Rejection Archives - The Sales Evangelist

Category Archives for Rejection

Failure, Brad McDonald, Donald C. Kelly

TSE 1174: Why Do You Say That Failure is the Greatest Sales Lesson?

Failure, Brad McDonald, Donald C. KellySellers get knocked down plenty of times, but sometimes failure is the greatest sales lesson.

Brad McDonald works with Sandler Systems which has 250 franchises around the world that help businesses grow by improving their sales processes. 

Failure

Brad’s 28-year career in the U.S. Navy taught him that failure could mean the difference between life and death. When he transitioned from the Navy to the sales world, he realized that many of his attempts were going to end in failure. He had to change the paradigm. 

The things he perceived were failures — having people hang up on him or cancel an appointment — weren’t really failures. 

Along the way, he learned to embrace failure. 

Gumballs

You must make a lot of sales calls in order to get to yes. On the other hand, if we see the sales calls that ended in “no” as a failure, that will feel bad. 

Brad uses a gumball analogy to explain it. If you want a green gumball from a gumball machine, and there are multiple colors inside, there’s a good chance you won’t get a green one. When you put the quarter inside, there’s a good chance you’ll get a different color. 

Imagine you’re making prospecting phone calls, or cold calls; the most dreaded form of prospecting. If you make 10, 20, or 30 calls, you’ll eventually get someone who wants to talk, just like you’ll eventually get a green gumball. 

You’ll also likely get an orange gumball which might represent a buyer who wants to talk more to see if there’s interest. If you view every orange gumball as a failure, you won’t be very likely to keep going while you wait for the green ones. If, on the other hand, you understand that you have to get the orange gumball out of the way in order to get to the green one, you can embrace it.    

Process of failure

Brad came from a culture where sailors did what he told them to do and they didn’t say no. He was surprised to find in the sales world that prospects aren’t always honest and they don’t always respect his time. And they certainly don’t feel compelled to follow his orders. Initially, all those things felt like failures. 

Failure mimics the stages of grief which are disbelief, fear, despair, anger, and acceptance. 

Brad refers to the “ok, not ok principle.” He came to believe that he needed to be ok being not ok. 

He needed to not seek to meet his emotional needs in a sales call. Many sellers get emotionally involved in their sales calls and that’s one of the five big conceptual roadblocks in sales. Head trash gets in the way. We get excited when we’re about to make a sale and we stop doing the things we need to do. 

Sales activities

Brad learned along the way that his focus on outcomes and results was wrong. He was excited when he made sales and dejected when he wasn’t. He discovered over time that focusing on things he could control, like activities, made more sense. He started doing the things he knew would make him more successful and he tracked those things. 

Brad focused on his tonality, his demeanor, his body language and other things that were well within his control. 

Conceptual issues

Brad believes that all sales problems come in one or two categories. 

  • Tactical. What do I say, When do I say it? How do I say it?
  • Conceptual. Relating to the beliefs we have between our ears.

Most tactical problems have a conceptual basis. In Brad’s case, he came out of the Navy where he didn’t fear much of anything into a setting where he was afraid to make a cold call. The fear was a result of the beliefs he held about sales.

The conceptual issues are these:

  1. The need for approval. The problem occurs when you want to be liked more than you want to make sales.
  2. The BUY cycle. How do you buy things? How do I treat salespeople when someone is trying to sell something to me? We tend to sell the same way we buy. If you tend to comparison shop, you’ll be more forgiving of buyers who do the same.
  3. Negative scripts. Many of these originate in childhood. Examples are the idea that you shouldn’t openly talk about money. Also, very few of us were raised by parents who hoped we would grow up to be successful sellers. 
  4. Emotional involvement in the sales process. It’s ok to have a love for your prospects, but you must also have the mindset that you don’t need anyone. Instead, find something that’s mutually beneficial.
  5. Money concept. Your very first memory of money has a relationship to how you feel about money now. When Brad made his first big commission check, he felt guilty for earning so much money. He had a money concept issue. 

Changing beliefs

Changing your own beliefs will take time. It’s a process. 

For his own therapy, he sat down each Sunday and wrote about his sales experiences. Those articles helped him process the emotional aspects and taught him to have honest conversations with his prospects. 

Salespeople can benefit from journaling about their own experiences, about the perceived failures, and about the head trash. 

“Failure is the Greatest Sales Lesson” episode resources

Grab a copy of Brad’s book, The Art and Skill of Sales Psychology, or email him at mcdonald@sandler.com

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. We want you guys to go out each and every single day to find more ideal customers and do big things.

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Rejection, The Sales Evangelist, Cisco Terreros

TSE 1165: Why Getting a No is Not Such a Bad Thing and How to Accept it!

 

Rejection, The Sales Evangelist, Cisco Terreros

Some people aren’t into the idea of rejection but actually, there are positive reasons why getting a no is not such a bad thing. 

Francisco Terreros is a co-founder of Felkrem, a full-service sports marketing agency focused on two core services. First, they represent professional footballers/soccer players in their careers both on and off the field, and secondly, they sell brands and reach the players’ demographics through sports and marketing. They are FIFA agents and marketers who do sales every day. The sell to parents and kids they want to sign to their firm as well as to teams and sponsors. 

They are selling their experience as sports marketers to brands who want to capitalize on their understanding of how to navigate and reach their target demographics. 

Their company is surviving, thriving, and growing rapidly despite the competition in the industry. Felkrem is dealing with the athletes’ professions and their dreams. 

Getting no as a sales rep

Sales reps have been in this situation once or twice in their careers as salespeople. It’s difficult to hear the rejection, and much more difficult to accept it. But why do we get a no and why is getting a no not such a bad thing

A seller’s job depends on his ability to get a yes, so naturally, a no for an answer is a hard pill to swallow. 

Lions are the kings of the jungle. It’s their natural instinct to turn their chase into actual food. They have their hunting strategies matrixed down that when the prey gets away, they don’t just give up. They walk and find another kill. They also don’t necessarily go for the biggest and the fastest one. They change their game occasionally and go for something else. 

As sellers, we need to think like lions. It is our instinct to turn the potential sales opportunities into yeses. Our game must also be matrixed so that when we hear no, we don’t walk away dejected. Instead, we walk away with a new plan in our head. We should learn to walk away and get the next one. We need to understand that no is part of the process and it’s going to help us figure out what we must tweak to get the yes. 

Overcoming this is a hard job because our lives depend on the yes. ‘

The sales process is a numbers game and our closing rate of yes comes before several nos. Your sales career will change once you realize that and calculate how many nos you need to get a yes. Simply put, a no means one step closer to the yes. 

Back to the beginning 

We must all begin learning the basics before we become successful in our craft. Cisco got an internship with the sponsorship department in a major league soccer team in his area. He was assigned to support the sponsorship team. He took pictures of activations, set up banners in the stadium, and met with clients at the game to let them into the gate. He was a secretary but he needed to be more. He started coming in two hours before his shift and observed. With his notepad in hand, he listened to the sponsorship guide sell and he took notes to understand the process. Weeks later, he asked for more and he was given a list of people. He started calling and calling and got zero yeses. 

Years later he realized that all those nos taught him something since they got him closer to the job. The nos helped him understand himself and his techniques and what he needed to do to change the no into a yes. 

Cisco wouldn’t have been able to understand that it’s all a system and a process if he didn’t start with the basics. 

The hungry lion 

The analogy of the lion is perfect for this subject matter. After missing their prey for a couple of times, a hungry lion is more zealous than ever to catch another one. A hungry lion is persistent and patient in an intelligent way, not in a desperate way. 

We need to help our team understand that. Teach your team to think like hunters and that the no is a way for them to become hungrier. Not desperate; just hungry. Desperation can be felt a mile away, so don’t be that desperate seller who tries to oversell. Be hungry and be patient. 

A seller’s desperation is a puff of wind that clients don’t want to inhale. It’s also good to take a mental note that clients can hear your desperate sound even in a phone conversation. When your voice drops and your tone shifts, your client will start to zone out. Pay constant attention to how you sound and how you deliver your pitch. 

Turn that no to a yes

Cisco had a seller call him in the past for a pitch and his voice and tone were giveaways to his desperation. Cisco helped him understand the process of no and he asked the seller to count the nos he got before he had a yes. A week later, the seller talked to Cisco again but now with a triumphant voice. He said that he got 33 nos before he had a yes. Those 33 nos are no longer awful experiences because those are the setbacks that got him to a yes. 

Knowing the nos is the beginning. Doing something to lower the no-to-yes ratio is the next step. You do that by identifying where the gaps are in your pitch or in the presentation and you fill those gaps. 

‘Check Me’ partner  

Accepting no is a difficult thing but this process is a continuous one. Even if you get better at getting yes, you’ll still face some nos along the way. It’s better to have someone who’ll be on the journey with you. Find someone who can check you and get you back to reality when you’re facing a slump. It can be your co-worker or your business partner. It can be another team member or your boss. It can be anybody who can get you back to your feet. Teach them to remind of you three things:

  • What did you learn?
  • What can I do better next time? 
  • The no means you’re one step closer to the yes.

Be reminded of those three things to overcome the depression and dejection that come with the no. So, go and find yourself a ‘Check Me’ partner. 

This can be applied to basically every aspect of our lives because our society fosters a culture of positivity and negativity. People have high emotions of happiness and low emotions of sadness. This contrast is good because you won’t be able to feel the satisfaction and elation that comes with happiness if you haven’t experienced something bad. 

At the end of the day, rejection is a necessary evil to achieve heavenly success. Your no is one step closer to your heavenly staircase of success. 

We don’t have to become an expert in overcoming rejection but we do have to understand the tools to help us overcome the rejection. 

Learn to turn your awful nos to beautiful yeses. 

Why Getting a no is not Such a Bad Thing and How to Accept it!” episode resources 

Connect with Cisco in his social media to be inspired. Follow him on Instagram or shoot him a mail. 

This episode is brought to you in-part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a tool for sales reps and sales leaders to become better in doing their pitches and presentations. The program has 12 courses to help you find the right customers, ask the right questions, and close great deals. You can get the first two modules for free! 

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

If you’re a reader and loves reading and listening to books, you can also check out Audible as well and explore this huge online library with thousands of books. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

If you like this episode, don’t be shy and give us a thumbs up and rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Coaching, Start Up, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1078: CEO Lessons and How They Can Impact New Business Owners and Revenue Generators

Coaching, Start Up, The Sales EvangelistRegardless of industry, certain CEO lessons are common to every business owner, and the same lessons are important for you whether you own a business or not.

Benoy Tamang talks to us about the common lessons CEOs learn and the difference it makes if we take these lessons to heart.

Lesson 1

Being a CEO or a first-time startup guy is a lonely position. You’re trying to figure things out and take the bull by the horns.

You believe that your product or service or widget will be in high demand. You have a passion for it that no one else shares. Even your spouse likely isn’t as vested in your business as you are.

Everyone needs a trusted circle. Maybe it’s one person or maybe it’s five. Some will be very different and some will be similar to you. Have some people that you can talk to about the pains and troubles you’re facing.

You must have a support system.

Stand up for your business

Benoy talked to a CEO once who admitted to doing everything his board asked of him. He said he never offers any feedback to their requests either.

Benoy suggested that the board would rather him stand up for his business and speak up for the best interest of the business. Offer an alternative and suggest that you’ll execute your idea and report back.

Just because you took money from them doesn’t mean that they own you. They want you to run your business and stand up for what you believe in. You are the jockey they are investing in and they want you to lead them.

A good support network can offer you that kind of valuable feedback. That’s the kind of relief you can get if you have a good circle and cadre of people who provide unbiased input because they have experience and a willingness to help.

Lesson 2

Every CEO I run into, every senior executive, has a huge fear-based issue that undermines their performance. It constantly drags us down. It can manifest in arrogance, pride, and blustering of “I can do it myself,” but really it’s a cover.

On the other end of the continuum are people who are paralyzed by uncertainty because they aren’t entirely sure they can carry out what is being asked of them. They worry about making the wrong decision.

Benoy had a past client that hired two executive vice presidents who were older than him and who had significant experience. He feared that he couldn’t help them and that he was subservient to them.

Because they were more experienced and seasoned than him, he felt like he couldn’t talk to them. He was a tech, engineering, and product guy. One of them was a CFO and the other was a sales and marketing guy.

He was paralyzed by the inability to give them counsel and coalesce everyone around an idea.

It turns out this guy had some toxic relationships when he was younger and he carried that into his work situation. It neutralized his capability to lead and guide his employees.

It’s the same fear many of us feel when making prospecting phone calls.

Unconscious belief

The truth is that we’re all bright and capable and talented. Unfortunately, we suffer from an unconscious belief that originates from our early stages of life when we started to believe the wrong stories.

We’re capable, but we have a sort of alter ego that believes that we’re inferior. We perceive ourselves as slow of speech, impatient, and dumb. We focus on our weaknesses instead of our strengths.

Instead, we have to isolate the truth and recognize that we’re capable of magnificent work. We have to recognize our tendency to sabotage ourselves by listening to the alter ego that continually undermines us.

Evaluating self-talk

We have to start evaluating our self-talk to determine whether the things we believe are actually true or just a concern of mine that I’ve internalized.

If someone slams the door or hangs up the phone because he isn’t interested, does that make you a bad person? It doesn’t. It simply means that he isn’t interested.

Very often, though, we assign meaning to the rejections and we believe that we must have done something wrong. We assume it’s our fault they said no.

Be aware of the meaning you’re adding to the things that happen to you in a day.

Projecting

The same kind of projection happens in our relationships, too. Imagine my 16-year-old son doesn’t get up on time for school, and I immediately leap to worrying about whether he’ll make good grades or get into college.

I get wrapped up in fear worrying about what could happen.

Then he comes downstairs and tells me that he was up all night throwing up which is why he overslept. I’m in real danger of screwing that situation up by projecting my own fears as a parent on to him.

Identify the best course of action based on data rather than projecting your fear onto other people.

Lesson 3

It’s pretty surprising to find that straight talk is often absent. Too many new leaders focus on being nice instead of being kind.

Nice involves platitudes.

  • “You were great.”
  • “That was a great presentation.”
  • “You’ve got a great business.”

Kind actually goes deeper, and because it originates from a real concern for the person, it offers feedback.

  • “May I suggest that you make eye-contact next time?”
  • “You’ve got something in your teeth.”

A kind person goes a little deeper and offers straight talk even when it’s uncomfortable. Nice is too shallow. Nice is superfluous. Kind is authentic.

If you can just learn to believe in yourself everyone will be much better and we won’t be held ransom by jealousy, rage, and fear.

“CEO lessons” episode resources

You can connect with Benoy at bxtamang@gmail.com.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

Andrea Waltz, Donald Kelly, Go For No, Failure

TSE 1041: Just Go For No!

Andrea Waltz, Donald Kelly, Go For No, FailureSalespeople don’t like to hear the word “no” but Andrea Waltz is going to help you change the way you look at that response so that you’ll find yourself trying to go for no.

Andrea and her husband struck out on their own about 19 years ago. They did sales workshops and trainings for big companies, and they found that their rejection piece was the thing everyone loved.

This was a problem and a solution that affected everyone no matter what business they were in.

In this replay of a 2017 episode of The Sales Evangelist, Andrea offers the following advice to those dealing with rejection.

It’s not about you.

Although it’s true that the rejection isn’t personal, it’s hard to avoid internalizing that rejection. It’s normal to respond emotionally when someone tells you no.

If, however, you allow rejection to take control of your sales process, you end up with mediocre results because you’re little more than an order-taker.

Go for the no.

Eventually you’re going to have a conversation with someone, so rejection is always a possibility.

Andrea’s husband had an experience once selling menswear, and his manager asked him what the customer said no to. Her husband pointed out that the customer bought everything he recommended and didn’t say no to anything.

The manager then asked, “Well then how did you know he was done?”

As sellers, we tend to sell to our own wallets, but if we could get comfortable being told no, it’s possible that we’d be even more successful.

We must get used to hearing “no.”

Help struggling sellers.

“No” doesn’t mean never; it means not yet.

“No” is the beginning of a negotiation. If you call on someone who is happy with the current supplier, that won’t necessarily be true forever.

You must stay in touch and follow up even when people tell you “no.”

Encourage your sellers to continue the follow up. It’s easy to lose track if you don’t use your CRM.

There’s also an interesting phenomenon around getting a “yes.” Everyone celebrates that “yes.” Contrast that with the person who makes 20 phone calls and gets nothing but “no.”

Consider that a lot of those “no” answers can turn into “yes.”

Track your “no” answers. Set a “no” goal.

If you get permission to follow up, you absolutely must do it.

Manage “no.”

Sellers must learn to distinguish the different kinds of “no” answer. When you avoid hearing “no” you don’t get good at handling rejection emotionally.

When you get used to hearing “no” you learn to distinguish the “no” answers that could potentially turn into a “yes.”

Get permission to follow up with that qualified prospect. At worst, ask if you can check back in a few months to see if anything has changed.

You can also try to figure out what the “no” is by figuring out how you got to “no.”

You have nothing to lose at this point, so try to figure out why it wasn’t a good fit. Figure out why people are saying “no” and figure out how you can mitigate that in the future.

Talk to the right people.

If you’re getting a large number of “no” answers, determine whether you’re talking to the right people. Consider that maybe you aren’t contacting qualified leads.

Maybe your presentation needs a few tweaks.

If you’re only being proactive, you’re only dealing with the “yes” answers.

People usually have to be contacted multiple times before they say “yes.” They are often hesitant to change, so if you’re changing a service but the prospect doesn’t want to make a change, that’s why multiple contacts are necessary.

Add value. Get them accustomed to the idea.

Change your mindset.

Understand that you don’t just have to focus on “yes.” That mindset shift forces you to let go of being perfect.

People have been conditioned to believe that “no” and failure go together.

When you avoid “no,” you miss opportunities for some big “yes” answers. We want to give people permission to believe that it’s ok to get a “no.”

Create a “no” awareness.

“Just Go For No!” episode resources

Learn more about these concepts by visiting GoForNo.com. You can also grab a copy of their book Go For No!: Yes Is the Destination, No Is How You Get There.

This episode is brought to you in part by our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, which teaches you to improve your sales skills, find more customers, build stronger value, and close more deals.

The next semester begins in April.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Tamara Thompson, Donald Kelly, Convincing, Closing

TSE 1033: How To Turn A No To A Maybe To A YES!

Tamara Thompson, Donald Kelly, Convincing, ClosingAs sales reps, we all want to know how to turn a ‘No,’ to a ‘Maybe,’ to a ‘Yes!’

Tamara Thompson is the owner of a creative video production company that brings compelling stories and brands to life; from events to influencers to business owners. It is for those who need marketing assistance or who seek to broadcast their authority across different social media platforms.

Video is her forte’. She is very passionate about it and has directed several documentaries.

Tamara started using a video camera at the age of 7 and followed her dream into film school before launching her own business, Serious Take Productions, in 2012.

She is now focused on building her sub-brand, Broadcast your Authority, to help empower more female business owners – from taking the stage, to gaining media exposure, to implementing video that will attract and keep attention.

Tamara knows full well that receiving a ‘No’ in sales is inevitable. She used to take it personally until she read The Four Agreements, a book which she credits with changing her life.

Moving beyond ‘No’

Now, she views ‘no’ with a different mindset. That ‘no’ can turn into a ‘maybe’ and then into a ‘yes’ when you have the mentality and are able to think abundantly in order to handle rejection. Taking rejection personally only allows it to spiral out of control into negative feelings about one’s abilities.

The more positivity flows around you, however, the more you are able to deal with objections. To handle the conversation, you have to be able to listen to why they are saying ‘no.’

It is a preemptive process. It is the preemptive way of thinking when entering into any conversation: don’t expect a ‘no,’ but recognize that it may happen and be prepared.

When facing ‘no’ as an answer, it is time to discover why the hesitation exists. In this way, you can provide a different solution that caters better to the needs of your clients.

As the owner of a professional video company, Tamara knows she has the one-up in many situations simply because, in order to build a relationship with her clients, she needs to know exactly what entices them most and what they need most.

As an example, Tamara recalls hosting a ‘sale from the stage event.’ It’s a selling opportunity to a massive amount of people who are then invited to ask questions and to sign up for video retreats.

One woman, in particular, had many questions about her unique situation. Tamara was able to zero in on the specific hesitations of the prospect and cater to her needs as a result.

Relating to the prospect and fully trying to understand the reasons behind any hesitation is how Tamara is able to turn a ‘no’ into a ‘yes.’

Listening

She doesn’t view ‘no’ as a rejection or a lack of interest but rather as a call for more information. A weak seller might give up but a great seller will try to be helpful, to relate, and to listen.

When you truly care about the people you are working with and for and want to build a relationship with them, it is easier to steer conversations toward ‘yes.’ Once you understand the struggles and objections, it is easier to respond properly.

Tamara is passionate about her business. She is confident that listening and empathy can go a long way in helping sales reps close deals even if they are not particularly passionate about their product.

New sellers sometimes don’t know what to listen for.

Tamara recommends doing research on any person you hope to speak with. Take time to learn their lifestyle and interests and what their brand and business look like. Then tailor your questions accordingly.

The right questions – the right amount of interest in what the prospect is already doing – can open them up to tell you more.

Find out why they do what they do and where they want to go.

Most prospects are passionate about their business and when they are hesitant to make a change, you can hear it in their voice. Once you understand their goals, you can help them past the hesitation.

Being persistent

If a hesitant ‘no’ is still the answer, Tamara recommends follow-up.

Aim for a ‘maybe’ even if it means following-up multiple times, or several months later, because people are busy and can’t always respond the first time.

Once the prospect realizes that the sales rep is attempting to provide a solution and to help versus just trying to make a sale, it opens doors.

Persistence and the ability to listen to the real concerns of any prospect are Tamara’s key pieces of advice.

The more they can see the value in what you offer, the more ‘no’ moves to ‘yes.’

“How to turn a ‘No,’ to a ‘Maybe,’ to a ‘Yes!’” episode resources

Check out Tamara’s video content and learn about upcoming events on the Director Tamara Thompson Facebook page. You can learn more about compelling videos, event videos, and influencer and speaker trailers produced by Serious Take Productions at www.serioustakeproductions.com.

This episode is brought to you in part by our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, which teaches you to improve your sales skills, find more customers, build stronger value, and close more deals.

The next semester begins in April.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

 

Kevin Yee, Rejection, Dan Loc, High Ticket Closing

TSE 1014: Sales From The Street: “New Rejection”

Kevin Yee, New Rejection, Dan Loc, High Ticket ClosingAs salespeople, we’ve all faced new rejection. It feels like a punch in the gut every time. It can sometimes make you question if you should even stay in the business.

Kevin Yee knows what I’m talking about. Rejection is especially hard to handle when you are new to it as Kevin was.

Kevin left the pharmacy industry and now runs a high ticket closing agency of about ten team members working with B2B and B2C clients.

It was risky move but after attending a sales training course, Kevin was highly motivated. He was excited to start making calls but terrified at the same time. He knew he lacked experience and that affected his confidence. Kevin wanted clients but he wasn’t sure if he was really going to be able to help them.

Intellectually, he knew he could work hard and figure things out but he remained insecure.

The wrong focus

He was so focused on those insecurities, that within moments, his first client had control of the call. Looking back, Kevin realizes he was trying to be someone that he wasn’t. He is naturally inclined to be helpful but he was trying to be authoritative in his delivery.

He knew all the right things to say but he lacked conviction and it came across in his voice. It didn’t help that the client was also not interested in the services of a high- ticket closer.

Kevin had worked so hard to put everything in his training so the rejection really hit him hard. His confidence in sales was shaken.

He didn’t want to go back to pharmacy, however, so he decided to try again.

Trying again

At the time, he was a one-man sales team. He had a marketing background so he set up a sales funnel for himself where he was the closer at the end. With help from his YouTube channel, the leads started to come in.

It was a good problem to have.

Kevin signed on a few friends to help out. Having confidence in the team’s ability to get results made it easier to reach out to more and more clients.

It has been six months since the sales funnel took off. The team has been getting better and better and Kevin has focused on getting more and more clients. He learned how to really connect with people and to be a good friend to his clients. Kevin takes the time to really learn about their businesses so that he can tackle any problems his clients may have.

He knows that the most important part of any new business is marketing and sales.

Working with others

He and his team are currently in the process of onboarding a B2B client with six-figure packages as they continue to reach out to new clients.

They strive to authentically reach out to people to help solve the closing and sales problems of their business. He believes there is a lot of opportunity on the table and is excited for the future.

Kevin knows he could not have done it alone. He encourages you to reach out to others, especially if you are struggling. He believes that you have to have a giving mentality to succeed; nobody wants to work with a selfish person.

Sometimes we just get so focused on our own lane that we fail to realize there are cars next to us. Kevin hopes his story will inspire others who may be ‘in the slumps’ to keep putting themselves out there, and to rely on others for help as you continue to do the same for others.

“New Rejection” episode resources

Check out Kevin’s YouTube channel at Kevin Yee PharmD, or contact him at refugeehustle.com.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Prospect.io is offering three months at half-price.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

 

 

Alex Quin, Donald Kelly, Miami, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1011: What To Do When Everyone Tells You “No”

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we talk to Alex Quin about how to step up our game, get back up when we get knocked down, and what to do when everyone tells you no.

Alex is an investor who focuses on projects that he is passionate about, whether they be in entertainment, media, or fashion. His current projects include a globally-distributed clothing company based in Miami and several content creation projects bound for Netflix and Amazon.

As a public figure, Alex has had the opportunity to work with many brands that use his image and likeness for promotions and commercials. As an entrepreneur with several successful projects that garnered a lot of media attention, Alex became an influencer despite initially wanting to remain behind the scenes.

Hard work and consistency

Some view his achievements as an overnight success. Alex doesn’t agree. He knows it took many years of hard work and consistency.

Yet people tend to focus on the finished product.

Consider social media for example. We want to portray ourselves positively and in the best light, which can come across to others as a perfect life. But social media is just the highlight reel. It doesn’t show the downfalls, the difficult times, or the moments of self-doubt.

When all the hard work is glossed over, it is easy to be fooled into thinking that you are the only one not succeeding.

In reality, everyone makes mistakes. But those mistakes can become opportunities to learn.

Alex cites money, or rather the lack of it, as his biggest challenge. He started an advertising company using money he earned working in the fast food industry.

No job was too small. If he needed to clean bathrooms in order to afford computers or camera equipment or to pay the rent on a small office, he did it.

It was a difficult journey and he worked with a lot of people who let him down.

How to handle ‘no’

As sellers, many of us enter the industry assuming everyone will be nice, or at least polite. So rejection really hurts.

It takes a while to understand that they aren’t necessarily being mean to us but that maybe we are just not offering a good fit for what they need.

So how do we handle ‘no?’

We need to be realistic. We can get so involved in our project that we lose the outsider’s perspective and fail to see our own shortcomings.

Maybe the prospects are saying ‘no’ because there is a flaw in our presentation. Maybe we aren’t doing something right.

We need to re-evaluate ourselves and keep an open mind.

Is the feedback coming from a negative perspective or from a constructive criticism perspective? If you are continually hearing ‘no’ – what is the common denominator?

Find out why you were rejected.

It is the least you can do for yourself. Find out what part of your pitch caught their attention and what part turned them off.

Study your project. What do you need to do – what might you need to change – to get a ‘yes’?

The founder of Starbucks had hundreds of rejections, as did Walt Disney. They both learned so much throughout the process that when the ‘yes’ finally came – they were ready.

A ‘no’ is an opportunity to learn because it points you in the direction of improvement. [07:33]

Mental health

Learning to handle rejection is also extremely important from a mental health perspective. Depression is real. It is often overlooked but it happens.

As entrepreneurs, we deal with a lot of negatives and the only way to keep a positive outlook is to turn those negatives into positives.

Maybe things are falling apart so that you can build them back up in a better way. Maybe the structure was wrong or the foundation was crumbling; this is your chance to fix it.

Entrepreneurs are not successful simply because their one crazy idea took off. They are successful because they worked consistently at that idea.

It can be confusing when you see all the young kids on social media making so much money. You have to realize that most entrepreneurs aren’t successful until their mid-30’s or mid-40’s.

You are not in competition with other people. As an entrepreneur, you are in competition with yourself.

Your success depends upon your abilities:  your ability to be organized, to be focused, and to care for your mental state. It is your achievement when it works and it is your fault when it doesn’t.

Think of it as a race. Don’t focus on the competition, or the people behind you, or next to you. Focus on what you can do this time to make it better than last time.

Focus only on the finish line and go for your personal best.

Think about your outreach. Can you improve your email? Is your offering good? Maybe it is all great but the timing just doesn’t work for your client.

Leave an open door

Alex recalls working on a huge proposal for a global brand a few years ago. He spent three months researching and building strategy but didn’t get the deal through no fault of his own.

He and his team had done everything they could have possibly done. The client loved it but they were simply not ready.

No amount of sweet talking would have changed a thing.

Fast forward to the present, and that same company now endorses Alex.

You never know where something might lead. Leave an open door and don’t burn bridges. Do good business with good morals.

It is understandable that several rejections can eat away at your confidence. We all have our insecurities. You have to love what you are doing so much that it doesn’t matter what other people think about you.

Don’t listen to negative comments. Understand and have faith in your talent. Listen only to those people who want the best for you personally and professionally.

Confidence is key

You will meet setbacks and failures because nothing is perfect. But you were brave enough to come up with and pursue your idea, so the negative opinions of others should not stop you.

If others don’t see that confidence in you, however, they will move on. You must have confidence and project confidence.

There are ways to build confidence. Books you can read, classes you can take – the more you learn about something, the more confident you will be when speaking about it.

Use frustration as fuel to improve yourself. Educate yourself. Be informed. Hustle inspires hustle. Surround yourself with uplifting people and rise together.

You will face rejection. It is not the end of the world. Get yourself back in the game.

When Alex is having a bad day at work, he reads about the struggles that Elon Musk is going through with his business, or reads about the daily struggles facing people without clean water.

It puts a renewed perspective on things.

If you are listening to this podcast, you are already in a better position than most. You have access to a computer and a desire to learn.

If you don’t know how to use what you already have to do well, then do your research. Learn how. There is an alternative to everything.

Energy attracts energy

Don’t let the game change you. Don’t allow other people to bring you down with their negativity.  Radiate positivity.

Don’t give your energy to people whose loyalty is controlled by opportunity. Weed out the people in your life.

Why are they trying to help you? Why are they doing what they are doing? You can’t give from an empty cup so take care of yourself first.

“Plan, Prepare and Refuse to Give Up” episode resources

Alex loves to connect with people and to give marketing advice. Reach out to him at www.Alexquin.com.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcastso you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

 

 

 

 

Donald Kelly, Stephen A Hart, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1000: The Sales Evangelist 1000th Episode with Donald C. Kelly

Donald Kelly, Stephen A Hart, The Sales Evangelist

It’s The Sales Evangelist 1000th episode and Stephen A. Hart from the Trailblazers.FM Podcast is conducting the interview while Donald Kelly answers the questions.

This podcast started five years ago after Donald attended sales training to try to improve his performance. He started seeing some gains, and he figured the very least he could do was tell other people what was working for him.

He realized along the way that he would get to interview great guests like Jeffrey Gitomer who would share a wealth of information and he was hooked. Donald wanted to share sales content that would help himself and others at the same time.

Blessings and opportunities

The greatest benefit to a podcast like this is the relationships you build. There’s a camaraderie and people want to help each other. [05:50]

Perhaps it’s because the medium is so new, but a lot of podcasters are connecting with each other to share experiences.

People have become like family, and many business opportunities have emerged from it.

There’s a whole crew of people in the background who help create the content, and it’s blessing people along the way.

After Donald jumped ship from his full-time job in 2015, this lifestyle business allowed him to travel and speak in different parts of the country, and it all stemmed from the training and consulting that has developed.

10,000 hours

The podcast is officially five years old, which amounts to about 10,000 work hours. According to Malcolm Gladwell’s theory that it takes 10,000 hours to become an expert, Donald is officially an expert podcaster now.

The story started when Donald was working at a software company in Boca. His plan was that at the three-year mark, he wanted to go back to grad school for an MBA. [10:11]

The other alternative was that he would launch a startup.

TSE started as a hobby because Donald had done B2C in high school and college. Now, he transitioned to B2B, but he didn’t know how to talk to people or set up business opportunities.

His company provided training and he discovered a love of teaching and an excitement about the content he had learned.

He paired his love of teaching and his desire to be the center of attention, and it was a perfect marriage. Edutainment allowed him to educate and entertain at the same time.

Birth of a podcast

Jared Easley introduced Donald to the world of podcasting despite the fact that Donald knew nothing about it.

He started by listening to Seth Godin’s Startup School, a podcast that featured Seth guiding 30 entrepreneurs through the process of launching a dream business. [11:46]

He was still debating startup or college, and he realized that a startup didn’t have to mean developing a product. Donald didn’t see how the podcast was going to make money, but he launched it as a hobby.

The platform existed six months before the podcast did, but Donald recalls that he had to get over the worry and just pull the trigger. He had to stop worrying about how it would sound and what people would say about it.

He eventually decided that he had something valuable and he needed to share it. When he got out of his own way, the money started coming in.

When Donald started producing content that benefited the people around him, people started to raise their hands and seek his help.

Lessons learned

Donald calls episode 1 cringe-worthy. He says he was nervous and afraid throughout it. He was self-conscious about his voice, and he didn’t own his personality. [15:29]

Donald also wishes he had done video much sooner. He was afraid of the comments people would make and that fear kept him from producing video.

Donald also wishes he had known that people don’t know what you have to offer until they know what you have to offer. He was afraid of sounding pushy, so he was apprehensive about sharing what he knew.

Take more action. Get out of your comfort zone. Get out of your own way.

Despite the late start to the video world, TSE is getting into video now, so it’s better late than never.

Rejection

Donald points to the burned-ship theory that dates to sailors who were either going to burn the ships and win the battle or die on the seashore. There was no escape.

If you’ve burned the ship, there’s no alternative, so you have to make it work. Those men are the master of their own destiny.

Although Donald could still be employable in the sales realm if necessary, he doesn’t want to use that as a parachute. [19:27]

The “no’s” can’t hinder him. He either has to conquer or die.

He realizes that the “no’s” aren’t personally directed at him.

Your “why”

Donald’s desire to provide for his family drives his passion and his motivation. He wants to make things happen so that his family never has to be in the predicament of being homeless again. [21:50]

Those dark moments such as the first lull in listenership can plague podcasters.

Although numbers are great for measuring, Donald got too focused on the numbers. He started to compare too much and he neglected his own community.

When the website was down for a prolonged period in 2016, he started to feel tremendous stress. For 1-2 months there was no new content.

He worried about losing listeners and the huge setback that might come. He wasn’t sure he would be able to continue because there were so many technical problems.

Valley

You can’t succeed in a silo. Name any company and you can almost guarantee that they had help from some outside forces. [29:17]

The term entrepreneur is deceptive because there’s really no single person who creates a business. Donald avoided asking for help because he was embarrassed and he thought he was supposed to know how to solve the problem.

Advice and discussion help people share their burdens and to recognize that they can benefit from other people’s input.

Top takeaways

People who succeed do so because they partnered with others for good. There are people who are willing to partner strategically to make things work. [31:57]

All of his guests who have had success did so because they found synergy in the people they worked with.

Look at Henry Ford and the number of companies that spawned from his invention. Tire companies, radio companies, and other companies developed because of it.

You can’t be a lone wolf and you must be willing to admit that other people might be able to do things better than you can.

TSE is writing for HubSpot now and has been mentioned in Entrepreneur and Inc. Magazine because Donald was willing to reach out.

Don’t be afraid to sell yourself. People in post-recording conversations advised Donald that he was charging too little.

Customers aren’t paying for one hour of guidance or coaching. They are paying for 15 years of experience. [35:23]

Be aware of your worth. If you undervalue yourself, no one will willingly pay you more. Ask for more than you’re comfortable asking for.

Always push yourself for bigger and better things.

Once you push outside of your comfort zone, you’ll evolve. You’ll find yourself doing things that once scared you.

Emotional rollercoaster

Preparation helps us avoid the emotional rollercoaster of sales. October Donald should be helping December Donald. Salespeople must plan much further out than they can comfortably do. [38:50]

If you know you need 5 deals, you should put 7 or 8 in your pipeline. Never ease up off the gas. Have a systematic approach.

When Donald coaches people, he helps them see beyond the now. He helps them develop a system that prevents lulls.

Healthy competition

Donald remembers wanting to be included on a list of top sales podcasts. [44:01]

He refers to the power of “coopertition,” where people become allies.

As a track athlete, he learned that when you’re turning back to see where other people are, you aren’t aerodynamic anymore. You lose your focus and you slow down.

Instead of looking to see where other people are, look toward the finish line. Compete against your own yesterday instead of competing against others.

Future of TSE

The Sales Podcast Network will continue to grow and offer a community of salespeople who will encourage one another. [50:57]

If TSE ever gets boring, maybe the day would come when it would be “sunset.”

TSE will continue to grow. The goal on sponsorship side will eventually separate so that the training organization will separate from the media company side.

TSE will seek to double its revenue, and ultimately the platform will be bigger than just a podcast.

TSE has been a huge influence in the podcasting space by encouraging those people who are in the community.

The Sales Evangelist 1000th Episode resources

Connect with Stephen A. Hart and check out his  Trailblazer.FM Podcast.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Fear of Rejection, Prospecting, TSE Hustler's League

TSE 955: TSE Hustler’s League – “False Truth”

 

Fear of Rejection, Prospecting, TSE Hustler's League

All of us confront fears that hold us back and prevent us from being really successful at sales. One of the biggest is the fear of rejection, and it’s one of the first lessons we’ll review in The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League when we begin our new semester in January. On today’s episode, we’ll discuss how false truth contributes to the fear of rejection.

Fear of rejection

The fear of rejection and the anxiety that results from it cripple many people. It affects their business life, their personal life, their dating life, and their sales life.

It originates from a belief that someone or something is likely to cause us harm or pain. If we don’t address it, it grows.

For me, my claustrophobia was partly rooted in a TV sitcom with fictional characters who got stuck in a fictional elevator. In my mind, if the people on the elevator could get stuck, then I could get stuck.

As a sales leader, if the people on your team are afraid of rejection, what happened in their lives that led them to that point?

Is it true that sometimes people won’t be interested? Yes. But that doesn’t mean they are rejecting you as an individual.

Running in circles

Sales reps who fear failure avoid sending emails and making phone calls. The truth is that nothing will happen for those sales reps until they make contact somehow.

They will continue fearing that people will reject them so they will make excuses about why they aren’t communicating. They’ll keep running in circles.

Researchers set out to prove that some of our fears are based on “false memories,” or situations that we choose to remember differently than the way they actually happened. They convinced study participants that they had become ill after eating egg salad. Then, they offered the subjects four sandwiches, and none of them chose the egg salad.

Understanding the fear

We begin TSE Hustler’s League by recognizing the fears and trying to determine whether they are actually based in fact.

Even when they are justified, they often result from a one-off situation. It absolutely isn’t true that every single time you call to speak to someone, that person is going to reject you.

When I realized that my fear of elevators was unfounded and based in false memories, I went on an elevator. I didn’t get stuck and nothing bad happened.

It helped me move forward.

Taking action

I’m a big believer that you must take action.

Ralph Waldo Emerson says “That which we persist in doing becomes easier…” It isn’t that the nature of the thing changes, but our ability to do it actually improves.

If I ride an elevator despite my fear of getting stuck, it gets easier to ride the elevator. Psychologically, it gets easier for me to do it.

Sellers must pick up the phone and reach out to the prospect. They must send emails and LinkedIn requests.

If sellers do that, they’ll see that they won’t get eaten alive. The prospect isn’t going to yell at you or come after you.

Even if they do say no now, they might say yes later.

Imagine both results

Without realizing it, we get hung up on only one possibility and we never consider the other options. Instead of only imagining that things will go wrong, we should consider the possibility that things could go right.

If you never move beyond the fear, the fear worsens and it affects your work.

If you offer it and they say no, what’s the worst thing that happens? You move on to the next person. Once you’ve been rejected once or twice, you realize that it’s not fatal.

As you move through the fear, you develop a confidence that helps you become even more successful in your career.

Tackle it head on

Recognize that:

1. This fear is in your head.

2. It could be the result of a false memory.

3. Do something about it.

If you discover a fear that’s paralyzing you, do something about it. Do it over and over. It becomes easier to send an email to a prospect once you’ve done it a time or two. Same with LinkedIn messages or phone calls.

The more you do it, the more you’ll stifle the fear. You’ll move closer to accomplishing your dreams and desires and you’ll stop missing out on things because of fear.

If I had let my fear of elevators control me, I would have missed a chance to visit the World Trade Center during a school trip.

What regrets would you have if you never overcome your fear? What business could you start? Could you close a sales opportunity?

“False Truth” episode resources

Read more about the fear of rejection and how it manifests itself in our daily lives.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, Cold Outreach, Cold Email, Prospecting

TSE 862: I Didn’t Think Cold Outreach Was Going To Be This Difficult

Donald Kelly, Cold Outreach, Cold Email, ProspectingCold calling is always a challenge. If you’re in a role that requires you to spend all of your time doing cold outreach, it will mentally drain you. You may find yourself thinking that you can’t deal with even one more rejection. Many people discover they never knew cold outreach would be so hard.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, we’re addressing the challenges of cold outreach, and offering strategies to make it easier; ideas to help you be more efficient and effective. These ideas are targeted toward people whose focus is cold outreach.

Work as a team.

This is a numbers game. Realize that the more people you gain access to, the more likely you are to hit your goals.

Working as a team can make an already tough job a little easier. It can help you all learn, grow, and strengthen each other.

When you do your work near other people, you get a chance to bounce ideas off of each other. If you hear one of your teammates use a line that seems to be working, you can try using it yourself.

You can also set team goals: If we hit a certain number of applications, we can have a small celebration. Maybe your team leader buys lunch or gives out a Starbucks gift card.

The team environment will become more focused because everyone is working toward the same goal.

Talk about the challenges you’re having during team breaks. When you recognize that something you’re doing isn’t working, ask the other members of your team for feedback so you can tweak your script and try new things.

Have team members share TED Talks or podcasts or other sources of encouragement during your breaks. Ask one team member to share something that motivates him.

Look for ways to help your team have wins. As your team hits its goals, the whole team will get a morale boost.

In an environment where people are being hammered with rejections, look for ways to pick them up.

Help yourself.

Set up a series of sprints for yourself or your team. After you finish 45 minutes worth of calls, allow yourself a 15-minute break to regroup and refresh. I used to walk around the lake with a coworker when I needed a change of scenery, and we’d discuss ideas while we walked.

Measure your performance as an individual (and also as a team). Are you consistently better at accepting rejection? Better than you were last week?

I like to write out responses to objections so I’ll have them available when I need them. If I measure what I’m doing, I’ll be able to identify which ones work and which ones don’t.

If you’re able to break up the monotony by changing up your cadence, try that. After a block of cold calling, spend a block of time on social selling or email contact.

You may not have that option in your role, but if you do, use every tool in your arsenal to reach people and hit your targets.

“Cold Outreach” episode resources

Our friends at Wiley have provided a free excerpt of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. Based upon research and interviews with buyers, the book provides a blueprint sales professionals. Read an excerpt of the book here.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

 

 

how to turn failure into success, New Sellers, Airica D. Kraehmer (Air), Human Trafficing

TSE 998: How to Turn Failure into Success

Airica Kraehmer, how to turn failure into successFailures can be crippling if we allow them to be, but when we have the proper guidance, we can learn how to turn failure into success. Airica Kraehmer of Gracious Care Recovery shares her own story here and reminds us that we can turn our weaknesses into our strengths.

Mental toughness

Airica’s story doesn’t directly involve sales, but it does involve difficulty and mental toughness.

She started working as a model in the fashion industry and she had a dream to succeed there. She realized that the fashion industry demands that you be your own product and that you bring your A-game all the time. She called it cut-throat.

As a result, there’s room for exploitation. Airica found herself the victim of human trafficking because she was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

She wrote down her story, and when she finished her book, she looked for outlets that would help her share it. She figured telling her story would help her move beyond the struggle.

She became an international best-selling author, and it taught her that she could rise above the low points in life.

Seeking a challenge

After she moved to Florida, Airica realized that the state was number two in the country in terms of human trafficking, tied with Houston. After the upcoming Super Bowl, Florida is projected to move into the number one spot due to the large influx of people.

Hearing stories of other victims made her realize that she was part of something bigger. She realized that the process would repeat if she didn’t do something to help.

She reminded herself that there were as many good people in the world as there were bad people.

Rejection

Nobody wanted to talk about trafficking, so she kept encountering closed doors. She compares it to cold calling for sellers. [07:23]

Though people cared about it, they didn’t feel like they could speak out about it.

She kept knocking on doors, and eventually, she found Gracious Care Recovery. There were survivors there who recognized the need for people to speak out.

Her message to sellers, then, is to keep knocking on doors. Despite the fact that she was addressing an impossibly hard topic, she found people who would engage.

Get in the other person’s mindset. We each have different experiences, and we’re each traveling a different journey. That means we each have different ideas.

That can be a powerful tool as long as we remember that the effort isn’t all about us. It’s about who we can help and who we can serve.

Keep in mind that the prospect isn’t rejecting you. It simply isn’t the right time for your prospect.

Persistence

If you’re a sales manager who is motivating a team to overcome rejection, teach your team members to practice persistence.

Be persistent, but be kind. Be willing to invest the time to build trust.

Sales is a numbers game to some degree, and you have to keep reaching out in order to achieve results. Especially now that we find ourselves at the beginning of a new year, you have to keep knocking in order to hit your targets.

Overcoming failure

Airica compares her personal experience to bankruptcy. It was the ultimate low. She had nothing left. And she knew it would take years to recover.

She learned that you have to leave behind the things that don’t serve you well and that you shouldn’t focus too much on the why. It’s ok, for example, to ask why something happened, but refuse to stay focused on it.

Instead, look to the future and ask yourself what you can do to address what happened.

Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Who am I serving?
  • What is my purpose?
  • What’s my goal?

Once you’ve identified those things, align your morals and values with your goals.

Tackle one goal at a time. Small goals will accumulate quickly and result in large accomplishments.

“How to Turn Failure into Success” episode resources

You can connect with Airica at airica@graciouscarerecovery.com and grab a copy of her book, Models Stop Traffic: How to Dodge Enslavement in Pursuit of Your Dream to Become the Next Top Model.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

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TSE Hustler's League, Donald Kelly, Self Worth, Sales

TSE 685: TSE Hustler’s League-“Your Self Worth”

TSE Hustler's League, Donald Kelly, Self Worth, Sales

How much is your self-worth? How do you overcome your fear of rejection?

Today’s snippet taken from one of our recent sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League is about the idea of self-worth and how you can overcome your fear of rejection.

How Would You Rate Yourself?

We play all these roles – husband, father, mom, sister, spouse, sales professional, manager, etc. Say, you’re put in an island and all these roles are taken away from you. How do you rate yourself on a scale of 1-10? (10 being awesome and 1 being “you’re nothing”)

You’re a 10! You Should Be!

Roles are the things we’re given in life which were either given to us or something we choose.

On the other hand, your identity is your self-worth or your self-esteem. This describes you deeper than your role.

You’re a 10? Why? Because even if all your roles are taken away from you, that shouldn’t diminish your self-identity or your self-worth. Never!

No one can take away your self-worth besides you.

So the next time you get rejected over the phone. Ask yourself. Are they rejecting the seller? Or are they rejecting you as a person?

They don’t know you.

They’re not rejecting you as a person. They’re just rejecting you as a seller.

Therefore, understand your sales role is what’s being rejected, not YOU.

Don’t Take It Personally

But what usually happens is when somebody rejects you in your role, we take that personally and it brings us down.

So when the next phone call comes, your confidence level starts to decrease.

You’re an i-10!

But why is it easy for some people to rub that off their back and not have any issue with rejection? That’s because they have a strong sense of self-worth.

You’re an i-10! You’re an identity of ten. On a scale of 1-10, you are a ten. Take all these roles away from you but your self-worth should never be brought down.

Your Roles Don’t Define Your Self-Worth, But Your Self-Worth Define Your Roles

Don’t care about what people think about you. Only care about what you think about yourself. Realize who you are. Your self-worth is 10. You’re not going to be judged based on your role. You’re going to be judged based on who you are. And that person who’s going to judge is YOU.

Episode Resources:

Tired of doing boring presentations? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same.

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

 

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, Omar Jackson

TSE 629: Sales From The Street-“The Old Way Is Not Working”

Donald Kelly, Omar Jackson, Sales from the Street, TSERejection is part of sales. And if  you don’t know how to handle it then probably this isn’t the career for you. But sales can be learned and it can be learned by anyone. It’s a matter of finding that process to help you get over rejection and ultimately gain confidence. Today’s guest is Omar Jackson who’s going to share with us the biggest struggle he had, how he overcame it, and the results he has seen.

Omar got his college degree in operations supply management then got into corporate life until finding himself in sales. Currently, he works with a national solar company and sells door-to-door.   

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Omar:

Omar’s biggest struggle as a new seller:

Facing rejection

Strategies Omar did to overcome his challenge:

  1. Understand rejection is normal.

Understand that everyday you’re going to be rejected but once you will find people who see the value you offer.

  1. Have a reason why you’re out there.

For Omar, his overall happiness and being able to have more control in his life were big motivators for him. So it’s important to have a big why.

  1. Focus on the good things.

Focus on the people that respond to you.

  1. Work to your strengths.

Have a synergistic approach to your sales process where you can focus on your strengths and the other person in your team can focus on theirs.

  1. Learn the process.

Get more and more familiar with the market. Increase your skill set and confidence.

Results they’ve seen:

Increased sales with a steady, upward trajectory

Omar’s Major Takeaway:

Just show up. Anybody can learn sales. Control your emotions and just show up. There’s going to be somebody out there who’s going to buy from you and want what you have to offer. Then just keep refining your process and get better and better.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Omar Jackson on LinkedIn.

If you wish to share some sales struggles with us and how you got through them, send us an email at podcast@thesalesevangelist.com.

Maximum Influence by Kurt Mortensen

Join the  TSE Hustler’s League.

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Andrea Waltz, Richard Fenton, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 593: Just Go For No!

Andrea Waltz, Richard Fenton, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistSometimes we don’t like to hear the word “no” and this episode is going to change the way you look at it. Oftentimes, it takes multiple approaches before your prospects finally say yes. and that’s what our guest today, Andrea Waltz, is going to teach us. Andrea is the co-author of the book Go For No!: Yes Is the Destination, No Is How You Get There.

Along with her husband, Andrea started her own company some nineteen years ago, serving big retail organizations where they do workshops and training focused on their Go For No philosophy and strategy. Several years later, they have extended their help to people across industries and any level of the sales process specifically in dealing with rejections.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Andrea:

Don’t take it personally.

It’s not about you, it’s about the customer’s or the prospect’s preferences and their desires. However, this can be difficult emotionally.

It is fundamentally biologically programmed that we’re wired to not get rejected so we have these reactions. But when you allow this to take control of your sales process, you end up being a mediocre and an order-taker.

Strategies in going for the no:

  1. No doesn’t mean never, but not yet.

No is just the beginning and start of the negotiation. If you’re calling on someone who is happy with their current supplier and they’re telling you no, that doesn’t mean it’s forever.

  1. Stay in touch and follow up even with people who tell you no.

Keep the follow-up. Keep the systems in place because it’s easy to lose track and not be able to have all of those no’s in the pipeline that if you get the permission to follow, then you should be following them up. Follow up the right way and a lot of those no’s can turn into yes’s, it’s just they did not yes be today.

  1. Don’t just reward results, reward activity.

When somebody in the office makes one call and gets a yes, everybody celebrates that person, while the person who got 20 no doesn’t get rewarded. If they’re doing it right, eventually they will end up in results.

  1. Set a goal for the number of no’s you’re going to hear.

Focus on getting into action and not being hung up on the yes goals. Challenge yourself into that activity and you may just be surprised with a yes.

  1. Figure out how to manage that no.

A lot of times, you manage that no right then and there. When you avoid hearing no, you don’t get very good at handling rejection emotionally and you won’t get very skilled at dealing with taking the next steps. When you hear it a lot, you get good at managing it.

  1. If it’s a qualified prospect, make sure you get permission to follow up with them.

Ask if you can check back with them in a few weeks or a couple of months and get that permission. Be sure to figure out the rejection and what the no is.

  1. Figure out why people tell you no and what you can do in the future to mitigate that.

Learn from the no’s you got. Over time, you will figure out what your issue is for getting those no’s. What kind of prospects are you dealing with? When you up the quantity of calls, you can start narrowing down and figuring out where your gaps are. For example, you’re not prospecting qualified leads or the quality of your presentation needs some work.

  1. No doesn’t mean never, just not yet.

People have to be contacted multiple times before they finally say yes. Multiple contacts are necessary so you can add value and share more information and get the person more comfortable with you so that they are eventually going to be okay with making the change.

  1. Talk to the right people.

You need to qualify your leads and take the time knowing who you’re talking to, your target market, and your ideal customer. Otherwise going to people who would never say yes under any circumstances is a problem.

  1. You have to change your mindset.

Have that mindset that you need to be able to hear the word no. Having that shift requires you to understand that this is not trying to be perfect or trying to prove yourself. When you avoid hearing the word no, you avoid opportunities for some really big deals out there.

Andrea’s Major Takeaway:

Create a no awareness and think about how often you are hearing the word no. If you could just get comfortable with it and see it’s your hangup and not theirs, then you can be more successful. Then put that into a practice and set a no goal. Lastly, have fun with it! Just focus on getting better.

Episode Resources:

Get to know more about Andrea on www.GoForNo.com

Go For No! by Andrea Waltz and Richard Fenton

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League. Our new semester is coming soon! And we’re going to focus on how you can become buyer-centric and increase your win rate.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, TSE Hustler's League, Fear of Rejection

TSE 335: TSE Hustler’s League-“Rejection and Upselling”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, TSE Hustler's League, Fear of Rejection Today, I’ve pulled out yet another snippet from one of our training sessions over at TSE Hustler’s League so that you too might be able to benefit from these. In this clip, we talk about overcoming the fear of rejection and the concept of upselling, which are two essential factors in any salesperson’s success.

Here are the highlights of today’s episode:

Overcoming the Fear of Rejection

Fear is a limiting belief that actually prevents you from taking action and living your experience. C’mon now, what is the worst thing that can happen when you’re trying to sell your product or service to somebody? It’s just getting a “no.” Besides, you can’t lose something you never had. You can’t hide. Face your fears and just tackle them.

Asking for More

Don’t be scared to ask for more sales. There is nothing wrong with asking, “Is there anything else?” because it always does work. As you’re meeting with your prospects, bring out an unconsidered need that they weren’t thinking about. Be sure to ask if there’s something else that they may have trouble with because you just might have the solution for it. The great thing about upselling is you gain more money with less people.

 

Episode Resources:

Adversaries into Allies by Bob Burg

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Fear of Rejection, Donald Kelly, Angel Denker, Podcast

TSE 134: The Surest Way to Overcome Your Fear of Rejection

Fear of Rejection, Donald Kelly. The Sales Evangelist, Angel Denker “In sales, we’re going to hear that “no” word and we’re going to hear it a lot.  We have to understand that “no” is not to us – the person; it’s to our product or service.” – Angel

Taking rejection is not easy! But what do you do? You will always have to face rejection at certain points in your life and you just have to learn how to deal with it if you want to succeed in sales.

In today’s great episode, we’re hearing from Angel as we talk about overcoming rejection. Angel was a proponent in helping me get training when I first started off; early in my selling career. Angel and her company gave us above and beyond training.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Angel:

How to Overcome Your Fear of Rejection:

  1. Be able to take that “NO” and just move on.

“No” may just actually mean:

  • “Not now”
  • “I’m just busy today. I don’t have time to listen.”
  • “I don’t have the money right now. We don’t have budget.”

“You have to be able to take that “no” and just move on. That’s what really separates the average salesperson from being the best salesperson.” – Angel

  1. See things differently and stay positive enough to make your next call.

Some people can’t handle that they can get adversity. Their persistence goes away and they stop doing the behaviors they need to do to be successful.

The worst thing is when you think you know a lot and then you ask a question and the prospect says it’s not pertinent information. When that happens – Just dive in!

“People are humans and human nature is what is going to make us better salespeople – understanding human interaction.” – Angel

  • Eat positive food everyday.
  • Train your mind.
  • Learn about this idea of rejection, which starts in your childhood, and how it can affect you. How did you take those “no’s” as a kid?

The I.R. (Identity Role) Theory:

Parent, Adult, Child philosophy: I’m OK, You’re OK by Thomas Harris – the platform for transactional analysis

The attitudes and beliefs of a salesperson are an integral component in their success

Identity:

What makes you, YOU: your self-esteem, how you view life, self-image, self-awareness, and self-talk. Our Identity needs to be strong for us to be effective

Role:

  • Roles change: wife, daughter, wife, golfer, etc.
  • You perform your roles in a different way depending on your circumstances.
  • Your performance and your roles are changing

How to practice this:

  • Get your head in the right place; otherwise, you start to make excuses for how to perform in your role
  • Learn through listening and watching really good salespeople (reading books, CD’s, webinars, seminars) or just writing with somebody out in the field who’s a good salesperson

“Salespeople that are good, reward themselves.” – Angel

Should you take it personal when you get rejected?

It’s not taking it personal but you’re just in the learning stage.

Taking it personal will kill you in sales. Instead, determine:

  • What lesson you learned from that call?
  • What should you try differently next time so that wouldn’t be the reaction you get?

How long will it take to reach that level of confidence?

If you don’t have a hard time thinking you’re an “Identity 10,” then it’s going to be quicker. If you always look at the negative side, it’s going to take longer.

It’s up to you on how quickly you want to accept that you’re going to hear “no” and just move on.

Angel’s Major Takeaway:

“Make a list of every negative thought that is in your head and put it on a sheet of paper. Take that piece of paper, rip it up into little pieces, light it on fire and bury it. Then you can start.”

“When you go out today, remember you’re a 10! When you were born, somebody was ecstatic and happy about you and you made their world. You changed somebody’s world on your birthday and you’re awesome! You’re in sales and sales is fun! It’s the only job you can give yourself a raise everyday. Enjoy what you do. Go out and have fun with it! Make big money and don’t let anybody put your identity down.”

Connect with Angel through angeldenker@gmail.com or reach her through her phone number 954-675-3790.

Sales Opportunities, CRM, Sales Prospecting

TSE 104: Secret Nuggets In Lost Opportunities

Sales Opportunities, CRM, Sales Prospecting No, sometimes you are going to get this from a customer. Even worse sometimes the deal you have been working on for months will be awarded to another company. To most sellers this is devastating news. No one wants to get rejected, much less lose a deal. But in these situations, there is a golden question that most sellers often forget to ask the customer. “Why did I not get the business”. 

During this episode I share why everyone that is selling needs to ask this question when they are not awarded the deal. I also cover how to properly ask the question, how to use the information received to better your business and how new sellers can take advantage of this information to prospect.

Here are some of the major takeaways:

Asking the question

It’s important to ask this question properly with a good attitude. Even though you just lost a potentially great deal, you have to realize that its over and you need to move on. Keep a respectful attitude. I’m not saying you have to throw a congratulatory party, but it’s important to stay professional. Many times new sellers will want to get off the phone as soon as possible or if it’s an in person meeting, they want to leave the business ASAP to avoid an awkward situation. But while you are with the customer, it is important to ask them why you did not get the business.

Understanding that it may be awkward for the customer as well, the best way I have found to naturalize the situation is to remind the buyer of  the rules we set before we started about making sure we are a fit (learn more here “set the rules before we play the game”). Sometimes we are not a fit and that is okay. After I set the stage with that, and let them know that I am okay, I ask “now that it’s over, is it okay if I ask what were the deciding factors why “X company” was selected over us”? Typically at this point since it is over and they don’t need to have a guard up, the buyer will tell you everything you need to know. This information will now become gold for your business.

Using the information

Now that you received a wealth of information, it becomes crucial for you to log it in your CRM (Customer Relationship Management Software). For instance, in the Salesforce software in the opportunity profile, there is a section for sellers to indicate why an opportunity was lost. It becomes vital for you and your business to document well all the reasons. Why? If you are a business owner or someone who makes decision about the business, this will help you understand if there are things your business need to change.

For instant, if the reason why you were not selected was because your product is lacking a key feature, it becomes important for you to know this so you can fix it. More than likely if this buyer saw that reason as an important enough of a reason to select another vendor others may feel the same way. Now, I am not saying to run off and change everything based on the one lost opportunity, but if there’s a trend among the reasons why you are losing deals, it may be important to consider a change.

Prospecting

The final area where lost opportunities may become a gold mine is prospecting. If you are new to sales, new to an industry or company, look into the lost opportunities section of their CRM and learn the reason why your company are losing business to your competitors. Is it something that the sales person did or did not do? Is there a feature or solution that you should stay clear of? Or is there something that can potentially become an issue early in your business development process with a buyer? These notes in the lost opportunity sections can also provide you with a better understanding of who of your ideal customers is and what they want.

Conclusion

Overall, there are many reasons why people my elect not to buy from you and it is critical for you to know those reasons. Don’t look at it as a rejection and that all hope is lost, but learn to ask why you were not selected. Take it as a learning opportunity to enhance your business, product or services. Use it as a means to better prospecting and develop your sales skills. This information is GOLD!

I know this simple principle will help you grow. All and all, I want you to be successful and  I want you to go out and DO BIG THINGS!

 

Kingsley Grant; Fear of Rejection, Sales Coaching

TSE 090: Building A Bullet Proof Sales Professional Mindset

Kingsley Grant; Fear of Rejection, Sales Coaching In sales, rejection is always part of the game. Whether you like it or not, there will come a point in your sales career where a client will reject you in one way or another. How do you handle that?

Rejection is like a treasure chest wherein lies hidden opportunities just waiting to be unlocked. So don’t easily give up when a client rejects you. In this episode, Kingsley Grant will teach you how you can build a bulletproof mindset to handle rejection so you can achieve success in sales.

Kingsley Grant is a Marriage and Family Therapist, a life coach, author, speaker, and a midlifepreneur (an entrepreneur at midlife). He is passionate about bringing the best out of each and everyone in order for people to have more balanced, happier, and more meaningful lives.

His recently released book, Midlifepreneur: Making Your Dreams Come True Without Risking Everything, is all about getting out and just turn your dream into a reality without risking the loss of things or people that are most important to you.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Kingsley:

How sellers can cope with sales rejection

  • Mastering core strengths so you can dominate
  • Gauging how customers are pre-contemplating what you’re going to sell them
  • It may just be a “no” now so listen to the person and recognize the opportunity
  • Rejection is an opportunity to reassess

How to prepare before the meeting:

  • Know thyself.
  • Sell your likeability first before you sell your product.
  • Recognize how you can connect with the client.
  • Prepare your mind to how you can create a moment of likeability and trustworthiness

Ways to build strong relationship:

  • People have certain ways they want to be sold to.
  • Know to whom you’re selling.
  • Recognize that everyone does not buy the same way.

Building a bulletproof mindset to handle rejection

  • Sell according to how a client wants to be sold. How? –  Listen!
  • Empathize with them.
  • Shift the conversation from the product to the person.
  • Make the client feel that you understand them.
  • Take time to get to know your client.
  • Make it not about you but about the client.

Doing a “fire drill” of your sales presentation

  • Have a strategy and be prepared.
  • Know what to say, when to say it, how to say it
  • Practice so you can put your personality into it, then it will come out naturally

Strategies for handling rejection:

  • Think about what value can you bring to the person.
  • Pound on the value of what you’re selling – For example, you are not just selling a house but you are comfort, security, protection.
  • BELIEVE what you are offering them is something of VALUE

Kingsley’s current projects:

For more information on Kingsley and the amazing things he’s working on, visit www.kingsleygrant.com. Connect with Kingsley on Twitter @kingsleygrant

Kingsley’s Major Takeaway:

Seller, know thyself. Figure out your personality type and understand that your type may not be the same as other person’s personality types. It’s not about you but them.

Eliminate from your mindset all the things you have been hearing about how you should do it because you’re not everybody else. You are YOU. You are uniquely positioned. There is only one you so be you.

Know yourself. Know your style. And deliver through that style and not like how everybody else does it.

 

 

 

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