Sales Team Archives - The Sales Evangelist

Category Archives for Sales Team

Kingsley Grant, Sales Environment

TSE 1245: How To Create An Environment Where People Thrive At Work

Kingsley Grant, Sales EnvironmentA healthy work environment allows people to thrive and grow. But what can we do to create that environment where people thrive

Kingsley Grant is focused on helping leaders get better results by using a framework of emotional intelligence and leadership. He helps sales leaders create environments that support positive output. 

Reasons why salespeople don’t thrive at work 

The research group, Aussie Tanner, interviewed people who left their companies. Based on that research, it showed that people leave because they felt unacknowledged,  under-valued, and unimportant. The best way to address these problems is to create an environment that supports employees and allows them to feel they are part of the team. This engagement can be a challenge for many leaders. 

Another reason why salespeople fail to thrive is they don’t feel safe to share their ideas. There is a fear that sales leaders will use those ideas against them. Sales leaders need to create an environment where their team can share ideas they know will at least be considered.  When employees feel they’re in an environment that offers room to experiment and make mistakes, these salespeople grow and thrive.

How does thriving look like?

A salesperson who is allowed to unleash their talents is a person who thrives. For example, L’Oreal is a huge cosmetics company that wanted its people to thrive with their company. They had some of their salespeople trained in the area of emotional intelligence. The rest of their sales team weren’t given the training. What they found was that their trained personnel and sales staff were able to sell more. Their value increased and their net revenue rose to $2.5 million in just a month. 

Helping salespeople acquire emotional intelligence can greatly impact the company. Allowing your sales team to learn self-awareness is a powerful tool to build their confidence and increase revenue. 

Defining emotional intelligence

Emotional intelligence is the ability to recognize, understand, and regulate your emotions. It is the ability to have a level of awareness of how you feel and manage your relationships around you.  Every salesperson is building relationships around them, whether it’s with their team or their customers. Having emotional intelligence provides the ability to manage a variety of relationships. 

A sales leader plays a huge part in building their sales teams’ emotional intelligence. The leader must be sensitive to the needs of the members of their sales team. This includes an awareness of what their team is going through, what the sales reps need to learn in order to make better sales decisions, and more. When the sales leader is tuned in to the feelings of their sales team it helps them have a feeling of belonging. This helps the sales reps stay motivated, thrive, and bring in more sales. 

Building a safe environment for salespeople 

The sales team should be encouraged to share suggestions they think will help the company. Kingsley shares an experience he had at a previous company when he wasn’t supported. He wanted to help the company by sharing an idea he had and brought the idea to his coordinator. When his coordinator didn’t agree, instead of talking to Kingsley, the coordinator went to the vice president of the company. As a result, Kingsley could no longer trust his coordinator.  After his idea was received so badly, he didn’t share other ideas he wanted to offer and quit the company six months later. He could no longer work for someone who would shut down his ideas and talk to the executives behind his back. 

Sales leaders are often focused on the bottom line, only seeing the end results, and they fail to acknowledge the people who are delivering those results. They fail to see their most important resources, the sales team. The way teams are treated can determine whether or not goals are met. Salespeople have to feel safe. They need to know if they don’t make a sale, they won’t be reprimanded but instead, be mentored about how to be more effective next time.  It doesn’t mean a sales leader ignores a sales rep who can’t or refuses to learn but unfortunately, salespeople leave a company long before the company realizes their true skill set. People don’t leave organizations. They leave bad bosses. 

Reprimand at the right time 

Sales leaders are effective when they praise publicly and reprimand privately. A sales rep should never be embarrassed in front of the team. Tough love isn’t going to work.

As a mentor, build an environment where you can watch your sales team interact and help them modify any actions that aren’t working.  Help them to overcome and face a variety of situations that may be keeping them from success. You are learning with them and will see some skill sets you didn’t know they had. It’s these very skills that will prove to be useful in the sales process. You may even be able to reposition them to areas they are even more effective for the company. 

Be the thermostat and the thermometer of your organization. You are not only setting the temperature in the environment but also making note of the temperature so you can adjust your team accordingly.

“How To Create An Environment Where People Thrive At Work” episode resources

Kingsley Grant is also a published author of the book, The Emotilligent Leader: The Story Where Others Failed. You can check it out on Amazon. You can also check out his website, kingsleygrant.com

Do you have sales questions? Suggestions? You can also talk to Donald about it via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook for any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning in January and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Sales Leaders, The Sales Evangelist, Donald C. Kelly

TSE 1181: 3 Things Leaders Do To Hurt Sales Rep Relationships

 

 

Sales Leaders, The Sales Evangelist, Donald C. Kelly

Sometimes, there are 3 things leaders do to hurt sales rep relationships and most times, they do it unintentionally. This is especially hard because sales leaders and sales reps spend a lot of time together. A bad leader can negatively affect how a sales rep makes his sell. While a good leader helps how sales reps can improve their sales. 

Marc Levine founded his ImprovMySales business four years ago. The company is dedicated to creating wonderful and profitable places to work. Before this business venture, Marc was part of a sales team as a national account executive and technology and professional services. For the last 16 years, he has been developing leaders and teams, teaching people communication skills, selling services to certain companies including Citibank, Prudential, and Best Buy.  

3 things leaders do to hurt sales rep relationships

There are probably more, but let’s focus on just the three things for now. 

  • A leader does not create a psychologically safe environment
  • The leader forgets about humanity 
  • The leader is emotionally unintelligent

August has been a leadership month and people have been talking about the important things to become a good sales leader. This involves setting a vision and becoming a good coach. It’s about creating a culture where sales reps can thrive and succeed. 

When a leader fails to create that safe environment, the sales relationship takes a hit. 

By definition, psychological safety was a term coined by the social psychologist, Amy Edmonson. Google did a two-year study and analyzed the qualities of its most effective teams. The results of the study have shown that teams promoting psychological safety produced better revenues and their team members stayed in the work longer than others. Psychological safety is a team norm that says it’s safe to take risks, to be vulnerable, to ask for help, and to disagree with the rest of the team. 

When you do, you won’t be ostracized for disagreeing but instead, you’ll be honored and validated. 

An environment where sales leaders can thrive

As a parent, when your kid doesn’t understand something, you want your kid to feel safe to come to you and ask for help without getting embarrassed. The same is true in sales. As a leader, you need to develop a team where your members can be honest and can come forward when they don’t understand something. 

You want your team members to come to you about their problems early on in the sales cycle rather than at the end of it where the deal is falling apart. This is the essence of psychological safety. 

It’s an environment where people can ask for help, be vulnerable, take risks, and be supported 

Create a psychologically safe environment 

This doesn’t happen overnight. It happens when your sales reps come to you asking for help and instead of reacting, you validate and support them. Do it a couple of times for the team members to realize that you want to help them. 

Sales leaders also need to stop blaming the team members. Blame and accountability are two different things. 

Blaming makes the blamed feel bad and threatened. It’s when sales leaders bombard the reps with questions like: 

  • Why didn’t you hit the quota last month?
  • What are the reasons why you lost that sale?
  • Why aren’t you doing this?

These questions foster negativity. Accountability helps you raise the team’s standard without making the reps feel bad. It’s more like saying, “Hey you didn’t hit your quota last month and I know you’re disappointed. Let’s talk about what happened that may have contributed to this and let’s figure out the solutions.” Build an environment where your members can be comfortable in having a dialogue. 

As a sales leader, you also need to admit your own mistakes. Research shows that when you admit your mistakes, the people around you will come close and will open up about theirs as well. 

There’s power in vulnerability and when you use that power, you will see your sales team come closer and open up to you. 

Leaders forget about humanity 

The next in the list of the 3 things leaders do to hurt sales rep relationships is forgetting about humanity. 

Salespeople are like stand-up comedians. We go out there showing confidence knowing that we’re going to be rejected. We are a fragile group. When sales leaders remember the humanity of the people on their team, the members tend to go above and beyond. The members put in incremental efforts. 

Sales leaders also need to stop making the team members like little versions of themselves. Every member is unique with their own set of skills and strengths. Forcing things that you do well onto them will make them feel resentful. Instead, honor their strength. Validate the things that they do well to make them feel excited and engaged. Make them feel heard and understood. 

Remember that you are working with human beings who have hopes and fears. and get scared. Honor that part of them. 

Build strong relationships with your sales team

Sales leaders need to build strong relationships with their team and practice emotional intelligence. Daniel Goleman wrote in his book Working with Emotional Intelligence that people with emotional intelligence are more successful in their careers than those who are just relying on pure intelligence. Emotional intelligence is the ability to understand and regulate your own feelings to understand and empathize with the feelings of others. As a sales leader, you need to be aware of your emotional triggers to be able to manage them. If you fail to develop that, you can easily be overtaken by your emotional triggers and start to judge your team. 

These triggers tend to show up again and again and these are no surprises. 

Some of the triggers are when your sales rep didn’t hit the quota or when someone in your team isn’t adapting to the new technology, and when someone’s not putting something into the CRM.

So, list your triggers and think of all the situations and the people that trigger the fight, flight, or freeze responses.  

The sales team and all its members are the backbones of an organization. We want them to feel empowered and we can’t make that happen if we don’t provide them an environment where they can thrive and if we keep blaming them. Have conversations with them and make them feel good so that they’d want to produce for you. 

“3 Things Leaders Do To Hurt Sales Rep Relationships” episode resources

Connect with Marc at improvmysales.com or reach him at (718) 637-7890. 

If you like this episode, don’t be shy and give us a thumbs up and rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. We produce podcasts weekly so make sure to subscribe to get more of these sales talks that matter! Share this with your friends and teach them how to subscribe as well. 

This episode is brought to you in-part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a helpful guide for sales reps and sales leaders to improve their pitches and presentations. It has 12 courses and you can get the first two modules for free! If you want to take your sales to the next level, then I recommend that you join us with our group coaching. 

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

If you’re a reader who loves reading and listening to books, you can also check out Audible as well and explore this huge online library with thousands of books. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound

Cold Calling, Omnichannel Outreach, Fred Diamond, Donald C. Kely

TSE 1171: Helping Your Sales Team Perform Their Best

Cold Calling, Omnichannel Outreach, Fred Diamond, Donald C. Kely

I sat down with Fred Diamond at Podcast Movement 2019 to discuss the keys to helping your sales team perform their best. Fred is the host of Sales Game Changers Podcast and today he turned the microphone on me and allowed me to share the things I’ve learned during my career in sales. 

The Sales Evangelist

This podcast resulted from my own struggle as a B2B seller. Because of my own struggles, I wanted to help new and struggling sellers improve their sales game. I wanted to educate people who were in the same shoes and help elevate their performance. 

As The Sales Evangelist podcast grew, people in our community of sellers reached out to me for sales coaching. I started with one-on-one coaching for reps, and then those reps took their training back to their companies, and I started hearing from entrepreneurs and other business owners who needed to replicate themselves so they could scale their companies. 

I launched into the consulting side and helped businesses set up their sales teams. Eventually, that led to speaking opportunities and other things, so in 2015 I left my full-time job to do The Sales Evangelist full time. 

The podcast didn’t make money on its own, but it did generate leads and coaching opportunities and speaking and consulting gigs. Now, though, it generates its own income. 

Sales career

I got into sales before college, partly because my entire family was involved in sales. As a Jamaican boy, I grew up in a setting where everyone sold something. I didn’t see it as sales, necessarily. I simply saw it as the family business. 

I’m naturally outgoing, so people told me I’d be perfect in a sales career. That continued through college where I struggled to find a sales program. 

Eventually, I got a couple of sales jobs in timeshares and door-to-door that involved B2C selling. I made about $20,000 in three months selling door-to-door over the summer during my first year. 

When I transitioned to the professional world of selling, though, I struggled. 

Lessons learned

One of the things I learned selling door-to-door was the value of working smart. I saw people who worked hard but who weren’t effective, so they got burned out because they continued doing things that were ineffective. Those who hustled, on the other hand, worked efficiently and they practiced their messaging and they stopped doing things that didn’t work. 

I learned that I had to be willing to move on when a sale didn’t work out. 

Eventually, I moved into a BDR role in a B2B company, and I brought that need to work efficiently and plan my activities because it was a full-commission job. 

Time is money, and I needed to pay rent. 

During my time at the IT training company, Steve Hatch took me under his wing. He was the CEO of the company, and he taught me both the sales and the business sides of his company. In several cases, he did that by throwing me into the deep end. 

We were trying to work a deal with a local NPR station and he helped me learn to lead the deal and negotiate the deal. He helped me see who I could eventually become. 

Sales challenges

Current sales reps face a number of challenges that are unique to the kind of setting they operate in. Most of the ones I meet with struggle with prospecting, and with prospecting effectively. 

Many learn that cold calling is dead, for example, but they work for companies that were built by cold calling. Their leaders want them to engage in cold-calling but others tell them it’s ineffective, so they feel pulled in different directions. 

At the same time, many sellers struggle with the idea of social selling in which they engage with people on social media. They often don’t have the confidence to do it effectively, so they wait for inbound leads to come, and though they do often come, it simply isn’t enough. 

I constantly give training on how to use LinkedIn and how to take advantage of cadences and flow processes for outreach. 

Prospecting

Multichannel outreach, sometimes called omnichannel, matters the most in prospecting. When I work with sales reps, I encourage them to begin their interactions on social media. Make a genuine connection with people as a starting point. 

Understand that genuine connection doesn’t mean you simply “like” something that they posted or shared. Instead, engage with that person. If someone comments on something you share, take that conversation to the inbox next and tell him how much you appreciate his comment. Then, once you’ve built that connection, you can move the conversation to a phone call. 

Now you’ve created a warm, engaging connection. 

Then, for enterprise sales, you can even take advantage of snail mail to send them something to grab their attention. We created a Willy Wonka style ticket and invited them to join us for our demo. We sent sodas and snacks and a Starbucks gift card. We spent about $12 for each of three boxes and landed about $100,000 worth of deals. 

Sales tips

I read a lot of books in an effort to improve my game, and one of my recent favorites is Mike Weinberg’s Sales Management. Simplified. because he focuses on fundamentals. For me, mastering those fundamentals is the key to moving to the next level. Aside from prospecting, asking appropriate questions makes a big difference as well. 

For sellers who know nothing about their buyers, pipelines won’t matter at all. We’re skipping the discovery process and we’re missing a chance to ask meaningful questions and demonstrate our expertise. 

Related to that topic, time management presents a big struggle for sellers right now. I attribute my continued success to planning. In fact, I’ve created a selling planner because I couldn’t find one that I liked. 

I read a book by Kevin Kruse called the 15 Secrets Successful People Know  and another called The 12 Week Year related to time management. A lot of sales reps throw as many things as they can on a calendar in hopes that they can maximize their time. 

Instead, I break my day down based on categories to measure my effectiveness. I separate sales activities, marketing activities, and operations. I tracked those activities for a week to see where the commonalities are and which tasks I’m repeatedly doing. Then, I eliminated tasks that my team could do for me so I could focus on sales-related tasks. 

Preparation

Do a three-minute prep prior to each sales call. If you have a focused list of clients, consider hiring someone to do research on each of those clients. Find out the following:

  • How does this company make money?
  • What challenges do they have that they aren’t even necessarily aware of?
  • What common challenges are they facing?
  • How does this person I’m going to call help the company make money?

If you can help your customer achieve his goals, you’ll be so much further down the path. The process isn’t about you.

Someone is going to solve your customer’s problem. Why don’t you figure it out first and be the first to provide the solution?

“Helping Your Sales Team Perform” episode resources

Connect with Donald on LinkedIn. Also check out the Sales Game Changers Podcast.

 If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. We want you guys to go out each and every single day to find more ideal customers and do big things.

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Stress, Fatigue, The Sales Evangelist, Dana Cavalea

TSE 1160: How To Deal With Stress, Fatigue, Burn Out & Lack of Creativity

Stress, Fatigue, The Sales Evangelist, Dana Cavalea

Sales is a year-round activity with no off-season and no breaks, so it’s important for sellers to understand how to deal with stress, fatigue, burnout, and a lack of creativity. 

Dana Cavalea is the former Director of Strength & Conditioning and Performance for the New York Yankees. Coach Dana, who helps companies optimize performance and productivity, wrote a book called Habits of a Champion: Nobody Becomes a Champion By Accident.  

He became a coach after realizing the tremendous difference that coaches made in his own athletic career, and how they helped him overcome bumps in the road. 

Opportunity knocks

Dana, who originally hails from New York, chose to attend school in Tampa because he knew it was near where the Yankees conducted their spring training. When he got the opportunity to join the team as the guy who handed out towels and cleaned the weight room, he jumped on it. 

Within a few years, he earned a paying job as the director of strength and conditioning and performance, and the team won a championship during that time. 

He discovered, through that experience, that many executives, CEOs, and sales teams wanted to know how athletes prepare to compete at the highest levels. How do they deal with injuries and fatigue and the obstacles they face during a season? How do they keep showing up every day in the face of fatigue and burnout?

Individual protocol

People assume that high-level musicians and athletes feel good every time they perform, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. They’re tired a lot, but they don’t tell themselves that. They understand that fatigue is part of life and that you’re going to have days where you don’t feel great. The goal, Dana said, is to have fewer of those days and more of the days where you do feel great. 

To do that, Dana coaches people to focus on a couple of simple things that affect performance.

  • Hydration
  • Sleep

These factors can inhibit the way you function overall. To address them, you must have an individual routine specific to your needs that helps you perform at your best every single day. 

Some players like music that pumps them up, and other players like music that calms them down. Each person must have a routine and protocol that is based around their needs. 

But how do you get there?

You get there by testing things. If you sleep for six hours but wake feeling tired, that may mean that you need more sleep, or that you need to understand your 90-minute sleep cycles better. We must perform each day and test different things like the food we eat to determine what makes us feel better. 

How do I feel?

Begin by asking yourself the question, “How do I feel?” Phrased that way, the question takes you out of yourself and gives you a moment in the midst of all that you have going on to consider how you feel. People listen to a million different podcasts and listen to two or three books at a time, and we’re so busy that we don’t take time to think about how we’re feeling. 

We’re working to create a self-awareness that is super important in determining the strategies that will help you overcome your struggles. 

Sometimes we underestimate the impact of stress on our bodies. Sports are very competitive, as is business. Sales is extremely competitive. You must prepare and train to compete. 

The key is to keep your energy up by hydrating, sleeping, fueling, and training. Then, fill your mind with good stuff to crowd out the doubt and fear. 

Sports have a defined starting and ending point, but sales continues all year, quarter after quarter. There’s no break because each year leads into another. 

Expectations

If we do well this year, what will the people around us expect from us moving forward? They’ll expect us to do better. So now we’re constantly trying to push our threshold. Although what we did last year was good, it’s not good enough for this year. Expectations shift.

Some people, though, get comfortable playing things safe, and doing “just enough.” They don’t want to do more than they’re already doing because they know it will simply shift the expectation higher. 

People fear success almost as much as they fear failure. Sometimes, they sabotage themselves in order to avoid the pressure of accomplishment. 

Leaders can help their sales teams overcome these struggles by being honest. If a salesperson has hit his numbers for the month and he has a pending deal that he could close this month but he’s holding it for the next month, his leader must remove the need for the seller to impress him.

Creating clarity

Dana heard an interview with Mariano Rivera in which Rivera said his career changed when Yankees manager Joe Torre called him into the office and explained that Mo would always be his guy. As long as Torre was with the Yankees, he wanted Mo by his side. That freed Mo to relax and do what he was best at. He was freed from the need to prove himself. 

If you can reduce the need to prove yourself because you’ve validated yourself, you’re in a great position. When a manager does that for his team, it’s like glue for the team. 

Dana puts his clients on a morning walk routine that includes a 30-minute walk with no technology. It forces them to be by themselves without the defense of jumping into the phone. Without distractions, they can think about the things they actually want. They get the clarity of evaluating their current situation and their own performance. They have time to ask themselves questions about how things are going. 

Taking ownership

You may find that you have a leader or manager who isn’t leading in the way you need her to. In that case, it’s up to you to tell her what you’re struggling with, where you need help, and how she can support you. You can also ask for clarity around the work you’re doing. 

When you have the conviction to seek clarity without fearing the conversation, you’ll invite more clarity. 

Dana often encounters people who exude confidence. He calls it their birthright because it’s so natural to them. They know exactly what must be done in order to succeed. In most cases, though, your team will include really intelligent people who simply haven’t experienced enough success in order to feel confident. Coaches can navigate their sellers to achieve small, frequent wins that stack up and build confidence. 

Sellers can acquire confidence even if they don’t naturally have it.

On the other hand, Dana sometimes encounters finance people who allow the market shifts and trends to impact how they feel about themselves. He reminds them that the market will do what it will do, so these people must avoid being reactive to the external environment. 

Striking out doesn’t make you a loser, and losing doesn’t make you a loser. 

Dana got this advice some time back: People can either love it or shove it. Not everyone is meant to work with you and you’re not meant to work with everyone. That’s just the way it is. 

Starting point

Nobody leaves the gym feeling worse than when they got there. They leave feeling glad that they went. Training is your starting point. 

Not all sales are equal. Don’t compromise yourself in the process of making a sale. Some sales aren’t the right ones and they’ll be a death sentence for your company. 

Sales is a hustle and a grind, so you must approach every day with a vision of what you’re trying to create. We’re quick to judge ourselves against other people. 

Sales is a relationship game. If people know, like, and trust you, they’ll open up to you. If they don’t, they’ll be closed to you. Relationships take time and they aren’t one-sided. 

Burnout and stress are perspective-based. Stress is the result of pressures you put on yourself, and stress over time leads to burnout. 

If you try to be perfect, you’ll ultimately fail. Hit singles. Don’t try to hit home runs. If you hit a single every day, you’ll get a run on the board and another man on base. 

Create a healthy process for yourself and then execute every day. 

“How to Deal With Stress, Fatigue, Burnout” episode resources

Connect with Coach Dana at danacavalea.com or access his YouTube channel for more content. Grab a copy of his book, Habits of a Champion: Nobody Becomes a Champion By Accident.

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. We want you guys to go out each and every single day to find more ideal customers and do big things.

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Sales Coaching, Motivation, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1158: The Actions High-Growth Coaches Use To Motivate Their Teams

Sales Coaching, Motivation, The Sales Evangelist

While proper mindset is important, the actions high-growth coaches use to motivate their teams to allow those teams to succeed in sales.

Sarah Wirth works for EcSell Institute and studies sales leadership. Along with her team, they look at the coaches in the organizations they work with knowing that great coaches help teams to achieve better results. 

Sarah travels the globe studying different teams and applying the best practices they can teach to sales leaders. Their research-based teachings on best practices are grounded in fact rather than opinion. 

Misconceptions about coaching 

One of the common misconceptions about coaching relates to the timing of team meetings or sales coaching. Most sales leaders do team meetings weekly thinking that getting everyone together via phone makes the team effective. Based on the study, however, the best sales leaders have their meetings once a month rather than once a week. The monthly meeting is much more interactive and educational than the weekly kind of communication. 

Sales reps want an interactive educational team meeting where they can hear what the other departments are doing. They also want to hear and learn the best practices used by others in the company. They don’t want to sit and hear all the updates of what’s going on, because those things can be sent and read via mail. 

Instead, sales reps want a certain level of engagement and content to share during meetings. This content is difficult to achieve when you meet every single week. A longer time frame gives birth to more stories and more experiences to share, which results in meaningful and substantive conversations where everyone on the team learns things. 

Learning from experience 

Sellers like to learn the best practices, so they listen to podcasts. They want to learn from people from different fields who bring radical and neat insights that they’re not aware of. 

The interviews and surveys of salespeople reveal that they don’t want to hear the biggest deals. Instead, they want to hear how to get big deals. They want answers to the objections they encounter and tips to make presentations that help them win deals. They want to hear and learn the stories of how others became successful. 

It’s more of knowing what they did and how they did it. 

Salespeople want to be the best version of themselves. They aren’t into sales because of charity. They are in sales because they want to help their families and their clients. 

Most sales leaders are promoted to their position because they were good salespeople. They go from the bottom to the top without getting any formal training, education, and information on how to become good sales leaders. They learn from experience, and that’s why they become successful. Unfortunately, they don’t know how to transfer all these learnings to their peers so their team can be successful and achieve better sales. 

Motivate the team

There are three actions high-growth sales coaches use to motivate their team

  • Team meetings done in the right frequency and format
  • One-on-one meetings with each of the team members
  • Feedback on what they’re doing well and what they can improve

These three are effective ways to help salespeople grow and improve their skills. 

One-on-one meetings 

One-on-one weekly meetings with each team member are as effective as doing one-on-one meetings every other week. Aside from the frequency, it is also important to follow a consistent structure. 

The best sales leaders start their meetings with personal updates in the life of the salesperson they are talking to. They talk about how their family is doing, and if they’re working from home, sales leaders ask for updates on their projects. Sales leaders spend a few minutes connecting with their team members as people. They show that they care not only as a sales producer but also as a person. 

The coaching and mentoring from one-on-one meetings change a salesperson’s motivation and attitude towards his work. It ignites a fire in him that helps the team meet its sales goals. Even books can’t do this because no matter how good the contents of the books are, the pages can’t hear their ideas or challenge them with questions. There is no substitute for talking through what’s going on in their sales territory or getting their input on the strategies that they’re pursuing. 

Asking imploring questions during one-on-one meetings breeds in-depth conversations that are helpful for both parties to grow. 

Do one-on-one meetings with your salespeople either weekly or bi-weekly depending on what works best for your team. 

Give feedback 

Give your team members feedback on their selling skills regularly. After successfully closing an important deal with your salespeople, debrief them, and discuss what you saw in their selling skills. Talk about what aspect they did well in the presentation and point out the things they can improve. 

There is no better time to improve your team’s skills than seeing its members in action. When you see them do what they do best, you can talk conceptually around them. You can coach them on how to answer objections and even do roleplays to address different situations. 

When you travel with your salespeople and see them in selling situations, you also learn how they interact with their customers, build rapport, present information, answer questions, direct conversations, and figure out the needs of the customers. You have the first-hand experience and you’ll know how to assess them on the things they’re doing well and how they can improve. 

This is also a great opportunity for the salespeople to receive coaching from their leaders. They can see the things they need to work on from your perspective. This is beneficial for them and for the business. 

Your team members may have the tendency of reporting only the good things that went down on a deal, excluding the challenges and how they addressed them. They may tweak the information they give you. When you are with them, you get to see them and give them the corrections and guidance they need. Sales leaders can also point out the effective things their salespeople did during the sales call. They can then repeat what they did in their future deals. 

Career discussion 

Career discussion is critical to a salesperson’s motivation as well as his career longevity on the team. Many sales leaders shy away from doing this because they don’t have specific paths for their salespeople. 

There often isn’t a specific role that salespeople can be promoted to. Sometimes, salespeople don’t have goals other than being individual performers. They like to be in sales and not in other roles such as managers. 

Based on research, a salesperson tends to make progress toward his career development goals and stay with the organization longer if the manager helps him make progress. Aside from that, salespeople tend to be motivated when they receive help from their superiors. 

Management often doesn’t talk about things like this to its employees, causing them to feel stuck in whatever position they are in. It kills their motivation to achieve more in their careers. 

Ask your salespeople how they feel about their careers or what they potentially want to do. You can’t assume that they’re doing okay; instead, draw the answers from them. Sarah Wirth and Bill Ekstrom’s book The Coaching Effect was the result of a career development discussion that Sarah did with him. He asked Sarah about her longterm big picture goals and she said that she’d like to write a book. It wasn’t anything serious for her at that moment. It was merely an idea. Fast forward to when they started really doing it and it happened. 

Go outside your comfort zone 

Another effective action that sales leaders can do is to get their team members outside their comfort zones. 

Help your sellers be comfortable with discomfort. If you can get them outside of their comfort zones, they’re more likely to learn, grow, and develop. #SalesTeam

Most of us want to be on the safe side and gravitate toward what we know but this is not helpful if we want to grow. The same is true for your team members. New roles or situations force your team members to learn, grow, and get better in order to handle the new challenges. Get your team members outside their comfort zones on a regular basis, especially if you see them starting to stagnate and get comfortable in their roles. 

 

The Actions High-Growth Coaches Use To Motivate Their Teams” episode resources

Learn more about connecting with your salespeople today. Visit Ecsell Institute’s website to learn more.  

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

You can also read more books to become a savvy salesperson and sales leader in Audible, your online library that houses over a thousand books. Register now to get a free book and a free 30-day trial by typing in audibletrial.com/tse

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program, designed to help sales reps and sales teams improve their skills in finding the right customers, identifying the activities and strategies that work, and asking the right questions to build strong value and close business deals. Get the first two courses for free at thesalesvengelist.com/freecourse

Which of the three actions have you tried in your team? Tell us about it in the comment section in Apple podcast. Your rating is equally appreciated, too. Share this with your colleagues who are using other podcast platforms as well including Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Sales Training, Donald Kelly, Sales Manager

TSE 1002: What If I Train Them And They Leave?

Sales Training, Donald Kelly, Sales ManagerMany leaders avoid adequately training their team members because of a single looming question: What if I train them and they leave?

They structure their businesses so that multiple people work on a single project while other projects sit undone. It costs them money and productivity.

If you’re one of those managers, I’ll offer you a different consideration: what if you don’t train them and they stay?

We’re devoting the month of January to the topic of mental toughness, and today’s topic is directed at business and sales leaders as well as sellers.

Leaders

When team members aren’t trained well, they won’t be effective at their jobs. When team members aren’t effective at their jobs, the manager will have to help them do their jobs in addition to doing his own.

Leaders who fear employee departure often choose not to provide the necessary training, but the reality is that many of those untrained employees end up staying in their jobs. [3:37]

What if they stay with you and they don’t know what they are doing?

Financial considerations

Imagine your employee makes $40,000 a year. Are you willing to pay him $40,000 despite the fact that he doesn’t know what he’s doing, and then require someone who is making $60,000 a year to help him do his job?

Maybe you’ll eventually fire the person because he isn’t performing. [04:23]

When you let someone go, you may end up paying unemployment benefits, and then you’ll incur the cost of hiring someone new.

Whether you use an agency or review the resumes yourself, you’ll have to invest time trying to find someone who already has training.

Cyclical

Even if your new hire does have sales training, she won’t know your process. She won’t be able to perfectly understand your organization, so she won’t immediately be effective.

If you choose not to provide training, you’ll be back in the same cycle three months after you hire her. [05:04]

You will have spent countless amounts of money to avoid spending money on training. You’ll suffer from lost opportunity and lost revenue.

Long-term benefits

Imagine you have three employees. After you train them, one of them leaves your organization.

First of all, consider why the person is leaving. Is it possible that you’re not paying enough? Does your organization lack direction for its employees? Don’t miss a chance to evaluate why people are leaving. [06:36]

Even if you have a great situation, people may still leave. They may have to move out of state for family reasons or something else. People don’t stay in one place forever.

If one leaves, you still have two great employees who are giving you money back.

If you don’t train them, you’ll likely lose thousands in sales because they aren’t good at their jobs.

Do the math

When I was a young seller, I worked for a company that spent probably $7,000 training me to be an effective seller, and I’m thankful for it.

After my training, I landed a $30,000 deal as one of my first big successes. [07:52]

You don’t have to be a scientist to understand that $30,000 is a good return on $7,000.

If you invest in your people, they’ll love you, they’ll stay with your company, and they’ll earn you more money.

For sellers

When you’re considering your next organization, find out what kind of sales training they provide. Even if you’re a seller with a 10-year track record, it’s ok to consider training programs at prospective companies. [08:58]

If they don’t offer coaching or continuing education, that might be a red flag. If they aren’t willing to invest in you, consider other organizations that will.

Do it yourself

Sales leaders might consider providing the training themselves as a way to save money, and it might be true that they’re able to do it. For me, though I’m able to change my own oil and cut my own hair, I don’t do it. [10:21]

Just because we’re capable of something doesn’t mean we’re the best person for the job. Consider the opportunity costs and the cost for you to stop your own work in order to train other people.

Give them podcasts to listen to or books to read.

Don’t hurt your company by trying to save a dime.

“What If I Train Them And They Leave?” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Kris Nelson, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Sales Process

TSE 989: Sales From The Street – “From Click Try Buy to a Full-Fledged Sales Team”

Kris Nelson, Sales From the Street, full-fledged sales teamOn today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we talk with Kris Nelson, head of sales for CoSchedule.com, about how businesses can move from “click, try, buy” to having a full-fledged sales team.

CoSchedule is a SaaS-based marketing platform that helps marketers to stay organized through a combination of content calendar, a product, project management solutions and execution via social campaigns and email campaigns.

CoSchedule took the time to focus on true growth and the company has seen tremendous results. Prior to reaching that point, however, the business, which began as a “click, try and buy,” didn’t even have a sales team.

When “click, try, and buy” works

Initially, they released the product as a straightforward “click, try and buy,” product because it made sense at the time. They also designed it for small teams and individuals. The level of product and the price point didn’t really dictate a need for a dedicated sales team. [01:26]

As the product progressed and became more complicated, however, it became apparent that they needed a sales team to help the clients really understand how CoSchedule could benefit them.

It was simply a natural progression to establish a sales force as the product grew and the price point increased, especially with some of the advanced plans. They moved away from the “click, try and buy,” and toward a professional marketing team and into a standard sales cycle. [03:17]

Bringing whiskey to a Kool-Aid party

I’ve always thought it was a waste of time and resources to have the sales reps focus on low-end sales, think $15 a month kind of stuff, because customers don’t need help making a decision at the price point.

Higher end products are different. Companies who ask customers to pay more become more concerned with the quality of the product, and that’s when you need a sales team.

It is truly overkill to engage someone in a formalized, professional sales cycle at some of the lower price points. At the higher price points, it makes total sense.

You have to be sure you are asking the right questions of the organization to make sure your product is a fit. The sale is nice but long-term happy customers are the true goal. [04:25]

Move toward a sales force

Kris credits CEO and co-founder of CoSchedule, Garrett Moon, as the person who helped take the company where it is today.

It began with a series of phone calls to prospects to see if the market was viable and to see if it made sense to move the price point. Once that was established as true, Moon hired more people, including Kris, and the sales process was on its way. [05:58]

Kris says that CoSchedule is still an extremely heavy inbound model. They still decide the best fit for each client, whether that be the “click, try and buy,” model for the lower level plans, or working with a sales rep for the higher level plans.

Kris really had to learn and understand the buying process of the companies that use CoSchedule to determine how many real touch points would be needed from a sales standpoint to be effective.  

Three-call process

CoSchedule has a three-call process in place now.

The first, known as the discovery call, allows the sales team to learn more about the client’s business, teach them about CoSchedule and then try to determine at a really high level if there is a potential business fit. If everything matches from a budget standpoint and a use case standpoint, they move forward with the second call.

The second call is a full-scale demonstration of the product. It provides a great chance for the client to invite all their team members who might use the tool.

Kris and his team go through the product with a fine-toothed comb and answer any questions. During this timeframe, they give the potential clients access to a free trial of CoSchedule; a chance to kick the tires. If the team is still checking the right boxes by the end they move into the pricing discussion. [07:28]

CoSchedule provides a great tool for marketing organizations and other small organizations to all get on the same page. Their customers often refer to CoSchedule as the single source of truth for all their marketing efforts.

Whether it’s a social media campaign, or a large trade show event, or a podcast, CoSchedule acts as the organization hub for everything. [08:55]

Although they designed CoSchedule with a marketing focus, Kris believes it is also beneficial from an internal project management standpoint. It puts a formal process in place.

All the checklist items and all the behind-the-scenes items that go into a large-scale effort are put into a central location with CoSchedule. It unites everyone involved with the effort on the same page.  

Everyone can see what works well, what needs more work, and where the team must focus to get the product out the door. [09:53]

Building a sales team

Growing a sales team, of course, presents a challenge because there are as many different ways that salespeople sell and lots of ways that people sell effectively.

Kris works to understand how his team sells best and to accelerate that process and help them get better every day. He scales the number of reps on his sales team based on demand.

The number of sales calls, for example, on a rep’s calendar really does determine the growth of that team. Kris says they rely on the marketers to continually charge forward with fresh, hot leads so that they can then continue to add more in sales. [11:26]

Kris uses his personal experiences as a way to motivate his sales team.

In the past, he worked for a large banking finance and software company where it didn’t matter so much whether he hit his sales goals. With a smaller company like CoSchedule, however, every single sale matters. Every dollar matters to everyone involved.  

As a smaller company, Kris is able to focus on the people who work for him as individuals.

Kris expects that the CoSchedule will continue to add to their sales team. He hopes to continually increase the level of sophistication used to deploy that team.

Know if there is validity to your product first. You’ll be surprised to learn what your product can do.

“Full-Fledged Sales Team” episode resources

If you would like to reach out with questions or comments for Kris, he can be reached via email at Kris.nelson@coschedule.com

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. Use automated outreach to schedule your contacts and keep you from getting distracted.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. You can expand your outreach and set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Sales Process

TSE 972: How To Get Salespeople Not To Skip Steps In The Sales Process

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Sales ProcessOn today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we discuss the value of following every step in the sales process, and how you can prevent your sales team from skipping steps in the process.

Sales processes aren’t intended to add burdens to your role as a sales leader, but should actually free you and your team to be even more successful in your roles.

Detail

In the context of military operations and aircraft safety, it’s easy to understand why details matter. It’s easy to understand why the people involved have to prioritize safety by following checklists and double-checking equipment.

It’s not as easy to understand why every single step in a sales process matters, but it’s absolutely true that the small details can impact our outcomes. Although skipping steps in the sales process won’t kill us, it will absolutely affect our success.

If we find that we’re struggling to close deals, it may be because we aren’t following a detailed cadence process.

Our decisions to skip steps can stem from overconfidence or pressure to close a deal from those in authority over us, but skipping steps will eventually impact our sales process.

Diluting the process

Just as it does for the military, a decision to overlook small details can impact the team’s ability to accomplish the larger mission.

Imagine a sales manager who oversees 10 deals that are scheduled for demonstration. She has statistics that show that about 60 percent of the deals will close, so she forecasts that.

Of those 10 deals, though, not all of them are weighted the same.

Five went through the complete sales process, and five of them didn’t, maybe because they were repeat customers or they came to the sales rep as a warm lead. The sales reps might have assumed it was ok to skip qualification.

In other cases, if the sales process feels cumbersome, they may be tempted to skip steps that they deem unnecessary.

Avoiding skipping steps

Make sure your sales reps understand why the steps in the sales process are important. Review the sales process with them in a one-on-one setting to make sure they are accurately following the process.

Ask appropriate questions:

  • How many deals are you working right now that will close?
  • Of those deals, how many of them have followed every single step?
  • Ask sales reps who are successfully using the sales process to share some of the things they have learned throughout the sales process.

If one member of your team is having great success with demonstrations, ask him to share how he is successfully converting effective leads into clients.

Ask another team member who successfully moves people from leads into prospects to share how she does it.

Allow your team to benefit from the experience of their peers and give everyone on the team an opportunity to participate.

Use graphs

I saw a suggestion on Hubspot recently that helped me when I was a software sales rep working with complex sales scenarios.

Use graphs to outline each stage of the sales process and what must happen along the way. It provides a visual map that your team members can follow when a new prospect appears.

Graphs provide a repeatable process to look at throughout the process. Knowing how to move the deal forward will help your team successfully interact with the buyers.

Following every step will ensure that, by the time you get to the presentation, you’ll have all the information you need to successfully address your prospect’s challenges and struggles.

Your system will work best if people actually use it.

Roleplay

Have your team roleplay scenarios, and include scenarios in which someone is trying to pressure your team members into skipping steps. Address how they would make sure to follow every step in the process.

Your team members may worry that they will lose deals if they insist on following every step, but those people who refuse to follow your process won’t likely close anyway. They may be just looking for quick info.

Those people who want to make a great decision will appreciate your attention to detail and they’ll view you as professional if you stick to the process.

Sell them on the idea that you’re doing this to help them make sure they make the very best decision.

“Steps In The Sales Process” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. Maximizer is intuitive, simple, and personable. Maximizer integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one. It works throughout the whole organization and it’s customizable to the way you sell.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. You can implement our training and strategies today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out TSE Hustler’s League and apply to see if it’s a good fit.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share it with someone else you think might benefit.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Sales Process, Donald Kelly, Sales Fundamentals

TSE 957: Sales Process 101

Sales Process, Donald Kelly, Sales FundamentalsWhen I worked for a corporate organization, I had to call executives and convince them to consider our product. I had no direction for the conversation. Until I got sales training, I didn’t know what to stay to get them to the next step.

That map is known as a buying process or a sales process, and we’re going to give you the fundamental basics a sales process should have.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’re going to help you determine whether you have an effective sales process and what you can do to develop one.

 Sales process

You probably have some sort of process in place and it’s probably working to some degree. But would it benefit you to tweak it? Do you feel like you’re not closing enough deals?

Maybe it’s the way you’re presenting things or maybe you’re working in a company where you don’t have anything at all. Instead, you’re just winging it when you communicate with customers.

If you feel like you’re walking in the dark, that system won’t help you hit quota and you won’t be able to scale.

I want to give you basic sales processes that you can apply.

What is a sales process?

A sales process is different than a sales philosophy. Your philosophy is the belief that you have or the things that you value. It’s the values you present to your customer.

There are certain things you believe in that you’re unwilling to cut corners on.

Your sales process is the steps that you take in order to help a prospect go from an interested prospect to a paying customer.

What do you do at each level? You need to establish repeatable steps so that you aren’t making it up every single time.

Without a process, your sales will be agonizing and it will never scale.

Identify your existing process

If you don’t have a process or you have a process that is outdated, visit with each of your sellers to find out what they are doing to bring brand new prospects to the point of purchase.

What steps do they follow?

Why are they using those steps?

Some of your sellers will be doing things well and you can share those effective steps with your entire group. If you have this discussion as a large group, people will most likely give the answers they think they are supposed to give instead of the steps they are actually using.

Involving the sales team in building a sales process will give them buy-in.

Share commonalities

Once you’ve discovered what each person is doing, share the commonalities you found and what seems to be working best for the team.

Find out how your prospects buy. You can have a prospect on a call or you can simply research.

Once you know what works and what the buyer wants, you can develop a process that is in line with what the buyer wants. Your job is to tweak your process so that it falls in line.

Types of processes

There are many types of buying processes but there is something specific that must happen at each stage.

Determine what must happen at each stage. What things must we do in order to be effective?

If we skip steps, we get to the close before the buyer has addressed all his objections and uncovered all the needs. You’ll skip basic qualification steps.

Some companies use a top-down approach and some use a checklist of things that have to be accomplished. My door-to-door sales operated that way because we didn’t have a long closing process.

Flowchart approach usually exists with big-ticket items and b2b selling where your process evolves based upon the buyer’s behavior.

The approach requires adjustments at each step of the process. You must be moldable.

The more complex the sale, the more people you’ll have involved in it.

If you don’t have a process, create one. If you have one, tweak it.

“Sales Process 101” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Payman Taei, Donald Kelly, Visme,

TSE 936: Best Practices For Using Visuals To Level Up Your Sales Game

Payman Taei, The Sales Evangelist, Visual contentAbout 65 percent of the population learns visually. When you’re engaging with your prospect, are you simply explaining your goods and services or are you showing them your goods and services? Today we’ll discuss the power of using visuals to level up your sales game.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Payman Taei, founder of Visme, a DIY platform to help you create and manage visual content, talks about how you can begin using visuals to level up your sales game.

Payman has run a boutique digital agency for 17 years, and his mission is to empower anyone, even those with no design experience, to create engaging, “snackable” content.

Wide audience

Payman realized a need several years ago to create a tool to help people create visual content. He realized that 98 percent of the population has no design experience, which means they cannot effectively communicate visually.

Visme seeks to fill that void and give people a starting point. It’s a platform that allows you to create all kinds of visual content using an easy interface, and it allows you to create it more efficiently than you could without it.

This matters to sales professionals because they constantly communicate with prospects and customers. You have to demonstrate why your product or service is different from your competition’s product or service.

Starting point

Visme is meant to give sales professionals a quick starting point.

It offers templates and themes and icons and assets, so regardless of what industry you’re in, you’ll have the ability to put something together pretty quickly. Then, the analytics behind Visme will track how much time the recipient spends on each of your slides or pages.

You can create a form at the front of the content that requires users to submit a name and email so you can track who looked at your content.

It eliminates the guesswork after sending a proposal or other content.

Sales struggles

If you’re an individual working in a very small business and you don’t have a design team, the platform allows you to create presentations and reports without relying on a designer.

You may not have access to a designer, and you may not have the budget for a designer. The other fact about designers is that there’s a certain amount of back-and-forth that exists in that process.

Visme allows individuals to address those pain points.

You can create the document, and then share it digitally or in person, and you can measure its performance.

Breaking down silos

If you’re part of a sales team, and you have a marketing department, you may still face some of the same challenges that individuals do.

You might work with templates that include your branding and your messaging. Visme allows your team to create templates and then lock certain aspects of them so that they can’t be changed.

Visme gives teams the confidence that they can create unique content without altering the important details. It keeps your rogue agents at bay.

This platform allows you to interact with the templates without the worry of messing them up.

The designers can decide how deep to let individual users go in terms of editing.

Focus on content

Visme allows you to focus on the content so that you can quickly create something you’re happy with.

The other advantage is that the more content you create, the larger your repository of icons and images you’ll collect. You can reuse and recycle them. So your second project will go faster than your first, and the third one will go faster than the second.

Each project becomes more efficient because you’ve got material from the previous one.

Adding value

When you’re following up with your prospects, visual content will allow you to provide relevant information. If someone applies for a download or interacts on your website, you can provide content that stands out from your competition.

You may be able to create a sales pitch for a client, and then without a lot of effort, personalize that sales pitch to another client and send visual content that is personalized to your customer.

Most salespeople aren’t as concerned about content as they are about sales. We’re trying to help them fill that gap and overcome that fear factor.

The audience cares about the small details, so first impressions matter.

Visme can work together with the other pieces of your process to help improve your conversion. It’s a piece of the puzzle.

If your process is completely broken, Visme won’t fix it. There is no magic bullet. But if you need to tweak aspects of your process to improve your sales, Visme is the tool that can help.

“Using Visuals to Level Up Your Sales Game” episode resources

You can connect with Payman on LinkedIn, and if you are interested in Visme, you can message him on LinkedIn and he’ll send members of The Sales Evangelist community a discount code for the premium package.

You can test drive Visme for free, and access a certain number of templates and graphics.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

This episode is also brought to you by Maximizer CRM. If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Don Barden, The Sales Evangelist, Sales Podcast, Business Leader

TSE 911: The Secret Formula Of The “Elite 1%” Of Business Leaders


What allows some teams to achieve consistent success? Why are some leaders able to convince their team members to consistently follow? What is the secret formula that allows the elite 1% of leaders to achieve greatness?

Today on The Sales Evangelist, Don Barden shares the secret formula that allows leaders to achieve repeatable success, and why leaders should always be training. He’ll address the mistakes that leaders make and how to overcome them.

Don spent his “formative years,” about 25 of them, working on Wall Street, growing from very small deals to billion-dollar-plus international deals. He describes himself as one of many good guys that you never hear about on Wall Street.

Warp speed

Don calls these unique times, and he says he’s a huge fan of millennials. Unlike people who view the generation negatively, he says they are the first generation in the history of mankind to never know a limit.

They’ve always had Google, cell phones, and YouTube, and there are no limits to what’s happening in the world right now.

We’ve shifted the way we think, and that change has created a tremendous need for leaders who can guide us through this incredible time. We’re moving at exponential light speed (warp speed if you’re a Star Trek fan) and things can get out of control without strong leadership.

Because of the state of humanity right now, we need a combination of young leaders, mature leaders with decades of knowledge, and emerging leaders to guide us through the shift.

Becoming elite

Don was part of a 5-year doctoral study that considered leadership using science and proof points. They considered economic, scientific, and behavioral considerations.

They discovered that elite leadership can be traced to a mindset of leading with your heart first. Elite leaders spent every day serving other people by opening up their hearts.

Our word “servant” derives from the Latin word which means “hero.” If you were the type of leader who served other people, you were truly a hero. In Greek, it meant that you professed your love of serving people.

These leaders prioritize serving people, and they have a skill or a craft that they have honed over many years. The net result is that when they lead with their hearts, their businesses do well, and their people willingly follow them because they want to be around that mindset.

Learning leadership

Millennials who find themselves looking to learn about elite leadership should begin by looking to people who are older than them who have been leaders before.

Secondly, millennials are the most giving, caring, and generous generation we’ve seen in a long time. They want to give back socially, personally, and professionally for all the right reasons.

They want to give back and serve, so if you can help them be good, and if you can help them get there faster than they would on their own, you’ve got the ingredients for what leadership is all about.

For young leaders, just raise your hand and ask for help. For experienced leaders, be willing to help.

Be you

The other side of the coin is that, while you’re learning, you have to be yourself.

Although people will mentor you and train you, you have to be yourself. You have skillsets and a unique way of thinking that your company needs.

Don sold a company last week to a group that he felt could take it to a level beyond what he could do. After the sale, the new owners came to him and said they didn’t need his help anymore.

He considered that a great compliment.

He had created a culture of young, bright people that he had mentored for years. His team had helped them grow to the point that their own skillsets were sufficient to run the company without management.

He set guardrails, standards, missions, and objectives, and then gave his people room to operate.

His approach was this: You know the mission. You’re smarter than me. We’ll stay out of your way unless you’re drifting. You go be you.

Create the right environment to mentor and guide millennials, but don’t try to teach them how to be exactly like you.

Continue training

Never stop training. Leadership is all about training, and then going back to train some more even when you think you’re done because there’s so much information out there.

Training can take so many different forms, from a book club to a formal training.

The biggest mistake people make is to stop training.

Don is associated with the U.S. Army Rangers, who have made a career choice to serve other people at a level beyond what most people can comprehend. He notes that 99 percent of their lives are built around training, and that’s why they are so good.

When Don was seeking a title for his study, his wife suggested The Perfect Plan, so he set out to discover exactly what “perfect” meant.

The word perfect means “always becoming,” in other words always getting better. It means you aren’t done, and you’re openly becoming something greater.

At the end of the study, Don’s group asked average people to rate themselves on a scale of 1-10, and the average was 8. The elite performers rated themselves at an average of 3.5.

The group thought maybe the numbers were driven by humility, but they discovered that the elite leaders weren’t rating themselves against everyone else. They were rating themselves against their full, God-given potential.

Although we’ll never reach our full God-given potential, the mindset of these leaders was that they were always trying to become better.

Hire the right people

When you hire the right people, you aren’t hiring people because you have hope in them, or you feel sorry for them, or you just like them.

You have to hire people that you can guide and mentor, but they also have to have the right skill set. You have to hire for the position.

Get the right people and then create a culture that allows them to thrive.

The business world requires a different set of disciplines, so these great leaders hire the right people and then create the right culture, and then they get out of the way.

Players get you to the playoffs, but coaches win championships. So if you’re going to be a leader, you’re going to be a coach, but you have to have the right players. Then you have to train them and give them the environment and the mission and the direction they need.

“Secret Formula” episode resources

Connect with Don via email Don@dwbarden.com.

Check out his book, The Perfect Plan: A Study that Reveals the Secret Behind the World’s Elite Leaders, Sales and Marketing Professionals.

Is your CRM functioning properly? It’s important to have a CRM that your team is willing to use.

If you’re unhappy with your CRM, check out Maximizer CRM. If you’re happy with your CRM, check out Maximizer. It has been around a long time, and it’s worth the time to check out the free demonstration.

Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities. Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. Video Jungle offers top-notch, state-of-the-art advice about video, which is a great way to offer relevant content on LinkedIn.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Leading, Little Things

TSE 907: The Little Things Matter The Most When You’re Leading


Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Leading, Little ThingsHow far are you willing to go to get ahead of the competition? In order to be successful, you must do the opposite of what everyone else is doing. Realize that little things matter the most when you’re leading, and if you adopt them in your own business, you can become a better sales leader.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, I’ll share the true story of a dentist I visited who went the extra mile, and why it made such a big difference.

This dentist didn’t do anything big. Take note of the five little things that will cause your sales staff to look to you as a sales leader.

1. Recognize them out of the blue.

There are natural occasions like birthday, anniversaries, kids going to college or graduating, or 5th anniversary working with the company. A lot of sales leaders aren’t acknowledging these natural opportunities to recognize an employee.

Call them to see how they are doing; maybe on a Wednesday just to see how the day went and how the deals are going. Encourage them along the way, even if things didn’t go the way they wanted.

Your team will learn to trust that you’re looking out for their best interest, and they’ll trust and support you. And when you need help, they’re going to work harder for you.

2. Take time for one-on-one coaching.

Make sure you spend time with your sellers so you’ll understand their strengths and their struggles. Prioritize one-on-one coaching.

Stephen Covey’s fifth principle says to seek first to understand, and then to be understood. Before you focus on helping them understand the things you need them to get done, seek to understand the things they need.

Treat them like your customer. Make them feel good.

3. Recognize their successes in front of their peers.

When a sales rep closes a deal or lines up an appointment or gets a referral, recognize them in front of their peers.

Sales reps love recognition, and if you can make them feel good, they’re going to work harder to repeat that action. You’ll communicate to them that you care about the sales reps and they’ll want to work hard over and over again.

4. Make their goal become your priority.

It’s tempting to think of this the other way around and expect your sales team to make your goals their goals.

Begin the other way around. If your sales rep wants to buy a house, or get a new car, or take his family to Europe, or pay off college loans, make that goal a priority.

If you, as a sales leader, are focused on making me win as a seller, I am going to do everything you need me to do. I’ll understand that you had my best interests in mind.

If, for example, they are planning a trip, and you engage with them to find out details about the trip, and where they are in the buying process, and what the costs of the trip will be, it will communicate that you care about their needs rather than pushing your own.

5. Challenge them, trust them, and empower them to do tough things.

Let your team members know that you’re confident that they can handle the tasks you’ve given them.

Remind them that you’ll help them through the process.

Don’t simply give responsibility to the best sales reps on the team; trust and empower your sales reps with important tasks. Don’t give them too much too soon, and don’t give them work that is difficult for them to bear.

Remind them that you have confidence in them.

As your team members achieve success, gradually increase the tasks you entrust to them.

Give your sales team reasons to brag about you; to realize that they have the best sales leader in the world.

I share stuff like this because I want to help you guys find more ideal customers, to build stronger value, to close more deals, and most importantly to challenge you to do big things.

“Little Things Matter the Most” episode resources

Today’s episode is brought to you by Maximizer CRM, a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Jason Loh, Sales Manger, Get Time Back, Anaplan,

TSE 903: How To Get More Time Back As A Sales Manager To Exceed Quota

Jason Loh, Sales Manger, Get Time Back, Anaplan,Regardless of your industry, you’re probably invested in helping your sales team optimize its performance. Ultimately, we need our teams to hit their quotas and perform at their peak. So how do you help your team get more time back in order to exceed quota?

Jason Loh visits The Sales Evangelist podcast today to help us understand how to make the best use of our time and to help us understand the value of time. When we do, we can help our sales teams get more time back to exceed quota.

Jason is the global head of sales solutions for Anaplan, a software vendor that is pioneering a category of connected planning. Anaplan seeks to bring together people with data in order to help organizations better manage their business.

What is the value of time?

Sellers do best when they have clear marching orders.

Sometimes the problem emerges at the end of Q4 when an organization is moving into a new fiscal year.  Sellers don’t always know whether they are supposed to sell into the same accounts they sold into the last year.

While the company cleans house at the end of a fiscal year, very often the sellers find themselves with a nebulous period of time. They could spend as many as two or three months waiting to see what comes next.

If sellers don’t have a clear sense of what they should be doing, uncertainty causes them to hesitate. By the time the organization gains its footing for the new fiscal year, the company has lost two months’ worth of time, which means it has to complete 12 months’ worth of selling in only 10 months.

One of the first thing sales reps want to know when they begin a new job is how they’ll be compensated. If their compensation will rely on productivity, it’s in their best interest to make the most of their time.

How can teams get more time back?

Sales leaders can’t simply expect sellers to figure things out. Instead, they have to set a good example and get the house in order to remove roadblocks to success and empower their sellers.

Identify the top three things for the upcoming fiscal year.

You must make sure that your organization’s plan correlates to how you’re designing your compensation plans. Without an extra incentive to drive your reps to accomplish those goals, how will you expect them to accomplish those three things? Furthermore, why are you incentivizing things that don’t match your company’s top three goals?

So often there’s a disconnect between senior leadership and the sellers, so people are scratching their heads wondering why things aren’t matching up.

How does a lack of goal setting affect organizations?

The Alexander Group reports that 81 percent of organizations don’t have their comp plans connected to their sales team’s marching orders.

Jason says there are things organizations can control, and things they can’t control. Your organization should do its best to control things like marching orders and sales plans because those things are well within your control.

Things like employee turnover are completely outside your organization’s control and they can present a significant challenge.

How do you effectively plan for the hiring process of bringing on a new rep, ramping for a period of time, covering for employees who are absent for a period of time, all while still managing the entire process?

What platforms and technologies should my sales team be using?

From a seller or sales rep’s perspective, CRM is the core.

For leaders, consider this: does micromanaging your sales teams’ number of emails, number of voicemails and other metrics help you build your larger strategy? Does it get you where you need to be in 12 months?

Aim to help your sellers manage their sales basics so you can transfer a marketing qualified lead to a sales qualified lead.

Opt for a decision-based platform that helps you pull together data. Make sure you know who your contacts are at each organization as well as who your influencers and decision-makers are.

Identify the tools that will help your sales team elevate its game and develop more opportunities.

Measure your reps on whether they delivered.

Productivity depends on the industry you’re in and the tasks and activities you’re required to do. Understanding those requirements will help you understand whether your team is maximizing its productivity.

Imagine this:

If I’m a sales rep with a killer sales forecast and I miss my number, I might be escorted out the door. If I’m a sales rep with a horrible sales forecast, but I exceed my number anyway, I’ll be carried around the office like a rock star.

As a sales leader, it’s challenging to marry the endgame with the leading indicators like phone calls and emails, but it’s worth the effort. Otherwise, your team will focus primarily on the end number without paying as much attention to the process.

If you don’t incentivize the process, your sellers won’t pay attention to it.

There are a lot of movable parts in this process.

It’s all interconnected so the decisions in one part directly impact the other parts.

Introduce a decision platform so you can understand how even small decisions will cascade against the organization. Don’t look at things in a vacuum.

Look at things holistically and see all the components of your sales strategy to make sure you’re able to attain those goals.

“Get More Time Back” episode resources

Find out more about Anaplan or contact Jason Loh directly at the website.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Piyush Patel, On-boarding, New Sales Team, New Employee Training

TSE 893: How to Make New Employees Feel Like They Already Belong


Piyush Patel, On-boarding, New Sales Team, New Employee Training

When your company on-board a new employee, you invest time, effort, and resources into the process. So if you’re going to spend the money, doesn’t it make sense to put energy into making sure the employee is successful? The key is to help new employees feel like they already belong.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Piyush Patel, author of Lead Your Tribe, Love Your Work shares how he on-boards his new employees and how he engages his staff in the hiring process.

He emphasizes the need to show new team members where the finish line is before expecting them to sprint toward it.

Initial welcome steps

Before employees set foot in Piyush’s office, they receive a box in the mail that includes initial paperwork plus t-shirts and other swag related to the company. The company also sends a book about the team and how the company operates.

The most important item in the box is an empty picture frame with a note encouraging the employee to bring a picture of a loved one for the new desk.

Psychologically, he said, the first day presents the highest stress for a new hire.

There’s the potential for a lot of doubt, and lots of room to wonder whether he made the right decision.

If the new desk has a picture of a loved one on it, there’s a better chance he’ll be convinced he made the right decision.

Making time to welcome employees

Piyush, the CEO of his company, dedicates himself to spending a half day with new employees on their first day in the building.

He gives new employees a tour, explains the inner workings of the company, and then gives them a spreadsheet with every employee’s name on it. Their assignment is to go from desk to desk asking a series of three questions.

  • Why do you come to work here?
  • What’s your favorite food?
  • What’s your favorite memory of your time here?

By the end of the exercise, the new employee has heard every co-worker explain all the best parts of the company, as well as a sort of history of the company in the form of memories.

The net result is an employee who is excited to be part of the story.

“Dating” for 30 days

Piyush treats every new hire like a 30-day date for both employer and employee. The two come together at the end of the 30 days to decide whether the pairing is a good fit.

He identifies employees he calls navigators whose job it is to “protect the culture.”  Piyush tasks them with taking the new employee to lunch, taking him to happy hour, and walking him through a segment of training.

At the end of 30 days, the group decides whether the new hire is a good fit for the team.

Even if the new hire isn’t immediately a good fit, he’ll evaluate whether the new hire can be rehabilitated.

It creates the sense that the whole team is in this together, and it results in a culture where people love their work.

The result is a community with low turnover and great results.

Ongoing coaching

Some employers say they don’t have time to invest in new employees this way.

To them, Piyush says that he realized he was investing much more time dealing with unfulfilled expectations. He would have saved time by making the initial investment early on.

Instead of constantly rebuilding the process, he could carry out regular maintenance along the way with much better results.

He avoids making employees feel like they are constantly being criticized. Piyush constantly affirms employees: they hear the things they are doing well as well as things they could improve.

He said that people work for three reasons beyond money: belonging, affirmation, and meaning. Once they are in the tribe, you have to work to constantly maintain those.

“Make New Employees Feel Like They Already Belong” resources

Grab a copy of Piyush’s new book, Lead Your Tribe, Love Your Work or connect with him on LinkedIn.

We’ve been recommending the book the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley  for quite some time because we believe in the message. Based upon interviews with buyers, it offers specific information for sellers to help them become trusted advisors.

As part of the series this week, we have a SlideShare available for you to download, or you can link to it here. As always, we also have a free excerpt of the book so you can try it out for yourself. We believe you’ll like it so much you’ll want to grab your own copy.

Today’s episode was also brought to you by Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and making your brand pop using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

If you think you might benefit from more stories like these, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights. We’re beginning a new semester this fall, and we’d love for you to join us.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Sales Coaching, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Best Sales Podcast

TSE 892: How Can I Better Coach My Sales Team?

Sales Coaching, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Best Sales Podcast

When your sales team isn’t hitting its numbers, what can you do to help them improve? How can you make sure your training process is effective? Ask yourself this: How can I better coach my sales team?

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’ll discuss sales coaching, and how you can help your sales team succeed. We’ll address the things you can do to better coach your sales team.

If you have team members who are falling short, odds are that they want to succeed just as much as you want them to succeed.

There are three things you can pay attention to in an attempt to help your team.

Coach your reps

If you aren’t able to coach your sales reps yourself, then find a coach who can.

Begin by understanding the difference between training and coaching. Coaching helps the seller recognize his challenges.

Ask him appropriate questions and help him arrive at his own decisions about his selling. Allow him to participate in the process.

Tailor the approach to his particular challenges without lecturing him.

Work together to solve problems, and identify the things that aren’t working. Where does he think he can improve? What does he feel like he needs?

Training, on the other hand, is an on-going process. We cannot expect that one sales training session will help our reps instantly be effective.

That simply isn’t the case in any industry.

Training must be hands-on, and it must include application. Make it consistent; something that changes behavior.

Guide them through the process, and seek training that is continual.

Makes sales meetings educational

Sales meetings shouldn’t be focused on administrative tasks. It’s ok to talk about the effectiveness of sales, but this meeting shouldn’t be about measuring our individual effectiveness.

Sales meetings should address how the team is doing as a whole. Don’t single out individuals.

Some of your team members will obviously be doing better than others, and it’s ok to ask them to share what’s working.

Don’t single people out, because allowing the successful team members to talk excessively about their success will likely demoralize those who are struggling.

Instead of focusing on individuals during your sales meeting, focus on your team.

Best of all, ask your team members to share the tasks they are best at so that everyone on the team benefits from their experience.

Be involved in the process

Give your team members the opportunity to take ownership of the process. At the same time, though, be there with them.

  • Take her on a one-on-one call.
  • Go on an appointment with her.
  • Make calls with her.
  • Help her send emails.

When your team succeeds, celebrate with them. Your job is to motivate them and better coach your sales team.

“Better Coach My Sales Team” episode resources

We’ve been recommending the book the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley  for quite some time because we believe in the message. Based upon interviews with buyers, it offers specific information for sellers to help them become trusted advisors.

As part of the series this week, we have a SlideShare available for you to download, or you can link to it here. As always, we also have a free excerpt of the book so you can try it out for yourself. We believe you’ll like it so much you’ll want to grab your own copy.

Today’s episode was also brought to you by Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and making your brand pop using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

If you think you might benefit from more stories like these, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights. We’re beginning a new semester this fall, and we’d be honored for you to join us.

We’d love for you to give us a rating wherever you consume this content. If you love the podcast, give us a 5-star review and tell others about the podcast.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Annoying Co-worker, Office Worker

TSE 792: How To Deal With That Annoying Co-Worker On Your Team

Your job is hard enough without an annoying coworker distracting you from your work. In today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we discuss how to handle an annoying coworker when you’re simply trying to find new prospects, close more deals, and build more value.

Every sales team, no matter what you sell, has dealt with someone like this.

Perhaps he isn’t trustworthy. He coasts instead of working hard. He gossips and distracts others while they are trying to work.

Seek to understand.

Steven Covey, in his book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People,  suggests that we first seek to understand other people before we seek to be understood ourselves.

So what does that look like with an annoying coworker?

Ask her to lunch or to coffee. Ask about her sales experience and what’s going on in her life. Try to understand who she is as a person.

She probably isn’t intentionally being annoying. She might not even realize she’s doing it.

Be a leader.

Establish a standard of working hard and staying focused, and that expectation will spread through your sales team.

More importantly, the annoying team member may discover that he’s in the wrong place. If everyone else is working and he doesn’t want to, he might decide to move on.

Ultimately, too, hiring managers may better understand how to choose future team members.

If you’re a sales leader, identify people on the team who aren’t thriving and figure out how you can coach them. How will you protect the team if your team members don’t improve after they’ve been given the opportunity?

Don’t be the annoying coworker.

If you aren’t thriving and you aren’t motivated to improve, look into your why.

Maybe you aren’t cut out for sales. Perhaps you’re in the wrong industry or you’re selling the wrong product.

Don’t stay stuck in the wrong place.

If you have a coworker like this, tell her about this podcast where we provide sales training to sellers of all levels. Tell her about The Sales Evangelist Hustlers League where she can learn from other sellers in an online group coaching format.

We want you to build stronger pipelines, close more deals and do big things.

Rebecca Teasdale, Donald Kelly, Loyalists Team, Sales Team

TSE 706: How to Go From a Good Team to an Exceptional Team

Rebecca Teasdale, Donald Kelly, Loyalists Team, Sales TeamHow do you move your team from being good to great?

Rebecca Teasdale is the co-author of The Loyalist Team. Learn how you can  apply some tips and strategies from this book into your own sale process.

The other co-authors of the book are Linda Adams, Audrey Epstein, and Abby Curnow-Chavez.

Whether you’re the team leader or the manager or a member of a team or department, there are so many great gems in this episode.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Rebecca:

About The Loyalist Team:

This is based on the model for the types of teams that all teams fall into.

The books allows you to identify and recognize if you’re on a great team, a bad team, or somewhere in the middle.

This allows you to diagnose your starting point for any other business process. Once you know it, you know where to start and what actions to take.

The 4 Different Types of Team:

  1. The Saboteur Team (The Bottom End of Pack)

Characteristics:

  • There is about 15% of teams with this type of team.
  • Teams are governed by a lot of distrust.
  • People are motivated by having the best recognition or the best project or the next promotion.
  • People undermine each other. They’re afraid and are not able to do their best work.
  1. The Loyalist Team (The Top of the Pack)

Characteristics:

  • People hold each other accountable. They will call each other out when they see someone struggling or not doing their best work.
  • They’re just as committed to the success of their peers as they are to themselves.
  • When they see someone struggling or having a bad day, they’re able to step in and help the person rebuild their confidence or give the help they need.
  1. The Benign Saboteur Team (Middle of the Pack)

Characteristics:

  • Living the life of live and let live
  • No active undermining but very much set down mentality of not wanting to get involved.
  • They’re motivated to survive.
  1. The Situational Loyalist Team (Middle of the Pack)

Characteristics:

  • This is a good team, but not great.
  • They’re good on the surface, but they’re missing a couple of the key ingredients.

What You Can Do to Get to the Loyalist Team:

  • Be very intentional about being a good team but be armed with the right knowledge.
  • Have success conversations.
  • Get involved.
  • Talk about what things don’t work and be comfortable with that.
  • Have the ability to talk about these types of issues.

Some intersting statistics:

  • The loyalist team is 2000 times more likely than a saboteur team to be viewed effectively by their internal customers.
  • They are 50,000 times more likely than a saboteur team to detect conflict when it arises and do that in a productive way.
  • A loyalist team is 106 times more likely to give each other hard feedback.

Strategies for checking the team:

Know where you are at this point. Have an environment where you can sit down and have a conversation about this. Have a meaningful discussion on:

  • Your shared priorities
  • What you need from each other to be successful
  • What behavior do you want to hold each other accountable for
  • What ways are you going to support each other
  • How are you going to hold each other accountable
  • What results are you looking for as a team

Rebecca’s Major Takeaway:

Start by understanding any relationship on the team that are not loyalist relationships. Then work hard on finding common ground. Show up in a supportive way for those people. Give them the knowledge you want them to succeed. Start being willing to have difficult conversations as you’re asking them how to be better. Then go from here.

Episode Resources:

www.theloyalistteam.com

Tired of the same old, boring PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same. Tell your story the way you want to tell it.

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Noah Kagan, Donald Kelly, AppSumo, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 701: How Noah Kagan and Team Used Inbound and Outbound To Reach 8 Figure Sales

Noah Kagan, Donald Kelly, AppSumo, The Sales Evangelist

Noah Kagan is the founder of AppSumo and today, he’s sharing with us what they did internally to grow AppSumo to an 8-figure business though inbound and outbound strategies.

The number one challenge many sellers face is getting more customers. Noah describes AppSumo as a “groupon for geeks” where they offer daily and weekly deals for small business owners.

His other company, Sumo.com offers free email tools for online businesses. It’s 90% inbound sales. While AppSumo has been 90% outbound sales. That being said, Noah is sharing the different strategies they’ve learned in their seven years of doing this.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Noah:

How their outbound approach works at AppSumo:

  1. Align your offering to how your clients can grow.

They focus on promoting clients to 100,000 people.

  1. Work on how you can transition them into a phone call or real-time chat as soon as possible.
  2. Give a clear benefit.
  3. Make sure you follow up.

Doing a follow up is critical. Almost 50%, if not more, of our communication with potential partners happens on a follow up.

  1. Education is key to not come across as being pushy.

Show them that they’re important to you.

  1. Put in the work.

Your responses and replies are a direct input of how much time you’re spending on that email. For how many replies and success you get from people responding to your through text or email is a function of how much you’re putting upfront.

More nuggets of wisdom from Noah:

The more boring sales is, the better you do it.

When you contact the person you believe you can truly help, then it’s a disservice for you to not educate them and make them your customer.

The power of having process.

This also involves figuring out the right sales people for your culture.

Go find a product that you just love.

There are tough times you feel you have a crappy job or you’re in a company you don’t believe int. Then use it as a time to really improve and hone your skills.

Listen for feedback or ask for it.

Work on how you can get better for the next one. Then you will improve and be so much better.

Are you driving results for other people?

Your selling some expectations and they have to have some confidence on whether you’re going to deliver on that.

How to Improve Your Sales Pitch and Process:

Record your next sales call or sales email. Get it transcribed. then send it to someone you think will give you honest feedback, Then go through your sales pitch and your sales process. Do this on a monthly basis.

Strategies for achieving KPIs:

Split up the responsibilities so your team can focus on what they need to do all day.

Put people doing specific tasks and they should only focus on that specific task.

Getting Started with Inbound Sales to Generate Traffic:

  1. The education model

Offer a free product or some type of product for free for lead generation. Put on different types of content.

  1. Then call people and talk to them and find out if what you’re offering makes a big difference.

Adjust your messages according to what customers like.

Noah’s Major Takeaway:

Find something you just love. Don’t think yourself as a salesperson and instead, think of yourself as an educator.

Episode Resources:

AppSumo

Sumo.com

Listen to Noah Kagan Presents podcast.

The Sales Acceleration Formula by Mark Roberge

Tired of the same old, boring PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same. Tell your story the way you want to tell it.

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, George Santino, Best Sales Podcast

TSE 393: Tips for Building a High Performing Team and Steps to Build a Career from the Ground Up

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, George Santino, Best Sales PodcastAs with many other sales people, our goal is to perform well. Today, I’m bringing on George Santino so he can teach us how we can be better working on a team whether you’re the leader of the team or part of a team. He gladly shares with us his stories and experiences he has had with his 20 year- experience at Microsoft. George shares with us how you can think like an entrepreneur and how you can be better working on a team regardless of its size.

Remember that as you go higher and higher up the ranks, it’s not only your personal contribution but also your team’s. So it’s absolutely important to have a highly effective team that gets results because now your review is based on their results.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with George:

Tips for Building a High Performing Team:

  1. Determine what you’re building them for.

Determine what you’re trying to produce and what skills you need to help you do that. Make that assessment as to the needed skills you need from your people.

  1. Determine how your team’s skills will complement your skills.

Determine how your team can bring in a set of skills that you don’t have. Don’t hire a bunch of people that are just like you. You already have you so bring people in who know things you don’t know and things that people can add value from day one.

  1. Give your team permission to speak up.

Make sure you give your team permission to speak up. You want a team of people who can sit down on a project and be willing to express their opinions and be willing to tell you when your opinion might be incorrect. Ultimately, you’re the boss but you want a team who will question things as necessary. Give them the permission to tell you when you’re screwing up. You would rather hear it from your team than from your boss.

  1. Hire a diverse group of people with different perspectives and experiences that will add value to your project.

Always listen to your team’s opinions. In the end, you all deserve the right to say, “I told you so.” This fosters cohesiveness within the team that makes you more effective as a team.

  1. When motivating people, motivate the individuals.

A team of people is like an orchestra with different instruments. Your job is to get the best music you can get out of all the instruments so that when they come together, they make an absolutely beautiful sound.

  1. Create an environment that they’re empowered to voice their opinions.

Take the best ideas regardless of who is in charge or not. Build that kind of environment where people feel safe to say things.

  1. Always give “positive” feedback.

This means that even when they’re wrong, it’s feedback that’s going to have actionable information where people can improve. As a manager, it’s your job to give the employee enough feedback to where they can adjust their course towards exceptional performance. Be comfortable with giving feedback.

  1. Give feedback along the way, not after your employee’s performance.

Tell them what they’re set out to do, what they did, what obstacles they ran into, and the adjustments that need to be made in order for them to be exceptional. Tell them these along the way so they’re given the opportunity to adjust.

How You Can Help Under-Performing Employees:

  1. Determine the cause or what the employee lacks

Sit down with them and determine what happened or what the employee lacks. Try to discover some external factors and if there’s anything you can help them with. You have to dig in. If it’s an issue at home, give them some time off if they need that time. Or help them find some skills they lack through mentorship or internal training. First determine the cause and if there’s something you can do about it. Then put together a plan to bring about that positive change.

2 If your employee is a wrong fit for the job, help them find something else in the company where they can be successful but DO NOT transfer your problem to another team.

If they’re not going to be effective anywhere in the company, let them see that as well. An employee who is not doing a great job is unhappy and is under a tremendous amount of stress. Help them see where they can be better off.

 

How You Can Foster a Good Relationship with Your Boss:

  1. Recognize that managers have different styles.

Determine what is important to them, what they value and what do they reward.

  1. Determine that can you do to help him achieve those goals and objectives.

Your manager has goals. The more you can get your boss to write in his review things that you accomplished, the more indispensable you can become to that boss.

  1. Don’t be afraid to move on if you are going to run into incompetent bosses.

If you’re think you’ve put out your best efforts but you still find your boss to be incompetent or just a real jerk, then move on and look elsewhere. Go to a different company or different department. Life is too short to put up with that. Do not be afraid to make those changes.

Steps to Make Sure You Have a Successful Career:

  1. Pick the right company to go to work for.

Determine where you want to work and not just for the sake of finding a job. Do the research. Determine what these companies do, what they’re trying to accomplish and whether or  not they’re a fit for you.

  1. Don’t be afraid to ask good questions during a job interview.

Answer the questions well obviously. But you’re making a decision too, in fact, it’s more important than the company’s because to you, this is your life and this is your career. So make sure you’re asking intelligent questions to determine if you really want the job.

  1. Once you get the job, truly understand what your job is.

Look into the job description. Is there an employee handbook? Are you going to be assigned a mentor? What are you supposed to be doing? What does success look like to you, to your boss, to the company. Determine what things are valued and rewarded.

  1. Do things better than anybody else.

Put in the time and energy. Be willing to take the scales of work-life balance towards work early in your career because you’re building a foundation that everything builds on from that point forward.

George’s Major Takeaway:

Depend on the people around you. Trust them and empower them so you can truly utilize their diverse sets of skills to build up what you’re trying to build up or sell. Have fun! Celebrate the successes. Take care of your people and reward them. Be honest with your people.

Episode Resources:

Connect with George through his website www.georgeasantino.com or connect with him on Twitter @georgeasantino and YouTube.

Check out George’s book, Get Back Up from the Streets to Microsoft Suites

Please support us in our Indiegogo campaign, a movement to inspire others to Do Big Things. Simply go to www.DoBigThings.net.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Register for DO BIG THINGS TODAY!