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Doyle Buehler, Donald Kelly, Break Through Digital, Prospecting

TSE 964 : Sales From The Street: “Selling And Monetizing Your Brand”

 

Monetizing Your Brand, Sales From The Street, Doyle BuehlerOn today’s episode of Sales From The Street, we talk to global entrepreneur Doyle Buehler about monetizing your brand.

Doyle helps businesses organize their work and their strategies so they can do good work.

Many sellers don’t actually own their own businesses but they operate a business within a business. They are intrapreneurs, and many salespeople miss this truth.

Common mistakes

Many entrepreneurs who utilize online marketing make a mistake that Doyle calls the “3 percent.”

Businesses out there assume that everyone wants to buy from them, but that’s far from true. Many studies suggest that about 3 percent of people at any given time are interested in purchasing your product or service.

By understanding the buying process, you may find that 30 percent of customers will never buy from you, but that means that about 67 percent of customers will eventually buy from you when the time is right.

The salesperson’s job is to tap into that 67 percent to figure out where the customers are in the process. How far away from buying are they?

You may find that 3 percent are ready, 7 percent are really close, and 60 percent can be moved toward buying from you.

Expand your market

We thrive on instant gratification. It’s a natural tendency for us as humans. But our buyers are like us in that they probably aren’t going to buy something until they’ve done a lot of research on it.

It’s important for us to get past the instant gratification and stay aware of the 67 percent who will eventually buy from our business.

We must keep our eye on those people:

  • The ones who are getting ready to buy
  • Those who are learning about the product
  • The ones who are defining their needs and challenges

Those are the people you want to start talking to. Those are the people whose attention you want to get.

Getting their attention

The know, like, trust triangle is the essence of getting their attention.

Do they know you and understand who you are? This is where personal branding comes into play.

Do they like you? Can they sync with you? Do you have synergy with your audience? Accomplish this by producing great content.

Do they trust you? This component isn’t always as important for widgets but it’s vital for larger purchases.

How do you talk to the 67 percent of people who are starting the journey? If you’re providing content and a platform and ecosystem to support them in their journey, they’ll come to you when they are ready to buy.

Main strategy

If, for example, a listener is regularly engaging with a podcast, where do you take that conversation next? You can promote it all over the place and get people to listen to it, but what’s the next step?

There’s a whole schema to this: what gift can I give to a potential customer so they’ll get to know, like, and trust you?

A gift is easy because there’s no risk. How will you create a community and get them involved?

How do you continue to scale and escalate that conversation?

A lot of people don’t have these in place.

Zero moment of truth

Google did research about 10 years ago that revealed that your buyer behavior breaks down into the need for 7 hours and 11 touch points. Some people would add four platforms.

So how do you get your prospects to spend that much time with you?

It’s a cool concept because it says that if you can spend more time with them, you’ll move them toward a final sale.

Core strategy

Many times, companies don’t have a core strategy or a workflow to their advertising. When they don’t get the results they want, they spend more money, which isn’t always the right answer.

Companies must be smart about how they spend their money.

Doyle’s recommended structure, described in his recent book called Breakthrough — Unleash Your Remarkable Brand Value, Influence, and Authority: Evolve Your Strategy and Marketing, lists seven workflow steps to help companies organize their digital ecosystems. They will end up with a platform that helps them build the know-like-trust triangle with their customers.

Keep your eye on the longer term, strategic mission of your business and what you’re offering in terms of value.

If you don’t understand your own strategy or your brand value, you’re going to spin your wheels because you won’t know what to do.

Build a strong platform but start with a strong strategy.

“Monetizing Your Brand” episode resources

Grab a copy of Doyle’s book, Breakthrough — Unleash Your Remarkable Brand Value, Influence, and Authority: Evolve Your Strategy and Marketing. You can also go to www.breakthrough.digital to check out the book.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Be Human, Erick Hart, Sales Podcast, Donald Kelly

TSE 959: Sales From The Street: “Be Human”

Erik Hart, Sales From The Street

For this episode of The Sales Evangelist, I talked with Erik Hart, a Sales Manager for an Internet company, to discuss how he is able to help his team achieve not only sales results and, perhaps more importantly, person-to-person results by learning to be human.

The Numbers Game

Often times, especially with sales, it becomes such a numbers game that the person-to-person experience is lost. The human connection is lost.

We find ourselves churning through conversations and deals with a laser focus on strategy and metrics and we lose context.

Erik, for example, had a rep on his sales team with a great understanding of how to guide his clients through the various buying stages but it became such an exercise in ‘checking the boxes’ day after day that the rep felt totally defeated, unproductive and he failed to generate revenue.

Recalculate

Erik asked the rep to take a step back and to really think about: What kind of story did he want to be part of? What kind of difference did he want to make?

In doing so, the rep realized not only where he wanted to go but how he could get himself there, without just running on autopilot.

Simply put: Let things be a little messy!

The sales rep had organized himself into a rut by creating a very specific process when interacting with leads and clients.

The response to a potentially lower quality lead, for example,
was three phone calls and one email while a high-value lead would have other very specific tasks tied to it.

Eventually, the tasks became more important than actually having the conversations with the clients. He found himself speaking with clients but thinking about the next task – the next box to check – instead of making a human connection.

He was reading the script instead of being present in the moment; acting like a robot instead of really digging into the needs of the client. He failed to see them as people – and they could hear that in his voice.

The New Bottom Line

Taking a step back and re-evaluating his goals worked.

Overall improvement became evident in just three months; not only in sales but with increased engagement with the customers and improved morale.

The sales reps are proud of what they do again. The sales are great, but the intangibles are sometimes even better.

We all have our imperfections and personal baggage and business operations to deal with and they have the potential to become real struggles.

There is a futility to the task of trying to attach the minutia without really understanding the context.

Instead, think about what you want the conversation to be. What’s your story? Where do you want to be? What kind of world do you want to live in?

Let those answers be your guide. Let that help you reach your goals.

It can become an incredibly powerful experience. The minutia will take care of itself.

“Be Human” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Inbound, New Clients, Sales, SDR, BDR

TSE 914: Sales From The Street:”How To Handle Inbound Leads”

Inbound, New Clients, Sales, SDR, BDR

We cannot develop quality inbound leads without a process that nurtures and prepares our customers. As a sales professional, it’s important to know how to handle inbound leads so that you’re working in tandem with your marketing team.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, I’m putting myself in the hot seat to discuss how to handle inbound leads, especially in the case of smaller organizations.

Just like you can’t rush to cook frozen chicken, you can’t rush to land an inbound lead.  You have to invest the right amount of time and the right preparation for both to turn out the way you’re hoping.

Qualified leads

When leads come in, we sometimes expect to make things happen quickly. Like the story of trying to cook frozen chicken, we forget about the seasoning, the marinade, and the temperature. We forget about the amount of time that the chicken has to cook.

When we’ve taken those things into consideration, that’s the same as a sales qualified lead. It’s defrosted, marinated, cooked, and ready to be eaten.

Prior to that point, it’s a marketing qualified lead: it’s a prospect who perhaps downloaded something but isn’t necessarily ready to buy. In the context of our cookout, it’s chicken that isn’t defrosted or marinated yet.

Marketing has identified a person who raised her hand to say she’s interested. Maybe she downloaded a white paper or signed up for a webinar. They’ve initiated the process and they have asked to speak to someone.

Now it’s time for someone to take advantage of the lead.

Too often, though, we jump too quickly. Instead of nurturing the lead, we jump down their throats in an attempt to close quickly.

 

Integrated efforts

A great CRM is the core of a great combined sales effort.

When you can enter information about the prospect and then track whether he opened the email, read the email, or reacted to the email, that’s the ideal situation.

If sales and marketing are working together, sales can come in an take over as soon as the prospect raises a hand to say “Yes, I’m interested.”

When a lead falls into your funnel, you have to reach out to that person within five minutes.

You may recall our friend David, who we’ve been following since Monday. David was tasked by his boss to find financial software for the company, so he’s in the research part of the process.

Let’s assume David enters the funnel by downloading a piece of content. When we email him a day later to ask if he’s interested in a demo, he indicates that he is.

Now sales gets the marketing qualified lead. You must call him within five minutes.

Otherwise, he’ll presume that you aren’t interested in taking care of me. Because I’m doing research, I might find someone else who is willing to help me when you wouldn’t.

Remember that your prospect is busy. I know that you are, too, but you can at least acknowledge the person.

Worst case, you must call him within 24 hours.

A sales qualified lead is chicken that is defrosted, marinated, cooked, and ready to eat.

Flow process

Many companies make the mistake of not having a flow process. That simply means that from the time I get a new sales qualified lead to the time this person says, “Yes, I want to buy,” many companies have no plan.

We might think we have a plan, but if we aren’t measuring it and tracking our efforts, how can we know what’s working and what isn’t?

We must have predictability behind our efforts.

The whole point of it is to let them know that you’re aware of their existence and that you’re here to help.

Predictable processes enable us to understand how the buyers buy and what the buyer’s journey looks like. Your cadence can evolve over time, but you must have predictable efforts so you can test your processes.

Each industry’s process will be totally different, and the buyer’s journey will be different, so you will tweak your process along the way.

A process will allow you to determine that, when you reach out within the first 5 minutes, 95 percent of those people eventually buy.

Nurture campaign

If your prospect isn’t ready to pull the trigger even after your flow process, then put him back into the nurturing process. Studies indicate that even bad leads often become clients in the long run because they were nurtured well.

What seems like a bad lead could end up being a customer if marketing is able to continue nurturing. Don’t throw away bad leads if there’s a chance they can still develop.

Send them information related to the product they were pursuing. You can hopefully, over time, help them develop a greater interest in your product.

I share stuff like this because I want to help you find more ideal customers. To build stronger value. I want you to close more deals, but most importantly, I want you to go out each and every day and do big things.

 

“How To Handle Inbound Leads” episode resources

Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. Video Jungle offers top-notch, state-of-the-art advice about video which is a great way to offer relevant content on LinkedIn.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, Take Charge, Creative, Outreach

TSE 824: Sales From The Street: “Take Matters Into Your Own Hands”

Donald Kelly, Take Charge, Creative, Outreach

The very best thing you can do for your sales pipeline is to get your content in front of your prospect even before they need it. The most effective way to do that is to take matters into your own hands and utilize social selling to reach your prospects.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’re sharing our own story of social selling and why we fought so hard to employ it. Like every episode of Sales From the Street, you’ll hear about the struggle, how we overcame it, and what the results were.

Resistance to social selling

At one of my previous companies, a coworker and I recognized the power of social media for sales professionals who were trying to reach prospects. What we noticed, though, was that our leaders weren’t on board with the idea.

In the early days of LinkedIn, management assumed that if you were on LinkedIn, you were looking for other jobs. Since then, the platform has transformed into a place where sellers can build relationships and find opportunities.

The truth is that very often your prospects don’t know who you are; and being the best-kept secret should never be your goal.

Your ideal customers need to know who you are, because they know who your competitors are.

The marketing department didn’t like the idea. They said any social selling would have to be consistent and uniform. (Translation: they didn’t like the lack of control.) They recognized that we should be doing something, but no one wanted to implement change.

Our markets were shrinking and our opportunities were dying.

Your own pie

My coworker and I offered to help write content so it didn’t all fall to marketing. Although everyone acknowledged the need for social selling, no one wanted to let us have a piece of the pie.

So my coworker and I created our own pie.

We created a blog and started generating content about our product. We shared the content with our prospects in the form of blog posts.

The important thing is that we took control of the problem and addressed it ourselves. We never did close lots of deals as a result of it, and we didn’t make millions, it helped us realize the need to embrace social selling.

I’ve done the same thing with The Sales Evangelist, using my podcast as a means to connect with people. Early on, I noticed that one of my prospects had been interviewed for a pretty popular magazine. I asked him to appear on the podcast, and he eventually introduced me to other people.

Your own brand

Every seller must have his own brand online, even if it’s only your LinkedIn or Twitter pages. If you’re in the healthcare space, tailor your accounts to that industry.

Create content that helps you connect with your prospects, whether it’s a blog or a podcast or something different.

Just like there are many possible routes that will get you from New York to Los Angeles, there are many ways to utilize social selling to reach your audience.

Don’t be a one-trick pony, and don’t abandon the things you’re already doing. Simply add social selling to your process to help you reach your audience more quickly and efficiently.

Episode resources

If you haven’t already established your own brand, personal brand strategist Stephen Hart specializes in helping service-based professionals and entrepreneurs build their own personal brand.

Successful sellers find ways to think outside the box, because prospects want you to lead them rather than sell to them.

This is why I’ve recommended Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen, brought to you by our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a blueprint for sellers, giving you a first-hand look at what buyers want and the things they hate. Click here for an excerpt of the book.

Check out the Video Jungle Podcast to hear best practices for video and film production and to learn the art of selling your product with video. The podcast is part of our newly-launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

David Burkus, Friend of a Friend, Donald Kelly, Best Sales Podcast

TSE 819: Sales From the Street-“Networking Done Right”

David Burkus, Friend of a Friend, Donald Kelly, Best Sales Podcast

Most of the networking advice we hear is doomed to fail because it’s a story of one person in one situation. When we try to put their ideas into practice, it feels inauthentic.

Instead of copying someone else, we need to redefine what it means to network on our way to discovering what “networking done right” looks like. On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, David Burkus helps us change our mindset about what networking is so we can better take advantage of our existing networks.

You don’t have a network. You’re in a network.

We spend so much time trying to figure out how to connect with a stranger in a span of 7 seconds that we neglect the network we’re already in.

The biggest mindset shift is this: you don’t have a network, you exist inside a network.

If we redefine our thinking about networks, we can invest our time in learning how to navigate the network we’re already in instead of trying to figure out how to bring strangers into it.

David defines a network as a three-dimensional entity that you’re the center of. It includes your close connections as well as your weak or dormant connections.

Your goal should be to pay attention to the fringes of your network: those people who are one introduction away from being closer to the center of your network.

He calls it transitivity, and it’s an awareness that A knows B, and B knows C, so perhaps A and C can be connected.

Networking isn’t limited to events.

There is ample research to suggest that unstructured networking events such as Chamber of Commerce and other gatherings aren’t beneficial.

Realistically, most of us might try to make a few connections, but we spend the bulk of our time with people we already know who are similar to us. Instead, we should look at the totality of the network we’re already in.

Most people should begin by identifying their weak and dormant ties. Weak ties are those that you don’t know well. Dormant ties are people you know who were once stronger connections but who fell by the wayside. None of them are strong connections.

Begin by asking them who they know in the sector that is relevant to you. It’s less assertive than asking them who might be interested in your product, and you’ll get a larger list because it’s less specific.

If you ask a variety of people and the same few names keep cropping up, those are your referrals. There’s a strong likelihood you’ll click.

Identify hidden networks.

Begin with an accurate map of your entire network, and include everyone.

We tend to put people in buckets based upon our connection to them: those we work with and those we know socially for starters. Realistically, though, many of our connections have more than one tie.

If, for example, you work with a person, that’s a uniplex tie. If you work together, have kids in the same school, and work out at the same gym, that’s multiplicity. You have multiple connections.

As you’re identifying your connections, then, don’t ignore someone just because your only shared interest is college football. As you’re building a map of your entire network, you never know who is in his network.

Find structural holes.

People tend to gather in clusters around similarities like industry, work history, or ideology.

Historically, the greatest value in our network exists when we can connect two of those clusters.

If you can reach out to another cluster and bridge the gap between two groups, you can create value.

Make it a habit to reach out to your weak and dormant ties. Pay attention to people you aren’t as close to.

Don’t trust your networking to fate. Most of us already have a route to meet everyone we want to meet within our existing networks.

Episode Resources

Check out David’s book, Friend of a Friend: Understanding the Hidden Networks That Can Transform Your Life and Your Career.

Learn more about growing your network, becoming a better leader, and developing creativity at his website, www.davidburkus.com.

Check out the Video Jungle Podcast to hear best practices for video and film production and to learn the art of selling your product with video. The podcast is part of our newly-launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries.

Email us at SPN for more information.

Pick up your copy of Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley.

Check out a free excerpt of the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen, and discover why some of the things you’ve been taught to do in sales may be the very things your prospect hates.

Audio providede by Free SFX.

Donald Kelly, Lazy Selling, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, sales basics

TSE 809: Sales From The Street-“My Creative Lazy Ideas”

Sometimes the sales basics feel mundane.

Sometimes we burn ourselves out making phone calls and sending emails, and we feel like we’re spinning our wheels. Without regard for how effective it is, we want to try something different.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, I share my own experience with burnout and the hard lessons I learned from it. I was looking for an easy way out and avoiding the things I knew I needed to do.

Don’t abandon sales basics.

In college, I worked in an IT training company that offered training classes. I was tired of making phone calls and sending emails and I wanted to try something new like guerrilla marketing.

I assumed the marketing department was the problem, and I figured there was a better way to get our company name out there.

After doing lots of research, I launched ideas for computers at bus stations, as well as A-frame signs and banners; and I got very few leads.

It turns out the problem wasn’t the phone calls themselves. The problem was that my phone calls weren’t effective.

I didn’t speak the language of the decision-makers I was contacting. I didn’t understand my ideal customer, and I didn’t know how to differentiate.

When I finally sat down with the technicians to understand what the clients liked about the training and the problems they were trying to solve, I had a better understanding.

Be consistent, AND creative.

I would never suggest that you shouldn’t try new things. Do research in your off-time to discover what others in your industry are doing. Put your own spin on it and tweak it until you get it right.

When you’re consistent at something and you improve and tweak it, you’ll see results.

Make sure you budget your time effectively. Call your prospects when they are most likely to be available. I was calling home phone numbers in the middle of the day when most people were likely to be gone.

Over time, I learned what worked and I gained decent clients and I acquired good experience.

Try unique things that tie to your industry. Understand how to help your prospects and recognize them as humans.

Episode resources

People often tell us to fail quickly and then move on, but what if we don’t have to fail at all? What if you could get a jumpstart by learning from other people’s challenges?

Doesn’t it make sense to figure out where other people went wrong so you can avoid repeating their mistakes?

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is a group coaching program that offers training sessions every week, and a chance to hear from sales professionals from other industries. We offer group accountability and an exchange of ideas.

We’d love for you to check it out, and we’d be honored to have you join us.

The April semester will focus on building value so you can see better results and close more deals.

We’d also love for you to subscribe to the podcast, and if you haven’t already, leave us a review wherever you’re listening.

Evangelize for us by telling other people about the podcast.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

The Car Flip, Justin Carper, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 186: Sales From The Street-“Back Off A Bit”

The Car Flip, Justin Carper, The Sales Evangelist Podcast Justin Carper is a hustler to the core. Justin is the founder and mad genius behind “The Car Flip”. As Justin said on his site, he’s not going around physically flipping cars over. However, he educates people like you and me everyday on how to sell cars on the side and make extra money.

During this episode, we dive in as he shares a common struggle most car dealerships have to deal with. Many dealership have sellers waiting for the customers in the parking lot. When the buyer gets out of their car, they are bombarded and it sometimes turns off the prospect from wanting to buy. As the general manager, Justin recognized this issue after doing a verbal survey with his customers. He quickly made adjustments and results became very apparent. Listen to what he did and the result’s they saw.

Connect with Justin:

Justin Carper, The Car Flip, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

www.TheCarFlip.com

The Sales Evangelizers, Donald Kelly, Sales Facebook Group