Personalize Archives - The Sales Evangelist

Category Archives for Personalize

Personalisation and Automation in Sales

TSE 1315: Finding the Right Blend of Personalization and Automation In Outbound Sales

Personalisation and Automation in SalesThere has to be a balance between personalization and automation in outbound sales. The question is, how do you keep the right blend of the two? In this episode, we’ll discuss how to personalize the method of automation.

Stephen Lowisz always says that he sucks at everything except sales. He was 16 when he started selling consulting solutions. He didn’t make any money at first but even with no formal training he was able to study the process and he made his first 1.1 at 19. When Stephen started sales, it was old-school smile-and-dial. It was a time of manual effort – finding people, getting their data, putting it on SalesForce, and calling. Things are different now.

The lack of interest in effective outreach

Outbound sales isn’t necessarily viewed as appealing. The appeal comes later when you’re collecting the check. Outbound sales is considered spam because we often get automated messages from a variety of sources. Many sales teams don’t realize there is a right and wrong way of sending out emails. 

The balance between personalization and automation 

Executing Stephen’s philosophy of making outbound more personal is executed by taking a group of people that are almost identical in persona. Once they are selected he then communicates with the group as a specific persona and it helps make the message more personal even if it’s being automated to a specific group. In his company, they sell behavioral analytics to predict sales team performance within organizations and most of their products are focused on HR. They are good clients but they are not a group where persona can be defined.

When he talks to a small group of people who exhibit the same persona he can get very personal with them. Most salespeople approach an individual saying, “Hey I’m Stephen from Quality Agents. I run a performance solution and I have behavioral analytics …”  and on and on, making it all about them and their products.  Stephen has a different approach. He’ll say, “Look, running HR, essentially being the CEO of people in a fast-moving tech company with ever-changing needs, is really, really difficult. I get to align with HR leaders like yourself, to help them grow and scale and align their teams and I want to swap some insight and ideas.”  He’s able to make it about them and shows up to serve and partner. 

Automate the activity and the task

Stephen suggests that you can automate the activity and the task well. You can send a sequence of automated emails and then do the same thing with LinkedIn where you do voicemail drops.

Another tip to staying personal is by automating the task. In earlier years, sales had no automation. Everything was manually and there was a need for a methodology. Even with automation, however, we still need methodology in sales today. Without specific steps, you can end up working harder without working smarter. There are many tools to do this but it’s when you have a sequence and methodology that you are able to optimize your sales process. 

The approach 

Stephen created an e-book called Sales Code which offered a different mentality around sales. The goal of salespeople is to set up an appointment and make a deal; however, it is also equally important to pique the emotional curiosity of your prospects. This is what outbound sales is. It’s about piquing not just the product or service interest but also emotional curiosity.

To create a balance between automation and personalization, Stephen suggests beginning with a personal approach. Once they have an emotional investment, it is more likely appointments will be made. When that’s done you can move them through email automation and start connecting with them via LinkedIn automatically. After that, a personal conversation.

Cold-calling isn’t dead 

Cold-calling may not be scalable but it’s also not dead. It’s a good idea to warm-up your prospects with a few LinkedIn touches or emails. Depending on the size of your business, you can also use Facebook. Generally, it takes 7 – 12 touchpoints before someone will meet. Remember that prospects are different from each other so spend a lot of time nurturing the relationship using a lot of different avenues. Be professionally persistent without hounding your prospects.

Cold-calling is a catalyst to get a response via other mediums. More often than not, people won’t call you back but if you give them the right opportunity and nudge them in a professional way, they will respond. Others misconstrue formality with professionalism. Stephen uses an informal approach but he tailors his message. His goal is to talk to people on a peer-to-peer level. He is professional but for him, taking a formal approach doesn’t work as well. 

It’s very easy to become unoriginal in sales if you just follow the strategies of other people. It’s good to take into account what successful people have done but do it in a way that is authentic and unique to you, and to your client. 

The formal kind of market

According to Stephen, the European market can be very formal in the way that exchanges are made. He trains ways that conversations can be professional but still be conversational. If you communicate on the side of formality, you may try adjusting your approaches to best suit your client. 

Just remember to create a very niche and specific persona. Craft a custom message to that persona and take that same exact message and apply it to 100 people. Create a personal message and slightly back it up just enough so that you can automate it. 

Finding the Right Blend of Personalization and Automation In Outbound Sales” episode resources 

Connect with Stephen and know more about Qualigence via his LinkedIn account

If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald directly. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by Crmble, the easy-peasy CRM for Trello that helps you manage your contacts and leads without investing in complicated solutions, sync all your data, manage custom fields, and get powerful reporting on your sales. Try Crmble now for free at www.crmble.com/tse. This course is also brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. It will help them elevate their sales game. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can go and visit www.thesalesevangelist.com/closemoredeals also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Leading your SDR and BDR team

TSE 1306: How To Lead A Team of SDRs and BDRs During Challenging Times

Leading your SDR and BDR teamThese recent times have been tough for sales leaders. There’s a lot to be done, but if you have a team of SDRs and BDRs in these challenging times, you can still guide them toward success. Let’s talk about that in this episode. 

Asa Hochhauser has been in sales for 15 years primarily leading startups, both as an individual contributor and as a sales manager. He is currently busy helping sales enterprises, from small to mid-market businesses, and he is leading a sales academy where they are experiencing a lot of growth as people look for more training. 

Challenges in leading a team

Keeping the team motivated is often the biggest challenge a sales manager can face. It’s difficult to keep up team spirit and focus on helping other companies. It’s also equally challenging to ensure that the SDRs and BDRs are doing the right thing when it comes to disseminating information and providing value. Sometimes, salespeople are so focused on learning about the product their attention is diverted away from solving buyer problems.

Planning ahead 

As Abraham Lincoln said, “Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe.” Sending emails and calling on a daily basis is still a priority but these activities have to be modified to accommodate the change brought about by the improvement of technology and computers. Asa always encourages his team to spend time understanding their ideal customers or buyers and segmenting them. Asa is also seeing to it that they are keeping their outbound in motion and encourages his team to plan for the next day. These are all done based on marketing-generated outbound.  Asa’s team understands that when they plan ahead they’re not wasting valuable time that can be used on making actual contacts. They come to the office prepared with the set of activities that ensures productive time in the office. 

Leads coming in

For Asa’s team, their marketing-generated leads are coming in based on events or content that people are engaging with. They also have a list from Discover.org based on the content they’re creating. Platforms like LinkedIn, CRM, and SalesForce have also been effective tools.

 There are a lot of ways that businesses can get their list of prospects but Asa cautions that these platforms can also become a distraction. This is why planning is imperative. Your team will know which platform they should focus on but don’t spend so much time there that they move away from the business of selling. This was a lesson that Asa learned from his first sales experience. Activity is important and planning, even more. 

Hustle despite the challenges

BDRs and SDRs should always incorporate channels where their buyers are. As sales reps, we should be leading with value and empathy when reaching out to potential buyers. It’s not about asking them for appointments right out of the gate. In today’s market, conversations are started by providing the insight and value that will be helpful to the buyer.

For Asa’s team, their approach is to personalize contact based on the prospect they are trying to connect with. For example, they might send a helpful article highlighting ideas in the article that the buyer needs. This empathetic approach is all the more important with heightened isolation. Their approach has been adapted to focus more on the challenge brought about by the pandemic. SDRs and BDRs would do well to focus on the needs that their clients and prospects are facing and learn more about their problems.  Do this well before you mention your company’s name or product so you can personalize your solutions. Personalization is so important in today’s climate.

Improving personalization

BDRs and SDRs need to spend time doing their research. It’s important you understand the company you are trying to approach. Start by going to the bio profile or the company profile to know the people you want to talk to. Read what your buyers are reading. This common ground goes a long way in making a connection.

Another way to improve personalization is by providing solutions for pain points. Just ensure your messaging is centered on the person you’re talking to. Having a genuine approach is effective and so important. 

Even in these hard times, be grateful you are still a sales rep and a member of a team. This means you still have a job and with that, you have an opportunity to make a difference. 

“How To Lead A Team of SDRs and BDRs During Challenging Times” episode resources 

Reach out to Asa Hochhauser via his LinkedIn. If you enjoyed this episode, drop us a comment below! 

If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald directly. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by Crmble, the easy-peasy CRM for Trello that helps you manage your contacts and leads without investing in complicated solutions, sync all your data, manage custom fields, and get powerful reporting on your sales. Try Crmble now for free at www.crmble.com/tse. This course is also brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. It will help them elevate their sales game. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can go and visit www.thesalesevangelist.com/closemoredeals also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Outreach.io, Mark Kosoglow, Donald Kelly, OniChannel

TSE 1119: Sales From The Street: “Omnichannel Outreach”

Outreach.io, Mark Kosoglow, Donald Kelly, OniChannel

We consume information from a variety of platforms, so we have to connect with prospects from different angles using omnichannel outreach. We have to find our audience where they happen to be listening.

Mark Kosoglow is the VP of Sales at Outreach, a sales engagement channel, and he’s explaining today how sales reps can include omnichannel outreach in their efforts. His passion is developing people and creating a winning, fun, positive atmosphere where people are inspired to do their best.

He said if you are going to have a hard worker, they have to enjoy work. That doesn’t mean you have to enjoy what you do. It means you enjoy working and you’re likely always tinkering around the house. His dad taught him that if you make people’s work easy, they’ll work hard for you. To that end, he tries to make people’s work easier so they’ll work harder.

What is omnichannel?

Consider the following questions as you’re considering what omnichannel is.

  • Do you answer the phone when someone calls?
  • Do you reply to every email you receive?
  • Will you sometimes engage with people who contact you on social media?
  • Will you sometimes talk with people who stop by your home or office to sell something?

That’s omnichannel. As humans, we engage with people in many different ways depending on our mood or their approach or the channel.

The point of omnichannel outreach is to meet people where they are. People have preferred methods of communication, and by limiting yourself to a single channel you’re excluding a large number of people. You’re missing out on a growing audience.

Overthinking omnichannel

Many people don’t understand how to use omnichannel. With social, for example, if I’m targeting you on social media, I’d begin by following you. Then I’d read your posts and engage in activity to let you know that I’m interested in you as a human and in the things you’re doing. After I’ve built an online social relationship, the person I’m targeting should understand a little bit of why I’m interacting with them.

At that point, you can reach out with a value pitch or something that helps people understand what you’re offering.

As humans and nonsellers, we do this kind of stuff all the time very naturally, but then when we bring it to our careers and the way we make money, we get weird about it. We do stupid stuff that we would never do as a normal human. But the truth is that if you engage professionally on social media the same way you engage on your personal pages, you’ll be a great social seller.

Beginning with omnichannel

Sales managers who hear this may wonder how to introduce these concepts without disrupting the success their team members are already having. Admittedly it’s difficult to introduce change while trying to avoid disrupting the status quo.

At Outreach, the teams begin with a hypothesis like, “I believe that by engaging with our top 10 accounts that we can create more meetings.” It’s specific and measurable. Then they create a plan to go do that.

Maybe set up a strike team of your best reps or a cross-section of different kinds of reps and have them run the same process. Then, using KPIs, measure their results against the control results. If there’s a lift, then people will be happy to move to the new techniques.

Realize that you cannot have people who conduct activities in different ways. There must be a workflow and process in place to ensure that you’re measuring the process rather than the ability of the individual. In the end, you must have the guts to make a decision.

The only sellers who should balk at this kind of change are those that live in the exact house that they want, who are driving the exact car that they want, and they are happy coming into work. If a seller fits that description, he’s likely already making $10 million a year or he is lying to himself.

Tracking results

Sometimes our tracking processes do a fantastic job of motivating our activities, but they produce such a heavy cognitive load that teams spend more time managing them than they do in their sales activities.

Mark equates sales to plate spinning, where you spin up a couple of people on Monday, and then spin a couple more on Tuesday and then again on Wednesday, but you have to return to the Monday people to keep them spinning. The problem is that you can only spin so many plates at a time.

Technology allows you to add a motor to the stick that will keep the plate spinning until the motor runs out of gas. Technology helps you administer and run the system, and Outreach does exactly the same thing.

Personalize

Even if you’re automating a system, you can build out processes that allow you to be personable. Include a first step that involves research to discover two or three specific things about your prospect. Then include those in your CRM and write an email based on those things you found. The first step should not be an automated email.

Even if you send an automated email to 10,000 people and get 100responses back, you will have burned out 9,900 people by sending a generic email. Take your time and send personalized messages to a select group of people.

Organization size

Outreach works with single seller startups and huge companies like Adobe, Microsoft, and Amazon. The tool is meant to be flexible. The sweet spot is probably from 100-500 users; a company that is seeking to really nail down their scaling strategy. It’s for those companies who can’t afford to rely on the top 20 percent to carry the load for the other 80 percent.

Your company must have a much more operational system driven way of selling.

One of its secret sauces is its integration with SalesForce and Dynamics so that every action is logged into the CRM automatically. The tool uses a feature called Amplify that involves complex, futuristic machine learning.

Machine learning

As an example, the average percentage for out-of-office replies is 17 percent. So 1 in 5 of those responses will likely include the date the person will return, and the name and phone number of someone else in the organization who may even be higher in the organization. And most reps probably delete those emails despite all the good information that’s in them.

You’re 46 percent less likely to book a meeting with someone if you contact them a second time when they’re out of the office. Pair that information with the fact that the majority of those emails will include the contact information for another person on the team. Outreach has created machine learning that can read out-of-office replies.

It reads the date of return in the email and offers an option to pause all communication until the recipient returns. It also notifies you of the other team member’s contact information. With one click, you can address these issues.

From the company’s origins, they scanned emails and discovered 73,000 phone numbers in the email signature blocks. Of those contacts, only 23 percent of those were added to CRM by the reps. Seventy-seven percent of those were never captured.

In 9 out of 10 deals, you end up talking with the person who was originally listed on that out-of-office email. And considering how much less likely you are to book a deal if you contact the person again while they are out of office, it’s damaging your efforts if you don’t read the out-of-office email.

This helps you be more personable because you’re not contacting the person continually while he’s on vacation.

Multiple channels

If you aren’t contacting people on multiple channels, you’re limiting your ability to succeed. But don’t go willy-nilly spending half your day on LinkedIn. It’s a waste of time. Create a defined experiment with a hypothesis to test against, measure it, and see if you can get better at what matters by doing something different.

If you can combine those two things, you can potentially improve your performance in two weeks.

“Omnichannel Outreach” episode resources

You can connect with Mark on LinkedIn, where he’s fairly active. He doesn’t do Twitter, Facebook, or other social media. You can also connect with him at outreach.io to book a demo and experience world-class inbound lead handling. Within two minutes you get a personalized email from a rep, and within 15 minutes, large companies get a phone call from a rep.

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester. You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561) 578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Take advantage of a 30-day free trial, including a free book of your choice, at audible.com/tse.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. When you share your experiences with the show, others will read the reviews and give us a listen.

I truly appreciate you and appreciate your reviews and your subscription, and your willingness to tell your friends and anyone you know that’s in sales about the podcast.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Donald Kelly, Customer Experience, Sales, Donald Kelly

TSE 1027: 3 Simple Things You Can Do To Offer Exceptional Customer Experiences

Donald Kelly, Customer Experience, Sales, Donald KellyWhen you’re working to stand out from the pack, there are 3 simple things you can do to offer exceptional customer experiences.

In this day and age, it is easier now that ever before to stand out by offering a great experience because so many others, quite frankly, are not.

We can get almost anything we want quickly and easily. That focus on speed, however, eventually causes the quality of the customer experience to decline. Think about it. So many organizations focus on speed in order to beat their competition or to attain the numbers, that they neglect to put their customers first.

While it is certainly possible to have both, it takes effort.

The bar has been set low today. When we focus on the speed at which we deliver our product or service, or focus only on finding and getting new customers, we neglect the people we already have.  

The bucket analogy

We neglect the people we already have that are easier to sell to … the ones who can give us referrals … the ones we can upsell ….We neglect them and waste our time running back and forth, here and there, instead.

It is the bucket analogy all over again. We work hard to fill our buckets by bringing people in only to have them fall straight out the holes in the bottom. We need to be sure to plug those holes so that our hard work doesn’t drain away.

One of the things we can do to show love and care and respect to our current customers is to woo them, right from the start, with a great experience.

What happens too often is that we knock on doors, blast emails, and get their attention with great marketing messages. We sell them on a dream or a vision, and we deliver our product quickly.

But we neglect to consider our client’s experience.

Exceptional customer experiences

Your client’s name

Dale Carnegie once said that “a person’s name is to him/her, the sweetest and most important sound in any language.” It’s true.  We can be in a large crowd but if someone calls our name, we immediately turn around. We want to know who knows us.

Using your client’s name in conversations creates a more personalized experience. It is as simple as “What can I help you with today, Amanda?” I know for sure, that if you are going to call my company or connect with me, I will respond much better if you use my name.

Be sure to address your client the way he prefers to be addressed. For example, does he sign his emails as ‘Dave’ or ‘David’? If you aren’t sure, just ask. The simple task of asking about something that is important to him shows that you care.  

How your clients make money

If you plan to teach them how to save money, or how to bring in more money, you best know how they already do it.

This is why it is important to study how various industries work and operate. If your client is a nursing home, for example, a simple Google search can help you understand if the client makes more money via patient stays or from insurance payments or Medicare payments.

Having a basic understanding makes the conversation so much easier.

Personalized interactions

Send a thank you note at the very end of your conversation, even if it is the first meeting.

“Dave, it was amazing to connect with you last week” or “I look forward to talking to you again soon, Amanda.” It doesn’t have to be elaborate or lengthy. In fact, what you say in the note isn’t as important as the fact that you took the time to send one.

It is great to send an email as well, but a thank you note demonstrates a higher level of care. It gives an added touch.

Additionally, the thank you note will be delivered 3 or 4 days after your conversation. It serves as a nice reminder of the conversation, and it helps you stand out.

You can also personalize your presentations. Use your client’s logo and tagline in every presentation you make for them. It is another added touch that shows you care and that you are willing to take the extra step. It will help you stand out significantly over your competition.

If you can combine these 3 simple things that offer exceptional customer experience with the delivery of amazing speed, you are going to be totally fine. I’m sure of it.

“Exceptional Customer Experiences” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, which teaches you to improve your sales skills, find more customers, build stronger value, and close more deals.

The next semester begins in April.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Michael Wills, Donald Kelly, Sales Training, How to do a salesprocess

TSE 971: How To Develop A Sales Process That Works

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we talk with global sales team leader Michael Wills about how to develop a sales process that works.

Many sellers have no real sense of direction, but they expect to be successful despite the lack of a plan.

Defining a sales process

A sales process provides a way for you to communicate with a buyer in a systematic way that is successful and repeatable. A single success doesn’t mean you have a sales process. It needs to be measurable so you can confirm results and grow.

To start, recognize that you’re doing something well, but there are no doubt areas that you can improve.

Figure out who exactly your buyer is.

Find out these things:

  • Where do they live?
  • Where do they work?
  • How do they work?
  • How can you communicate with them effectively?
  • What’s my industry?
  • What’s the norm?

Be able to understand and document that information, which will give you a path. Once you have that path, you can figure out the processes to execute.

If you have someone who has had internal success, do a Q&A with him and figure out what his best practices are and build processes around those ideas.

People who aren’t led systematically will create their own strategies, which isn’t necessarily a positive thing. The process facilitates the execution of a strategy.

Dangers of operating without a process

If your team doesn’t have a process in place, you won’t know whether the team is selling to customers that you don’t necessarily want to do business with. You won’t know if the team is selling in a way that is unprofessional or inappropriate. Finally, you won’t know how consistent each person is in the process.

It’s important that you don’t let people operate on their own because you can’t grow around that system.

The sales process must be built around the way the buyers buy. When you truly know who you’re going after, you can understand their way of purchasing.

It’s also really important to understand where your buyer fits within the decision-making process because you’ll have different processes for different levels of people.

The method of communication and the information you share differs based on authority and timeline.

Fundamental parts of a process

Begin by understanding that your buyer knows 50 to 60 percent of what she needs to know because she ever talks to you for the first time. Knowing that frames the picture for you to jump in and be further down the sales process than you would have been without that knowledge.

Begin by talking about the client’s industry and situation. Use her language and previous client experience to bring value. You can share information, share best practices and share things you understand about the challenges her organization will face.

By doing that, you become a trusted person.

Today’s buyer needs value early. By sharing that value, you become trusted, and that person will share your information through the organization.

You can share solutions and then concrete details about how other clients have solved these problems.

Building a pipeline

Build a pipeline of prospects that are interesting to you.

Choose an industry you have a little bit of insight into and that you’re comfortable with. It’s important to understand the language of the industry.

Use the Internet to learn about the industry and the company itself. Determine hot topics and find out the things they are posting.

Instead of referring to it as cold calling, we should call it smart calling because we’ve done the research and you know who you want to talk to and why you want to talk to them.

It’s a lower conversion rate but it’s a great way to build your pipeline and gain some real opportunities.

Customization

Find the right level of customization for your prospecting.

Using a first name in an email is critical, but so is the information you find through your Internet searches, posts, product launches, and any other information that demonstrates that you’ve done some work.

Value

You can’t discuss value until you understand the industry you’re working in.

Use the experience you’ve gained by working with an earlier client to quantify benefits for your potential clients. Through your discovery process, talk to the prospect about the current situation and how your product or service could help them operate more efficiently or have capabilities they didn’t have before.

It’s “back of the napkin” stuff that doesn’t require an Excel spreadsheet, but it’s specific information that will be relevant to your prospect.

When a prospect agrees to meet with you, they already know a decent amount about your product. If you initiate the conversation talking about value, and you can quantify that value, it’s a different conversation.

Being consistent doesn’t mean you never tweak your process, but consistency is the only way to track whether your process is working or not.

It’s critical for salespeople to know what they do well and to understand why they do the things they do.

“A Sales Process That Works” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Dave Cook, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Closing

TSE 933: Closing Strategies That Can Be Used By People at Any Level In Any Industry

Dave Cook, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, ClosingNo one wants to discover at the end of a sales process that the prospect isn’t planning to buy. So how can you improve the odds that your prospect follows through? What closing strategies will improve your odds?

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, David Cook, author of How to Be a Great Salesperson… By Monday Morning!, discusses closing strategies that any seller can use in any industry to close more deals.

Closing

When we do our jobs properly, our prospects can’t help but buy our products and services.

Even though we’re all constantly using computers, sellers have to humanize the process. When people call your organization with questions, they want to talk to someone who is more than a robot with a heartbeat.

David begins with a cough. It sounds strange, but he explains to his prospects that he picked up a cough while he was walking his dog over the weekend.

Now your prospect knows you have a dog, and if he has a dog, there’s common ground. The prospect is no longer talking to a robot.

People are dying for the human touch. They crave it, so give it to them.

Urgency

Make sure to say your customer’s name over and over. Every time you do, you’re breaking down barriers. If you’re making a really strong point, make sure to use the prospect’s name.

Also, urgency separates the stars from the superstars. If you don’t create a need for the prospect to act now, why would they?

The first moment they hear about your product is the hottest they’ll ever be. They’ll get involved in other projects as time goes by, and they’ll cool to your product.

But how do you create urgency without being pushy?

Talk about the company as an outside entity.

“They’re allowing me to offer you x if you act by this date.” It isn’t you making the rules; the company is making the rules.

Position yourself as an advocate for your prospect.

Confidence

You must expect the sale. You must stay positive.

In the example of real estate, when you’re showing a home to a prospect, refer to it as their living room, their swimming pool, and their kitchenThe more times you refer to it as theirs, the more likely the customer will subconsciously start to think of the house as theirs.

If you build a burning desire within your customer to acquire your products and services, there’s no dollar amount in the world that’s too much.

Humor

Make your customer laugh.

Within a first few seconds of talking to you, they’ll decide whether or not they are going to buy from you. Get them laughing immediately.

If you make them laugh, they are on your side because their brains release endorphins that make them feel good.

Happy people buy and unhappy people do not.

Believe

You have to believe in your heart that your customer is lucky to be talking to you. You must believe in your product.

If you don’t think they’re lucky to be talking to you about your product or service that will make their lives easier or help them impress their bosses, then why should they believe they are lucky to be talking to you?

Your customer will pick up on it if you don’t absolutely believe in your product.

Believe that you have a moral obligation to share good things with your prospects.

“Closing Strategies” episode resources

You can connect with David at his website, salestrainingonthego.com. You can also grab a copy of his book, How to Be a Great Salesperson… By Monday Morning!

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

This episode is also brought to you byMaximizer CRM. If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Ryan O'Hara, LeadIQ, Sales Prospecting, Outbound

TSE 928: The New Era of Effective Prospecting

The process of prospecting constantly changes. It has evolved over the last 5, 10, 15 years, and it continues to evolve today. Buyers are more educated than they used to be, so we’re entering a new era of effective prospecting.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we talk to Ryan O’Hara, VP of marketing and growth at Lead IQ, about the new era of effective prospecting.

Are you practicing the old methods of prospecting? Are you willing to try new ones?

Prospecting changes

When Ryan first started prospecting in 2008, he recalled starting with a person’s first name, last name, title, company, email, and phone number. LinkedIn was new but not many people were using it.

Now, more people have online presences, which literally gives you an open book on how to win their hearts. It’s so easy now to figure out what the prospect is interested in.

The problem is that, since more and more people are doing it, it’s becoming less effective. For the last 10 years, these prospects have been hammered with the same cold emails and cold calls.

You have to do way more today to win your prospects over.

New movement

A lot of salespeople are working to be more human in their selling and their prospecting.

We have a chance right now to refresh and do everything right. Part of that includes learning how to be more human at scale.

The struggle is figuring out how to hit your quotas and be human at the same time.

If you’re a new company, the best approach is to do a lot of activity to figure out the best way to up your product. When you’re learning to sell a product, it’s not a bad idea to do quantity so you learn to beat objections.

Personalization

If you’re working at a bigger company, the more customization and personalization you have to do. Most people think it’s the opposite.

It’s really true now that you aren’t calling or emailing or doing social to convince someone to look at your product because it’s awesome. You’re hand-picking prospects and inviting them to engage with you because you specifically picked them.

When Lead IQ reaches out to someone, they use social every week. They use video on LinkedIn, and they reach out to anyone who engages with it, even if that person is already a customer.

We might ask them to introduce us to another person. They think it’s cool because we’re engaging with them.

It’s also important to be entertaining and appeal to the person rather than the company since people are less loyal to their companies now.

  • Have interesting stats.
  • Share interesting commentary.
  • Start a discussion about an article they shared.
  • Stay away from religion and politics.

Lead cycle

If you reach out to a prospect who isn’t in the market for your goods and services right now, engage them to create some sort of content for you.

They could write a blog post or do an interview with you, and you can help them get their name out there. At the same time, some of their customers are likely people who would want to see your products.

You’ll establish a lasting rapport that might benefit you someday.

Also if you engage with someone who isn’t a good customer, you can ask them to make a referral for you. You’ll be creating a cycle that will constantly generate warm leads for you.

Lead IQ

Ryan’s team likes to do the tedious work required before you reach out to a prospect.

  • If you’re trying to determine whether anyone from your team is already working on this account
  • If you hate creating leads or contacts in Salesforce
  • If you want to be able to find your prospects on the web, research them, and get all of their contact info

They’re trying to mash all the steps together so that when you have to reach out to a customer, you can hit one button and get all the different sales tools.

Sales reps spend 6.8 hours a week doing data entry, but people that use Lead IQ spend less than an hour. It can save your sales reps a lot of time which will allow them to get more deals.

Consider the industry. Be thoughtful with everything you do.  All it takes is one bad rep to make people decide to stop taking sales calls.

Make your prospects feel good. Make them feel like they are being scouted.

“Effective Prospecting” episode resources

You can connect with Ryan on LinkedIn by sending him a personalized message. He gets about 50 messages a day, so he only responds to the personalized messages.

You can also find him at LeadIQ, along with information about prospecting and some of the experiments they’ve done.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

This episode is also brought to you byMaximizer CRM. If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Pagely, Sean Tierney, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Sales Process

TSE 921: The 7-Step Approach Pagely Used to Systematize Sales

Whether you’re working a sales campaign or building a fantasy football league, preparation and process will always improve your outcome. You absolutely have to have a sales process to systematize your sales.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’ll hear from Sean Tierney, Director of Sales for managed WordPress hosting provider Pagely.  Sean will share the 7-step approach Pagely used to systematize its sales that can help you and your team improve your sales.

Pagely helps some of the world’s largest brands — Disney, Virgin Atlantic, Comcast, Univision, and other companies that don’t want to worry about scaling and securing their websites.

“Shoot from the hip” sales

When Sean took over at Pagely three years ago, the sales process was non-existent. He was employee number eight, and he was running both sales and marketing.

The company had lost its main salesperson, and the team was basically shooting from the hip. That approach wasn’t working, so Sean was adamant about setting up a framework to systematize the sales process.

He built a 7-step approach for sales that allowed the company to more than 3x its revenue.

In that time, the employee headcount has grown to 38.

7-step approach to sales

  1. Map out the flow.
  2. Track metrics and KPIs.
  3. Implement a pipeline.
  4. Flintstone.
  5. Delegate
  6. Automate.
  7. Scale personal attention.

Flow refers to the buyer’s journey, and there are two different kinds of maps that Pagely uses to understand the current reality.

One is an imagined drawing on paper that shows how people are getting to the website. It shows the lead forms they are filling out and where that information goes. It shows newsletters and support systems so Pagely can understand where all the data is going.

The other flow map is a funnel map, which is usually a left-to-right diagram that helps you understand your funnel.

  • How do people come to find out about you when they don’t know anything?
  • How do they proceed down the continuum of increasing engagement on the way to sharing their contact information?
  • What does the followup and nurturing process look like?
  • How will you grow the relationship once they’re a customer?

Pagely considers it a lifecycle of sorts; it’s lifecycle marketing.

 

How the system affected sales

The first hire following the new system was a sales development representative because Sean recognized that sales development was where the bottleneck was happening.

Sean recognized that sales development was keeping him from being more strategic, a feeling that many entrepreneurs can likely relate to because they wear so many hats.

You have to be cognizant of what’s consuming your time.

Sean assigned his interns to import all his chats, his emails,  and his phone calls into a spreadsheet. The team pulled more than 500 sales exchanges into the spreadsheet and turned that into a knowledge base.

That information became their training material for the first hire, who was one of the interns.

Flintstoning

Flintstoning refers to the presence of a pre-optimization problem. Very often people try to launch immediately into automating things, but entrepreneurs know that it’s important to automate the right things.

Pagely didn’t have a fancy CRM tool initially, so Sean used a simple tool called Boomerang that would notify him if a prospect hadn’t responded to his email within a predetermined amount of time.

Instead of using a fancy tool, he started with something simple. Then he figured out what the follow-up process should look like.

You don’t have to be perfect right away. You just have to start.

 

Scaling personal attention

Sean learned the concept from Jermaine Griggs, a well-known marketer some time back. The idea is that you provide a boutique experience at scale.

Why do people go to boutique stores? Because they like the personal touch.

Seek to deliver that experience at scale.

Pagely uses video to deliver a personalized sales pitch. They employ presales questions that the sales reps ask in every call, and that effort often engages prospects who wouldn’t have otherwise done so.

Because they get a chance to “see” the sales rep and hear some of their questions being answered, it pulls them in.

Video personalization

Personalized content allows you to give your prospects exactly what they want.

Imagine being able to craft a video to your prospect, and allowing the prospect halfway through to choose one of five problems that most plague his business. At that point, the video explains how your company solved that problem for other customers.

The conversation is immediately more relevant because it addresses his exact problem.

Beyond giving you a better experience, Sean is able to extract answers and follow up using the information and data points he gathered.

In the emails you get after the video, they’ll be very fine-tuned to the pain point you have. It can be highly calibrated to your situation.

It’s a win-win proposition because the prospect is getting exactly what he needs in an engaging format, and the sales rep doesn’t have to spend so much time answering the same repetitive questions. It lowers the overhead.

The process also allows for much higher-level conversation when the sales rep finally does get on the phone. Instead of dreading those initial phone calls, people tend to be excited to have the conversation.

Pagely

Pagely is at the high end of the market, and they actually launched the concept. For big brands, it’s not worth it to focus on running a website.

Disney is happy to pay to offload all the web concerns to someone else so they can focus on their core competency.

Don’t just parachute in and flail. Take your time and understand where you’re trying to get. Be intentional as you execute.

“Systematize Sales” episode resources

Pagely has a huge amount of resources available on its website. You can see the information about Pagely’s knowledge base here.  To view the videos Sean referred to in the episode, visit Pagely.com/explore. See the video sample at Pagely.com/video.

Also, check out dot.vu to learn more about the interactive videos Pagely employs to lower its overhead and improve engagement.

Be intentional as you develop the seven steps:

  1. Map out the flow.
  2. Track metrics and KPIs.
  3. Implement a pipeline.
  4. Flintstone.
  5. Delegate
  6. Automate.
  7. Scale personal attention.

Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Christie Walters, The Why and The Buy Podcast, Sales Caoching

TSE 898: What Role Does A Sales Coach Play In A Growing Organization?

Christie Walters, The Why and The Buy Podcast, Sales Caoching

Christie Walters believes that sales is an act of service. She defines coaching as the secret sauce for all top performers. Coaches take on different forms, and Christie believes that the best coaches operate from the performer’s perspective rather than their own.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Christie Walters, co-host of the podcast The Why and The Buy, explains how coaching can help you find better ways to accomplish things and help you overcome barriers to success. She answers the question, “What role does a sales coach play in a growing organization?”

She calls coaching powerful and transformative, and she relates that she worked with her own coach for 10 years before becoming one herself.

Career shaping

Good sales coaches help you identify your own goals and your own internal struggles.

The outside perspective a coach offers can help you fine-tune your life and your work. Coaches help us recognize our blind spots and the self-limiting beliefs that are holding us back.

Coaches don’t necessarily indicate that there’s a problem. Very often, companies bring them in to initiate big change.

Coaches help you design the future of your life instead of allowing your future to happen to you.

Growing organizations

Organizations typically engage coaches when they are trying to move to the next level.

For sales leaders, in particular, it’s easy to get so busy managing out and up that you forget to manage down. If you’re managing down, you’re often not coaching along the way.

What percentage of your time is spent nurturing your people?

It’s really more than sales processes, which are important to success. It’s also more than sales training, which will largely look the same for every person in your organization. Sales coaching relates to the individual person because each of us has unique struggles.

Coaching, together with training and leadership, can exponentially change the trajectory of your team.

Personalized coaching

It’s difficult for sales managers and leaders to step into the personal level with their employees, but it’s a powerful tool for success.

There must be a personal element for each person’s processes, and the path to success won’t look the same for everyone. Simply mimicking others’ success won’t work because each salesperson has a unique personality.

Although there is value in parroting what you see and hear others doing, that cannot be your long-term plan. If you’re new to the industry, it’s ok to copy what others are doing, but develop your own techniques and your own authentic approach.

If you aren’t selling from an authentic place, you might have small successes, but you won’t be ultimately successful.

Initial coaching

Christie said that although she is often hired by companies, she serves individuals. She strives to help people discover themselves and their own tendencies so they can tie those things to their own work performance.

It’s about getting the individual deeply connected to the work he’s doing and about helping him understand his work as a service. He’s serving the people he’s selling to, and he’s supporting other things he loves by working.

What drives you on a day-to-day basis?

The first meeting will help you figure out what drives you, what blocks you, and what your blind spots are. Christie views coaches as accountability partners for their clients, and she notes that too many salespeople aren’t their own champions.

She also stresses the power of a single negative thought and the power it has to spiral to more negativity. When salespeople learn to channel that frenetic energy into something that serves them instead of draining them, they’ll change their sales performance.

Common struggles

Every salesperson will eventually struggle, and every company will eventually face transition.

Coaches come in all shapes and sizes, but there are three elements to success for every organization.

  • Build a solid culture which starts at the top.
  • Create training programs that allow people to carry your culture into the marketplace.
  • Coach your salespeople to avoid drift inside your organization.

Be a champion for your salespeople and consider hiring a sales coach to transform your team.

“What Role Does A Sales Coach Play?” episode resources

Connect with Christie Walters on LinkedIn, or on her website, ChristieWalters.com. Find her podcast The Why And The Buy,  and listen to an earlier conversation between Donald Kelley and Christie Walters on episode 87 of her podcast. You can also call or text her at (770) 687-6678.

Today’s episode was also brought to you by Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and making your brand pop using video. If you want to stand out, use video. Video is everywhere, and it can help you improve your presence. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

If you think you might benefit from more stories like these, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights. We’re beginning a new semester this fall, and we’d be honored for you to join us.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.