward in the form of money. Great salesmanship is about the other person and how he’ll benefit from your product or service. 

Economic downturn

Bob heard from a roofer during an economic crisis who recognized that his approach had been wrong. He was trying to save money during the downturn, but he realized that instead of trying to give the least he could for the money, he needed to focus on giving more value. 

It didn’t necessarily mean spending more, but rather creating a better experience. His business took off as a result. 

Technology has leveled off the playing field. We live in a commodity-based society which isn’t necessarily bad. It does mean that you must distinguish yourself. If you sell a widget that your customer can’t distinguish one from the other, it will always come down to price. If you sell on low price, you’re a commodity. If you sell on high value, you’re a resource. 

Communicating value

There are likely hundreds of way to communicate value, but Bob boils it down to five elements of value. 

  1. Excellence
  2. Consistency
  3. Attention
  4. Empathy
  5. Appreciation

To the degree that you can communicate these things to your customer, that’s the degree to which you take price and competition out of the picture. 

Begin with leadership, and with a leader who is totally committed to making this part of the culture. Anyone can lead from anywhere but culture trickles down from the top. If the leader invests in this and gets buy-in from other leaders, it becomes part of the culture. 

Bob Chapman of Barry-Wehmiller wrote a book called Everybody Matters in which he recalls running a profit-focused company. Though there is nothing wrong with profit, it must be sustainable, so it must be the result of the value you provide. Bob attended the wedding of his best friend’s daughter, and the father of the bride made a toast. He acknowledged that the groom was marrying a treasured daughter. Bob took that same concept to his business. 

Barry-Wehmiller has thousands of employees, all of whom are someone’s treasured sons and daughters. When the economic downturn emerged, rather than lay off any one employee, they came together as a company and traded work days. They stopped putting into the company savings account until the crisis was over. The corporate family came together in a crunch. 

Heart level

Herb Kelleher of Southwest Airlines understood the concept and he restructured the organization to focus first on allowing employees to thrive, learn, grow, and have fun. His team had a higher sense of purpose in their jobs. 

As a result, the team takes care of the customers and the customers take care of the shareholders. 

Until you know there’s a problem that needs to be fixed, you’ll never take the steps to address it. 

Be willing to shift your focus. 

When Bob’s business partner sends a sales letter, he makes an effort to take the “I,” “me,” and “we,” out of the letter. We’re self-interested human beings and we write in terms of how great we are and how great the product is. 

We aren’t denying self-interest. We’re acknowledging that you have to work at placing  your focus on others. 

“Developing A Go-Giver Strategy” episode resources

You can find Bob’s podcast, The Go-Giver Podcast, at his website. You can also grab samples chapters of his books before you buy them. Consider subscribing to his list to get a copy of a written resource called Endless Prospects

The Go-Giver way teaches you to build relationships with solid step-by-step information. 

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump. If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. 

Tools for sellers

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Building Value, Ken Rutsky

TSE 1106: Why Assessing Value is Not As Simple As It Sounds, and How Companies Often Get This Wrong

Building Value, Ken Rutsky

Value is in the eye of the buyer, and because assessing value is not as simple as it sounds, companies often get this wrong.

Ken Rutsky specializes in helping companies tell their story in a way that connects it to the customer. He says that value is all connected to the stories we tell.

Defining value

We’re trying to sell something. Essentially what we’re doing is making a trade of the two things they value the most in order of least to more. Money is the thing everybody values, but often buyers value their time even more. They value the time they spend understanding, evaluating, and implementing a solution or a product.

We’re asking our buyers for two rare commodities, so we have to deliver something that is equal to or hopefully greater in value.

As a result, the simple definition of value is what will the customer open his wallet and pay for?

Many sales reps perceive that they are creating value but that may not be the case because assessing value is not as simple as it seems.

Perceived value

Ken said that the biggest mistake sales reps make is overvaluing value. Seems strange to say in a discussion all about value, but it’s true.

If we’re sitting next to each other on an airplane and I’m showing you pictures of my four kids, by the third kid you’ve probably seen enough. We tend to get excited about our goods and services just like we do about our kids. Many times, we want to show the client thousands of pictures of it. We overvalue what they’ll see in it.

Instead, we really need to relate our product to our customers.

Sales doesn’t work the way it once did. Your customer doesn’t need you to tell him about your product. They’ll go to your website and find out everything they ever wanted to know.

In the book Launching to Leading, Ken talks about how salespeople should succeed today. Start by creating that shared context with the customer. Realize, too, that it’s the customer’s context, not yours.

Viewpoint

You have to start the conversation about your customer’s world. Come in educated about how you can transform your customer’s world.

In a recent survey of B2B buyers, business buyers ranked product knowledge as the 8th most important factor in the process. They ranked the seller’s ability to understand the buyer’s business as the number one priority.

Number 2 was the ability to teach the customer something he didn’t already know. Don’t enter the relationship with the intent to sell something. Instead, have a conversation about their business, and then teach them something.

Teaching is critical to establishing your value as a salesperson. If the customer isn’t learning from you, he could just as easily go to your website instead. In fact, most customers are 60 percent through the process before they ever want to speak to a salesperson.

Find a teaching opportunity.

Stories

Realistically, it is marketing’s job to create the stories, but the sellers are the ones who must deliver them and create context around them.

Marketing is a one-to-many art. Great sales reps show up and contextualize the stories. Understand the story of your product and how it transforms your customers’ business.

You have to do the hard work of understanding all these things. There is no magic shortcut.

Empathy

Sales leaders must operate with a sense of empathy. Understand that marketing is working hard to provide the stories and the materials. If marketing feels like they aren’t getting the things they need, there’s a shared responsibility to make that connection.

Marketers must have empathy for the pressures and difficulties of selling. Great marketers have empathy for sellers. They understand the need to work as a team.

Leaders must create that environment of empathy across the organization.

Confidence

Sales reps have to be competent and courageous enough to show the product very early in the sales cycle. Whether it’s a true demonstration or a case study, sellers have to demonstrate value if they want customers to believe it.

Don’t wait six weeks into the sales cycle. Demonstrate early and often. Sellers must have the ability to create and demonstrate their own contexts.

Teach your customer something and then show them how the product can enable the thing you taught him. It can happen in the first call and then it should happen again and again through the process.

The teaching diminishes as the process goes along because the customer already understands the possibility.

Your competition may be showing the products sooner because prospects don’t have the patience they used to have.

Do the homework and understand your customer and everything follows from there. Assessing value is not as simple as it sounds.

“Assessing Value is Not As Simple As It Sounds” episode resources

You can connect with Ken at kenrutsky.com. You can find information about him and his clients, and grab a copy of his book, Launching to Leading.

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

Tools for sellers

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

FSMSDC, Entrepreneur, Podcast

TSE 1105: Growing Your Business and Creating Value

FSMSDC, Entrepreneur, PodcastDuring our time at the Florida State Minority Supplier Development Council’s expo, we’ve met a number of people who understand the secrets behind growing your business and creating value.

Felix Bratslavsky works at Tampa General Hospital, a very large level-one trauma center that is number one in Florida for transplants. The organization has more than 8,000 employees but they still contract out much of their workload.

Gilda Rosenberg started a vending machine company 35 years ago in Miami and she slowly grew it to include major clients like universities, schools, and hospitals. She calls her relationship with  the NMSDC a love affair that resulted in referrals, connections, and mentorship that helped her to grow her business.

Partnerships

Tampa General has a minority business program that breaks out the four procurement categories from construction and professional services to general goods and services, and medical services and supplies. The hospital has a lot of contracting opportunities and a lot of partners within the state of Florida and even nationwide.

The Minority Business Enterprise program administered by the NMSDC recognizes for-profit businesses in the U.S. that are 51 percent owned, operated, capitalized, and controlled by minorities.

Felix says that MBEs that want to stand out should strive to be a partner. Add value, be cost-efficient, and know about the customer. Understand the customers’ goals, their missions, and where they’re headed. Bring the solution to wherever your prospective customer is going.

In the case of Tampa General, the hospital recently got a new CEO that is leading the organization down a different path. MBEs that want to engage should recognize that the business has changed paths and they should offer solutions that relate to the path the company is on.

Be an expert in your own business. Instead of coming to the prospect with a variety of items, they should know the situation well enough to narrow the solution down the best possible option and lead with that one.

Homework

MBEs must do their homework and focus on preparation if they that want to get noticed. Organizations receive hundreds of emails every day, so generic outreach will generally get deleted.

Learn the process to get on the vendor application and then build a relationship. Finally, come with solutions. Understand your business and their business well enough that you can have meaningful conversations about each.

If you want to be the next partner, you should already know who your competitors are, and who your prospect is currently using and why they are using that company. You should know whether a contract exists, and whether it’s up for renewal.

Companies that do those things win opportunities.

Differentiate

Differentiate yourself by being prepared. When there are so many companies doing the same thing and offering the same service, you have to stand out.

Maybe you stand out on price or on value or even additional services. Whatever it is, make sure that the corporations you’re pursuing know what sets you apart.

Finding the right people

Gilda recalls asking a bank for a $5 million loan for vending machines and being treated as though she was crazy. She said that her connections through NMSDC helped her learn how to negotiate the loan process as she interacted with banking people and how to create bids from connecting with hospital CEOs.

Her biggest challenge in the vending industry has been the labor force. Her first route driver stole from her, so she learned that she had to control inventories differently. As the industry grew into a technological one, she had to bring in geek squads.

She also learned how to find the human resources that support your mission and your vision. She said that finding the right manpower still poses one of her greatest challenges even today. The company struggles to find loyal employees who stick around because small companies struggle to sustain high turnover. The cost of training is simply too high.

NMSDC

She experienced a huge lift when she was introduced to the minority certification program. Then, she slowly grew her network and interacted with larger organizations where she landed contracts.

You must prove yourself to the client. She says the most incredible satisfaction comes from helping minorities nationwide. Her suppliers and equipment originate from minorities. And now newer companies want her to introduce them to other contacts.

Gilda calls her mission a mission to help other minorities. She also calls NMSDC the best college she ever went to. Although she studied economics in college, she grew professionally among the members of the NMSDC. She learned to nurture others.

Don’t think twice about joining the council because there’s nowhere better to network. The council’s handholding helps businesses by taking extra steps to get you to the right people. And knowing the right people can be the key to growing your business and creating value.

“Growing Your Business and Creating Value” episode resources

You can connect with Felix at (813) 844-3474 or at fbratslavsky@tgh.org or go to the hospital website. You can connect with Gilda at gilda@gillyvending.com. Learn more about the National Minority Supplier Development Council and its offerings at the website, nmsdc.org. If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Client Referrence, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1102: “Should I Give Client References?”

Client Referrence, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistIt can be frustrating for prospects to ask to speak to your current customers, and it can leave you wondering, “Should I Give Client References?

It can be tricky to balance this need, because you don’t want your current customers, the ones you’ve developed into raving fans, to be constantly bombarded by prospects.

Root cause

Throughout the process, your prospects are trying to determine whether you’re a good fit and whether you can truly help solve their problem. I recommend that you develop a wide base of people that can give you good support.

But let’s address the root cause of how your prospects got to this point. In my experience, it’s because they don’t have confidence in you as an organization, so they are seeking third-party validation. They don’t want to make a bad decision.

Put yourself in your buyer’s shoes. His job or his reputation may be on the line. His company may not have a lot of money, so they can’t waste it on buying the wrong product or service.

Diffuse risk

This issue usually traces back to a fear of risk, so you must diffuse this fear.

It’s not bad to give customer references, but client testimonials might work better. You can collect them in video form or as case studies.

In last week’s episode, we discussed the importance of leave-behinds, and testimonials might be a great option for you, especially if you’re in a high-risk industry. Leave behind video testimonials of your current customers addressing some of the common questions or the challenging objections you routinely hear.

You can leave them information about your past customers’ pain and how you’ve addressed it. You can also indicate that you’ll discuss these topics more on your next interaction.

Your prospects simply don’t want to be guinea pigs.

Value

You know your product or service is fantastic, but your prospects don’t know that yet. Give value in order to help them understand.

Use videos, case studies, and client testimonials on your website to communicate value. You can also create YouTube videos to help your client when he does the research you know he’s planning to do. They’ll establish a level of comfort with your product or service.

If I’m your customer, I’ve got my own business to run. I’m too busy to answer all your customers’ questions and to do all your selling for you. Referral phone calls interrupt my day.

Compromise

Perhaps the best option, then, is to offer to provide testimonials and case studies first to see if they can address the most frequent questions. Then, if the customer still has a level of uncertainty, you can consider providing referrals.

You can even explain that you’re trying to be considerate of your current customers just as you would do for this prospect someday when they’ve become your customer, too.

Make sure you minimize the prospects’ risk. Give them an opportunity to alleviate. Use leave-behind to help you accomplish that. Tell stories of clients that had similar challenges.

 “Should I Give Client References?” episode resources

You can connect with Ebony at her website, www.ebenumequationcoaching.com, or on LinkedIn @EbonySmithCoach.

You can connect with Abdullah at tharooa@paykoncept.com.

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

Tools for sellers

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Ideal Customer, Dr. Frances Richards, Black Podcast

TSE 1099: Sales From The Street – “My Ideal Customer”

Ideal Customer, Dr. Frances Richards, Black Podcast

 

Business owners and sales reps who try to sell to everyone will struggle to succeed until they decide to focus their efforts on the ideal customer.

Today, Dr. Frances Richards, whose company helps people reclaim their wealth by transforming their health, talks about the journey of finding her ideal customer.

Sales From The Street allows us to connect with a sales professional and hear about the biggest professional struggles that person faced. Dr. Frances is the host of a podcast called Black Entrepreneur Experience, where she interviews CEOs, innovative thinkers, thought leaders, and black entrepreneurs across the globe.

Finding a tribe

Her biggest struggle was finding her ideal customer, and connecting with the people that her message would resonate with. When you’re building an internet business, there are so many different ways to connect with people that it can sometimes be overwhelming for businesses that are trying to find their tribe.

She points to the fact that there are plenty of people telling you what you should do to connect with your ideal client, so it’s tough to know what to do. She said that people told her, “It’s all in the email list,” or “It’s all in social media,” or “It’s all in Facebook advertising,” or “It’s all in the messaging.”

Changing landscape

The hardest part, she said, is trying to determine what’s really relevant. And with the internet constantly changing things, the way you build a company in 2019 is different than the steps you might have taken in 2014.

The steps to find your ideal customer have changed. And when you talk about sales, certain steps are appropriate whether you’re online or offline. Building rapport, and building quality relationships, matters in every situation.

Authenticity

Dr. Frances said that in order to find her ideal customer, she had to block out all the noise and focus on authenticity. She started by deprogramming herself from the idea of working for someone else.

She said she had to adjust to the idea of working for herself and to lose all of the things she was accustomed to, like listening to the bosses tell her what she needed to do. Because she had done many different kinds of sales, she was able to change her mindset from employee mode to employer mode. Then she had to be true to who she really wanted to serve.

When she was an employee, she had to serve anyone. Once she started to define who to serve, then she started to attract her ideal customer as opposed to just doing cold calling.

To-do lists

She had an extensive to-do list of doing 10 posts a day, doing a Facebook live, doing a Periscope, posting on LinkedIn, and all of those other things. She was busy working on the business instead of in the business, which actually brings in income.

Once she prioritized how she would get sales and how she would bring value, she got out of the mode of being desperate. She was listening to her clients’ pain points and she set out to serve them. She went into the mode of serving and helping her clients, her fan base, her tribe.

Dr. Frances has turned down consulting contracts because she wanted to make it a win-win for all parties involved. She operates from a position of making sure both parties are a good fit.

Qualified clients

The shift to serving her clients resulted in more qualified clients. Previously she connected with clients who really couldn’t afford her service so it would have been a disservice to try to work together.

She started asking her prospects what they hoped to accomplish and if someone said, “I want to lose 50 pounds in 5 days,” she wouldn’t even try to convince the person to work with her since the goals were unrealistic.

She has found that when she gets qualified, bonafide clients, the two enjoy working together. The clients are getting results and she is building testimonies.

Ideal client

Just serve the people who really need what you have to offer. Be who you authentically are. There will be plenty of voices telling you what you should do.

Instead of following them, dig deep into yourself and discover what you’re really passionate about. What makes you sing? What makes you get out of bed every morning? That’s half the battle because your attitude dictates your altitude.

If you love what you do, you’ll do what you love. Dr. Frances uses the acronym DANCE to remind her to be authentic: Determine Action Now Creates Energy.

Dancers dance because they want to, not because someone forces them to. Instead of doing things you don’t like, do the things you authentically enjoy. Find your passion.

“Ideal Customer” episode resources

You can connect with Frances at drfrancesrichards.com and you can find her on Facebook and Instagram as Dr. Frances Richards. You can also find her podcast at Black Entrepreneur Experience.

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Sales Material, Donald Kelly

TSE 1097: “Fatal Mistake – You’re Not Leaving Anything Behind”

 

Sales Material, Donald KellyIf you find that your deals are falling through the cracks or you’re losing your prospects to your competition, perhaps the problem is that you’re not leaving anything behind

You might be thinking of brochures and other leave-behinds, but that’s not what we’re talking about here. Instead, we’re talking about the things you should be leaving behind any why these things are so critical to moving your deal forward. 

Research phase

Unless you’re dealing with a referral, when you’re dealing with a prospect, that person is probably considering other people as well. Even if the prospect reached out to you and seems completely interested, that person is ultimately looking for the best deal. 

You must stay top of mind. Ensure that you stay relevant and always present without being annoying. You must give the prospect something valuable. 

Content

Consider leaving content behind that ties directly to what you’ve already discussed. Or leave content that helps the prospect prepare for the next scheduled meeting. 

Once you’ve done this a time or two, you’ll understand why it’s so important. 

Imagine IT companies in this situation that are evaluating service companies. You won’t be the only company they are considering, but you want them to forget those other companies and focus on yours. 

One option is to determine which other companies the prospect is considering.

Create landmines

Create landmines for the competitor. 

For instance, when I sold document management services, I had a competitor whose services were only good for one department. The competitor served that department very well, but the other departments hated their services. 

I planted the idea in our prospects’ minds that a tool that only benefits one department isn’t really a valuable tool for the entire company. My leave-behind was the idea that the competitor would only benefit a small portion of the company.

If it wasn’t a good fit, certain departments wouldn’t use it, which would result in wasted money because no one used the software. 

I suggested to the prospect that a solution that benefits everyone would be a better fit.

Format

In the past, that kind of content might have appeared in the form of a white paper. Now, however, your prospects are busy and many things are grabbing at their attention.

Instead, consider a LinkedIn post or article, or a podcast, or a video addressing the issue. Identify the top things that make your company a favorable choice. Highlight the challenges that your company can solve better than the competition. 

Educate your buyer before you return for the next meeting or demonstration. That way, when the prospect meets with the competition, they’ll know what issues to ask questions about. 

If you’re not leaving anything behind, the prospect may simply respond to the flashy, cool presentation. 

Notifications

Make this tool even more powerful by using tools that notify you when the prospect opens the message or clicks on the video. 

Consider, for example, that you send a video for your prospect to watch prior to the next meeting. Maybe it answers questions that frequently occur during the second meeting. 

If you send it with BombBomb, you’ll know when the prospect watched it, and whether they watched the entire video. It helps you know when and how the prospect is engaging with your content. 

Do something different

Everyone is leaving a business card, so you must do something that helps you stand out from the crowd. Make your company the obvious choice.

Position yourself as the trusted advisor and the one who is helping the prospect understand all the important considerations before making a decision. 

If you’re not leaving anything behind, your promising deal may disappear. 

“You’re Not Leaving Anything Behind” episode resources

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Dion Travagliante, Value, Sales Rep, Donald Kelly

TSE 1083: 3 Crucial Signs You Need to Add More Value

Dion Travagliante, Value, Sales Rep, Donald KellySometimes as sales reps we don’t bring enough value to the table and there are 3 crucial signs you need to add more value so you won’t be judged only on price.

Dion Travagliante runs Madison One Consulting, a consulting practice where he solves problems for SAS businesses. He said he loves the fact that sellers have latitude in their careers and he loves the chase of finding the potential customer and then uncovering the issue and working to solve it.

People have a preconceived notion that sales is just talking with no science, rhyme, or reason behind it, but he calls it a challenging world that you can train yourself to succeed in.

Commodity

Sellers often struggle to stand out against other competitors and they struggle against being viewed as simply a commodity. The key is to become the winner of the account.

Dion defines value as improvement in a client or prospect’s individual situation. That centers on solving problems. Any company that is selling something originated around the idea of solving someone else’s problem.

That means as a sales rep, you’re a steward of your company’s solution in the marketplace. That should free you to talk to anyone about the challenges they are facing.

Flip the script. There will always be people who perceive salespeople as slick operators who try to jam products down people’s throats. No one wants to have that persona.

Instead, approach every customer as someone with a pain point whose problem you’d like to solve. If you do, you’ll be better than 95 percent of the sellers out there because you’ll be thinking about someone else.

Watch for these 3 crucial signs you need to add more value.

1. Negotiating price

When you’re talking with a prospect and they start negotiating price during the sales cycle. Do not go down the rabbit hole of arguing price.

The worst position you can be in as a sales rep is negotiating against yourself. If the prospect wants to lower the price, it becomes a game of limbo: how low can you go? Instead of just acquiescing, you want to push back on that. They are telling you that they don’t see the inherent value in the price you’ve determined for your product.

You can never negotiate against your own price, but you can flip the script.

If, for example, a single client averages $60,000 and your product costs $20,000, the purchase pays for itself three times over. If your product can speed up the process, the relevant issue is how much money they’ll derive from using your solution.

If the person you’re dealing with is an intermediary and they insist on dropping the price, what they are saying is that they don’t feel confident taking this solution at this price point to the decision makers.

The quicker path is to lower the price. Instead, arm them with more things so they look like the hero when they show up to present it.

2. Seeking referrals

When your prospect asks you for a referral, what he’s really saying is that he’s interested in what you’re selling and he wants to continue down the path, but he wants external validation.

Mike Brooks, who calls himself Mr. Inside Sales, wrote a book called The Ultimate Book of Phone Scripts where he shares 500 scripts that you can use to address objections. He suggests acknowledging that you’d be happy to connect the customer with a host of satisfied customers but then asking what sticking points still exist.

They want someone else to verify that they should buy this because we’re all somewhat tribal in nature. Get out in front of it.

Your own self-limiting beliefs can prompt you to negotiate with a client instead of seeking to provide enough value to get them across the finish line.

Practice saying that phrase so that it becomes second-nature. Because 90 percent of decisions are made with the subconscious mind, you should train your mind to respond this way automatically.

Courage isn’t the absence of anxiety or fear; it’s acting in spite of it. The people who improve are those that put themselves in uncomfortable scenarios. Human beings learn by pain.

3. Status quo

When you’ve done the discovery call and you’re in the demo and the prospect says, “You know, I think we’re going to stay with our current solution,” that’s an indicator that you haven’t provided enough value. The prospect is telling you that it seems like a lot of work to transition to your option, so they are going to stay where they are.

They are telling you that you haven’t exhibited enough value to drive them to switch. Sales decisions are made emotionally and then justified logically.

Todd Caponi, in his book The Transparency Sale, talks about the psychology of sales and the fact that if your customer’s logic is preventing them from closing the deal, you need to stoke some emotional flames.

You must provide enough value to make switching worthwhile.

Best sales reps

The best sales reps try new things. They put themselves into difficult scenarios that allow them to learn. They also end up selling more.

Always think about the prospects and their solutions. Get out of your own way and help your prospect solve a problem and better his solution.

Ask pointed questions. Figure out the plight. You’ll come off as more genuine than if you toss around buzzwords.

“3 Crucial Signs You Need to Add More Value” episode resources

You can connect with Dion at madisononeinc.com and you can email him at dion@madisononeinc.com.

Grab a copy of the two books Dion recommended: The Ultimate Book of Phone Scripts by Mike Brooks and The Transparency Sale by Todd Caponi.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Email, Prospecting, Value

TSE 1082: Your Emails Give No Value

Email, Prospecting, ValueWhen your prospects find 100 new email messages waiting for them on Monday morning, if your emails give no value, your prospects will never open them.

If there’s nothing in the subject line or the first sentence of the message to grab their attention, your prospects will probably never even open the message. Sellers must give thought to what their first sentence is saying to uncover how their emails are performing.

Preview

Consider your own email inbox.

You’re busy. You don’t have time to read every single email that arrives in your inbox. If you’ve got 100 new messages waiting, you’re not going to read them all. You’ll travel the path of least resistance by eliminating as many as possible.

In the book The Transparency Sale: How Unexpected Honesty and Understanding the Buying Brain Can Transform Your Results, Todd Caponi highlights several things to be aware of when sending emails.

Email content

The subject line is crucial, so your goal is to minimize it as much as possible. Get to the point quickly with as few words as possible.

Make sure the first sentence of your email relates to the subject line and make sure it has nothing to do with you. Avoid statements like “I have something I want to share with you,” or “My company helps clients who…”

Avoid including sentences that, when you think about them, simply aren’t helpful. “I hope this message finds you doing well.” “I hope your quarter is going great.” These are both fillers and they won’t compel anyone to open the email.

If you’re using the same content and the same statements as other sellers, your emails give no value, and no one will open them.

Truth

One of the worst mistakes you can make is using a subject line that has nothing to do with the email content itself.

If you bait your reader in with one idea and then switch ideas within the email, you’ll probably get black-listed. At best, you’ll get sent to the spam folder so you’re toast forever.

Do something totally different. Personalize your message and don’t include a huge pitch in your first email.

Think about it from your buyer’s standpoint. He has countless sellers reaching out to sell him something, and many of them are sharing similar messages. What if your first sentence offered something to help him?

Consider this example from Todd.

He got an email from a seller who recognized that he was a CEO who had to create and give presentations. The seller provided a PowerPoint template he could use to present metrics and then another template he could use to create a sales handbook.

The sender gave no information about himself or his company. The only reference was information in the signature block that Todd could access if he was interested.

Value

Buyers aren’t stupid. If you send a helpful, beneficial email, I’ll like go to your site. Even if I don’t need your product right now, I’ll know where to go in the future.

Give something of value. Provide some education. Think of it from the buyer’s standpoint. Give him something that will help him be more effective and efficient in his role.

When you give value, provide something that will address a problem that your ideal customer struggles with. It doesn’t even have to be something you’re an expert in, and in fact, that sometimes makes it more genuine.

Imagine I sell HR software to HR directors. If you send a document titled 5 Things HR Directors Should Consider When Selecting A Software, he’ll smell the bias from 10 miles away. If I provide something beneficial that isn’t in my wheelhouse, they’ll recognize that I’m not trying to sell something.

The goal is to build interaction by getting him to respond and open a dialog.

Dialog

If the thing you’re sharing will benefit him even if he doesn’t buy your product, go ahead and share that with your prospect. Just don’t make it gimmicky.

Give something that has value and then connect other places like on LinkedIn or over the phone. Many of us are stuck in the mindset that a single email will open the door to a deal.

Focus on the content you’re sharing. Focus on the type of content and how it applies to him as an individual. Then focus on how you can make his life easier.

Create emails that prospects will want to open so you can build meaningful conversations and then ask effective questions. #ColdOutreach

“Your Emails Give No Value” episode resources

Grab a copy of the book The Transparency Sale: How Unexpected Honesty and Understanding the Buying Brain Can Transform Your Results by Todd Caponi.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Talking About Price, Selling, Donald Kelly

TSE 1075: TSE Certified Sales Training Program – “When Should I Talk About Price?”

Talking About Price, Selling, Donald Kelly

The trend in sales now is to provide value to your customers, but there must be some kind of exchange in the transaction, so you may find yourself asking, “When should I talk about price?”

How do you bring it up? What exactly will you say when it’s time to talk about it?

Today we’re going to share ideas that will help you provide tremendous value and ensure an effective, value-rich conversation for both parties.

This is a segment from our TSE Certified Sales Training Program and we’re going to share a snippet from one of our training programs and then offer some ideas based upon what you hear. It will let you learn something about selling and offer you an experiment that you can test for yourself.

You’ll hear the challenges that other sales reps are facing and share with you what has worked for the group members.

Taboo

We’ve been taught that it’s taboo to talk about money, so many of us shy away from it. New sellers face the biggest challenge, usually because of limiting beliefs.

In the past when I was selling software training classes, I didn’t understand that it was worth $10,000 for customers to earn their certification over a weekend. I didn’t think anyone would be willing to pay it.

I didn’t understand that for their $10,000 expenditure, they were going to see a $20,000 to $30,000 increase in their earnings over the course of a year.

All I knew was that $10,000 was a lot of money. My self-limiting beliefs made me apprehensive, and this is a common problem for new sellers.

You must believe in the product or service you’re offering and the value it provides to your prospects. When you do that, you’ll develop more confidence in your messages, and it won’t matter what the course costs.

Bring up the money

Once you’ve identified a product you believe in, when do you bring up the money? That depends largely on the product or service that you’re selling. If it’s software that costs $30 a month and they won’t commit, they probably weren’t the right fit anyway.

Let them go.

If you’re selling a software solution that you have to customize for the organization, you’re going to need more time. You’ll have to gather more information in order to give them effective pricing.

If the customer can see the prices on your website, they can weed themselves out at the beginning. People who really want to learn more and have more value-rich conversations will engage. In the later conversations, we can discuss what they’ll get for their investment.

Addressing price

We’ll tap into emotion by addressing how our product or service will help them.

  • What will happen if the client doesn’t get coaching?
  • Why do I need coaching right now?
  • What results will I see if I get coaching?

Because people make emotional decisions and then justify those decisions logically, if we build value well, the $1,500 price tag for coaching won’t seem like a big deal. The return on their investment, the ability to provide well for their family, and the possibility that they will advance in their careers will justify the cost.

In the case of a more complex solution, when the customer asks about price, be honest when you tell them that you can’t predict exact numbers right now. If you can’t yet determine all the variables and if you can’t determine the exact infrastructure, explain that to the customer.

Then invest the time to understand the setup and the infrastructure. Find out what challenges the prospect is facing.

Be intentional

It’s possible that the customer is simply fishing, or in other cases that he is simply looking for a ballpark figure. In the latter case, perhaps try giving him a range for other similar clients.

Don’t give the customer your lowest number if you provide a range. If the cheapest you’ve done is $5,000 and the most expensive is $20,000, don’t offer the $5,000 number. Go a little higher.

Instead, offer a higher number, like $8,000 or $10,000. Once they have a number in their minds, you’ll determine whether they are truly serious about moving forward.

Content

In this situation, effective blog posts that describe the return on investment will help your customers gather information. Especially if yours is a complex solution, you’ll help them understand the components involved and what they should be looking for in a vendor.

In the case of sales training, perhaps you’d have different blog posts that describe the different levels of training and the different types of service that you offer.

The prospect can determine what courses are available and what his options are for in-person training, group training, or workshops.

Consider, too, outlining entry-level solutions, mid-tier solutions, and a higher tier. Each solution, based upon the complexity, can solve specific problems.

Research

The prospect can do some research ahead of time and find answers to some of their basic questions. Because this will be an enterprise solution, he’ll have to come to the table prepared to invest money.

At this point, it’s appropriate to talk about budget because you don’t want to begin building presentations or demonstrations if the product or service isn’t a fit. Get an understanding of what kind of investment the prospect is looking to make.

Be up front. Acknowledge that you’d like to know as soon as possible if the prospect determines this isn’t a good fit. Promise to do the same for your prospect.

Ask if the company has already earmarked a budget for this project. Find out if they are planning the project for this year.

Pain

Once you’ve discovered the pain, use that to see if you can move them toward the project right now. Anticipate that they may not be able to do the whole thing right now, but they might do half this quarter and half the next quarter.

Once we have an understanding we can move forward. If you built rapport with this prospect and created communication, it will be easy to discuss finances.

Terminology

New sellers might ask about the proper words to use. Rather than budget or payment, I use the word investment. That’s a given, right?

They are investing in sales training to solve a problem. They are expecting to see a return on the money they spend.

If it’s a new seller who wants to become the best in the company or a female business owner in a male-dominated industry, they are expecting to show some results from their investment. The word payment sounds too transactional.

As you’re having these conversations, understand that you should wait to mention the money after the buyer has a sense of the value you’re offering.

They must see the value before they can comprehend the investment.

“When Should I Talk About Price?” episode resources

Connect with me on LinkedIn or on Instagram and let me know how this worked out for you.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Social Selling, Personal Brand, Andy Storch, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1071: Building a Personal Brand, Giving value, Connecting with Others

Social Selling, Personal Brand, Andy Storch, The Sales EvangelistSmart sellers can make social media work for them by building a personal brand, giving value, connecting with others, and growing their business.

Andy Storch is a consultant and coach who is always learning new things about sales and who loves the freedom that selling provides. Though he says he still has a lot to learn, he has an advantage over many others because he’s always trying new things.

Because he has the confidence to experiment and discover what works and what doesn’t, he has a leg up on a lot of other people.

Personal branding

Whether you’re selling services or products, there are very few things that absolutely distinguish your offerings from other people’s. In fact, customers can always find an alternative.

In B2B especially, they are buying you. They want to do business with you.

Relationships are so important for sellers which is why it’s more important than ever to develop a personal brand. You must let people know who you are and create authority.

To that end, Andy uses social media to let people know who he is, to create authority, to share knowledge, and to build authority.

Attracting people

As sellers, we initially think we want to get on a call with everybody, but there are a lot of people we just won’t gel with. Social media attracts people who want to work with us and deflects others.

In an era where everyone is creating content of some kind, we have to put our own content out there in order to build our authority.

Given the amount of content that already exists, it’s tempting to wonder why yours matters. Even if you’re regurgitating information you learned from someone else, put your own spin on it.

For some, it’s blogging. Others use podcasting or YouTube. It depends on your style and where your clients are.

Andy points to podcaster Chris Ducker and his business Youpreneur. In his book Rise of the Youpreneur, Chris says that if you build a personal brand, it’s the last brand business you’ll ever need to build because you can take it with you and evolve it into any kind of business.

Five years from now, you may do completely different work, but if you’ve built a brand and a following, people will go with you.

Building a brand

Your personal brand is what you’re known for. Having your own website and your own colors is the advanced part of it.

Are you known for being knowledgeable, trustworthy, and someone that people want to learn from? Andy posts on social media with the goal of helping his friends discover the things that have previously worked for him.

They tell him that he inspires them, and he has created a personal brand as someone who is an achiever, who helps and inspires other people.

You want to be known as someone knowledgeable and trustworthy at the end of the day.

People who need it

Think of your content as giving information to a friend. You are putting it out there for those people who need it and want it at that time, not for people who don’t.

Don’t worry about the judgment from people that your content isn’t for. Most people are rooting for you. Even if the content isn’t for them, they’ll just scroll on by.

Action steps

Andy’s primary business is B2B so he spends most of his time on LinkedIn. When he moved to this business 18 months ago he committed to posting every weekday. Over time he has gained some traction there, though it’s a tough platform to engage on. Until you have a really good following of people, it’s tough to get likes and comments.

Start by finding an engagement group where people are in a group together commenting on each other’s stuff. Be careful with this, though, because if you join multiple groups it can be tough to keep up.

If you find one, it will help you build your following and gain exposure. It doesn’t directly turn into sales, but it keeps him top of mind for people.

You don’t know who’s on there and who’s seeing your content. Don’t put content out just for the sake of doing so, but find ways to be valuable to the people who follow you.

Don’t assume you’ll start generating sales right away. You’re serving people, you’re building a brand, and long-term it will work out for you.

Logistics

The best practice is to schedule content, but Andy calls himself a live-in-the-moment kind of guy who decides each day what to post. He alternates between providing content that targets his ideal clients and general content that would be helpful for larger numbers of people.

His target clients are less than 10 percent of his overall network, so sometimes he wants to speak directly to them, but sometimes he wants to engage a larger group.

Share experiences

Think back to your own experiences and knowledge. Can you turn those into posts or stories that you can tell Would you rather write or speak?

You’ve got to put it out there are hit publish. You won’t get much response in the beginning but you’ve got to keep doing it.

When you have a fear of judgment or criticism, it grows as you let it fester. The more you take action, just like with cold calling, you build more experience so it becomes less scary.

Podcasting

Andy has two podcasts: The Andy Storch Show and The Talent Development Hotseat. He uses the latter to land meetings with target clients who otherwise wouldn’t meet with him, and it’s working beautifully.

Everyone loves to tell their own story and they love attention. Many people don’t know how to do that because they aren’t going to start their own podcasts. Andy gives them a way to share their stories and experiences.

The same people who failed to accept sales meetings with Andy suddenly accepted the offer to appear on his podcast. He’s working to develop personal relationships with these people.

These people didn’t see a compelling reason to interact with him before they discovered his platform.

The added benefit is that he’s growing his authority and building relationships.

Serve don’t sell

Resist the temptation to include lots of calls-to-action and links. Provide value. They want to know that you’re trustworthy and that you have interesting things to say.

“Building a Personal Brand” episode resources

You can connect with Andy at his website, www.andystorch.com, and on LinkedIn. You can also check out his two podcasts: The Andy Storch Show and The Talent Development Hotseat.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Ted Ryce, Donald Kelly, Value, Selling

TSE 1039: Sales From The Street – “Sell Value”

Ted Ryce, Donald Kelly, Value, SellingIf you struggle with sales and the challenges that go along with it, you aren’t alone, and today Ted Ryce shares how he overcame his own struggles and how you can overcome sales plateaus.

Ted has been a health and fitness professional for the past 17 years in Miami Beach. He has worked with tons of celebrities, CEOs, multi-million dollar companies and personalities like Richard Branson and Robert Downey, Jr. He now has a health, fitness, and personal development podcast called Legendary Life Podcast.

Ted figured out early on that he actually is a salesperson. Sales never came easy for him and so today, he shares with us the challenges he faced and how he overcame them so you can learn from his experience.

Don’t undersell yourself

Ted poured a lot of effort and resources into the fitness industry, and though it helped, he hit a plateau where he wasn’t getting more clients. For the money he invested, he expected to have a mile-long waiting list.

He was in desperate need of new clients when a guy expressed interest in training with him. Ted saw it as a chance to grow his client list and raise his prices.

Looking back, he realizes that because he didn’t have confidence in his business or his cost, he didn’t justify the cost to his prospect.

Determine your value, and stick to it.

Differentiate yourself

Once you play the price game, everyone loses, including other people in your industry. You have to differentiate yourself and have a reason for charging as much as you do. You must explain it so that the prospect can understand the cost.

Have a reason for charging more, not coming from a place of being awesome but in a way the prospect can understand.

In Ted’s case, he realized there would always be people who would work for less money, so he started to highlight how his training was different.

He offered a holistic approach that included sleep and other physical and health challenges, and he specialized in injuries. He also had a background of working with CEOs, so he marketed himself accordingly.

Sell what the client wants

Don’t sell yourself or what you want to sell. Sell exactly what the client wants.

Ted worked to determine exactly what his clients needed, and then he sold them exactly that instead of selling what he wanted to sell.

He also made peace with the idea that some customers would need something different than what he was selling, so he would be willing to refer them out.

Match what you do with what someone else needs.

Reach more people

Once you’ve narrowed your message, find ways to reach the people who can benefit from your product or service. This is a great way of selling yourself without selling yourself.

Go out there and do more presentations. Do a podcast. Eventually, they will look at you as a leader in your industry.

People will apply the things you’re sharing, and if it helps them succeed, they will view you as a subject-matter expert.
Take things step by step. Stay at it. Take lessons and courses. Listen to podcasts. Stay on course to make consistent improvements. In 3-6 months time, you’re going to see major changes.

Stay consistent, keep at it, and don’t give up.

“Sell Value” episode resources

You can connect with Ted on the Legendary Life Podcast, and check out the Be The Change group.

This episode is brought to you in part by our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, which teaches you to improve your sales skills, find more customers, build stronger value, and close more deals.

The next semester begins in April.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Story Telling, Donald Kelly, Sales Training

TSE 1035: TSE Certified Sales Training Program – “Story Selling”

Story Telling, Donald Kelly, Sales TrainingStories provide a powerful opportunity to connect with your prospects, and story selling can push you across the line and even make you more successful than the competition.

They can even help you overcome a less superior product because people respond to good stories.

Stories as a lifeline

Good stories can separate you from your competition.

I’m putting together a workshop right designed to help business owners understand the power of stories in the selling process. Many of them are trying to land big contracts without great stories.

I call this process edutaining, and it differentiates those who do it well. After all, anyone can talk about their product or service. Not everyone can explain how it solve problems for clients. Not everyone can give specific examples of the difference their product or service made.

Your prospect wants to hear why it matters. He doesn’t care about your software or widget; he cares about what it can do for him.

Focus on “why”

I’m helping a client build a huge presentation for a corporation her company has done business with in the past. She’ll be educating these buyers about her company and its offerings. As she prepares, she’s trying to determine what exactly she should say.

We’re working to provide the “whys” of her company instead of focusing on the “what.” Rather than address what they do, what they offer, and what they can create, she’ll focus on why they’ve done those things.

  • Why did you start the company?
  • What makes you passionate about solving this issue?
  • Why do clients seek your products?

When she told me the story of why she started the company, she came to life and her excitement pulled me in. She told me about her first client and the series of events that launched the whole company, and she pulled me in.

It didn’t matter to me that she had been in business for 15 years.

The buyers

Think about your buyers.

Spend time thinking of examples of the ways you help your customers solve problems. Ask yourself what your buyers are most concerned about.

Think back to an experience when you helped a client solve an important problem or prevent a crisis for their own customers. Then, weave that into your presentation.

In the case of this client, her company had suffered a bad experience because of a product delay, and she was concerned about how to handle the situation. To take the fear out of the incident, she decided to tell a story that directly addressed it.

She acknowledged that her organization isn’t perfect, and then she addressed how they had fixed the mistakes that happened in the past. She emphasized her company’s desire to never make the same mistake twice.

“Story Selling” episode resources

The TSE Certified Sales Training Program addresses how to provide value to your buyers. We discuss the importance of teaching and educating them using stories, and you can be part of it.

This episode is brought to you in part by our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, which teaches you to improve your sales skills, find more customers, build stronger value, and close more deals.

The next semester begins in April.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, Client Success, Sales, Increase Sales

TSE 1022: The Redheaded Stepbrother of Sales…Client Success

Donald Kelly, Client Success, Sales, Increase SalesThe Red-headed Step Brother of Sales … Client Success; we don’t pay attention to it. But, we should.

There were times, growing up in Jamaica, when we would have issues with getting water into our house. The pressure wouldn’t be strong enough or a pipe would burst, and we would have to take buckets down to the community water source and haul them back home.

Imagine me, Little Donald, carrying a bucket of water a quarter mile each way …and I’m sure I filled that bucket to the very top.

Naturally, some will spill out as you walk along, but imagine my surprise to see the bucket only half-full when I got home … A small crack in the bucket caused me to lose most of it.

What incentive would I have to go back for more? I needed to fix that bucket.

Client success is the same way. Nobody pays attention to it but it is critical to the organization’s success.

Client Success

Client success is the function of a company responsible for maintaining the relationship between the client and you, the vendor. The goal of client success is very simple: to make sure your clients are as successful as possible. This, in turn, improves your relationship with the client and the lifetime value of that client.

It helps the organization in many ways. As with my bucket example, client success is the source that helps to make sure the holes in the bucket are sealed. We don’t lose water – we don’t lose customers. [02:17]

Compare the lifetime value of your client to my bucket of water. The last thing you want to do is lose your customers after working so hard to get them. It would be such a waste to work for a year and a half to land an amazing client only for them to move on after only a year.

Multiply that scenario across multiple clients and you’ll find yourself in a whole heap of trouble: you need to fix that bucket. You need to address client success. [03:26]

I read a statistic in an article published by the Precision Marketing Group which states that 86% of buyers will pay more for a product if they receive a better customer experience.

This may not occur immediately but imagine a client does come on board who has an opportunity to purchase more of the licenses, or services, that you offer.

Let’s use furniture sales as an example. You sold a nice desk and chair to your client. In the future, what prevents him from going elsewhere if he needs another chair? [04:11]

Maintaining relationships

What if your client success team was able to actively work that account and learn the goals of the client? If you knew the client was planning to expand in six months, for example, would it not make sense for you to create an opportunity to help them reach that goal?

In some companies, sales takes care of this but it spreads the sales force thin. They are asked to find new people, build value, close deals, AND actively farm the account, fix problems, and keep the client happy.

You need new business to come in but you also need to maintain relationships with your current clients so they will return to you over and over again.

It is virtually impossible to do it all. Something has to give and, in all likelihood, new business will stop coming in. [04:58]

Again, 86% of buyers would pay more for a product or service if they receive a better customer experience.

Let’s say your product is at premium value and a buyer could go somewhere else next time to get it for less. If the buyer perceives a value in the sales experience he has with you, however, he will stay with you. [05:48]

Client Support

Client support, on the other hand, is basically a range of client services to assist clients in making cost effective and correct use of a product. This includes assisting in planning, training, troubleshooting, maintaining, updating, etc.

Using the office furniture example again, the client support team helps install and assemble the desk. The client success team does not.

In smaller organizations, however, sellers often do it all. Solving problems while also maintaining accounts can certainly be overwhelming. You can see how this could affect new net revenue. [06:32]

The emphasis on new business causes client support and client success to be pushed to the side: they become the red-headed step children of sales.

Customer experience

Another statistic from the Precision Marketing Group states that the companies who prioritize customer experience generate 60% higher profits.

Instead of hiring three new salespeople, would it not make more sense to hire two sales individuals and one client success individual instead? Hire a client success person to ensure that everyone brought on board by the sales team stays on board.

Instead of losing new clients each year, keep them for five or six years – even longer. Give them an amazing experience. Help them. Guide them and fix any problems they might have so they don’t feel neglected. [07:29]

It has been said that the client success team is just an appendage of customer support and it is not as important as sales. But we all know that it is much easier, and cheaper, to keep a client than to find a new one.

If you give your client a great experience, he will give to you in return with referrals and repeats sales.

The client success team can then create more opportunities for more sales.

The Pod Approach

A ‘pod’ is a term some companies are now using to refer to a three-system approach: one person from sales, one person from customer support, and a third person from client success working as a team. Together, they create a cohesive relationship that keeps new business coming in, solves issues, and works toward the success of the clients.

It makes a huge difference. [09:30]

Finally, I previously shared a story about my experience working for a software company where I didn’t really know what to do. I learned, however, from working with client success (known as customer support back then) the type of clients not to pursue, which helped me to recognize the type of clients I did want.

I was able to retain those types of clients, build stronger relationships with them, and close more deals.

Customer support helped the clients be successful. If they recognized a problem that I could fix for the client, they would bring me in. It worked amazingly.

I suggest considering such a system in your organization. If you already have one in place, be sure to evaluate its effectiveness. What is the lifetime value of a client right now? How much money can you expect from that client? Is there a process for upselling or cross-selling? [10:07]

Don’t waste your time and energy on a client only to have him fall through the cracks.

Don’t go home with a half-empty bucket.

Episode Resources for ‘The Red-headed Step Brother of Sales … Client Success”

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Prospect.io is offering three months at half-price.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

 

Number Game, Prospecting, Bad Sales Person, don't treat prospects like a number

TSE 1017: Don’t Treat Prospects Like a Number

Number Game, Prospecting, Bad Sales Person

If you’ve been guilty of bulldozing your prospects or being rude or uncaring, today must be the day you change your mindset: Don’t treat prospects like a number.

Although numbers are important to those of us who work in sales, we can’t let them become our primary focus. They can help us measure our success and determine our strengths and weaknesses, but we can’t reduce our prospects to a number.

Find the balance

Some organizations focus so little on numbers that they don’t have any way to replicate their successes. They have no idea how many calls it takes to get to the right customer. They have no idea of their conversion rate.

On the other hand, some organizations are so focused on the numbers that it becomes the primary focus of their work. As a result, they often sacrifice quality in the name of numbers.

Do not lose track of the people in the process.

My wife got a call from a traditional seller in a traditional selling situation last week: he knew nothing about the company except the name and the phone number. He didn’t know who he needed to speak to, and it was obvious he was calling from a call center.

The caller wasn’t prepared and he didn’t have a cadence to his call.

Dialing for dollars

Some companies have a single speed. They spend each day dialing for dollars and relying on phone calls to advance their numbers.

They fail to realize that today’s buyers are busy. They fail to approach selling from the buyer’s standpoint.

It never occurs to them that they could have brought value in an email. Or that they could have used multiple emails to share client testimonials or valuable tips or irresistible messages.

They overlook LinkedIn as a place to connect with prospects and they miss the opportunity to provide value. They forget that they could mail something to the prospect or research who they should contact within a company.

They overlook the strength of using multiple points of entry rather than just blasting the prospect with phone calls.

Control your emotion

When my wife told the caller that we weren’t interested in doing business with him, he got upset.

He’s no doubt frustrated because he’s doing the same activity every single day and not having much success, but it doesn’t give him a pass to get upset.

Sometimes you’ve brought value and done everything possible for your buyer, and they still aren’t ready to buy.

It’s ok to say, “Hey, I get this all the time. Sometimes people aren’t ready. Out of curiosity, is it because you guys already have someone in place or just that you’re not looking to buy right now?”

Once they give me an answer, I ask if it’s ok for me to send podcasts or videos in the future. If they say yes, then I’ve left the door open.

Instead of sacrificing my connection by getting angry, I keep opportunities open.

Develop processes

I’m a big proponent of making sure you have processes in place as you reach out to prospects.

If you’re treating them like a number and calling without doing any research, please stop. You’re treating them like a number and they’re going to respond accordingly.

Offer personal touches.

Take 2 to 5 minutes to go on LinkedIn and find out what the company does. Don’t eat up too much of your time, just find out the key players and the company mission so you can have an intelligent conversation.

Do work

If you’re trying to reach people the same way everyone else is, you’re probably not going to have a lot of success.

You’re going to have to do a little bit of work to grab our attention in a busy setting.

I recently got a video from someone as a form of outreach, and I complimented the person on the video. Then, I invited the person to be a guest on the podcast, and the show is going live soon.

It’s more work for you, but your job as the seller is to make the buyer’s job easier. Don’t add unnecessary complication.

“Don’t Treat Prospects Like a Number” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never, ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Pauline Muffin Grayson, Donald Kelly, Ration Your Passion, HGTV

TSE 1009: Sales From The Street: “Don’t Ration Your Passion”

Pauline Muffin Grayson, Donald Kelly, Ration Your Passion, HGTVPauline “Muffin” Grayson is a graphic designer who believes we shouldn’t let anything get in the way of our passion, and she has a single message for us: Don’t ration your passion.

Pauline has a degree in fine arts. After school, she stumbled into freelancing and surface pattern design; the design for gift wrap and greeting cards. You may know her from her designs on  petitelemon.com and Shutterfly.com.

Pursue your passion

Pauline describes passion as doing something you absolutely love without letting anything else get in the way. For Pauline, that is design. She says she is just not happy unless she is doing it. It is who she is as an individual.

Yet sometimes, societal expectations seem to limit us from pursuing our passions.

I remember telling people that I was in sales and getting the distinct impression from them that they assumed it was only because I couldn’t find anything better to do. I wasn’t living up to their expectations despite that I was doing what I truly loved to do.

Pauline can relate.  As a stay-at-home mom, many people wrongly assume she chose to do so because she couldn’t do anything else.

Pauline is passionate about being a mom, but she is also passionate about design. So she found a way to do both. It makes her a better mom and a better designer as a result.

Many people abandon their passion because they fail to set goals. As a young girl on a dairy farm in Idaho, Pauline learned that hard work pays dividends.

She says she is not the best designer out there but believes that her hard work and her goal to continually improve is what sets her apart.

Don’t be afraid to try

Fear is often not even based in fact. We worry about what might happen and create a false reality as a result. It is helpful to have someone to discuss your goals and aspirations with; someone who can keep you grounded and on course.  

Set goals high but also set reasonable timelines to reach them.

Pauline recalls a time when she met the owner of Betty’s Beds, someone she really wanted to work with. Fast forward a year after their initial encounter and Pauline never heard back from the owner. But rather than letting it go, or being afraid to reach out, Pauline sent them an email.

They have been working together now for some time and Pauline has seen her designs on blogs, magazines, and HGTV.

Don’t give up

Pauline could have concluded from the year-long gap in communication that the owner simply didn’t want to work with her. Instead, she chose to understand and empathize that they are busy with their work and their families, or that maybe the timing wasn’t right, etc.

Pauline chose to share and offer value and it paid off.

From doing this podcast, for example, I’ve been introduced to many more people and opportunities than I ever would have if I hadn’t put myself out there. You have to get out and share.

Do what you love and put it out there for people to see.

Finding your passion

Pauline always had an interest in art but as a young girl on a dairy farm, all she really knew was that she liked to draw. It wasn’t until high school, with the encouragement from her art teacher, that she started taking art classes. Soon afterward, she attended a business conference where she heard a graphic designer speak.

The spark was lit. She knew that was what she wanted to do.

She remembers being awful in so many of her classes. It just didn’t click until her very last class in college but she worked at it and eventually figured it out.

She began working as a freelancer, designing gift bags for Target, after being laid off from her first office job when the company was bought out.

With the confidence she gained from seeing her products on display in a huge retail setting, Pauline started a blog to post more items that she had designed. It was there that she got the call from Petite Lemon and Shutterfly.

Put yourself out there. Don’t worry about whether it will be liked by everyone or not.

Do what you love.

“The work you do while you procrastinate is probably the work you should be doing for the rest of your life.”  

To Pauline, that is the best piece of advice because that ‘other thing’ that you choose to do may just be your passion.

Find a way to do what you love. Be happy!

“Don’t Ration your Passion” episode resources

You can reach Pauline “Muffin” Grayson at muffingraysondesign on Instagram or through her website at www.muffingrayson.com. You can also find her on Pinterest and LinkedIn.

Pauline "Muffin" Grayson, Passion, The Sales Evangelist

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

They are offering a 14-day free trial, and half off your subscription when you use the code Donald at checkout.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast  so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, emotional intelligence

TSE 1005: TSE Certified Sales Training Program- “Emotional Intelligence”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

 

 

 

 

Sometimes small problems grow into much bigger problems, and without emotional intelligence to help you address misunderstandings, these problems can affect your relationships with prospects and clients.

Have you ever met up with a friend who suddenly became upset but, to you, the thing they were upset about wasn’t a huge problem? When you react, it becomes something bigger, and before you know it – you are arguing with each other without really knowing what you are even arguing about?!

You can have similar situations with a prospect. The client loses interest, or maybe, becomes so upset they no longer want to do business with you ever again.

What happened? Why does it go wrong? The answer: Emotional intelligence.

These situations affect both sellers and buyers, so our TSE Certified Sales Training Program will help you identify these problems before they escalate.

The TSE Certified Sales Training Program is designed to help sellers at every level, from new sellers to seasoned professionals. The course has three main sections of four modules each. Tackle each section on your own or participate in a group. [01:58]

Surface-level problems

I was running a meeting last week when one of the committee members had an issue outside the topic we were discussing. The challenge she proposed began to derail the entire meeting.

What was I to do?

I realized that it was a surface-level problem rather than a true issue. We decided, therefore, to have a one-on-one discussion to address it instead.

Turns out, there was so much more she wanted to talk about than what was originally mentioned during the meeting. If I had entertained the issue during the meeting, it would have derailed the entire event for the entire group.

No money was involved, but imagine a similar scenario when working with a client. A client or prospect presents you with a surface-level problem. Then, because of a lack of emotional intelligence, people focus on that problem instead of the underlying issue.

Emotional intelligence

Suppose your client says they will not renew their contract. They might be upset because the project was late. Perhaps they are downsizing. Or maybe they no longer have the budget for it.

Those are not the true issues.

Emotional intelligence is the capacity to be aware of, to control, and to express one’s emotions, and to handle interpersonal relationships judiciously and empathetically.

Empathy

In Stephen Covey’s book, The Seven Habits of Highly Successful People, empathy is defined as seeking first to understand, then to be understood.

Back to the client who is no longer interested, we have to dig deeper to find out the true reason for their decision.

Someone with a high level of emotional intelligence is able to see things from the prospect’s perspective. Rather than take the lack of interest as something personal, they are able to investigate and realize the core issue instead.

It’s tempting to think about how the decision affects me:

  • What did I do wrong?
  • How will this affect my commission?

Instead, as the seller, we need to think about the buyer.

  • What will happen to the buyer?
  • Why did he change his mind?
  • Is this the real issue?
  • What caused him to feel upset or frustrated?
  • What changed?

It could be that the buyer didn’t get their second round of funding and now has to do some trimming. The service you provide is still important to them but it is not mission critical to the function of their organization.

That is something, as a seller, that you would want to know.

When you put yourself in the buyer’s shoes and seek to understand, you may find other ways to be of assistance.

Is there something else you can do? Is there another value that you can bring? Maybe you can introduce them to someone else in the industry.

Bring value

When you focus on being helpful instead of on selling your product or service, you have attained a high level of emotional intelligence.

Recognize that it is not about you, or your bottom line. It is about serving your client.

People sometimes lash out or seem angry. Perhaps they had a bad morning or an argument with their spouse. Maybe that team member who annoys you so badly is having trouble paying his bills.

Your job is to not react to surface level issues. Your job is to understand the true source of the problem so that you help to find a solution.

Your job is to bring value to the situation.

Don’t simply react to the emotions. Be a problem solver instead.

Emotional intelligence is something you can build on. It will help you tremendously in the early stages of the sales process.

Put yourself in your buyer’s shoes. Connect on a human level and realize that your client is not just the CEO or the marketing director. He is a human being with goals. When you recognize that, you will create a foundation of trust.

Then, if something does change, he will be willing to discuss the true issues with you. It will also help you guide your buyers toward a close.

Try not to react to difficult situations. Seek first to understand. Remember that there are two sides to every situation: the side they let us see and the side they don’t want us to see.

Your job is to identify the real reason for the situation so that you can help provide solutions.

Don’t react to surface-level problems. Dig a little deeper.

“Emotional Intelligence” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

They are offering a 14-day free trial, and half off your subscription when you use the code Donald at checkout.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

David DeRam, It Factor, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Company Culture

TSE 981: Creating an It Factor Culture

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’re going to hear from David DeRam, CEO and co-founder of Greenlight Guru, about the “it” factor, and how it can change the culture in any organization.

Culture

At Greenlight Guru, David and his team spend a lot of time focusing on culture. He calls the company culture unique, but he says that culture doesn’t fall down on you like rain. You don’t experience culture; you participate in it.

Leaders can think about culture and work to create culture, but leaders can’t execute culture. It’s like a plant that will grow the way that it grows, and if everyone isn’t on board with the culture, the culture won’t grow the way leaders want it to. [4:51]

As a result, David’s team looks to everyone on the team to get involved and participate in the culture.

People will work how they feel, and if they feel great, they’ll bring an entirely different energy to their efforts.

Profession

David’s team intentionally calls work your profession. He points to the fact that the leaders in every industry, (think Tiger Woods, Warren Buffet, Jimi Hendrix) have devoted themselves to their work. Their work is their profession. [6:35]

Listeners of this podcast have devoted their lives to sales and it’s their profession. Your profession isn’t just what you do; it’s what you believe. David’s team has worked to bring all of those aspects into the culture.

Companies tend to focus on results, and by focusing on results you can miss the one thing you desire the most, which is the people, culture, and execution.

“It” factor

David became immediately aware of the “it” factor when he subbed as a coach for a little league baseball team. As soon as he encountered the players on the team, he could tell who the natural athletes were.

They moved naturally. They were confident. The true players were like fish in water.

David took the lessons he learned from that sports experience and moved them into his business. He prioritizes where people aim in order to find leaders.

Setting the bar high for yourself can create a lot of stress, anxiety, and uncertainty. People with the “it” factor know how to set the bar high because they understand that the vision they create is more exciting than the fear they experience as a result of setting it there. [9:46]

You can feel the “it” factor when you meet people. They have reached high levels in everything they’ve done and they have a lot of swagger. They’ve survived a lot of hardship.

Alligator blood

One of the company’s core values is something it calls “alligator blood,” which refers to those people who are resistant to the endless psychological blows, and competitive enough to keep pounding away on others when they are ahead.

Not everyone is wired that way. You can coach it and build it, but when you find the “it” factor, you’re in the right place.

The people who love the struggle and who set the bar really high for themselves exude an energy that spreads to the people around them. [12:21]

Teaching culture

David’s team focuses on the medical device industry. It’s a tough industry with a complicated product and a complicated regulatory environment, and the rules are constantly changing.

Instead of spending time talking about how hard the work is, the company focuses on true quality and being great. They take a one-game-at-a-time mentality, knowing that you can’t win the Super Bowl in week 1. [17:09]

Because the team understands that there’s a long way to go, it’s able to focus on execution.

David’s hiring process strives to bring people to the team who naturally fit that culture. Some personalities might work really well in other industries, but not in David’s industry.

It’s not in the company’s DNA to have a bad actor in the company.

The best way to destroy a company is from the inside. The same is true of building it. David’s team measures its success partly by whether the entire team is living the core values.

Culture shift

If you discover that your culture isn’t exactly where you’d like it to be, begin inside the organization. [19:50]

People who have had to perform in the past and really put themselves out there for the good of the team (like authors, musicians, and athletes) often make great recruits.

If a person doesn’t fit your core values, no matter how talented he is, you will have to unravel a huge mess if you hire him.

Raising the level of play

People with the “it” factor have a combination of God-given ability, work ethic, fun, and what David calls bounce. [20:57]

They win battles, they win games, they overcome odds, they win championships, and along the way, they raise the energy and the level of play for the people around them.

The team gets better, and the players respond and get better. When that happens, you’ve got something really special.

“It Factor” episode resources

David’s team is always hiring people who want to play at the highest level. If you’re interested in figuring out whether you’re a good fit, you can connect with David’s team at www.greenlight.guru on the careers page. [21:55]

You can also connect with David on his LinkedIn page.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Dr. Richard K. Nongard, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Referrals

TSE 934: Sales From The Street – “Referral Business”

The Sales Evangelist, Sales From The Street, Dr. Richard NongardPeople are often uncomfortable with the idea of prospecting. Many salespeople struggle with it because they relate it to cold calling, but it isn’t possible to transition to a referral business until you find prospects.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Richard Nongard talks about the role prospecting plays in transitioning to a referral business.

It’s our mindset that leads us to fear cold calls, but the truth is that people aren’t usually mean when we’re face-to-face. Unfortunately, that same mindset cripples us even when we’re dealing with warm or hot leads.

We miss the chance to follow up two or three days later to make sure that we answered all their questions. We never check in to see if there’s anything else we can do for them.

Come with value

There’s a reason we don’t just randomly hand out business cards at networking events. People didn’t ask for our cards, so we don’t hand them out without any context or conversation.

Instead, if I come with value and answer their questions in a way that relates directly to them, they’ll be more likely to welcome my interaction.

Richard recommends a simple strategy when cold calling. He explains to his prospects that he’s in the neighborhood learning more about local businesses so he can refer and network with other people here in the community.

When you explain it that way, people are always happy to tell you about their businesses and, of course, they’ll be willing to reciprocate.

Overcoming fear

Sales trainers across the board report that overcoming fear and self-doubt are the most frequent challenges they address.

Most salespeople are well trained in the language of sales

Imagine you’re a new sales rep at a company where 90 percent of your business has to come from prospecting. You have very few leads, and you’ve never sold before.

The key is to build relationships. Networking is essential in a B2B sales position.

We mistakenly believe that if they build a website, buyers will come. As a result, they spend all their time trying to make their website perfect so that when people come to their site, those prospects will become buyers.

They tinker with images and with fonts without realizing that people are the most important component in the transaction. Technology actually becomes a barrier for us because we believe we’re spending our time doing something useful but we really aren’t building relationships that drive people to our website.

Your website should simply be proof of your product or service rather than a way of generating leads.

Networking

Get out in the community and go to meetups. Go to networking events. Take every opportunity to meet real people.

If you’re invited to events that you aren’t interested in, go anyway. The people there might need your services someday.

Many of us would prefer to have a referral-based business over a prospecting-based business, but the truth is that you have to prospect to get to that point.

The reason so many businesses miss the opportunity to pivot from prospecting-based to referral-based is a failure to follow up after the sale. By not creating relationships with the people they are selling to, and not asking for referrals, we overlook many opportunities.

Time management prevents us from following up, as does the lack of a system to support a referral-based business.

Seize the power of now

Richard recalled that he often spent time worrying about the future. He ended up focusing on the future rather than living in the moment.

When we live in the moment, though, we can actually activate all of our intentions. It’s a much more powerful strategy than goal-setting.

Research actually shows that goals have a downside. They can be a downward spiral to mediocrity as we lower our goals to meet our deadlines.

Goals cause a great deal of anxiety. Goals are focused on the future while all we actually have is this moment.

By staying in the present, we activate our greatest level of potential.

“Referral Business” episode resources

You can reach Richard Nongard at his website, Viral Leadership and you can grab a copy of his book, Viral Leadership: Seize the Power of Now to Create Lasting Transformation in Business.

You can also get more information there about training and consulting for large and small companies, as well as coaching services, keynote speaking, and Richard’s new podcast on leadership.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

This episode is also brought to you byMaximizer CRM. If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Rebecca Brizi, Donald Kelly, Inbound Leads, LinkedIn

TSE 931: How To Use LinkedIn for Inbound and Developing Process

LinkedIn is a powerful tool for sales professionals, but you must have a strategy in order to use it well. If you have a plan, you can use LinkedIn for inbound and developing process.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Rebecca Brizi, strategic consultant to small businesses and solopreneurs, talks about using social media to grow your business and how to use LinkedIn for inbound and developing process.

A place for business

When you enter LinkedIn, everyone knows why you’re there. There’s no ambiguity; it’s very specific.

People join LinkedIn because they want to connect with and network with people who are relevant to their businesses.

Rebecca’s husband is a great example of how LinkedIn can supplement your marketing efforts, especially for small businesses that don’t have a huge team of people.

Her husband doesn’t want to have to set up and run and manage a website, so he uses LinkedIn the way most people would use their business site. In fact, she said, he’s not asking people to visit an external site; he’s inviting them to find out about him in a place they’re already visiting.

LinkedIn can do everything for your business that websites can do. It can serve as an online brochure, an online messaging platform, and an online content platform.

Network with people

The best way to network with people is to help them know, like, and trust you.  Once you’ve done that, you’re on your way to a solid relationship that can create great opportunities.

Treat LinkedIn the same way treat your face-to-face marketing. Start with a focus on what you can do for other people. Begin by discovering what you can do to help people.

  • Who do they want to meet?
  • What do they want to learn?
  • What sort of information could be of interest to them?

Work to connect with people and stay transparent about who you are and why you want to connect with people.

You’ll be effective as long as you’re working to make your interactions positive for other people.

Great prospects

Once you’ve identified someone as a great prospect, consider trying to learn from him first. Determine whether you can make introductions that could be useful to him.

You have to know what your prospect wants in order to sell to him something. You have to understand what the prospect wants from life and how your product or service fits into that.

Effective sales is always about the buyer rather than the seller.

The Chet Holmes Buyer Pyramid says that at any given moment, only about three percent of your audience is actively looking to buy what you’re selling. Seven percent are open to whatever it is you’re selling.

The other 90 percent are split into thirds:

  • 30 percent haven’t even thought about it
  • 30 percent have thought about it but don’t think they need it
  • 30 percent are never going to buy from you.

You begin with 70 percent maximum reach every time. So do you want to capture the 3 percent or the 70 percent?

Well-crafted pitch

There’s a certain amount of subjectivity in each relationship that helps you determine the right moment to make your pitch.

A well-crafted pitch is a little like a marriage proposal. You’ve built up to that point and you expect the answer to be yes.

Success is much more about the buildup than about the final pitch. Once you’re facing that moment, you know when the time is right. You have the right solution at a fair price, so the moment develops clearly.

Using LinkedIn

LinkedIn is somewhat self-promotional, and businesses should use it to publish articles, post PDFs, list services, and share recommendations. Additionally, you’ll interact with other people and their articles, you’ll comment, and you’ll ask questions.

Rebecca’s husband focused less on selling and focused more on helping his prospects buy. He crafted his website so that people could see themselves in the content on his profile.

Remember that people who are on LinkedIn are there because they want to network. They want to grow their businesses and learn for their businesses.

Start by getting on LinkedIn and emulate what you see other people doing.

Make sure your profile looks good and start small.

Determine which interactions give you the most value and replicate those tasks. Work LinkedIn into your natural flow and don’t let it interfere with other things you need to do for your work.

“Use LinkedIn for Inbound” episode resources

Connect with Rebecca on LinkedIn or at her website rgbrizi.com. All her contact information is there, so you can message her, email her, and ask questions or share experiences.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

This episode is also brought to you byMaximizer CRM. If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, TSE Hustler's League

TSE 885: TSE Hustler’s League-“Dog Chasing A Car”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, TSE Hustler's LeagueImagine a dog chasing a car in your neighborhood. He’s chasing the car with every ounce of effort that he has, but clearly, he hasn’t developed a strategy: what will he do when he catches it? As sales professionals, we need a clear strategy for prospecting so we know exactly how we’ll delight the prospect once we get the prospect to say yes to the first appointment.

Today on The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, we’ll talk about how to delight the customer early in the process.

Try to identify one piece you can apply to your own sales process immediately in order to delight the customer.

Delight the prospect.

Your goal is to do something for the prospect that your competitors aren’t willing to do or aren’t capable of doing.

Find a small way to delight the prospect early in the process.

  • Send a thank you card.
  • Use video to grab the prospect’s attention.
  • Invite the prospect to an event unrelated to business.
  • Interact on social media.

Teach something new.

Forbes reports that the salesperson’s ability to teach something or challenge the prospect’s thinking drives more than 53 percent of transactions.

Instead of telling the prospect about your product or service, tell him how it solves a problem he has.

If you don’t have any data to provide to the prospect, do research to find data. Give him tools to address challenges or pitfalls.

Address unconsidered needs.

Take advantage of your prospect’s unconsidered needs.

Your customer isn’t as experienced with your product as you are, and he doesn’t even realize the problems it can help him solve. Help him discover the problems your product solves even if he doesn’t realize he has those problems.

As an example, if you’re seeking to hire a salesperson, I might tell you that your hire will be nine times more likely to fail without any kind of sales training. Conversely, it will be three times more expensive to hire a salesperson and then provide training to help him succeed.

I can use data to convince the prospect that spending money to train a salesperson is less expensive than employing an untrained salesperson. If I identify an unconsidered need that he wasn’t aware of, I can get the prospect to say yes to sales training.

Come to the table as a leader instead of as every other seller who is engaged with your prospect. The sales arena has evolved, and buyers have, too.

“Dog Chasing A Car” episode resources

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is our online group coaching program designed to help sellers who have been selling for years as well as those who are new to sales.

Last semester, we focused on building value, and we’re beginning a new semester in the fall. To find out more or to apply, visit the Hustler’s League.

During this semester of the Hustler’s League, one of our students used BombBomb to include video in his emails and engage with his customers.

If you’d like to learn more about video and how to include it in your sales process, check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Our friends at Wiley have provided a free excerpt of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. Based on research and interviews with buyers, the book provides a blueprint for sales professionals. Read an excerpt of the book here.

They’ve also created a SlideShare free for you to use or download.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Value, What is Value, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 867: What Is Value?

Value, What is Value, The Sales Evangelist

Sales professionals sometimes talk so much about value that it becomes meaningless. We toss it around like a buzzword instead of sincerely seeking to provide value. What is value, and how can you become better at using value more effectively?

Today on The Sales Evangelist, we’ll define value and discuss how you can make it work for you as a sales professional.

What is value?

Value has both a noun and a verb form. When something is held to be worthy or important, it’s valuable. When we treat it as though it’s worthy or important, we’re valuing it.

Most sales professionals use the term value to refer to features or benefits. We discuss the features and benefits of our product or service and we connect the value to those aspects.

In many cases, though, the things we think are valuable aren’t the same things our customers value.

Figuring out value

Sales professionals must avoid misalignment of value. We must understand what our prospects value before we can provide value to them.

Stephen Covey’s book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People teaches that you must seek first to understand and then to be understood. Before I can expect a prospect to accept my phone calls and hear what I have to say, I must seek to understand his point of view.

How can I figure out what’s valuable?

Figure out the organization’s end goal. What is the organization trying to accomplish? What is the end result? What is the goal of the entity you’re trying to sell to?

If the end goal is to increase sales, to make money, to make great hires,  or to find great talent, know the individual goal will help you provide value.

Discover unconsidered needs

Sales professionals make themselves especially valuable when they become problem finders rather than just problem solvers.

When you help prospects identify needs they didn’t know they had, you become an extremely valuable member of the team. The book The Three Value Conversations calls them unconsidered needs.

Begin by asking current customers about benefits they have discovered since they started working with you. If they have discovered a way to use your product or service to help them solve a problem, other prospects may find the same benefits.

Read magazine articles and news articles to track new regulations that may present new challenges. If you can anticipate problems, you’ll become someone useful to your customers.

“What Is Value?” episode resources

Improve your ability to provide value with The Three Value Conversations and  The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.

I continue recommending the book Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley because it is a buyer-based blueprint that can help you increase sales. We’ve made a free excerpt available to listeners because we believe it’s a truly valuable resource.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. Video Jungle offers top-notch, state-of-the-art advice about video.

If you found this information valuable, share it with others who can benefit from it. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

SaveSave

Jay Gibb, Donald Kelly, Referral Program, Sales Podcast

TSE 858-Three Things You Should Remember When Creating a Referral Program

Jay Gibb, Donald Kelly, Referral Program, Sales Podcast

Many companies stumble blindly when they are creating a referral plan. Referrals can pay dividends for companies, but it’s important for companies to have a plan when designing a referral plan.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Jay Gibb of CloudSponge shares insights about creating a referral plan and discusses some of the mistakes companies make in the process.

Avoid starting too early.

When you’re creating a referral program, you’re asking people to give you information about their friends.

Until you’re providing tremendous value with your product or service, it’s generally a bad call to ask for a referral.

One of the key measurements, according to Jay, is product-market fit: being in a good market with a product that can satisfy that market. Product market fit is a key component to referrals, because it indicates that you’ve found your ideal customers.

Once you’ve learned how to speak to them, and how to effectively speak their language, you’re more likely to be providing massive value.

With those components in place, you’ll have the tools to build a really effective referral program.

Offer the right incentives.

Especially on the B2B side, Jay said that many companies stumble in their incentives by offering only discounts for referrals.

Unless you’re dealing with the company founder, a discounted price in exchange for a referral won’t offer much incentive.

It’s also a good idea to remind the referrer that you’re planning to provide an incentive to the referred party as well, because people are altruistic, and they want to help others. They want to introduce someone they like to a product they like.

As you build your referral program, consider all four parties: the company and the individual who referred someone, and the company and the individual who were referred.

Make it easy for buyers to refer.

If your referral form requires customers to toggle between multiple pages in order to copy and paste email addresses, you’ll likely get limited results from your referral program.

Consider, instead, a way for customers to access their address books from the referral page. You’ll likely discover that most of your referrals come from people who uploaded their address books.

That’s why CloudSponge exists; to help companies offer an address book function without having to build it themselves.

Larger companies generally want to build their own platform, but they’d rather buy the address book component off the shelf because it’s a tedious process to build one.

Don’t forget the simple things.

Most importantly, make sure to ask for referrals when the time is right. Many sales professionals and companies neglect to ask for referrals.

If you’ve got happy customers and repeat buyers, call them and ask them to help you grow your company. You’ll be amazed at the response you’ll get when you ask for help.

Once they provide a referral, remember to say thank you. When the deal closes with a referred customer, send some kind of thank you to the referrer.

Doing so will have a compounding effect and make them want to refer more often. They’ll realize that your company cares about people, and they’ll regularly look for chances to provide referrals.

Consider, too, that customers may not always know of people who will benefit from your product. When that happens, consider asking for a review, a testimonial, or a case study.

Develop a funnel and a backup plan when you’re creating a referral plan.

“Creating a Referral Plan” resources

Connect with Jay at CloudSponge.com, or email CloudSponge for more information about their services. You can also find Jay on LinkedIn.

Consider giving a copy of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading as a thank you gift to someone who provided a referral. It’s a blueprint for sellers based upon years of research about the things buyers hate.

We’re so convinced that you’ll love the book that we’re providing a free excerpt to our listeners here.

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is an online coaching program designed to help sellers of all levels and all industries improve. It’s an opportunity to share ideas and interact with other sellers from around the world.

Also check out The Sales Evangelizers on Facebook, where a community of people shares their struggles and their experiences with selling.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Dale Dupree, The Sales Evangelist, LinkedIn, Social Selling

TSE 836: Make Social Selling A Part of Your Day to Day Life

Dale Dupree, The Sales Evangelist, LinkedIn, Social SellingIf you don’t already make social selling a part of your day, you should. The millennial generation has connected everyone on social media. Using those platforms to sell should be a natural progression for all sales professionals.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, we’re talking with Dale Dupree, the Copier Warrior, about using LinkedIn as part of your sales process.

Create Curiosity

Your social media pages are your own personal web pages. Your goal is to make sure that people who visit your page can tell what you’re all about.

Make sure they can accomplish the things you want them to accomplish when they get there.

Spark interest for your connections. Create something of value.

If you can create undeniable curiosity, you’ll fly through the sales process in ways you never have before.

Dale recalled a customer who walked away from a 20-year relationship with another company to do business with him.

The customer told him that no one had ever created the kind of curiosity that he had. No one had ever made the sales process enjoyable like he did.

Avoid Pitching

When you first reach out to someone on social media, they’ll likely visit your profile and decide whether to connect with you.

If the very first thing you do after connecting is pitch them, you will have blown an opportunity.

It won’t matter that you have a cool product that no one has ever heard of because you will have blown your chance to connect.

Pitching them should never be the very first contact you make. You’ve built no credibility.

Social media is purely an outreach piece.

Build Community

Dale did the same thing with his LinkedIn community that he does with his in-person sales community.

He created content that motivated people to interact with him. He went local with his outreach and targeted people around him the same way he would with traditional prospecting efforts.

His social media platforms allowed his connections to view his bio and his work history, and learn more about him and his business.

He posted regularly about the connections he was making with people to promote the idea of fellowship.

He boiled it down this way:

Don’t neglect the less-obvious employees in any company either. Rather than simply connecting with the decision makers, connect with the people they work with as well.

Share Stories

People love a good story, so articulate yours well. Tell them how you got where you are. Ask them to share their stories.

It creates interest, and it encourages people to get to know one another.

Don’t be sales-y.

Salespeople are the enemy because there are a million of them, and you’re just one more in the crowd. Your prospect already has plenty of them.

Make people smile. Have fun. Get familiar with the people on social media.

If you do it well, when they meet you in person for the first time, they’ll know you as “the LinkedIn guy.”

Make social selling a part of your day.

Episode Resources

You can connect with Dale at CopierWarrior.com. You can also find him on LinkedIn and other social media platforms as well.

Our friends at Wiley have provided a free excerpt of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. Based upon research and interviews with buyers, the book provides a blueprint sales professionals. Read an excerpt of the book here.

Once you’ve applied the concepts you heard here today, message me or email me and let me know what your results were.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

The podcast is part of our newly-launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. To learn more, email us at SPN for more information.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

 

 

Different, Sales Leader, Prospecting, Donald Kelly

TSE 835: TSE Hustler’s League-“What Is Different About You?”

Different, Sales Leader, Prospecting, Donald KellyYou are not the only salesperson who has contacted your prospect this week. In fact, she has likely heard from 10 other salespeople selling exactly the same thing you are. So what is different about you?

How do you differentiate yourself from the other 10 people so she’ll want to move to the next step with you? Today, on The Sales Evangelist, we’ll discuss how you can set yourself apart in your relationships with prospects.

What is different about you?

If your only focus in your initial contact with a prospect is setting an appointment, your focus is too narrow. You must go into every appointment with the intention to provide value; to bring something to the table.

In other words, what can you offer the prospect that she can’t get from any of the other 10 people? Busy buyers have lots of options, and you don’t want to be just one of many options. What is different about you?

How can you stand out from the others? Consider the following questions:

  1. Why should the prospect meet with me?
  2. What can I offer that she won’t get from anyone else?
  3. What will she miss out on if she doesn’t meet with me?

Recognize that she has many roles in her life, and this is just one of them. Do your research and figure out how to provide value to her.

What problem can you help solve?

In my early days of selling, it never occurred to me to think about the prospect and what she might need. Instead of helping my prospect, I was focused on getting appointments and closing deals.

I discovered my mistake the hard way, and I learned that prospects have no shortage of choices, so I needed to do more than sell.

Before you meet with your prospect, conduct some research. Call the company and speak to people who can give you insight about the problems the company is facing.

Find a solution to those problems and bring those solutions into your meeting.

In the case of an inbound call, use your pre-existing knowledge about the industry to move them toward the next stage of the process.

Look at past customers you’ve solved problems for. Look to situations in which you solved problems that the customer didn’t even know she had.

Bring insights to the table that no one else is offering to move the prospect to the next step.

Episode resources

Pick up a copy of the book The 3 Value Conversations: How to Create, Elevate, and Capture.

If all of this sounds great to you but you still aren’t sure how to start, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights.

We’ve just started a new semester, and it’s not too late to apply to see if you’re a good candidate for our program.

You can also join our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers to connect with sales professionals from all walks of life.

There’s a reason I continue suggesting the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic blueprint of all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

I’m so convinced of its message that I’m offering a free excerpt of the book so you can check it out.

Email me for more information about our newly launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. You can also email us about our new business development services.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Social Selling, Donald Kelly, Content, YouTube

TSE 829: Sales From The Street-“Being Small Doesn’t Benefit You”

Social Selling, Donald Kelly, Content, YouTubeI spent too much time thinking small: failing to try new things for fear that I wouldn’t be good at them. It wasn’t until friends in my Mastermind group challenged my thinking that I realized that being small doesn’t benefit anyone.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, we’ll discuss how small-mindedness can hurt you, and how you can provide value to your customer if you’ll push past that kind of thinking.

Nagging thoughts

For years, I believed that social selling wasn’t for me, because I wasn’t charismatic or beautiful enough to make videos or create other visual content.

Furthermore, I believed that if I did create content, trolls would come out of the woodwork and sharpshoot my efforts. If that happened, their criticism would send me running back to the safety of my cave.

Finally, I believed that I didn’t have anything of value to offer. I didn’t believe I was capable of social selling.

Even with the launch of this podcast in 2013, I was plagued by thoughts that I didn’t have enough time or adequate equipment to generate videos. I didn’t have the capability to edit them and I didn’t have enough content.

When my friends challenged me to share just one thing on social media, I created a video that didn’t get a lot of attention. That video prompted me to compare my own work against other content that was out there, and I was immediately tempted to stop.

It took me a while to realize that you’ll rarely be successful on your first attempt at anything.

Untrue beliefs

At some point I realized that YouTube is the second largest search engine in the world. I also realized that by failing to take advantage of its audience, I was passing up opportunities.

I bought myself some inexpensive lighting and a small camera, though I could have accomplished the same thing using simply a cell phone, and I got to work creating videos.

Surprisingly, no one criticized my appearance in those videos and no one challenged my content. In fact, they liked what they saw, which propelled me to create more.

When I committed to do Facebook live segments, I discovered that people were really watching them. One day when my broadcast was a few minutes late starting, a group member messaged me wondering why he couldn’t see the content.

It occurred to me then that, if I hadn’t generated that content, at least one person would have missed it.

Effective tools

So how does social selling help your business? People see your expertise in a different medium than usual and they have a chance to evaluate your content.

Instead of simply trying to convince them to buy my product or service, I can use social selling to prove the value of my content so they’ll be more inclined to take the next step.

Think of how many YouTube videos you have personally watched, and the value they have provided to you when you were trying to fix something or solve a problem.

Figure out your prospects’ frequently asked questions, and begin with a simple video answering those questions for your audience.

Being small doesn’t benefit you and it only serves to cripple your efforts. Get rid of thinking that says you’re not capable.

Episode resources

You can also become a leader to your buyers by presenting value and building relationships. The book Stop Selling & Start Leading, offered by our friends at Wiley, provides a blueprint for your customers and what they are seeking. Read an excerpt of the book here.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Outreach, TSE Hustler's League, Donald Kelly

TSE 825: TSE Hustler’s League-“Outreach Strategy”

Outreach, TSE Hustler's League, Donald Kelly

Without an outreach strategy or a plan, sales professionals run the risk of looking pushy. When we focus entirely on making money and closing deals without working a plan, we miss the opportunity to position ourselves as leaders in the sales process.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’ll discuss how emails should fit into your sales process.

Understand the value of trust.

In the book Stop Selling & Start Leading, I discovered this quote:

Some sales people don’t have a moral compass. They don’t operate according to a set of values, so it’s easy for them to deviate to questionable behavior.

Buyers, however, want to work with sales leaders. They want to work with ethical people who live by a set of values. They want to be able to trust the people they are working with.

We position ourselves as leaders when we prioritize the customer and his needs instead of our need to close a deal and make money.

Plan your outreach strategy.

Do not focus purely on making money and closing deals.

Instead, decide how you can motivate the prospect to engage with your company or your product.

Begin by demonstrating your interest in the prospect, which will serve the dual purpose of letting him know that you exist.

Do that by working smart. Your time is limited and his is, too. Send a brief email that makes him aware of you, and begin with something he’ll want to read.

Subject line: Congrats on your recent round of funding, (insert name)

Opening line: Congratulations on your recent round of funding!

Your work is going to impact the law profession in a major way.

I look forward to seeing how you’ll employ your resources to be even more effective in your work. 

Sincerely, 

(insert your name)   🙂

This brief email serves as an initial connection. It’s simple enough that he can read it on his phone, and it will invite response because you’ve acknowledged his accomplish, and we’re all a little ego-driven.

Additionally, because it’s brief, he can scan it quickly and send a brief response back.

You’ve let him know that you exist, and you’ve initiated a simple conversation that can expand in later days.

Don’t skip steps.

Some sellers won’t understand the point of this because it didn’t result in an immediate sale. But now they know I exist, and I can continue the conversation.

A few days later, I’ll send a value-driven email that provides information about their industry, or perhaps I’ll offer to feature them in a webcast my company is hosting.

I’ll do them a favor without trying to sell them something.

By working smarter, I’m able to build connections that become long-term relationships instead of short-term sales.

Episode resources

Our friends at Wiley  have provided a free excerpt of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. Based upon research and interviews with buyers, the book provides a blueprint sales professionals. Read an excerpt of the book here.

Once you’ve applied the concepts you heard here today, message me or email me and let me know what your results were.

I’d love to hear how you’re working to accomplish big things.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Douglas Vigliotti, Paradox, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 806: The Salesperson Paradox

douglas-vigliotti, Donald Kelly, The Salesperson ParadoxThe Salesperson Paradox requires sales professionals to shift their focus from selling something to the customer to helping the customer solve a problem.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, Douglas Vigliotti helps us understand how sales fundamentals can help us grow our business.

As a strategic selling partner for small business owners, Vigliotti understands that businesses without processes don’t progress or grow.

Salesperson Paradox

The most important question a salesperson can ask himself is this: Am I selling products and services or am I helping to solve a problem?

Sales professionals have been conditioned to sell by their bosses, their investors, and a host of other people. What drives the process, though, is helping someone solve a problem. When the customer gets what he wants, the sales professional gets what she wants.

People innately think of themselves first.

Imagine you’re at a party with a group of friends and someone takes a picture. When you look at the picture, who do you look to first? We look at ourselves first, of course. If we don’t like how we look, we may stipulate that the picture can’t be posted.

Rock-solid strategy

Tactics are interchangeable.

One day the focus might be Facebook, and another day it’s Google.

Your sales focus must be on strategy rather than tactics because without a rock-solid strategy, you’ll never reproduce your success.

The key to business relationships lies in positioning the deal so that both parties win. Reducing the social, emotional and financial risk makes it easier for the customer to say yes.

When you make it easy for the customer to come on board, you increase the likelihood that they’ll choose you repeatedly.

Simplicity

Never confuse simplicity and ease.

Simplicity is the key to reproducibility. If you strive for clarity about your process, you’ll be able to reproduce it.

The number one skillset for entrepreneurs is problem-solving, and Vigliotti offers a framework for creating solutions. He calls them CRINGE solutions: they’re so good that customers would cringe at the idea of saying no.

Customer first: Does my customer feel like he has won?

Real problem:  Am I solving the customer’s true problem or a problem I perceive he has?

Immense value: Can I provide value, either real or intangible, that increases the value of my customer?

Non-negotiable: Am I communicating my belief that you’re better off with me than you would be without me?

Good timing: We can do everything right, but if the timing is off you won’t win the deal. Optimize timing by improving the speed of delivery.

Easy to say yes: The most powerful acquisition strategy is making it easier for the customer to say yes.

Episode resources:

In order to solve problems for our customers, we must know how to solve problems and provide value. If you aren’t sure how to do that, help is available.

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is an online group training program that will help you learn processes that you can apply immediately in order to see results.

It’s a weekly live training session that will help you become more influential and be more successful. We’ll help you find more leads, build more value, close more deals and do big things.

If you enjoy our podcast, leave us a review wherever you consume this content. Share it with someone else who can benefit from it.

Check out Douglas Vigliotti’s book The Salesperson Paradox, or find him on LinkedIn.

Sound in this episode provided by Free SFX.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Value, Questions, Listen

TSE 764-Sales From The Street-“Don’t Make Them Feel Stupid”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Value, Questions, ListenAs a seller, our job is to ensure we make our prospects feel comfortable with us.

During this episode, I share why and how we should help our prospects feel comfortable.

In a Perfect World

As a new sales professional, you want to get a templated script and be able to follow along. You want to know exactly what to say, when to say it, how to say it.

You just want everything laid out so you only have to follow it, thinking it’s going to work in every perfect situation.

In reality, it doesn’t work like that.

You need to have intelligent business conversations.

One of the major challenges I had when I was starting out was that I was being robotic as a sales professional.

Scripts are not bad per se, but it’s bad when you’re just reading the script and going without emotions, without connecting or understanding the person you’re talking to.

Strategies to Make Your Prospects Feel Comfortable

Don’t make your customers feel confused or look stupid.

When you’re just reading off the script and you have no emotion built into it, that would make them think you’re stupid.

Have a business conversation.

Don’t just ask rogue questions to the customers that don’t necessarily make sense to the customer because you didn’t do research on them.

First, understand how your customers are making money. What are the challenges that cause them to not make money?

Try to research on their industry to get a better understanding. That way, you’d know how to move the needle and have a business conversation with them.

Educate your customers and have meaningful conversations. As Donald Miller says, “A confused customer will never buy.”

Episode Resources:

Building a Story Brand by Donald Miller

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Deb Calvert, Stop Selling and Start Leading, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 763: Stop Selling & Start Leading Movement

Are you just selling or are you leading? During this interview, Deb Calvert shares with us why the movement of becoming leaders in the eyes of our prospects is so critical. Listen and learn why and how we should do this.

Deb is an activist in the sales arena, specifically around the idea that we have to stop selling, and start leading. Today, she lays out the blueprint if you want to be successful in selling.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Deb:

What is the Stop Selling and Start Leading Movement?

Leadership behaviors get you in the door. They make you stand out to buyers. They help you close more sales.

Bad Selling Habits:

They tend to adopt behaviors that make them seem pushy and obnoxious. It makes them seem selfish,  greedy, and money-motivated exclusively. It also makes them seem that they don’t listen well.

Leaders influence, inspire, and guide people to an exciting new place full of possibilities.

5 Practices of Exemplary Leadership

1. Model the Way

You set the example. You’re credible.  You know what you’re values are. And you align your actions accordingly with your values. You are consistent and predictable because people know what you stand for and they believe in you.

2. Inspire Shared Vision

Leaders breathe life into a vision. But it’s not only their own vision, it’s shared. It’s something that others have participated in. They struggle to make that vision into a reality because they believe in it so powerfully.

3. Challenge the Process

This means being restless. Leaders always ask what’s new, what’s next. They’re afraid to innovate and experiment and take some risks. They challenge themselves and others to look at things in different ways. They look at the bigger picture and not just getting mired in the status quo.

4. Enable Others to Act

Leaders collaborate with people. They dignify their decisions and listen really well to make sure they’re together and understand what they’re looking to do. Leaders allow people to contribute. They don’t just do work by themselves.

5. Encourage the Heart

Leaders pour courage into someone’s heart. They celebrate and share the victories and values they recognize. And when the going gets tough, they’re right there to support and encourage.

How to Be Credible and Build Trust:

DWYSYWD – Do What You Say You Will Do!

Deb’s DISCOVER Questions:

1. Buyer wants sellers to answer their questions in a timely and relevant manner.

2. Buyers want a two-way dialogue. They want sellers to ask them questions that makes them participate in creating what they want so they can share insights and put their imprint on solutions sellers will later offer.

Deb’s Major Takeaway:

Leadership is not the same as management. It’s not reserved for an exclusive few with certain characteristics.

Leadership is for everybody. It’s nothing more than choosing a certain set of behaviors that help you to be more influential and allows you to guide other people that cause other people to willingly choose to follow you.

Leadership is easy access for anybody who will choose to step into their full potential as a leader and liberate the leader inside themselves.

Episode Resources:

Get to know more about Deb on @PeopleFirstPS and Stop Selling Start Leading.com

Check out her book, Stop Selling, Start Leading

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Tibor Shanto, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 611: What Is The “GAP” & How Can I Find It In My Prospects Business?

Tibor Shanto, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist PodcastMind the gap! I’m not talking about London tubes here but today’s guest, Tibor Shanto, is going to teach us this concept of how you can help your buyers understand where they are and where they want to go as well as how you can fill that gap with your product or service.

Tibor Shanto does professional development for professional salespeople, specifically working with B2B sales forces of all sizes as they focus on business acquisition and transitioning into business sales.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Tibor:

What is the GAP?

Sellers may have this tendency that you’re focusing on one segment of the market at the expense of ignoring an entirely larger segment of the market

Then there are buyers that you know they’re going to have to make a purchase decision but they feel they don’t have to make the decision for some time down the road. Basically, they still have an x amount of time left before they have to make that decision.

Status quo market- These are the complacent buyers making up 70% of the market where they’re not really interacting with the market.

Buyers or companies have objectives and there are gaps between where the buyers want to be and where they are now.

How to identify the buyer’s challenges:

  1. Assume the medal of a subject matter expert. Understand why you win and why you lose.
  • Understand why a lot of the stuff that goes on top of the funnel just doesn’t come out at the other end.
  • Explore what happens within your pipeline and you’ll begin to see which certain objectives are common and which objectives people are willing to invest money in.
  • You will begin to understand how they define those objectives and how you can influence how they look at it.
  • You will understand which questions you should be asking during the discovery phase – What can you learn from them and what they can learn from you
  1. Lead with outcomes.
  • Explore the relationship between the objectives they’re trying to reach and the impact they have on their business.
  • Then frame your discussion around those impacts and then you can work backward to the gap.

Example: Let them talk about all the things they see as where they want to be 18 months from now.

  1. Discover the gap.
  • Get down to the actual discovery element of the discussion until they give you the gap for you to work on. So you’ve actually mined the gap.
  • By asking the right questions, it makes them share more information and what they really think is behind it.

Example: Help me understand why we’re not there now.

  1. Get them to emotionally re-invest in their objectives.

When people don’t achieve success towards their objectives, they begin to give up on the objectives and scale them back. So you have to get them to emotionally re-invest in where they want to be. You need them to articulate out loud what would be the upside if they achieve their objectives.

  1. Go deeper with the customer.

Don’t just stay at the surface level when working with your customers. Go a bit deeper and they will tell you what’s in it for them.

  1. Follow up with the risk of inaction.

Follow up the discussion with what’s the risk of inaction. People’s propensity if they’re in the status quo is to not act because the alternative will always seem less safe than where they are even if it’s not perfect. Again, get them to articulate this. If it comes from their mouth then they would have to own it.

  1. Let them understand your monetary worth.

Ask them what’s the worth of your product from a monetary point of view. Get them to articulate the value of what you bring to the table and extrapolate on that with your benefits.

Tibor’s Major Takeaway:

You want to be a subject matter expert but don’t be worried if you can’t. Think about two or three areas you might want to explore. Make an honest effort and you’ll get further than trying to be that perfect, smooth-talking person.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Tibor by giving him a call at 855-25SALES or for international call +1-416-822-7781. Or send him an email at tibor.shanto@sellbetter.ca.

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Help us spread the word out by leaving us a rating or review on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play or whatever platform you’re using.

Anil Kaul, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, AI

TSE 561: Using AI To Close Deals Faster

Anil Kaul, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, AI63% of sales leads don’t convert for at least 3 months. One reason is that many salespeople just don’t understand how to use the information they have that’s been sitting on their CRM this whole time.

My guest today. Anil Kaul is going to teach us how you can circumvent this issue through the power of AI.

Anil Kaul has grown a successful organization as the CEO of Absolutdata, a 15-year old data analytics company that help companies make informed and better decisions as well as empower sales teams to make better decisions. Sales is a combination of science and art for which their company can provide the “science” side of things. Listen in to find out how you can utilize technology to make your life so much easier!

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Anil:

Lessons from Anil’s coolest sales experience when he was the customer:

  • Sales is not about selling, but about helping.
  • As soon as you help, you’re going to be their friend and they’re going to buy from you because you are their friend.

Why companies find it difficult to convert leads:

  • Salespeople don’t understand because they don’t have the information behind the scenes
  • If you provide the right level of information to the right person, the process starts to flow and move forward. Otherwise, bombarding the customer with information, the flow stalls.
  • You have to be strategic with what you share with your leads in order for the sales process to move forward.

The role of a sales leader to move the process forward:

The sales leader needs to enable the sales team which of the leads they need to focus on and then determine the right strategy.

The role of the sales leader now is to provide the team with the right tools on the science side and the right kind of coaching and training on the art side of things.

The Role of AI:

Now is the time that AI will make a difference. One of the biggest challenges sales is facing as well as other departments is too much information coming from all directions and it’s difficult which pieces to take in with not enough time.

There is too much information that you only need to sift through only those that are relevant to you and that can make a difference.

AI can process a huge amount of data in terms of text, events, data, social media, etc. It’s good at figuring out what matters and what doesn’t. AI can now correlate and connect discrete pieces together based on these different pieces of information obtained.

How sales teams can take advantage of AI:

Change the mindset of leaving that burden on the sales individual because the organization itself has to take responsibility and AI needs to be done on an organization level.

How small businesses can get started with AI:

Absolutdata focuses on the salesperson and looks at what they need to do and what kind of information can be pulled up from the data they have.

Most small businesses have CRM systems and there is so much data sitting in that database that you can leverage by finding patterns that can help your sales team. Absolutdata can help you find out new opportunities you’re not aware of and also find out the most likely effective paths to closure.

They have access to the history of the customer, to the history of similar customers, and access to what your best salespeople have done. By combining these three, Absolutdata can give you the best recommendations on what your game plan can be. So you can focus on selling rather than spending extra time sitting down trying to figure out what your game plan should be so you become a significantly effective salesperson!

Who can best benefit from Absolutdata:

Larger sales teams and organizations are better suited to what they have since they have access to more data so that makes recommendations more robust.

They can also give tools to smaller organizations. They have a tool where you just give your quotas set for the beginning of the quarter and they can look at your sales history and tell you which customers are more likely to buy and which gap is the largest.This little tool simply sits on your phone and you can have access the necessary information you need to move that deal along.

Anil’s Major Takeaway:

Make sure you take the optimum value of the data the organization has because you make better money because the data is sitting there so just use it.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Anil through email at anil@absolutdata.com and on Twitter @anilkaul

The Sales Development Playbook by Trish Bertuzzi

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, WoW Factor

TSE 560: TSE Hustler’s League-“WOW Factor”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, WoW FactorToday’s snippet from one of our past training sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League is about what you can do to maximize those major gateway points to help move your deal to the next level.

  1. Get them to get the first appointment with you.
  2. Do the diagnostic test or the apples-to-apples comparison.

The biggest competitor you have is the status quo. Even if it’s bad, you tell yourself lies because you’ve gotten used to it.

  1. Demonstrate the solutions.

Present the solutions with them and get them to understand. That meeting is going to be totally educational and the best way to educate is to ASK questions.

  1. Create some questions that can educate them to go to the next level.

Ask questions that are going to get them to think and propose action.

  1. Think about what you can do to WOW the customer in this process.

Don’t think about the huge stuff as everyone can do the big things. Most people do not do the little things. Take time to listen to them.

  1. Return their calls.

Most leads go bad because people don’t return calls within the first 24 hours of getting the lead.

  1. Follow up.

People love to buy but they hate to be sold. So give that power back to them and think about the little things in that sales process that you can make it easier. Price would no longer matter if they feel the value is there.

  1. If you find a lot of fall-off after the demonstration, educate them.

If there is something that is causing the deal to not move forward, think about what you can do to educate people at that point to help them go further.

  1. Educate before the purchase.

This is another little factor that can separate you from everybody else.

Episode Resources:

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Tim Sanders, Donald Kelly, Dealstorming, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 558: Dealstorming: The Secret Weapon That Can Solve Your Toughest Sales Challenges

Tim Sanders, Donald Kelly, Dealstorming, The Sales Evangelist PodcastAt various points in our sales cycle, we could encounter really tough challenges to the point that we feel stuck or the deal is stuck. And more often than not, we resort to giving up. But how do you get yourself out of the rabbit hole?

Today’s guest is Tim Sanders and he’s going to share with us some insights gleaned from his new book, Dealstorming: The Secret Weapon That Can Solve Your Toughest Sales Challenges so the next time you get yourself stuck in a deal, you’d know how to storm through your way out and get that deal that you want!

Tim has been selling since high school which led him to build a skill set in creating value and urgency, limited to direct selling opportunities. But eventually, as the sales world evolved, the way things are being done also had to change. Tim worked for Mark Cuban in the early part of his career and he’s also sharing with us the lessons he got from that experience.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Tim:

His experience working for Mark Cuban:

  • They were selling video and audio streaming for businesses.
  • From smaller deals, they pursued 7-figure opportunities, being aware that the bigger it gets, the harder it is.
  • When you become ambitious, you’re going to get stuck because the sale is not about one thing but a bunch of problems. And when you get stuck, don’t go down alone.
  • Grab somebody who cares about you winning. Create a team and make it reign.
  • Make unlikely alliances (with the engineering group or finance, customer support, etc) and make complexity a competitive advantage.

This resulted to Mark landing some very complicated, high-value deals like the Victoria Secret Fashion Show in 1998 which broke the Internet. Then he worked at Yahoo! as a Chief Solutions Officer looking at the biggest deals after the dot-com crash.

And this was the time he refined the dealstorming approach. Since he left Yahoo!, Tim has written a bunch of books and has worked with a lot of startups and entrepreneurs, teaching them that no matter how small you are, you can build a team and help them think about their challenges and making that leap, bringing out teamwork in groups operating in silos.

The Great Lie of Small to Big

There is this lie we tell ourselves in sales that you just need to close this sale, only $500 and then we’re going to scale that $500 deal to be $5 million over the course of four years. This never happens.

The reality is when you go in small, you have no barriers to entry. Understand that when you book a small deal, it stays a small deal. If you’re going to focus on that, then you need to add a zero to the number of deals you’re going to book this year for you to scale your own personal production. If you go small, you have to be a very high-velocity salesperson in the kind of market where you can do a one or two-call close.

The difference between B2B and B2C: The number of addressable decision-makers.

B2C has a smaller number of decision-makers that are highly addressable. You have a chance to make your case for change and for you being the one to every one of the decision-makers in almost every B2C marketing/sales situation. There are usually 1-2 decision-makers or even 3 if there is an influence.

B2B has around 6 decision-makers for every quality sales. And research suggests this is going up 20% a year and most of them are not addressable. Most of the time, you get access to one or two decision-maker/influencers and then they have to sell to the other six. You can’t round them up and sell them all. That is the biggest collaboration challenge we face as sellers. At the end of the day, you’ve got to teach your mobilizers inside your accounts to sell the others and do it quickly since time is not on your side.

Unteaching People and Storytelling

Customers do their own research and oftentimes, the research contradicts everything you say. In B2B is usually 2/3 through their decision-making process before you actually get in front of them. So our challenge is to learn how to respectfully unteach people that have incorrect insights they’re about to make a decision based on.

Here is where the power of storytelling comes in. You have to develop stories and illustrations demonstrating the urgency to change and why you’re the only choice to make. You have to move beyond just trying to sell price or features, facts, and figures. This is why you need to collaborate with other people when you get stuck.

Collaboration and Diversity

Diversify the way you think about solving the problem. You have to have 2-4 perspectives in a room to have a creative group. Sales have a way of seeing the world and so does customer service, marketing, engineering, and suppliers. SO when you best practices become obsolete, diversity solves that.

Whatever it is you’re trying to do, when you get stuck, grab somebody that has a different way of seeing the world, a different set of constraints and a different set of greatest hits and they will complete your weaknesses.

“Products and companies do not become obsolete but the constraints by which we live by, they become obsolete. The best practices by which we live by, they become obsolete. And that’s why it’s important to have diversity.”

Questions to Ask When Building Your Team:

  1. Who has a stake in the outcome or the sales process?

Who really cares if we win or lose? Who really cares about the promises we make? These are the ones who care about being in your team. They are your tacklers.

  1. Who’s an expert about my problem?

That is your skill player or two.

Other keys to great team-building:

  • Create relationships across the company.
  • Discover other people’s concerns about sales.
  • When you get stuck, find the root cause of the problem.

“Great salespeople of today are not problem-solvers, but problem-finders. They know the reason their deal is really stuck.”

Tim’s Major Takeaway:

Get up every morning and live every day to build value. What Tim learned from Mark is that if you feed your mind, you can trust your gut in the moment. Read books. Get up every day and build your personal value that you can give away to your customers.

This is the only way you can become an essential partner in their life. Being a good option is a bad strategy in our world today. Be a voracious reader. Be a student of the game because that’s the only thing that’s going to make you truly different than anybody else your customer takes a meeting with this week.

Episode Resources:

Visit and www.timsanders.com/salesevan and get access to a chapter from his book. The chapter is called Sales Genius is a Team Sport.

How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie

The Go-Giver by Bob Burg

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 515: TSE Hustler’s League-“Credibility and Trust”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast Today’s snippet taken from one of our sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League is about building credibility.

Credibility leads to trust.

Trust is essential in sales. You have to trust those you’re working with and build trust with . People do business with those they know, like, and trust. Credibility is a precursor to that. Build credibility, then you gain trust.

[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

3 Pillars in Building Credibility:

  1. Don’t be desperate.
  2. Be specific.
  3. Back it up.

Don’t Be Desperate

  1. Identify your ideal customers. Go for those that fit your product. You cannot be the “yes” man to everyone.
  1. Set the rules before you play the game since there are people who can alter rules during the game or even deny there were any.
  1. Offer them an “out” or the fitness test. Set the perimeter early on and ask your prospect to be open to telling you at any point during the conversation when they recognize that you’re not a great fit.

When you can give people an out, you become so much more credible.

[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

Episode Resources:

Join the TSE Hustler’s League and be part of a dynamic, results-driven, like-minded group of awesome people!

Say goodbye to long, boring proposals and check out PandaDoc. Create electronic proposals to your prospects. Sign and receive payments without leaving your CRM. It integrates well with other CRMs such as Salesforce. Pipedrive, and HubSpot. To get a quick demonstration and a free trial, go to www.thesalesevangelist.com/panda

Donald Kelly, PandaDoc

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

Value, Conversation, Listening, Asking Questions

TSE 510: TSE Hustler’s League-“What Is Value?”

Value, Conversation, Listening, Asking Questions Today’s snippet taken from one of the past training sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League is focused on building value.

The extent to which a good service is perceived by a customer to meet his needs or wants is measured by a customer’s willingness to pay for it. The company depends more on the customer’s perception of the worth of the product than on its intrinsic value.

[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

Establishing your value:

  1. Ask for more than what you’re comfortable asking for.

Follow the 10x rule and bump up what you ask for 10x. Sometimes your customers will value something a little bit more.

  1. Educate your customers.

It’s your job to educate customers on the value you’re bringing to the table so they can make that important decision.

Ways to find out what your customers value most:

  1. Ask what is important to your customer.
  2. Get the customer to understand the potential pain without using scare tactics.
  3. Tailor your presentation and solution to what’s important to them.
  4. Ask them questions in a way that you make it seem you’re not selling but instead they’re buying.
  5. Figure out how you can establish value.

Again, people need to see the value first before they even decide to buy. Sometimes they don’t know about you, so you need to provide education.

[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

Episode Resources:

Say goodbye to long, boring proposals and check out PandaDoc. Send proposals that not only will your customers enjoy and love but also have time to be able to do more selling. Perfect combination! To get a quick demonstration and a free trial, go to www.thesalesevangelist.com/panda

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, PandaDoc

[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

Donald Kelly, TSE Hustler's League, Sales Training, Best Sales Podcast

TSE 505: TSE Hustler’s League-“Customer Friendly Sales Process”

Donald Kelly, TSE Hustler's League, Sales Training, Best Sales PodcastTraditionally, the sales process has not been very conducive to providing value to clients. But this doesn’t work anymore. Over the years, the buying process has significantly changed and so you must also be able to align your sales process with it if you want to achieve success.

Today’s snippet is taken from one of the previous sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League is all about giving value.

[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

Here are 7 key steps to creating a value-friendly sales process:

  1. Your goal is to understand your prospects and their challenges.
  2. Define your prospect’s unconsidered need.

This may be something your prospect may not be thinking about because they don’t see it but it can become the most damaging.

  1. Educate your prospect on the unconsidered need.

Again, this could be something they’re not aware of or they’re blinded to, or have lived so long with that they don’t pay attention to and could cause more damage to them.

  1. For prospecting purposes, spend at least 1 month focusing on just one particular industry.
  2. Be sure to ask the appropriate questions.
  3. Give the prospects not what you want but what they want.
  4. Align your process with your client’s process.

What can you do to change your process so that it’s reflective of your client’s process? Have a single sales process that can tailor to one specific prospect.

[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

Episode Resources:

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Say goodbye to long, boring proposals and check out PandaDoc. Create electronic proposals to your prospects and save an enormous amount of time. Sign and receive payments without leaving your CRM. It integrates well with other CRMs such as Salesforce. Pipedrive, and HubSpot. To get a quick demonstration and a free trial, go to www.thesalesevangelist.com/panda

Donald Kelly, PandaDoc

Help us spread the word out by leaving us a rating or review on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play or whatever platform you’re using.
[mk_button dimension=”three” size=”large” bg_color=”#59b671″ text_color=”light” icon=”moon-screen-4″ url=”https://www.pandadoc.com/demo/?utm_source=podcast&utm_campaign=salesevangelist&utm_medium=cpc” target=”_blank” align=”center” margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”15″ width=”1/1″ el_position=”first last”]Check Out PandaDoc[/mk_button]

Donald Kelly, Hidden Figures, NASA

TSE 487: How To Become Indispensable To Prospects & Clients

Donald Kelly, Hidden Figures, NASA Today I’m going to teach you how to  stand out and become indispensable to your clients, prospects, and your company.

My wife and I saw a movie last week called Hidden Figures. It’s about a group of African-American “computers”, who were really mathematician women working for NASA. When Dorothy Vaughan (played by Octavia Spencer) realized that a newly invented computer mainframe was going to put them out of job. She decided to make herself become indispensable to NASA by learning the computer language.

NASA hired her to be one of the lead project engineers over the programmers. She brought the other girls along with her as well and taught them how to program the mainframe. They would have been out of a job had they not put themselves in a situation where they have become indispensable.

How this applies to sales and how you can become indispensable to your clients:

  1. Treat others the way they would like to be treated.

Figure out how you can be indispensable to your prospects. What value can you bring to the table that people cannot say no to? Look at your clients and prospects and think about this one thing. Give people what they want and not what you want.

  1. Give them stuff they don’t know they need yet.

Think about what’s on the line for your prospects. What are some of the changes that you can foresee that may be coming down the pipe in terms of your industry, business or solution that you provide that can help them recognize things they could already do now to prepare for that so they can continue to make money or reduce cost. Consider account-based selling. If cold calling works for you then great, but if not try a better way to become indispensable by giving value.

  1. Take the initiative.

Share ideas and concepts. Try new things. Learn new stuff. Be a doer and always do your very best.

Today’s Major Takeaway:

Find out how you can be indispensable to your prospects, clients, company, and even to your family and friends. Be the person that brings value to the table every single time.

Episode Resources:

David and Goliath by Malcolm Gladwell

How to Win Friends and Influence Others by Dale Carnegie

The Challenger Sale by Brent Adamson and Matthew Dixon

Get a free audio book download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Help us spread the word by leaving us a rating or review on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play or whatever platform you’re using.