Category Archives for Marketing and Sales

TSE 1189: Pulling Profits Out of a Hat

TSE 1189 Pulling Profits Out of a Hat

Pulling profits out of a hat is something that salespeople are raving about. But how do you go about it? 

Brad Sugar has been in the teaching business for 26 years and now has coaching offices in over 80 countries. He’s also a published author with 17 books in his name. He appreciates being able to help others grow their business and keeps expanding his business to be able to help more people improve their sales. 

One of his recent books is Pulling Profits Out of a Hat: Adding Zeros to Your Company Isn’t Magic 1st Edition. This book teaches companies how to get multiple growths instead of percentage growth. As salespeople, challenge yourself to multiply your growth. If your company grew by 15% last year, make it an aim to grow it 15 times more this year. 

The starting point is to believe that your business can multiply and have the right attitude in getting it there. 

Pulling profits out of a hat

Every business person is a business owner. Whatever your role is, whether it be a salesperson or a sales leader, you have your own section of the business.  

Set your goals and be specific about them. What are the goals you want to achieve two times, five times, and so on? There are five core disciples mentioned in the book – strategy, business development, people, execution, and mission. You need to start with the strategy. 

Strategy

Strategy can be broken down into four main points: 

  • Leverage
  • Scalability
  • Opportunity
  • Marketability

We define leverage as doing the work once and getting paid for a long-term basis. Bill Gates, for example, understood leverage. He made software once and he sold it forever. These days, Microsoft doesn’t sell software anymore. They make you pay for it every single month. Steve Jobs understood leverage after he got fired from Apple. He bought Pixar and found ways to sell a movie repeatedly in various formats. They sell their products and they set their businesses up in a way that customers buy it over and over again all the while making a lesser effort in selling it.

Salespeople find this challenging because they’re not wired to do this. They are trained to do sales one at a time as opposed to the marketers who do multiple sales at a time. The selling one at a time mentality kills the business. A salesperson should remember all his strategies, from the short-term to the medium-term, and the long-term. Don’t go directly to the long-term strategy where you build your reputation with social media and create content. Start from the short term goal of picking up the phone and making a call.  

Scalability 

Brad defines scalability as the next sale should cost less and is easier to sell. Salespeople need to keep building, to look at what the product or services they’re selling, and how they’re selling it. Work the scales into your program and go backward. Think of ways of how you can continually make money month after month. 

Set goals that are based on the market and the opportunity size and not based on your own needs, desires, and previous results. #SalesSuccess

Marketability 

Look for products and services that are easier to sell and check their marketability. Zappos has a good market. It sells shoes and many people want shoes. They want shoes now, they want shoes next month, and they want new shoes just to look good. The market is rich and they have a product that’s easy to sell. 

Sales, marketing, and customer service all have to go hand-in-hand. This is easy if you don’t want to grow your business but if you want to grow your business exponentially, you need to have a great sales system, a great marketing system, and a great customer service system. 

Break down the marketing to the most granular loads and work backward from there because that’s how you get good results. You don’t leave the basic steps of doing the call even when you’ve already made it to the building connection phase. 

Continue getting at least 20 connects a day or whatever number you’re supposed to reach as a sales rep. There is no limit on how many you must do but there is a limit on how little you must do. 

Testimonials and rankings are two of the most important things in marketing today. Find ways to make people give you testimonials and ask them to rank you.

Value 

Another thing that would help you be better in pulling profits out of a hat is to add value. Keep learning because you can only ever own as much as you’ve learned to make. It’s also important to make sure that your sale is made before you turn up. 

In real estate for example, when somebody calls asking for an appraisal, do not just send them an e-mail. Make it more personal and let them know why you’re the company for the job. Send them a box filled with the magazine where testimonials of your customers are found. Deliver it to them as fast as you can. When the prospect gets the box, they’ll think you’re a genius and they’ll want to work with you because you aren’t just an email. You are as visible as the testimonials in the magazines show. This is how you make the sale before even showing up. 

“Pulling Profits Out of a Hat” episode resources

Always continue learning and never wish life were easier. instead, wish that you were better. If you get better at sales, then life gets easier. If you get better at marketing, and marketing gets easier. Connect with Brad in his social media accounts. He is in LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook. You can also visit his website Brad Sugars and ActionCoach.

You can also ask Donald any of your sales concerns via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook

This episode is brought to you in-part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a helpful guide for sales reps and sales leaders to improve their pitches and presentations. It has 12 Modules and you can get the first two modules for free! 

If you like this episode, don’t be shy and give us a thumbs up and rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. We produce podcasts weekly so make sure to subscribe! Share this with your friends and teach them how to subscribe as well. 

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

You can also check out Audible as well and explore this huge online library with thousands of books. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.  

 

Marketing, B2B, Bill Bice

TSE 1178: B2B Sales Optimization

 

Marketing, B2B, Bill BiceB2B sales optimization requires a longterm commitment to creating quality content that will grow your audience and increase your success.

Bill Bice, CEO of  boomtime, said he was born to be an entrepreneur, launching his first business when he was 14. He loves to talk about sales and marketing because it makes the biggest difference in business. 

Data and marketing

As business owners, we all know that we have to spend money on marketing, but it’s tough to do if you’re not seeing the ROI. For Bill, marketing is about data, which allows you to understand what’s working. The difficulty occurs when you have too much data because it can be difficult to gather valuable insights that help you improve marketing.

Smaller companies often have more freedom to bring their sales and marketing together. In larger companies, the two disciplines are separate, and they are often at odds. Marketing isn’t doing the support work the sales team needs and each blames the other for lack of performance. 

In smaller companies, the CEO or entrepreneur can decide to tie the two together. 

Bill calls himself a big fan of the challenger sales approach, which resulted from research done in Fortune 500 companies. The concept of using key insights to drive a sales approach creates sales optimization in smaller companies. It’s a perfect example of tying together marketing and sales so that marketing generates insights that truly help sellers. It creates better opportunities which result in better success. 

B2B sales optimization

To begin with, businesses must be better at 

  1. capturing leads 
  2. following up on those leads
  3. staying top-of-mind with that larger audience that we’re building 

In any complex, high-value sale, a content-driven approach to marketing is the perfect way to optimize the sales process. 

Then, if you’ve done the hard work of taking care of your customers, they’ll tell others about your business which creates referrals. Now the goal is to amplify that effect, 

How do we make word-of-mouth work even better? 

Capturing leads

Micro-commitments are the most effective part of capturing leads and in doing B2B sales optimization. Your website was once a replacement for the Yellow Pages, and a way to get people to pick up the phone. Now, the most important piece of information for a prospective client is an email address.

If you ask for the prospect’s name, you’ll reduce conversion by 20%. If you ask for the phone number, you’ll reduce conversion by 60%. Every additional field you add reduces conversion by another 8%.

Ask for the one thing you really want from the prospect, which is an email address. You have to be willing to do something that is really hard in order to get those referrals and capture those leads. 

You have to give your best stuff away for free. Give away your deepest and best expertise in exchange for the really valuable thing, which is the email address. #CaptureProspects

The traditional battle between sales and marketing centers around what makes a qualified lead. All we really want is to get people to follow us on LinkedIn and to get the prospects’ email addresses. If we grow our audience in those two places and we’re constantly sending people back to our website with high-value insight, that creates success. 

What’s actually hard to do is the day-to-day work in the trenches, because it’s the consistency that makes this work. 

Marketing mistakes

There are B2B sales optimization mistakes that marketers commit. The first on the list is talking about themselves. Nobody cares. 

Are you talking about the problems your target audience struggles with, and are you helping them solve those problems?

Of the content you provide to your prospects, 90% should be entirely focused on the problems your audience is having and the insights you bring that they can’t get from anywhere else. 

The good news is that if you have a niche in the marketing your company serves, then hundreds of those companies will share the same problems. 

CEOs struggle to find those insights because they are running their own businesses. Your marketing department must take advantage of that. You must train your sales team to use a key-insight driven approach. 

Secondly, you must commit to this kind of approach in your sales and marketing. You should plan for at least a year. It won’t be a miracle fix. 

Test and iterate

All forms of content work. Whether you use video, white papers, or checklists, you must test each idea to determine what’s best for that particular segment of the target audience. Even with the explosion of LinkedIn, most B2B sales optimization organizations aren’t leveraging it the way they could. 

The whole point is to grow a new audience and LinkedIn is the easiest way to get your word out to a larger audience of exactly the right prospects. 

Avoid being salesy. Be there to help your network. Use your key insights to drive interest in what you’re doing. Share insights with consistent posting. 

Get the executive team involved in building the audience. Then, turn those connections into opportunities for the sales team. 

Bill’s team sends 40-50 connection requests a day, and they follow up on each one of those accepted connection requests with a recently-written article by that executive that tackles a problem and shows your audience how to solve it. 

Following up on leads

Everybody wants more leads, but most companies generate all the leads they need. The easiest thing to do is to follow up on the leads you already have. 

Most sales teams aren’t very good at using the CRM so they aren’t capturing leads. No follow-up exists. 

Bill’s team created a process that requires going through email boxes of everyone who is client-facing and capturing those email addresses. Add those people to your CRM and then apply a nurturing campaign that follows up on every single lead. 

Sellers tend to focus on things that will create a commission in the next 60 to 90 days. When you get a prospect that may take 6 to 12 months to close, you may see a tendency to drop those. Put a system in place to capture those leads and follow up with them. Use that data to understand when they are interested so you can assign a salesperson to them when they start paying attention. 

Lead follow-up represents the lowest-hanging fruit in most B2B organizations. Think of the number of people you meet at trade shows, and then figure the number of leads that actually get added to your CRM. They are all valuable prospects, but some may not be immediately valuable.

CRM

Bill dislikes the fact that CRM systems are designed for sales managers, but his team uses Pipedrive. He does appreciate the fact that modern CRMs integrate email systems so that you can see all the email interaction that’s happening within the company.

The more your company automates around CRM, the more likely the sellers will actually use it. Make it a tool that actually makes their lives better rather than just a tool that tracks what they are doing. 

In an ideal world, sales managers will work to uncover objections and help the sellers be more effective. 

Top-of-mind

Once you put some real effort into building a larger audience, it will begin to grow organically because you’re giving them social currency. Word-of-mouth works best, and we want to amplify that. The best way to do that is to give the audience that already knows you — current clients, past clients, and prospective clients — the tools to create referrals for you. 

If you’re giving them insightful and helpful content, the next time the issue comes up while they are having lunch with a peer, they’ll have the perfect thing to talk about. As your audience shares your content, you’ll get organic growth. 

Getting started

Everyone is terrified at this piece because actually doing it is the hardest part. Other than in early-stage startups, companies will struggle to accomplish this unless they tag a dedicated resource. Hire a large enough team to make it happen. 

In Bill’s case, they don’t do the writing themselves. They hire people who are already in that market, who understand it well, and who don’t have to be trained. That kind of approach works consistently to develop a steady flow of high-quality content. 

It’s a combination of well-written content with good insights that match the company’s tone. 

Coming up with ideas is the easy part. 

Send an email with a single link and a catchy headline. Drive your audience back to the website. Link all those articles together so that you create a trail of crumbs and you can see what really interests them. Your reader should never reach the bottom of the blog article and not have a next place to go. 

About us

The second most visited page on almost every B2B site is the About Us page, but 99% of the time, that page includes a boring list of executives and bios. It doesn’t sell you on the company. It doesn’t take you to the next natural place that you should go to. 

You’re trusting your prospects to figure out where to go but you really want to control that customer journey and tell the whole story. Managing that journey improves the capture rate of leads. 

Many customers choose companies who have a face on the business. They will choose you because there’s a real person behind the business who cares about them as a client. 

No quick fix

The number-one battle we face in marketing is that there’s no quick fix. This approach works, but it’s a long-term commitment. If you apply it all through your sales team, you’ll create a dramatic trajectory for your company. 

The challenger sale reports that 53 percent of why customers buy from your company traces to the sales experience rather than the product, the price, the service, or the delivery. The key is how they are sold. 

“B2B Sales Optimization” episode resources

Bill loves to talk with business owners and marketing directors about sales and marketing. You can connect with him at boomtime.com, or on LinkedIn

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. We want you guys to go out each and every single day to find more ideal customers and do big things.

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Inbound Leads, Marketing, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1177: Our Inbound Leads Are Causing More Work Than Good Sales

Inbound Leads, Marketing, The Sales Evangelist

Often, you hear salespeople say, “Our inbound leads are causing more work than good sales.” It’s always on the question of who should follow up on inbound leads and how to go about it effectively.

Many small organizations are having a hard time utilizing their inbound strategies effectively. We don’t have all the variables and all the situations within an organization. Still, we can assume that there are three people on a sales team. 

The sales team

Assume that a sales team is composed of three people: the marketing person who does almost everything, the junior assistant who helps with content creation, and the outsourced person who does the marketing strategies. Among the three, who should follow-up the lead? 

Not all leads are created equal. This means that before deciding who will follow up the lead, the lead should be evaluated first.

You don’t want your salesperson pitching to a lead that in the end would go to another competitor. 

Do a pre-qualification 

Do a pre-qualification in your organization to know if the people you are going to have the conversation with are ready to consider the deal. Set a benchmark and rules for what you consider a marketing quantifiable lead. Consider the following questions: 

  • What is considered a sales qualified lead?
  • What is the KPI of your organization? 
  • How many new inbound leads do you want to get per quarter/per month?
  • How much money do you want to generate from those leads?

The answers to those questions will lead you to your ideal customer. It would also help you identify the triggers that qualify them to be a marketing quantifiable lead and a sales qualified lead. 

The work is far more efficient because when a lead comes in, your salespeople can vet them and follow the pre-qualification factors you’ve set to see if the lead can generate new business for the organization. This is also helpful in maintaining your current customers. There’s no time wasted in sifting through leads and trying to figure out which one works and which one doesn’t. 

Create a system

Create a system to efficiently manage the workload. The marketing team can do the pre-qualification to increase the odds of the lead being converted into something real. Whenever a lead comes in, let marketing take a look at it and check the website and the title of the person. 

Then let the intern or junior marketing rep take over the other tasks like looking into LinkedIn, HubSpot, Marketo, or other platforms you have to find the data that you can transfer into your CRM. 

You can then sign that into the sales team for it to become a sales qualified lead. The system prevents wasting time on people who aren’t real prospects. 

Marketing can help fix the problem of having to go back to the beginning of the funnel and pre-qualify the leads again because they’re not yet ready then. 

  • Fix your content
  • Develop a good strategy
  • Make a drip campaign for people who are not yet ready 
  • Separate the marketing qualified lead and your sales qualified lead

Website leads matter

The sales team sometimes takes for granted the leads that they didn’t hunt for. A good example is leads coming in from the websites. Salespeople have this notion that they can get more of those so they ignore them. It’s the mentality that since they didn’t work for it, it doesn’t mean much. 

You must recognize that the organization spent thousands of dollars to get that lead. The organization paid for the marketing and the sales rep to produce content on your site. You have writers and you have graphics on your site. You have all the different infrastructure to make sure that your website functions. 

It is disheartening when a sales rep doesn’t take that into consideration when a lead comes in via the website. 

Whenever an inbound lead comes in, it is best to use your flow process to follow-up particular prospects. It should be written and put in your company’s playbook so that everyone can read it and use it with every inbound lead that comes in. 

Follow-up right away 

A stat from insidesales.com said that a lead that’s contacted within five minutes is 100 times more likely to convert than leads that are followed-up 90 minutes later.

When a lead comes in, follow up right away. You’re more likely to convert than if you wait. #SalesHacks

Strike while the iron is hot. 

Do a quick research and evaluate whether the person is real, see if it’s a true marketing qualified lead, and toss it over as a sales qualified lead if it ticks all the boxes. 

The sales team can take a quick visit to the person’s website, check their LinkedIn profile, and the pages they’ve visited on your site. 

Tools like HubSpot and Active Campaign allow you to see where they’ve signed up and the number of times they’ve looked at the pages. You can then use these data to have a meaningful conversation with the prospect leads. 

Focus on the people that matter

Include in your flow process the phone call and email for the first time then do the same things a day later. Connect with them on LinkedIn and share some of their content for seven full business days. 

Do the same things that you would do with a cold person. Nurture the lead and try to grab his attention. Even if they’re not ready now, then at least you can toss it back into the marketing pool and revisit it another time. 

With the right system and by focusing on the people that matter, your work is going to be minimized but the return is going to be much higher. Filter your inbound leads and let the marketing do the review. Recognize the good ones and toss them over to the sales reps to reach out and convert. 

“Our Inbound Leads Are Causing More Work Than Good Sales” episode resource

Email Donald for more questions or connect with him via LinkedIn.

This episode is brought to you in-part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a helpful guide for sales reps and sales leaders to improve their pitches and presentations. It has 12 courses and you can get the first two modules for free! If you want to take your sales to the next level, then I recommend that you join us with our group coaching. Our next semester begins mid-September. 

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

If you’re a reader who loves reading and listening to books, you can also check out Audible as well and explore this huge online library with thousands of books. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

If this episode answered your concerns about why your inbound leads are causing more work than good sales then don’t be shy and give us a thumbs up and rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. We produce podcasts weekly so make sure to subscribe to get more of these sales talks that matter! Share this with your friends and teach them how to subscribe as well. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. 

Jaron Rice, Marketing, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1149: The Power of “Cause Marketing”

Jaron Rice, Marketing, The Sales EvangelistSupporting a cause as part of your business model can help you establish your brand and create a personality for your company, and “cause marketing” can draw customers who want to do business with you. 

Cause-based marketing stems from a business or a business owner that champions a cause that they believe helps with their personal branding as well as the company’s brand. It benefits a specific cause while it generates more business for the company. 

Jaron Rice is the founder of Magothy Payments, Maryland’s highest-rated merchant services provider. He helps businesses become more profitable by lowering their costs of credit card acceptance and helps organizations save money on payment processing. 

Payment processing

Businesses have to pay fees in order to accept payments from their clients. The transaction is called an interchange and it’s set by the card brands: Visa, Mastercard, American Express, and Discover. The fees are paid to the issuing banks and then there are dues and assessments that are paid to the card brand. 

At the same time, there are merchant service providers that sell similar services. A typical merchant services agreement is a three-year contract that has a $495 cancellation fee. Also built into that contract are canceling penalties called liquidated damages. In effect, the merchant services provider is arguing that if the business takes their processing volume somewhere else, the bank or merchant services provider will suffer financial harm. The fee generally amounts to about $150 a month for the remaining months in the contract. 

Jaron often interacts with small businesses and discovers that he can save them about $200 a month with his services. For a main street business, that’s a substantial savings unless the cost of breaking the contract will be $4,000. At that point, it isn’t worth switching providers.

Unfortunately, these fees aren’t usually disclosed on the contract agreements. 

Terms and services

Penalties present a major issue for the industry because the typical contract is about three pages long. On the last page of that contract, companies often include a URL that links to a 75-page PDF document full of clauses and information about cancellation fees. These fees aren’t actually presented to the merchant at the time of signing. 

Worse yet, some companies require you to have an account with them before they allow you to view the document. These companies have created a shell game that keeps businesses locked into unwieldy contracts for years. 

Then, to make matters worse, there’s a small 30-day window at the end of the contract during which companies can cancel their existing agreement in writing. If they don’t, the contract automatically renews. 

Bad reputation

Jaron discovered upon engaging with this industry that it has a bad reputation. He brought on a small hobby shop business as a client, and at the time they signed a contract, he asked whether the owner had any outstanding contracts or cancellation fees for its payment processing. The owner assured him that he was 4 and a half years into a three-year contract, so he was good. 

The owner signed a month-to-month contract with Jaron, and 9 months later he contacted Jaron to ask about a $179 charge on his bank statement. 

The charge originated from a merchant services provider, but the identification number didn’t match Jaron’s company. It turns out the previous company had been charging him $179 a month for the previous 9 months despite the fact that he sent a certified letter canceling the service. 

When the owner called the company about the charges, the representative said that they were charging him $179 a month because the company figured he would rather pay that than the $2,400 plus cancellation fees that were spelled out in his contract. Because he hadn’t canceled his contract, it automatically renewed. 

The next day, the company randomly took $600 from his account. 

Addressing the problem

He went to his bank to find out what recourse he had. The bank advised him that they could block the withdrawals for a period of six months, but that on the 7th month, the provider was likely to try to take the previous six months’ worth of charges all at once. The bank advised closing his account and opening a new one. This was a business owner who had a family to support and employees who worked for him.

Jaron recognized immediately that something needed to be done. About a year later, he connected with a business owner who ran a cigar shop. The two signed an agreement to work together and then spent some time talking about the horrors of payment processing. Jaron mentioned that he wished he could write a law to make these kinds of conduct illegal, and his new client mentioned that he was a state delegate. 

The two generated an idea for a piece of legislation that would protect the small business owners in Maryland from the predatory bank practices of banks and merchant services providers. On the third attempt, the bill passed unanimously and was signed into law. 

Protecting businesses

The legislation requires that the length of the agreement, the cancellation fees, the liquidated damages, and the penalties associated with canceling the agreement must be conspicuously displayed on the contract and that each term be initialed.

The legislation also caps the fees for terminating an agreement at $500 and is applicable to businesses that have less than 50 employees and that are doing less than $2 million a year in credit card volume. This includes about 98 percent of Jaron’s clients. 

The law also stipulates that if the contract automatically renews, the business cannot be charged fees or penalties, which gives Maryland businesses a chance to shop for services. It forces companies in that space to be customer-focused. 

Customer service

One of the problems that emerged was the reality that companies that had businesses locked into contracts weren’t motivated to service the accounts properly. Stories exist of businesses who called seeking assistance and were put on hold indefinitely. 

They provide no guarantees on rates or pricing, so they can change your rates at any time. 

The new legislation will make it easier for businesses to find services elsewhere. It’s forcing the entire industry to focus on servicing accounts and keeping customers happy. 

Jaron acknowledges that many in his industry oppose this change, but it’s typically only those who are only focused on profit. Those who want to establish long-term relationships with their clients and do things the right way have incentive to work to keep clients. 

Championing a cause

He didn’t tackle this cause so he could make more money. He did it because it was the right thing to do. In the end, though, his company is benefiting financially from the move. He is working with the Better Business Bureau and the chambers of commerce to host lunch and learns to help businesses learn their rights under the legislation. 

The bill has teeth and consequences, but businesses must report the conduct. In order to report them, businesses must understand the protections of the law. 

In the end, businesses understand that Jaron went to bat for them, and now many of them want to work for him. 

Other opportunities exist for businesses who want to engage in this kind of service to their own industries. The cause your businesses chooses will depend on your individual situation.

Get involved

Join your local organizations and learn who the delegates are. Many of them are seeking opportunities to help their constituents, so if you have an idea that makes sense, they’ll be willing to get involved. These people have teams who understand how to accomplish these things. 

One of Jaron’s clients started a charity called Burgers and Bands to benefit suicide prevention. Because people near to her have struggled with suicidal thoughts and attempts, the issue has touched her life. As a result, she helps raise money for the cause. 

Aside from the good work she is doing in the community, businesses recognize her as a mom and a concerned citizen rather than simply as a business owner trying to sell them something.

The effort must be genuine, though, or people will recognize it as a fake. 

Company identity

Explore the idea of cause marketing as a way to help build your company’s identity. It helps establish your personal brand and your company’s personality. It reveals how your personality translates into leadership within your company. Your cause is a reflection of who you are, and it helps customers see the human side of the business. 

Jaron has had customers whose situations didn’t lend themselves to switching companies except that they were so eager to work with him they settled for deals in which all they asked of him was the ability to match their current deal. He said that doesn’t happen unless they understand your vision and the causes that you stand behind.

Be yourself. It sounds cliche but Jaron realized that most of his clients are laid-back, down-to-earth, Main Street business owners who didn’t care that he didn’t wear a suit to work every day. Be genuine and true to yourself. 

“Cause Marketing” episode resources 

You can connect with Jaron at his website, www.magothy.biz or find him at LinkedIn. You can learn more about the bill specifically at www.MarylandHB777.com.

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program or free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. 

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Building Value, Ken Rutsky

TSE 1106: Why Assessing Value is Not As Simple As It Sounds, and How Companies Often Get This Wrong

Building Value, Ken Rutsky

Value is in the eye of the buyer, and because assessing value is not as simple as it sounds, companies often get this wrong.

Ken Rutsky specializes in helping companies tell their story in a way that connects it to the customer. He says that value is all connected to the stories we tell.

Defining value

We’re trying to sell something. Essentially what we’re doing is making a trade of the two things they value the most in order of least to more. Money is the thing everybody values, but often buyers value their time even more. They value the time they spend understanding, evaluating, and implementing a solution or a product.

We’re asking our buyers for two rare commodities, so we have to deliver something that is equal to or hopefully greater in value.

As a result, the simple definition of value is what will the customer open his wallet and pay for?

Many sales reps perceive that they are creating value but that may not be the case because assessing value is not as simple as it seems.

Perceived value

Ken said that the biggest mistake sales reps make is overvaluing value. Seems strange to say in a discussion all about value, but it’s true.

If we’re sitting next to each other on an airplane and I’m showing you pictures of my four kids, by the third kid you’ve probably seen enough. We tend to get excited about our goods and services just like we do about our kids. Many times, we want to show the client thousands of pictures of it. We overvalue what they’ll see in it.

Instead, we really need to relate our product to our customers.

Sales doesn’t work the way it once did. Your customer doesn’t need you to tell him about your product. They’ll go to your website and find out everything they ever wanted to know.

In the book Launching to Leading, Ken talks about how salespeople should succeed today. Start by creating that shared context with the customer. Realize, too, that it’s the customer’s context, not yours.

Viewpoint

You have to start the conversation about your customer’s world. Come in educated about how you can transform your customer’s world.

In a recent survey of B2B buyers, business buyers ranked product knowledge as the 8th most important factor in the process. They ranked the seller’s ability to understand the buyer’s business as the number one priority.

Number 2 was the ability to teach the customer something he didn’t already know. Don’t enter the relationship with the intent to sell something. Instead, have a conversation about their business, and then teach them something.

Teaching is critical to establishing your value as a salesperson. If the customer isn’t learning from you, he could just as easily go to your website instead. In fact, most customers are 60 percent through the process before they ever want to speak to a salesperson.

Find a teaching opportunity.

Stories

Realistically, it is marketing’s job to create the stories, but the sellers are the ones who must deliver them and create context around them.

Marketing is a one-to-many art. Great sales reps show up and contextualize the stories. Understand the story of your product and how it transforms your customers’ business.

You have to do the hard work of understanding all these things. There is no magic shortcut.

Empathy

Sales leaders must operate with a sense of empathy. Understand that marketing is working hard to provide the stories and the materials. If marketing feels like they aren’t getting the things they need, there’s a shared responsibility to make that connection.

Marketers must have empathy for the pressures and difficulties of selling. Great marketers have empathy for sellers. They understand the need to work as a team.

Leaders must create that environment of empathy across the organization.

Confidence

Sales reps have to be competent and courageous enough to show the product very early in the sales cycle. Whether it’s a true demonstration or a case study, sellers have to demonstrate value if they want customers to believe it.

Don’t wait six weeks into the sales cycle. Demonstrate early and often. Sellers must have the ability to create and demonstrate their own contexts.

Teach your customer something and then show them how the product can enable the thing you taught him. It can happen in the first call and then it should happen again and again through the process.

The teaching diminishes as the process goes along because the customer already understands the possibility.

Your competition may be showing the products sooner because prospects don’t have the patience they used to have.

Do the homework and understand your customer and everything follows from there. Assessing value is not as simple as it sounds.

“Assessing Value is Not As Simple As It Sounds” episode resources

You can connect with Ken at kenrutsky.com. You can find information about him and his clients, and grab a copy of his book, Launching to Leading.

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

Tools for sellers

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

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Stephen A. Hart, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Marketing, FSMSDC

TSE 1091: Three Things Small Businesses Get Wrong When Marketing

Stephen A. Hart, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Marketing, FSMSDC

When you’re looking to grow your business or your brand, it’s important that you recognize the three things small businesses get wrong when marketing.

We’re at the Florida State Minority Development Council expo visiting with my friend Stephen A. Hart. He’s a brand alignment strategist who helps entrepreneurs grow an amazing brand that is authentic, relatable, and profitable.

Mistake #1: Overlooking messaging

Many people hear the word branding and they think of logos or designs. But pretty websites don’t sell things. Words do.

People get unnecessarily caught up on design but what they need to focus on is clear messaging. You have to clarify your message so that customers will listen.

Be deliberate about articulating what you do. In order to do that, you must understand who you’re serving.

Too many people think they are serving everyone with their product or service but that isn’t the case.

If I’m speaking to grandma and I’m speaking to my niece, we’re not having the same conversation. The language is different.

If you understand that you’re speaking to a particular group of people, there is a language that connects to that person. When you understand their pain points and their demographics, you can communicate your message about how your product or service solves a problem.

Dialing in

Stephen recalled a realtor who focused on selling to millennials and young couples. That’s who she was serving, but her message didn’t reach those people. She was trying to serve everyone.

Dial your message in. Understand who you’re truly serving. When you do, your message doesn’t have to be pitchy about your product or service. Your content can create a connection between you and your community.

Then your community will share it with others in the space.

Messaging isn’t a static process. It’s dynamic. You’ll constantly be optimizing your message.

Your brain

We lack trust in those we connect and do business with.

Understand that your brain is trying to survive and thrive. Within that, there are three things it’s trying to accomplish.

  1. You want to make money or save money.
  2. You want to gain status.
  3. You want to associate with a tribe.

Your brain is also trying to conserve calories. So if your website or your collateral is too busy, your audience will tune it out.

For example, how many emails do you receive in a day? Most of them get deleted because the messaging didn’t appeal to you.

It isn’t a design or branding that gets your attention. It’s the message.

Mistake #2: Neglecting web presence

Your website is your digital home, and first impressions last. It allows you to redirect traffic to your products or services or other online avenues.

Studies show that 57 percent of people are afraid to recommend a business because of its website.

Decisions are emotional so if your website doesn’t inspire confidence, you won’t be able to convert the people who show up there.

You must take care of your website, and specifically your home page. Get a good solid web design.

Mistake #3: Lacking content

You must have a presence on social media specifically for businesses. You also have to be on LinkedIn.

Sharing content on LinkedIn generates so much more organic traffic than other platforms. It’s a business-related social channel. As result, the income and quality of the people you’re engaging with there.

There are more than 9 billion impressions on LinkedIn every week, which amounts to 468 billion impressions annually. Of those, only about 3 million users are actually sharing content, which means there’s a lot of room available. And it’s all free.

Don’t worry as much about buying ads on Facebook. Worry about who your audience is. Realize, too, that about 98 percent of your leads will come from LinkedIn.

Video and long-form content are your friends on LinkedIn. Write longer posts. The sweet spot is 1,900.

Also write how-to and list posts to bring awareness to your brand.

Be creative

If no one is looking at your business, you’ll never thrive. You must create content of value and place it where the customers are. Put it in front of their eyeballs where they can’t dismiss it.

Have a solid brand presence online. Avoid the three things small businesses get wrong when marketing.

Branding course

Stephen created an online course called Brand You Academy that allows him to serve people and help with branding. It’s a 6-week online course that walks people through Stephen’s 15-year experience in branding.

When people Google you in 2019, whatever appears in your result will either leave people more or less inclined to do business with you.

People who sign up for the course are getting lifetime access to the course.

You can also connect with Stephen on his website and everywhere on social at Stephen A. Hart.

Isolation

The wisdom and the knowledge you gain from relationships is invaluable.

The Florida State Minority Development Council is here to help you grow your business. Your goal is to make money, so you must align yourself with other people who understand what you’re trying to do.

“Three Things Small Businesses Get Wrong When Marketing” episode resources

You can connect with Stephen at his website and everywhere on social @Stephen A Hart. You can connect with the Florida State Minority Development Council for more information about the council and its offerings.

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Tom Jenkins, Amir Reiter, Power of Chat, Donald Kelly

TSE 991: Sky Rocket Your B2B Sales Through the Power of Chat

Tom Jenkins, Amir Reiter, Power of Chat, Donald KellyIn this episode of The Sales Evangelist, we talk about how to take advantage of the power of chat when growing your business.

Many organizations have struggled to capitalize on the power of chat, but Amir and Tom share the struggles they’ve had using chat and how we can overcome them.

Tom Jenkins and Amir Reiter help companies scale their workforce without having to get offices, pay insurance and taxes, or worry about hiring and training.

Instead, they offer technology and strategy.

At CloudTask, they provide sales development reps, they manage account executives and they manage the customer success/account reps responsible for renewals and upselling to existing customers.

They comprise one office. If someone wants to hire five sales reps, five account executives or five support reps, they will all be in office and managed so that the customer gets what they want – representation and results.  

By specializing in sales, customer success and customer support, CloudTask is the best of the breed. [00:51]

The power of chat

One of the biggest issues surrounding the use of chat is a lack of clearly defined ownership.  If you look at our partners at Drift.com for instance, their ability to work as a bot or as a human can confuse whether chat is owned by marketing or by sales.

Marketing is typically used to drive traffic to forms, to blogs and to sign-ups. As such, marketing tends to prefer automation.

Sales, however, relies on people first, so deciding who owns chat is often a hurdle.

Failure to assign ownership then creates a failure to act or a failure to implement correctly. [02:19]

We manage a lot of cloud chat programs and have noticed that many people view chat as just another tool for the reps to use in addition to calling, emailing, LinkedIn, etc.

Rather, with a high volume of web traffic, chat is a key tool in the generation of qualified leads.

In fact, because chat allows you to respond quickly with the right answers and in the right way, it can be your number one lead generation tool. [03:17]

Qualify leads

People today want answers now. They expect to be able to go onto a website and to be able to chat. It has worked well in the B2C world but is really moving quickly into the B2B world as well.

We are finding that an MQL (marketing qualified lead) or SQL (sales qualified lead) that chats with a member of the sales team is 2-3 times more likely to close versus one that goes through the process of filling out a form. It makes sense. A form is stationary and available to anybody.

With chat, you are able to quickly let people qualify themselves with a friendly discussion.

For example, suppose someone wants to hire a sales rep. Within a few moments, we can discuss salaries and budgets and determine right away if it is something to pursue, or not. [04:54]

Chat conversation

Chat does not replace cold calling or emailing but it does allow the person who visits your website to have a conversation with you and determine for themselves if they want to move forward.

The desire to engage is up to the visitor. As the sales rep, you increase the level of engagement with your replies. Consider “I’m here to help sales leaders every day, how can I help you?” instead of “How are you?”

People want to work with companies that can fix their problems. Target the message to visitors as much as you can in order to increase engagement with them.

You will receive visitors who want to know more about the topic rather than starting from scratch.  

You don’t want to write too much in a chat forum, of course. Start by keeping the conversation focused on the problems you are trying to solve for your prospects. [06:48]

The initial engagement is absolutely key but response time is just as essential. Buyers are conducting research and they want answers.

It is imperative to be super sharp and to answer quickly. [08:10]

Pique curiosity

When you give visitors the information they want to the questions they ask, they begin to ask the more sales-related questions themselves.

Knowing how to give people the right amount of information so as to pique their curiosity without being overly aggressive is a skill.

For example, the best way to answer many of the questions about a technology product is with a demo. An aggressive tactic might be “this is the best product and it will solve all your problems.”

“We want you to get your eyes on this to see what you think about it” is a better approach, however. It allows the buyer to have ownership in the decision.

Chat also identifies return visitors so that you don’t have to start all over from the beginning each time. [09:42]

Sales or marketing

When Sales and Marketing are aligned as a team with the common goal of getting customers, ownership of chat is less important.

When Sales and Marketing are not aligned, better results occur when chat ownership is with the sales team.  Sales speaks to people and that brings results.

It is really important that everyone involved be 100% clear on which team does what so that each can grow and build expertise. [11:27]

Decide first if you will make your own chatbot or use a company like Drift or Intercom.

Many such companies have partner systems that can help with deployment. They are also set up to support the user and the sales cycle. It can be a big jumpstart toward a successful launch. [13:30]

Common mistakes

Some companies rely on too much automation. We’ve seen companies who don’t get the results they want right away so they just scrap the whole thing versus A/B testing people.

Everyone wants leads. It is the goal of every company but people make the chatbots and automation too much about themselves.

They try to get contact details and meetings rather than making the initial interactions about web visits. They aim to fulfill their own needs rather than the needs of potential customers. [14:25]

Chat gives buyers the ability to raise their hand, to tell you who they are and where they are in the sales cycle. It gives them the ability to get what they want now instead of going through the standard sales process. [15:28]

Successes

We have an interesting case now with a client who had used chatbot before but didn’t get the results they had hoped for. They weren’t particularly sold on the idea but were willing to give it another try.  

We were able to successfully implement a program on Drift consisting of a training program, as well as the addition of five sales development reps.

As a result, they realized $3.5 million in opportunity and $1 million in closed within eight months.

They appreciated our complete focus and specialization. We also provided them with quality assurance teams that checked in on the chats, and we worked really well together. [16:17]

We represent your company and do what needs to be done, just like employees.

The main difference is that instead of getting one new employee, our client gets a whole team. We are remote to you, but not remote. It is like having multiple offices or a satellite office.

We check on everything. [18:28]

Don’t blind yourself with the idea that you can’t use chat for enterprises.

Even if your sales process has you on flights to Hong Kong, or spending nine months working a deal, it can still start with a chat.  

Don’t consider chat as a replacement but rather as an extra channel that gives people the ability to communicate with you faster.

It can be such a cool tool to add to your cause, to your social network, and to your social ads.

When used correctly, chat will deliver results. [19:59]

“Power of Chat” episode resources

Visit Tom and Amir at Cloudtask.com or through their partners at Drift.com.  Allison manages their chat and is always more than happy to help everyone. Experiencing their services first-hand is the best first step.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

 

Kathleen Hessert, Krista Jasso, We are Gen -Z, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 988: How To Adjust My Sales Process When Selling Gen Z

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’re talking to Kathleen Hessert and Krista Jasso about the newest generation and how to adjust your sales process when selling Gen Z.

Kathleen launched a project called We R Gen Z because she saw a lack of information about the newest generation because the marketplace was completely focused on millennials. Her organization conducts original research with a bank of 1,000 teens on a monthly basis to understand Gen Z.

Krista — a member of Gen Z herself — works as the social media coordinator and intern coordinator for We R Gen Z and she believes that her generation will take the world by storm.

Massive spending

Gen Z spends $44 billion a year in the U.S. and influences $600 billion when it comes to household spending.

It’s vital for the marketplace to understand that Gen Z will make up 40 percent of the U.S. population and 37 percent of the global population by the year 2020. [3;47]

Organizations that exclude them will be behind in their sales efforts, and they may never catch up.

Mistakes selling Gen Z

Sellers often talk down to Gen Z and the generation sees it. Gen Z has what Krista calls a “strong BS filter,” and they see right through lack of authenticity.

The generation values authentic, genuine behavior. Gen Z is turned off by fake, flashy marketing, instead choosing brands that are transparent about what they value and believe. [6:50]

Gen Z cares about who is behind the product as well as the product or service itself. They care about what top executives are saying about topics such as politics and the environment.

They include countless outside factors in their decision-making and if a brand doesn’t match what they are looking for, they won’t support it.

Gen Z trends

We R Gen Z hosts a trends panel that evaluates what’s hot and what’s not for the generation.

Organizations should understand that Gen Z are the next creators and innovators. Those companies need the young people of Gen Z more than the young people need their products or services.

They will buy or shun organizations based on their values and their passion. When Nike included Colin Kaepernick in its commercials, one member of We R Gen Z put all his Adidas clothes away and wore only Nike for two weeks to honor the decision made by the company. [10:19]

The founder of Tom’s Shoes gave $5 million to anti-gun-violence in response to a school shooting in California, marking the largest corporate donation ever to this particular issue.  The decision resonated with Gen Z.

Business is more than money, especially for Gen Z. Older marketers can miss this if they try throwing more money at the marketing effort.

Instead, marketers should look at the lifetime value of a Gen Z customer, which is a lot higher than the lifetime value of an older customer who has been with the company for a number of years. [12:13]

Digital natives

Managers must remember that Gen Z asks why. Previous generations were taught not to question authority, but Gen Z asks why, not to be disrespectful, but to understand the reasoning behind decisions.

The generation is curious and they want to understand motivations.

Gen Z is also the first generation to be true digital natives. They grew up in a world where the Internet was prolific. When they seek information, their first source is Google and their second is Instagram. [14:29]

They tend to seek a wide range of different perspectives on a topic. If someone tells them one thing, Gen Z tends to seek other voices before making decisions because they are used to this expansive focus.

Gen Z and video

Gen Z responds better to video than past generations. Primarily, the generation watches YouTube and Netflix more than they watch regular television. Many of them learn new things like how to play instruments simply by watching YouTube videos. [16:39]

Companies can’t take traditional routes when selling Gen Z.

We R Gen Z’s research shows that 48 percent of respondents said that social media influences their purchases most. Big sales are next because the generation is more frugal than its predecessors and they are watching their dollars more carefully.

Companies have to be on social media, present it in an awesome way, and be there for the right reasons at the right time.

They’ve seen all kinds of incredible creativity and they expect it cool and different and new each time they interact with a brand. [20:45]

Reaching Gen Z

Brands must actually engage with this generation on social media. Consumers are looking to see that brands are liking comments and responding to comments. They must show that they are authentic and real.

They must also understand that 64 percent of Gen Z will buy things via smartphones. Most of Gen Z will look to reviews before buying and that they will sometimes buy a product because their friends vouch for it. That suggestion will carry more weight than any marketing campaign. [24:41]

Other findings are that 65 percent won’t use voice tech such as Siri and Alexa to buy, though they will use them to accomplish tasks like making lists.

Spending habits

Krista told the story of one of their panelists who loved the idea of the Nintendo Switch so much that it motivated him to get a job. He hadn’t had a job prior to that, but the new system motivated him to save his paychecks to purchase it.

Gen Z is willing to save for a few months to buy a certain product, but if the product is overly expensive, they fear it will be irrelevant by the time they save for it, so they won’t likely purchase it. [27:51]

Gen Z has also learned from millennials that they don’t want to be burdened with hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt. Their frugality is based upon the things they’ve seen. they want a different future for themselves.

As an aside, clothes, gift cards, and tech are the hottest items for Christmas when you’re shopping for Gen Z. They also really appreciate making gifts for the people they care about.

Marketing

Look at your marketing and your brand. Look at how you’re reaching Gen Z and think outside the box. It’s a creative group of people and you have to stay a step ahead of them to gain their loyalty. [31:36]

Think about accessibility. They want brands to be easily accessible and to make their lives easier and faster. Speed has become their standard, and they want easy.

Brands that don’t make it easy to access products and services don’t stand a chance.

“Selling Gen Z” episode resources

Follow Kathleen and Krista atWe R Gen Z and find them on social media. If you’re a brand seeking custom research, email them at askus@wergenz.com. You can also find Kathleen on LinkedIn or @kathleenhessert on social media.

3

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Channel Partners, Matthew Hernamdez, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 984: Sales From The Street: “Find Local Partners”

Channel Partners, Matthew Hernamdez, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistOn today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we talk to Matt Hernandez about the changes in the marketplace, and how the ability to find local partners has helped him drive more revenue for the businesses he serves.

In his work with small-to-medium businesses, Matt has worked to figure out new ways to deal with leads because people have become more resistant to cold calling.

He believes that, although cold-calling can work, it must exist in the right circumstances. The key is better lead intelligence.

Hire the right people

Matt doesn’t struggle with recruiting or interviewing salespeople.  The key, he says, is to be very upfront about the challenges of the role and hire the right type of people.

Hire open-minded people who aren’t super particular about their activities and who often aren’t as needy. [7:15] They’ll be more coachable.

Also be very honest about the type of role you’re hiring for, the challenges it will present, but also the benefits of the role as well.

Moving away from cold leads

In the past, sellers would have a name and a phone number and they could attack each cold lead with different opens or different hooks. Now, he says, people are numb to that approach.

Instead, his company looked to generate inbound leads and lukewarm leads.

Matt’s company uses a program called “Local Partners” that pays contractors to feed them warm or hot leads from local areas. He pointed out that using pure commission models doesn’t change your cost structure. [9:14]

He does acknowledge that you must make sure the payment is in line with the revenue goals. You must make sure your customer acquisition costs aren’t too high.

Big revenue increases

Matt’s company has seen strong results from the move away from cold calling. He estimates that the effort now accounts for 5 to 15 percent of their deals.

He predicts that this kind of effort would likely work in a variety of industries.

Companies just have to be creative to figure out how to scale in a cost-effective way. Buying leads can be very expensive, but a pay-for-results model can work if the infrastructure is set up properly. [11:10]

Partnerships model

Begin by listing as on Craigslist in the cities you’re interested in. State what you’re offering and decide ahead of time how much you can afford to pay.

Decide how much you’d be willing to pay someone if they were to generate meetings or contracts. For longer sales cycles, you might have to pay per demo. [12:09]

In shorter sales cycles, you pay based upon generating contracts.

In your ad, provide a range of income that interested parties could generate per month.

Then you could interview over the phone or in person or over video.

The effort is super cheap, super easy and really scrappy.

Be willing to pivot

Be creative. Sales requires consistency and training and the right effort for the right amount of time. Without it, you’ll never see meaningful results or data you can measure. [14:54]

Seek objective advice and make sure you’re giving your new ideas time to work.

If things aren’t going the way you want despite your effort, don’t be afraid to pivot and try new approaches. Be willing to try something different.

The marketplace changes rapidly, and technology does, too. You have to be willing to adapt.

Fivestars

Local businesses are the best candidates to benefit from Fivestars because they are traditionally underserved in their marketing efforts. They often face huge competition from groups of businesses that pool their resources. [15:59]

Think of a small coffee shop competing against Starbucks, who has millions of dollars to spend on advertising.

Fivestars has created a software that costs pennies on the dollar because the cost is spread across 10,000 merchants. It’s an incredible solution for anyone who owns a local business with a physical location.

“Find Local Partners” episode resources

Connect with Matt via email at matthew.hernandez@fivestars.com. If you need a way to get more customers in the door, Fivestars works with more than 40 million consumers who use the platform.

This episode is brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, a personalized and robust CRM with the capability to organize your company and effectively line up not only your sales, but your client’s success. Go to TheSalesEvangelist.com/maximizer for a free demonstration.  

We are also brought to you by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. It has changed the way we prospect.

Take advantage of the risk-free trial they offer specifically for the TSE community. First three months at half-price? You can’t beat that! To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. Your prospecting will never ever be the same. 

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher or wherever you enjoy fine podcasts.

And be sure to subscribe to the podcast and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Webinar, Todd Earwood, Inbound Leads

TSE 983: I Reinvented The Webinar Model

 

Todd Earwood, Webinar, The Sales EvangelistOn today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, I talk to Todd Earwood about the adage that we need not reinvent the wheel, but Todd is doing just that.

Todd famously cold-called the CEO of a billion dollar company for 43 straight days until he finally got the interview, and then the job.

He began his career in software. It wasn’t until he was making the rounds to thank investors for the success of his latest software endeavor that he realized that marketing was his real niche.  

As Todd explains it, one of the investors simply asked Todd what his future plans were, which seemed like such a silly question at the question. Software was all he had ever done. But the investor went on to say that marketing and sales were really the special skills he saw in Todd.

Todd reluctantly agreed and MoneyPath began.  [00:54]

Clear the path to purchases through quality marketing

AtMoneyPath, Todd and his group of marketers ‘clear the path to purchases.’ It is their tagline because they are dedicated to helping sales. In the marketing world of pretty pictures and shiny objects, the reality is that without the lifeblood of qualified leads coming into the sales team, good things are not going to happen. Budgets will be cut and people will lose their jobs.

But if you can master the marketing side of things, then the company grows. Everybody is happy and everybody wins. In the software environment, Todd was willing to experiment and fail. He looked beyond the traditional social channels, the paid media and the heavy use of emails.

To begin, Todd and his team did an email research project where they opted into the funnels of the top 300 SAS software companies to see what those companies would do with a cold lead. The number one email topic returned to Todd’s team was about content. The second topic was webinars and that is when things really began to change.

Now instead of writing six blog posts a week, Todd and his team create one great webinar every 15 days. Before long, they had created a massive educational series with more and more content.

Reinventing the webinar to keep listeners engaged

The old model is clearly broken because nobody really gets excited about ‘this week’s webinar’. People sign up but they don’t attend. Todd and his team wanted to change that. [03:38]

There is a poor functionality with the current webinar system. It fails to keep the listeners engaged. Even when the topic sounds interesting, we never get around to actually listening to it, or to listening to it wholeheartedly. Todd realized that the engagement model needed to change. It needed to become interesting and engaging.

There is just too much information and too many ways to deliver it. As a marketer, you are vying for the attention of the clients so you have to do something different.

As Todd explains, unless you hire Kevin Hart or Adele, it is too hard for one person to carry 30-60-90 minutes of content. So at Webinar Works, they always have at least two speakers: a host and a thought leader.

Bringing in leads

The host facilitates all the basics and keeps it moving. The host will almost immediately facilitate a poll to grab people’s attention and get them actively participating with the webinar.

Todd has seen up to 60% of the attendees join in because their webinars break the expectation of ‘another crappy webinar’ from the very start.

The thought leader for each webinar is the expert on the subject. They aren’t there to read their own bio or tell the listeners how great they are. The thought leaders are there to educate and to share their wisdom. [06:44]

The ultimate purpose of the webinar, aside from providing information to the listeners, is to obtain information from those listeners at the end in the form of a segmentation poll which generates qualified, high intent leads. This could be something as simple as asking the listeners to select the one issue addressed in the webinar that best fits their organization.

With that information, the sales rep now has a tracking mechanism that tells him which listeners actually listened to the entire webinar, as well as which listeners requested assistance.

That is way better than cold calling 2,000 people. [10:21]

Leads delivered by the webinar

The Webinar was interesting but I want to do more research.

This is not a hot lead. It is a cool lead that needs some nurturing before it goes to the sales team.

I really enjoyed the webinar but I need to refer any decision to my colleague.

With this response, the sales rep knows the problem is there and the interest is there but that more research is needed to move into the right part of the organization.

I want to learn more!

This is the hot lead button that should be flagged as a real person with interest. [11:11]

Beginning of the sales process

The live webinar event may be over but the sales work is not done. As a marketer, Todd can help you divide that 42-minute webinar into three or five smaller clips so when a listener has a problem or a question, you will be able to easily find and deliver the information they need. [14:43]

There is certainly a lot of preparation that goes into creating a webinar. Decide where you want to insert the polls. If you are creating content that educates the prospects and making statements that they haven’t heard before, you should expect and plan for questions. Your content should drive the questions, and those questions will increase engagement. [17:10]

People will register for a webinar with a good hook.

  • Choose three to five points and dedicate 10-12 minutes to present each point.
  • Know what problem you want to solve and walk the listener through that scenario.
  • Present listeners with the options they need to solve that problem.

If you do it right, the listener will naturally determine, for themselves, that you have the answer he needs. [18:54]

Webinar trends and tactics

As far as the words people use – webinar vs masterclass, Todd has seen a trend in that most blog posts titles tie directly to a webinar.  For example, ‘Top Five Ways to Do X’ or ‘Old Method vs New Method’.

Todd believes that the content should appeal to a narrow persona so that it draws only those people that will benefit from the content of your webinar. Webinars can break through all the noise and the clutter that other marketing is trying to do. Speak to your listeners as individuals and tailor your tactics to their needs.

“Webinar Model” episode resources

Check out WebinarWorks.io/salesevangelist for free resources, to grade yourself against great webinars and to find out if Webinar Works is a good fit for you.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

TSE Hustler’s League

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Pam Didner, Sales and Marketing, Donald Kelly,

TSE 973: Achieve Sales Growth Through Collaborative Sales And Marketing

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we talk to content marketing leader Pam Didner about the critical role content plays in sales and the importance of collaborative sales and marketing.

Content plays a critical role in educating customers and prospects, making sales enablement a natural extension of content marketing.

Pam is the author of Effective Sales Enablement: Achieve Sales Growth Through Collaborative Sales and Marketing

Automated marketing and sales enablement

Email is often our most common form of automated marketing.

Over time, with the integration of social media, social selling emerged, and it has allowed sellers to add other features to their automated marketing platforms.

Every organization automates its marketing differently, so your automation efforts will look different than those of other people around you.

Most people consider sales enablement to be related to sales training and development. If we expand it, though, we’ll recognize that there are things marketers are doing to enable sales.

Sales and marketing aren’t the same, but they complement each other.

Sales and marketing

Consider sales an additional marketing channel for your organization. With that in mind, consider the things you can do using existing marketing elements to better support your sales team.

Consider the example of a whiskey company who wanted to increase its shelf space in a specific city, so it offered to run specific paid ads on social media to drive foot traffic to the stores.

Who doesn’t appreciate more foot traffic?

This kind of effort requires sales and marketing to work together and think through some of the elements that marketing can use to support sales.

Sales and marketing people tend to lose sight of the fact that they are doing the exact same things every day.

Struggling to collaborate

Sales and marketing have the same business goals and they should work toward them together.

Things get complicated because their department goals are different. Sales focuses on revenue while marketing focuses on brand recognition.

Sales also has more of a short-term priority than marketing, which tends to have more of a long-term mission.

Finally, the two departments tend to have different resources and support allocations available to accomplish their tasks.

Sales and marketing can never be 100 percent fully aligned, but is it possible to find commonalities? Can we drive a joint initiative together?

Joining sales and marketing

In smaller environments like emerging startups, sales and marketing tend to work closely together.

In every organization, the mandate to work together must start at the top. Without direction from the leadership, the two teams will avoid working together because it’s more difficult than working separately.

It’s similar to parenting. Two kids from the same family have different personalities and different interests, but parents can lead them to work together and facilitate their relationship despite those differences.

Enablement ingredients

The three critical keys to enablement are

  • training
  • content
  • coaching

Sales and marketing teams should try to understand those on the other side of the equation. Marketing is probably on the forefront of digital communication, and they can help sales understand how to use digital platforms well.

Have a conversation with your marketing department to learn from the things they already know.

“Collaborative Sales And Marketing” episode resources

You can connect with Pam at pamdidner.com. You can also grab a copy of her book, Global Content Marketing: How to Create Great Content, Reach More Customers, and Build a Worldwide Marketing Strategy that Works or Effective Sales Enablement: Achieve Sales Growth Through Collaborative Sales and Marketing

Her challenge is this: if you read her books and don’t find anything of value in them, schedule a call with her to let her know. She’d love to hear about your challenges and help you find solutions.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

TSE Hustler’s League

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

Doyle Buehler, Donald Kelly, Break Through Digital, Prospecting

TSE 964 : Sales From The Street: “Selling And Monetizing Your Brand”

 

Monetizing Your Brand, Sales From The Street, Doyle BuehlerOn today’s episode of Sales From The Street, we talk to global entrepreneur Doyle Buehler about monetizing your brand.

Doyle helps businesses organize their work and their strategies so they can do good work.

Many sellers don’t actually own their own businesses but they operate a business within a business. They are intrapreneurs, and many salespeople miss this truth.

Common mistakes

Many entrepreneurs who utilize online marketing make a mistake that Doyle calls the “3 percent.”

Businesses out there assume that everyone wants to buy from them, but that’s far from true. Many studies suggest that about 3 percent of people at any given time are interested in purchasing your product or service.

By understanding the buying process, you may find that 30 percent of customers will never buy from you, but that means that about 67 percent of customers will eventually buy from you when the time is right.

The salesperson’s job is to tap into that 67 percent to figure out where the customers are in the process. How far away from buying are they?

You may find that 3 percent are ready, 7 percent are really close, and 60 percent can be moved toward buying from you.

Expand your market

We thrive on instant gratification. It’s a natural tendency for us as humans. But our buyers are like us in that they probably aren’t going to buy something until they’ve done a lot of research on it.

It’s important for us to get past the instant gratification and stay aware of the 67 percent who will eventually buy from our business.

We must keep our eye on those people:

  • The ones who are getting ready to buy
  • Those who are learning about the product
  • The ones who are defining their needs and challenges

Those are the people you want to start talking to. Those are the people whose attention you want to get.

Getting their attention

The know, like, trust triangle is the essence of getting their attention.

Do they know you and understand who you are? This is where personal branding comes into play.

Do they like you? Can they sync with you? Do you have synergy with your audience? Accomplish this by producing great content.

Do they trust you? This component isn’t always as important for widgets but it’s vital for larger purchases.

How do you talk to the 67 percent of people who are starting the journey? If you’re providing content and a platform and ecosystem to support them in their journey, they’ll come to you when they are ready to buy.

Main strategy

If, for example, a listener is regularly engaging with a podcast, where do you take that conversation next? You can promote it all over the place and get people to listen to it, but what’s the next step?

There’s a whole schema to this: what gift can I give to a potential customer so they’ll get to know, like, and trust you?

A gift is easy because there’s no risk. How will you create a community and get them involved?

How do you continue to scale and escalate that conversation?

A lot of people don’t have these in place.

Zero moment of truth

Google did research about 10 years ago that revealed that your buyer behavior breaks down into the need for 7 hours and 11 touch points. Some people would add four platforms.

So how do you get your prospects to spend that much time with you?

It’s a cool concept because it says that if you can spend more time with them, you’ll move them toward a final sale.

Core strategy

Many times, companies don’t have a core strategy or a workflow to their advertising. When they don’t get the results they want, they spend more money, which isn’t always the right answer.

Companies must be smart about how they spend their money.

Doyle’s recommended structure, described in his recent book called Breakthrough — Unleash Your Remarkable Brand Value, Influence, and Authority: Evolve Your Strategy and Marketing, lists seven workflow steps to help companies organize their digital ecosystems. They will end up with a platform that helps them build the know-like-trust triangle with their customers.

Keep your eye on the longer term, strategic mission of your business and what you’re offering in terms of value.

If you don’t understand your own strategy or your brand value, you’re going to spin your wheels because you won’t know what to do.

Build a strong platform but start with a strong strategy.

“Monetizing Your Brand” episode resources

Grab a copy of Doyle’s book, Breakthrough — Unleash Your Remarkable Brand Value, Influence, and Authority: Evolve Your Strategy and Marketing. You can also go to www.breakthrough.digital to check out the book.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out our new semester of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League. We’re taking applications for the semester beginning in January, and we can only take a limited number of people.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Michael Koral, First Ever RoboAgency Needls, Donald Kelly, Social Media Marketing

TSE 948: What Small Businesses Need To Know About Building An Empire Through Effective Marketing

Michael Koral, First Ever RoboAgency Needls, Donald Kelly, Social Media MarketingOn today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we talk to Michael Koral about building an empire, and what small businesses need to know about building an empire through effective marketing.

Michael is the co-founder of needls.com, a robo-agency that creates targets and optimizes Facebook and Instagram ads for small business owners and entrepreneurs.

Small business owner

Many small business owners have tried using Facebook ads in the past without a lot of results. It’s tempting in that case to assume that the ads don’t work, but the reality sometimes is that they didn’t use them well.

Perhaps the business owner didn’t have a good handle on what he was doing or he didn’t want to admit that he needed help.

Business owners only have a few options when it comes to Facebook ads.

  • Do it yourself (which is challenging)
  • Hire an agency (which is expensive)
  • Use a different platform (which is complicated)

Needls is intended to “dumb down” the process of running Facebook ads. Its meant to help entrepreneurs or small agencies run Facebook ads properly.

Know your audience

Understanding the demographics of your audience isn’t the same as truly understanding your audience.

If you sell women’s shoes, it isn’t enough to know that your audience is women around 40 to 50 years old. You must know what her job is, what her income level is, who her friends are, what kind of shows she watching on TV, and who influences her purchasing decisions.

You must know the ins and outs of your potential customer in order to advertise effectively. The best way to do that is to talk to your existing customers.

If you’ve only sold 100 pairs of shoes, talk to the people who bought your shoes to find out why they bought them. Frame your marketing and sales around that particular buyer persona.

Consider whether there are multiple personas that make up your target audience.

Testing different objectives

Even if you talk to your customers, you’ll still have to test different marketing objectives and advertising objectives.

Your first 100 customers may have a different persona than your next 1,000 customers, so you may have to shift your approach.

You must try different approaches in your digital marketing mix.

You only have to do one thing really, really well, but you can test things outside of that one thing to make sure you’re not missing the boat somewhere else.

Grow the organization

It’s somewhat counterintuitive to digital marketing people, but in-person events are a great way to interact with potential customers or partners.

There’s still nothing better than actually talking to people in persona and getting to know like-minded business owners.

Meet with different people at different networking events. Go to dinners or meetups or find ways to connect with people in your industry.

It’s not digital, but it’s important. The point isn’t to gain business; it’s to make genuine connections and get insights.

When you go to in-person events, listen to people and provide advice and build trust. Then build an understanding that people should go to you for whatever it is you’re selling.

Having conversations

Sales calls now are about having meaningful conversations.

If you’re relying only on cold calls, you have to try something else. Focus on social media or ads, or content, or try the soft-sell approach.

Cold calls don’t work even as well as they did five years ago.

One executive told us that he doesn’t respond to cold calls. He said that the LinkedIn connection or emails are the primers for those conversations.

Needls has never done a cold call. They’ve grown from 0 customers to 1,000 customers by driving qualified customers to their site using Facebook ads, content marketing, and influencer relationships.

Start small.

It’s so easy to connect with people on social media. If you don’t already have an Instagram account for your business, set one up and start posting content. Instagram could become one of the biggest drivers for your business.

Finding influencers

If you sell office furniture, which isn’t super sexy, realize that everybody has office furniture.

Find someone on Instagram who has a unique twist on their office furniture. Follow that company.

Find people in your niche who already have a large following. Reach out and offer to supply a desk to an influencer who is willing to do a shout-out about your product.

Find people who have a large following and connect with them via direct message. Try out their service. Get in front of their faces as politely as possible.

You can generate leads on Instagram when you’re able to:

  1. Build connections
  2. Grow your following
  3. Use Instagram stories to talk about your service or provide advice.
  4. Use Instagram stories to drive traffic to your website.

Mistakes to avoid

To make your videos more effective, realize that 80 percent of the traffic is mobile, and most people don’t have their sound on while they are watching videos.

Without subtitles, they don’t know what’s going on, so they scroll past.

Use subtitles so that people who are watching without sound will still get your message.

Also, install a Facebook pixel on your website that will track to see how well your ads are doing. Without it, you have no idea how effective your ads are.

Make sure that you have a call-to-action. Don’t just talk about your product or service and then hope that someone clicks to your site and buys something.

Try something like, “Go to my site and check us out, and get a 25% discount if you use this code.”

Capture the audience’s attention within the first one to five seconds. Attention spans are incredibly short, so you must give people a reason to stop scrolling and engage with your content.

Facebook and Instagram are amazing ways to grow your business without spending a lot of money.

Using Needls

Check out Needls by answering a few questions that will help launch your first campaign.

  1. Tell the team more about your business.
  2. Identify where you hope to drive traffic.
  3. Enter a URL.
  4. Provide us with a headline or piece of text that describes your product or service.
  5. Upload an image or two.

After you’ve answered those questions, Needls can create hundreds of different ads for you to test to see which ones will work best.

They’ll target your ads using data science, and then optimize the ads 24/7.

It takes about 10 minutes to set up the campaign and then you can set it and forget it.

If you’re looking to build your business and get more sales and work hard now to create freedom in the future, you’ll put the time in now but you’ll be able to look back and see the benefits of your hard work.

“Building an Empire” episode resources

Needls is offering a 35-percent discount off the platform fee for listeners of The Sales Evangelist podcast.

This episode is brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers and provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out TSE Hustler’s League and apply to see if it’s a good fit.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Payman Taei, Donald Kelly, Visme,

TSE 936: Best Practices For Using Visuals To Level Up Your Sales Game

Payman Taei, The Sales Evangelist, Visual contentAbout 65 percent of the population learns visually. When you’re engaging with your prospect, are you simply explaining your goods and services or are you showing them your goods and services? Today we’ll discuss the power of using visuals to level up your sales game.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Payman Taei, founder of Visme, a DIY platform to help you create and manage visual content, talks about how you can begin using visuals to level up your sales game.

Payman has run a boutique digital agency for 17 years, and his mission is to empower anyone, even those with no design experience, to create engaging, “snackable” content.

Wide audience

Payman realized a need several years ago to create a tool to help people create visual content. He realized that 98 percent of the population has no design experience, which means they cannot effectively communicate visually.

Visme seeks to fill that void and give people a starting point. It’s a platform that allows you to create all kinds of visual content using an easy interface, and it allows you to create it more efficiently than you could without it.

This matters to sales professionals because they constantly communicate with prospects and customers. You have to demonstrate why your product or service is different from your competition’s product or service.

Starting point

Visme is meant to give sales professionals a quick starting point.

It offers templates and themes and icons and assets, so regardless of what industry you’re in, you’ll have the ability to put something together pretty quickly. Then, the analytics behind Visme will track how much time the recipient spends on each of your slides or pages.

You can create a form at the front of the content that requires users to submit a name and email so you can track who looked at your content.

It eliminates the guesswork after sending a proposal or other content.

Sales struggles

If you’re an individual working in a very small business and you don’t have a design team, the platform allows you to create presentations and reports without relying on a designer.

You may not have access to a designer, and you may not have the budget for a designer. The other fact about designers is that there’s a certain amount of back-and-forth that exists in that process.

Visme allows individuals to address those pain points.

You can create the document, and then share it digitally or in person, and you can measure its performance.

Breaking down silos

If you’re part of a sales team, and you have a marketing department, you may still face some of the same challenges that individuals do.

You might work with templates that include your branding and your messaging. Visme allows your team to create templates and then lock certain aspects of them so that they can’t be changed.

Visme gives teams the confidence that they can create unique content without altering the important details. It keeps your rogue agents at bay.

This platform allows you to interact with the templates without the worry of messing them up.

The designers can decide how deep to let individual users go in terms of editing.

Focus on content

Visme allows you to focus on the content so that you can quickly create something you’re happy with.

The other advantage is that the more content you create, the larger your repository of icons and images you’ll collect. You can reuse and recycle them. So your second project will go faster than your first, and the third one will go faster than the second.

Each project becomes more efficient because you’ve got material from the previous one.

Adding value

When you’re following up with your prospects, visual content will allow you to provide relevant information. If someone applies for a download or interacts on your website, you can provide content that stands out from your competition.

You may be able to create a sales pitch for a client, and then without a lot of effort, personalize that sales pitch to another client and send visual content that is personalized to your customer.

Most salespeople aren’t as concerned about content as they are about sales. We’re trying to help them fill that gap and overcome that fear factor.

The audience cares about the small details, so first impressions matter.

Visme can work together with the other pieces of your process to help improve your conversion. It’s a piece of the puzzle.

If your process is completely broken, Visme won’t fix it. There is no magic bullet. But if you need to tweak aspects of your process to improve your sales, Visme is the tool that can help.

“Using Visuals to Level Up Your Sales Game” episode resources

You can connect with Payman on LinkedIn, and if you are interested in Visme, you can message him on LinkedIn and he’ll send members of The Sales Evangelist community a discount code for the premium package.

You can test drive Visme for free, and access a certain number of templates and graphics.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

This episode is also brought to you by Maximizer CRM. If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Rebecca Brizi, Donald Kelly, Inbound Leads, LinkedIn

TSE 931: How To Use LinkedIn for Inbound and Developing Process

LinkedIn is a powerful tool for sales professionals, but you must have a strategy in order to use it well. If you have a plan, you can use LinkedIn for inbound and developing process.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Rebecca Brizi, strategic consultant to small businesses and solopreneurs, talks about using social media to grow your business and how to use LinkedIn for inbound and developing process.

A place for business

When you enter LinkedIn, everyone knows why you’re there. There’s no ambiguity; it’s very specific.

People join LinkedIn because they want to connect with and network with people who are relevant to their businesses.

Rebecca’s husband is a great example of how LinkedIn can supplement your marketing efforts, especially for small businesses that don’t have a huge team of people.

Her husband doesn’t want to have to set up and run and manage a website, so he uses LinkedIn the way most people would use their business site. In fact, she said, he’s not asking people to visit an external site; he’s inviting them to find out about him in a place they’re already visiting.

LinkedIn can do everything for your business that websites can do. It can serve as an online brochure, an online messaging platform, and an online content platform.

Network with people

The best way to network with people is to help them know, like, and trust you.  Once you’ve done that, you’re on your way to a solid relationship that can create great opportunities.

Treat LinkedIn the same way treat your face-to-face marketing. Start with a focus on what you can do for other people. Begin by discovering what you can do to help people.

  • Who do they want to meet?
  • What do they want to learn?
  • What sort of information could be of interest to them?

Work to connect with people and stay transparent about who you are and why you want to connect with people.

You’ll be effective as long as you’re working to make your interactions positive for other people.

Great prospects

Once you’ve identified someone as a great prospect, consider trying to learn from him first. Determine whether you can make introductions that could be useful to him.

You have to know what your prospect wants in order to sell to him something. You have to understand what the prospect wants from life and how your product or service fits into that.

Effective sales is always about the buyer rather than the seller.

The Chet Holmes Buyer Pyramid says that at any given moment, only about three percent of your audience is actively looking to buy what you’re selling. Seven percent are open to whatever it is you’re selling.

The other 90 percent are split into thirds:

  • 30 percent haven’t even thought about it
  • 30 percent have thought about it but don’t think they need it
  • 30 percent are never going to buy from you.

You begin with 70 percent maximum reach every time. So do you want to capture the 3 percent or the 70 percent?

Well-crafted pitch

There’s a certain amount of subjectivity in each relationship that helps you determine the right moment to make your pitch.

A well-crafted pitch is a little like a marriage proposal. You’ve built up to that point and you expect the answer to be yes.

Success is much more about the buildup than about the final pitch. Once you’re facing that moment, you know when the time is right. You have the right solution at a fair price, so the moment develops clearly.

Using LinkedIn

LinkedIn is somewhat self-promotional, and businesses should use it to publish articles, post PDFs, list services, and share recommendations. Additionally, you’ll interact with other people and their articles, you’ll comment, and you’ll ask questions.

Rebecca’s husband focused less on selling and focused more on helping his prospects buy. He crafted his website so that people could see themselves in the content on his profile.

Remember that people who are on LinkedIn are there because they want to network. They want to grow their businesses and learn for their businesses.

Start by getting on LinkedIn and emulate what you see other people doing.

Make sure your profile looks good and start small.

Determine which interactions give you the most value and replicate those tasks. Work LinkedIn into your natural flow and don’t let it interfere with other things you need to do for your work.

“Use LinkedIn for Inbound” episode resources

Connect with Rebecca on LinkedIn or at her website rgbrizi.com. All her contact information is there, so you can message her, email her, and ask questions or share experiences.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

This episode is also brought to you byMaximizer CRM. If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

John Ferrara, Nimble, Social CRM, Donald Kelly,

TSE 923: How To Grow Your Sales Without Spending A Dime On Marketing

Imagine a world where you don’t have to spend any money on marketing. You have leads pouring in, deals close, and referrals pour in. Imagine being able to grow your sales without spending a dime on marketing.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Jon Ferrara shares the method he recommends to grow your sales without spending a dime on marketing.

Jon founded GoldMine CRM in 1989 and then sold it in 1999, and he has devoted his time since then to help other people improve their relationships. He also created a social CRM called Nimble.

No matter what industry you’re in, you have to find a way to get new leads into your funnel without spending so much money.

Great stories

Jon was looking for a way to automate the process of building relationships because he struggled with it as a salesperson and as a businessperson. He wanted to be able to connect more effectively with the humans around him.

The result was GoldMine, and it became exactly that for everyone it touched.

As an example, consider Jesus. Do you think Jesus spent any money on marketing?

He didn’t spend money. He shared words that empowered people and then those people became his teachers and preachers. Jesus created a movement.

If you’ll focus on helping other people grow and set yourself up as a trusted advisor, you’ll stay top of mind with your prospect. You’ll grow your sales without spending a dime on marketing.

Be an advisor

Advertising doesn’t work.

You won’t stay top-of-mind with your prospects by telling them how great you or your products are. Nobody cares about that.

Instead, teach others how to become better, smarter, faster, and set yourself up as that trusted advisor. Give knowledge away.

If you teach people to fish, they’ll figure out you sell fishing poles.

 

5 e’s

Your goal should be to:

  • educate
  • enchant
  • engage
  • embrace
  • empower

If you do that for your customers and your prospects, and for their influencers as well on a daily basis, you’ll establish your brand, grow your network and create a sustainable garden around your business that will help it grow.

That’s what Jon did with GoldMine. He figured out how to reach his prospects’ trusted advisor, in this case, Novell. Jon convinced Novell to use GoldMine, and then they started recommending it.

He started GoldMine with $5,000, without ever taking a dime of venture capital.

And that was only the first time he grew sales without spending money on marketing.

Jon used the one-to-many approach to reach his prospects.

Reach the influencers

If you could find a way to tell your great stories and get other people to tell your great stories around the clock globally, you could build a gold mine.

Most people focus solely on their customers and their prospects and they forget about the influencers who interact with those customers and prospects.

The secret to success is identifying the influencers of your core constituency.

If I was a business technology reseller, I could try to call businesses but they’d probably hang up on me.

Imagine, instead, if I built relationships with the trusted advisors of that small business person: maybe their accountant, their marketing consultant, or any one of their advisors.

If you can build those relationships, those trusted advisors will help you reach all those people on a daily basis.

We built a tool that helped the influencer grow, and they sold it as a solution and not only helped their customer grow but also grew themselves. It became a recursive cycle.

 

Amplify the message

Once you’ve built an army of evangelists, you have to amplify that message.

What does that mean?

Once you convince those influencers to sell to that base of trusted customers, they’ll likely ask you for leads.

If you don’t have money to advertise, how will you give people leads?

Jon went after the places where his prospects would be consuming information about how to be better and smarter and faster. He went after the business and technology publications and asked the editors and the writers how he could help them write more stories.

They needed stories about how businesses were using technology to grow, so he shared those stories. The term CRM didn’t exist then, but he helped define it.

He credits a combination of influencer marketing and guerilla PR that put GoldMine on the map.

Individual sellers

Your network is your net worth: your personal brand plus your professional network will help you achieve your dreams in life.

The more people you help grow, the more you will grow. To do that, you must set yourself up as a trusted advisor to your prospects, customers, and their influencers.

The simplest way to do that is to establish identity across all the brands where these people have conversations: Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram, Foursquare, Google Plus, Crunchbase, and Snapchat.

Share content on a daily basis that inspires and educates others about your areas of products and services. No more than 25 percent of what you share should be about you or your product. It should mostly be inspirational and educational.

You’ve likely forgotten more about your products and services than your customers will ever know in their lifetime. Since you’re likely consuming content every day about your area, just share it with the prospects around you.

Identify the influencers, share content, and hashtag it appropriately, (#sales, #marketing, #social) and then @name. It’s like dropping lures outside your boat into the digital social river surrounding your business.

People bite on that.

Listen and engage

Then you listen and engage. You educate with enchanting content with the intent to engage, embrace, and empower the people that you connect to.

When you connect with someone, you don’t start selling. You listen and learn. Prepare them before the engagement ideally by Nimbling them.

You ask questions and then listen and learn to find ways to add value. And if you do that for another person, they’ll naturally ask how they can return the favor. And you repeat that process at scale for the rest of your life.

You’ll build a sustainable garden of prospects, customers, and influencers that will help you achieve what you want to in life.

Islands of information

The biggest problem with this whole cycle is if you do what I tell you to do, you’re going to get so overconnected and overcommunicated wit this audience that you’ll need a platform to manage it.

We’ve got all these tools in all these places like Facebook, Gmail, MailChimp, and dozens of other places, and contact management is broken.

You can only manage about 200 people in your head at a given time, and most people have 1,000 or 10,000 contacts. They need a golden Rolodex, a personal CRM.

Instead of Googling people, you Nimble them. and automatically sync every interaction you have so that you have a history of every contact and every followup.

If you’re listening to this today and you don’t have a personal golden Rolodex, go find one. If you try Nimble and you like it, I’m going to give you three months at 40 percent off if you use the code Jon40.

Salespeople aren’t detail people

Most people who are in sales are people people; they are relationship people, not detail people.

If you’re in sales, you need a tool to organize yourself. You might want to find another human being who is detail-oriented and become a team.

Jon believes that if you do what you’re good at in life and then surround yourself with people that are good at the things you aren’t good at, you can be much more successful.

Establish a brand across all the places that are straightforward. People buy from people they like, know, and trust. Going to my LinkedIn profile is like going to my business lobby; you won’t find out much about me personally.

Instagram is where you’ll find out more about me personally, and you can connect based on that. People don’t connect because they both love sales. They connect because they value the same things.

Don’t just share business stuff. Open yourself up on your social media.

“Grow Your Sales” episode resources

You can connect with Jon via email or Google his name to find him on a variety of platforms. Connect with him on the ones that feel most comfortable.

Find Vala Afshar on Twitter to see an example of sharing content that educates and inspires at scale.

Listen to episode 005 of The Sales Evangelist to hear Judy Garmaise talk about the importance of followup for salespeople.

When it’s time to follow up with your leads, Prospect.io can make your followup that much better. It has literally changed the way I prospect, and I love it.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRMis a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Tom Poland, Leadsology, Inbound Lead, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 916: How To Develop A Marketing Message That Cuts-Through & Brings More Leads

Tom Poland, The Sales Evangelist, LeadsologyImagine how quickly sales will decline if your sales and marketing teams aren’t communicating well. You must have a marketing message that cuts through the noise and generates inbound leads.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Tom Poland helps us learn more about how to effectively create a marketing message that will guide your prospects through the buyer’s journey.

Tom helps professionals create a systematic flow of inbound leads. He’ll help us create a unified message between sales and marketing instead of bumping heads constantly.

Some people have suggested that sales and marketing are like siblings, and when they aren’t getting along well, it creates chaos in the family.

Inbound leads

When you wake up on Monday morning to discover multiple bookings by people who want to talk to you about becoming a client, and they have a pretty good idea of how you work and what you charge, that’s inbound.

They’re quite convinced that you are their number one choice to solve their problem or meet their challenge, and you didn’t need cold calls or direct mail letters to connect with them.

That’s the magic of inbound: creating high quality, well-qualified new client inquiries.

Tom says it’s a mistake to be singularly focused on just finding leads. It’s not about finding the leads, it’s about finding the people who are happy leads.

Finding leads is a little like running through the forest poking bears. The bears are asleep and you’ve got a honeypot that you want them to reach, so you poke them all and wave the honeypot in front of their noses.

If their hunger exceeds their anger, you get to live.

Good marketing gently puts that honeypot outside the forest in the form of some kind of content marketing. The people who put their hand out metaphorically and stop to smell the honey are the ones you want to put an offer in front of.

Marketing assets

The creation of marketing assets serves as the great separator between people who stay stuck on the treadmill and those who actually create something scalable.

Marketing assets can be presentations, lunch-and-learn opportunities, webinars, videos, or a book. The asset has to match the audience.

It’s no good running a webinar for CEOs because they aren’t webinar people.

In most cases, sales reps will have three target audiences:

  • corporate executives
  • entrepreneurs
  • consumers

Each of those markets will have different assets or mediums that they’ll respond best to. The creation of those assets demands that you include the right subject matter, communicate the right way, and reach the right people.

 

Starting point

If you’re starting a webinar or a series of videos, the first question people will have is “Why should I listen to this guy or girl?”

Next, we need to describe the problem in such a way that the audience knows that we understand their challenges. Finally, we’ll address why their previous efforts have failed, which builds a depth of relatability and respect for your expertise.

You must lay out a sequence that you lead the audience through from the start.

Normally they’re open-mindedly skeptical: open-minded enough to attend your meeting but skeptical enough to ask questions about your background and the solutions you’re offering.

The audience is looking for something valuable. They’ve given up their most precious resource in the form of their time, so they are looking for something they can implement.

When you give people what they came for, you differentiate yourself by giving real value. Allow your prospect to walk away with something valuable. If they buy, great. If they don’t, they still walked away with your brand in their brains.

Say something different

Your message must cut through to your prospects. You’ve got to say something different than your competitors are saying.

If, for example, every business around you is promising to help you grow your business and find more free time, you’ve got to stop repeating what everyone else is saying.

Secondly, you’ve got to motivate people to take the action you want them to take.

1. Make it benefit-rich. Instead of talking about being a business coach or a software developer, talk about the benefits.

2. Include specifics, which increase both believability and desirability.

3. Be different. When you incorporate cut-through, you immediately motivate the person to want to know more about your product or service.

You have to hit the sweet spot between believability and desirability.

Over-deliver

Whatever you are, be authentic. Whatever you do in your message, make sure that you can not only deliver but over-deliver, because you want the referrals and the word-of-mouth.

You want people excited about what you do, and you want to have quality experiences, which means you have to under-promise and over-deliver.

You set the expectations at a level that you know you can exceed. It means that you have to be good at what you do because you have to set the expectations at a desirable level and then over-deliver.

Scale your value delivery as much as you can because it gives you more resources for marketing. Marketing is what makes the money and it’s where the magic happens.

When your groups are communicating and the message is unified among the entire team, magic can happen.

 

“Marketing Message” episode resources

Email Tom or connect with him at leadsology.guru.  You can find lots of free stuff there, including the famous five-hour challenge that will help will help you create an effective marketing message so you can generate some leads.

Is your CRM functioning properly? It’s important to have a CRM that your team is willing to use.

If you’re unhappy with your CRM, check out Maximizer CRM. If you’re happy with your CRM, check out Maximizer. It has been around a long time, and it’s worth the time to check out the free demonstration.

Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities. Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. Video Jungle offers top-notch, state-of-the-art advice about video which is a great way to offer relevant content on LinkedIn.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Marketing, Sales, Thiefaine, Podcast, Prouduct

TSE 894: Sales From The Street-“Learn Marketing”

 

Thiefaine Magre, The Sales Evangelist

 

 

 

 

When sales are good, life is good. So what do you do if you’re a brand new business that isn’t making enough money to pay the bills? When larger companies believe you’re too new to trust, you must learn marketing in order to help others get to know your business.

On today’s episode of Sales From the Street, Thiefaine Magre, COO of Prouduct, talks about making the transition from a guaranteed position to an emerging business, and how he realized the need to learn marketing.

Once Thiefaine and his partners understood the importance of marketing, they made some key moves that propelled their sourcing business forward.

Name recognition

Thiefaine recalled being confused by the fact that, when he earned a guaranteed paycheck with a skate company, he was able to find plenty of customers. Then, when he branched out on his own, he wasn’t finding sales.

Despite the team’s hustle, they weren’t generating sales.

They quickly realized the need to learn marketing in order to help people recognize the business.

Thiefaine realized that his previous success stemmed from the fact that people recognized the name of the skate products: they saw people riding the boards around town and at competitions.

Despite their efforts at cold-calling, reaching out to friends, contacting other businesses, and asking for referrals, nothing helped.

Everything changed when the team landed an interview on John Lee Dumas’ podcast.

Credibility

Thiefaine calls that podcast appearance the tipping point for Prouduct.

Not only did John Lee Dumas mention the company, it turns out he had his own product that he thought might benefit from sourcing help. As a result, there was a separate conversation after the podcast centered around helping John source his own product.

John’s listeners heard about the relationship and reached out to Prouduct for their own businesses.

That single podcast, Thiefaine said, launched countless leads, and earned them millions of dollars. The referral and testimonial that resulted from working with John gave the company credibility.

It also gave Prouduct access to John’s already significant audience.

Marketing tactics

Thiefaine recommends taking advantage of as many marketing tactics as possible in order to maximize your company’s reach.

He believes that traditional channels like TV or national media don’t often benefit companies who aren’t highly funded, because they aren’t equipped to deal with the potential influx of business.

If you want to do podcasts, choose very focused podcasts that are in your area. Same with blogs. Begin with the ones that reach your target customer and grow into a more general audience from there.

Referrals

Behind marketing, referrals have been the largest source of revenue for the Prouduct team.

Thiefaine points out, though, that previous customers aren’t the only source of referrals.

Other entrepreneurs have been a great source of business for the company, and he believes the same can be true for you.

When entrepreneurs get together to share ideas and experiences, it’s a perfect opportunity for a prospect to hear about the work that your company is doing.

In their case, the Prouduct team was sourcing a business that creates teepees, and the business owner shared Prouduct’s information with a fellow entrepreneur.

The referral likely generated almost half a million dollars in sales.

The key is to hang on until you get your break. Keep trying different things until you find your opportunity.

“Learn Marketing” episode resources

Connect with Prouduct for more information about sourcing your product and protecting against supply chain failure.

You can also connect with him on his website, ThiefaineMagre.com.

We bring on guests like Thiefaine because we want to help you be more successful. Research podcasting to find out whether it’s a good fit for your and your organization. Whether you appear on other episodes or create your own, podcasting might be a good option.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

Grab your free excerpt of the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic blueprint for all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

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Adam Witty, Forbes books, Donald Kelly

TSE 678: The Seven Pillars of Authority Marketing

How do you want to be seen by prospects – a salesman or a Forbes 500 businessman?

Speeding up the sales process is critical in any business and if you want to do just that, you have to learn how to present yourself to prospects as a trusted expert, not just a commodity.

Adam Witty is the Founder and CEO of Advantage Media Group – ForbesBooks, an authority marketing and publishing company. It’s Forbes’ first foray into the book publishing world.

He definitely knows a thing or two when it comes to grabbing attention and being able to present a product or service to a prospect in a way they can better make decisions. Today, Adam dishes out the 7 Pillars of Authority Marketing.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Adam:

The Biggest Marketing Mistake Entrepreneurs Make:

Many salespeople tend to commoditize themselves. They talk, think, and act like everybody else. However, in this very competitive world of business, you need to get people’s attention.

So you need to do the opposite and stand out above the crowd. Strategically and systematically position yourself as an authority of whatever you do, regardless of the industry you’re in.

The Principle of Authority Marketing

If you spent more than twelve months at something you do, you know more about that one thing than 99.99% of the population. You become an expert in that very narrow niche topic. Unfortunately, we don’t recognize this.

Exploit the fact that you know so much about this topic and then build this into a marketing plan.

Your Best Marketing Tool: Write a Book on What You’re an Expert At

Write a book related to what you sell of course. And when you both sit down with that prospect, pull out a copy of your book. Autograph it to them and slide it across the table.

This completely changes the dynamics and it takes you from being a salesperson to a trusted authority. The prospect is now curious about what you have to share with them. You are now seen as an unwanted pest to a trusted guest.

The 7 Pillars of Building Authority

1. Content Marketing

This is when you publish your expertise through a book, an article, a white paper, an article about you, a blog post, a podcast, a webinar, an audio interview, etc.

This idea is that if you have something interesting and important to say to the right kind of person and you put that information in front of them, they’re going to listen to and consume that information. Then they will most likely want to engage with you.

Instead of pushing yourself towards the prospects, you’re actually pulling the prospects towards you.

2. Branding an Omnipresence

Are you seen as a salesman or an authority? This depends on how you show up – physically and online. What comes up when a prospect looks you up on Google?

Start with your LinkedIn Page and having a personal brand website. What is your personal brand and how is that represented online?

Through your personal branding website, you’re able to tie back into your content marketing (links to your Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, or whatever social media platform you’re using for your business).

What is your personal brand? Do you look like a salesman or a Fortune 500 CEO?

3. PR & Media

People won’t believe what you say about you but they do about what other people say about you. If you want to get the media, you have to give the media something to talk about (ex. book launch, compelling research)

The media is not the business of helping you grow your business But it’s in the business of reporting news or creating stories they think will be interesting to their audience.

4. Speaking

If you speak a lot, you are seen as an expert. Otherwise, they wouldn’t allow you to speak at an event.

You don’t have to be a professional speaker but you have to be able to speak about that thing you’re passionate about and you’re speaking to the right people.

When you’re speaking, you’re wearing that Fortune 500 suit and you have a command of the audience.

This is also your way to generate leads for your business.

5. Lead Generation

Bottom line, you need leads. But you attract really high-quality leads when you’re a magnet versus (again) pushing yourself towards other people. Nobody is attracted to needy people.

When you’re an authority, your customers brag about you. We create our own image and share that with your customers. Craft an image that your customers will brag about to their friends rather than image of just being a commodity.

6. Referral Marketing

When you’re the authority and customers brag about you, they’re going to talk about you to their friends and refer you to other people.

This is the key to preventing the erosion of margins and getting beaten up on price, and the key to shortening to sales cycle.

Your number one objective in sales is to accelerate the speed of trust. The quicker you build trust with the prospects, the quicker you get to the sales.

Being seen as an authority speeds up the trust. Then customers won’t buy on price but on value. They don’t treat you like a commodity.

7. Events

When you’re an authority, you have the ability to put on events. And when people trust you, you can post meetings, conferences, events, engagements for your customers, your fans, and your champions. Having an authority will get people to come to you.

Adam’s Major Takeaway:

Authority is not conferred upon you. It  will not creep up on you. If you wait for someone else to crown you king or queen, that won’t happen. The most successful people are the ones that have to guts to grab authority for themselves.

Episode Resources:

Grab a free copy of Adam’s new book, Lead the Field: How to Become an Authority and Dominate Your Competition on www.ForbesBooks.com/salesevangelistConnect with Adam Witty on LinkedIn or visit www.AdamWitty.com and www.ForbesBooks.com

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Scott Dubois, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 628: How To Use Personalized Media To Earn More Appointments

Scott Dubois, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist PodcastLet’s talk Marketing version 2.0! Today’s guest is Scott Dubois and he shares specifically about how you can utilize personalized media in sales to grab the attention of your prospects. Especially if you’re doing account based marketing, listen to this episode and learn things you probably have never thought of before.

Scott is the Co-Founder of Pidalia, a digital marketing agency, which he describes as an intersection between Madison Ave. and Silicon Valley.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Scott:

What is Personalized Media?

  • Personalized media is best when the recipient doesn’t even realize it’s being personalized to them. This goes beyond “Dear Donald.”
  • It’s certainly more than that. It could be based on things like changing photography based upon gender or changing the color or font size based upon age.
  • These are the simple things that make it seem more relatable and tangible in a way that the offer presented makes sense for the intended audience.

Steps in Developing Personalized Media for Your Business:

  1. Understand your data structure.

Understand what moves the needle for your audience whether be it eCommerce, traditional retail, or whatnot. For B2B, you need to understand like industry, vertical market applications, etc. Make sure you have that underlying data structure to support your business.

  1. Plan out how it’s going to happen.

How are you going to move the needle? In B2B, this could mean pulling dynamic case studies or email outreach campaign. You need to pull in the right case studies for the right vertical market so it resonates to the person.

  1. Measure.

Make sure what you’re doing actually works.

Does budget matter?
It really doesn’t cost that much unless you’re trying to scale. For example, there are tons of great sites that provide free images such as Pexels free stock photography.

Scott’s Unique Approach to Personalized Media:

On day 1, they send a package to the client.  On day 2, they send a follow up email.  Within those three days between the day they sent the package and the day they’re going to call the client, they buy Facebook and Instagram advertising, a 90-second video that has been shot to target employees of that company (you’re not going to see it if you’re not an employee of that company). They would then ask the employee for help to remind the client about the call.

How to overcome the fear of trying out new marketing techniques:

Do A/B testing. Compare things out. Do A/B testing to prove the theory. If you think something can work, try to test it. Take a sub-segment and try something out.

How to get started with personalized marketing:

  1. Do a personalized email by writing something specifically for them instead of being part of a larger campaign.
  2. Create a landing page specific for the person you’re reaching out to. This won’t take tremendous amount of time or dollars to do this.

Scott’s Major Takeaway:

Go back and look at your history. Past history is a gold mine. Profile your customers and figure out the point when they became customers and how you closed that sale. This is going to be your first iteration of what that personalized journey should look like for your sales team.

Episode Resources:

Get connected with Scott Dubois on www.Pidalia.com/TSE.

Pexels free stock photography

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TSE 569: Sales From The Street-“Content Marketing and Lead Gen”

Who doesn’t want to get more leads? But of course, you want to have quality leads and you want to make sure you’re being strategic about it. You can’t just wing it! Especially if you’re a small business that doesn’t have a robust marketing department, you have to find unique ways and this could be a good start.

My guest today is Phil Singleton who will share great insights related to lead gen. Phil runs a boutique web design/internet marketing agency that helps businesses build websites from the ground up and establishing them as publishing platforms so people can use them to publish content and become authorities in their niche and draw people in by teaching them through content marketing.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Phil:

Phil’s coolest sales experience as a customer and bought Jan Jantsch’s book, Duct Tape Marketing

Phil’s definition of Content Marketing

A way to establish yourself or your business as an authority in its niche through different approaches such as blogging, social media, podcasting, or being interviewed, etc.

It’s more than just producing content. The bigger issue is to really get 2-10x out of your content marketing investment by figuring out who your ideal customers want and how they’re searching for things on the internet.

Use a tool you can use like BuzzSumo to see what kind of topics are trending in a particular area then marry those hot trends with the way people are searching and produce 10x content.

Why companies fail at generating leads from their content:

  1. People still bring it back to an advertorial tone or message.

You have to buy into the idea that teaching is the new selling. Many businesses are still in an advertorial mode when it comes to their products and services. Figure out and put your best content and your best ideas out there. Be comfortable with giving some of your best ideas on a regular basis.Don’t worry you gave away one or two great ideas and think you don’t have any value anymore.

  1. Keyword research

You want the content you put up to show up in that search so that your information comes up when they’re looking for information on this type of product or service. Google is a part of every single purchase process there is. Buyers do their research and get reviews before buying a product or service. Be sure you’re baked into that search activity into your marketing plan and assets or you lose that opportunity.

How to capture information and maximize them:

  1. Invest in content marketing and do it the right way.
  2. Make sure your website is the referral source for all your best content and all your content marketing activities.

One of the mistakes small businesses make is they take their best content and put them up on the social media places where it dies since there is no trail back to their website so there is now way to capture them on a lead form. Make sure everything you’re doing comes back to your source:

  • You can offer them something awesome so they get into your sales automation system.
  • You’ve got your re-marketing systems in place so they once they come back to your website, you have the chance to chase them back on Facebook and display advertising ads while fresh in their mind.

Content Marketing Strategies for Small Businesses

  1. Consistent blogging

Find a way to publish 2 or 4 times a month.

  1. Social media presence

Have somebody help you write stuff you want to write about and publish to your website. There are tools you can use to automate publishing and then they’re posted out to your third party social media channels so you’re able to maintain that presence.

  1. Blog post series

Come out with say 10 blog post series that each one of these can then turn into a stand-alone blog post. And then at the end of that series, stitch these all together into an eBook that can then be used as your call-to-action that people can come back to at the end of ten weeks. Then you can also use that to republish onto the Kindle platform. Create a nice author page and use back links so it feeds you RSS feeds on the website.

Just by coming up with a strategic marketing plan, you’ve now just become an author and elevated yourself as an authority in your own niche. You’re just doing the work once but you’re getting multiple benefits out of it.

  1. Systematize these things and make it part of your discipline.

Part of being an effective content marketer is committing to it and doing it over time. You can’t just work on one or two blog posts and expect to get a return on it. You have to work over time.

  1. Get involved in committing to an online reputation management strategy.

If you show up on Google and one company has got 50 reviews and the next company has only one, that guy with 50 reviews is going to steal it every single time. Make it habit to make sure you’ve got your business profile setup. Online review sites are changing the whole buying process so be able to make it a part of your plan. Reviews end up making people push the purchase button. Ask your happy customers to go out there and say nice things about you. Be able to display you have a huge army of people that say you are the person, it helps people make the decision and you have control of that.

Phil’s Major Takeaway:

Stop thinking of websites as a business brochure. Think of it as a revenue-generating asset and something you need to invest time and money in. It’s true many small businesses will say most of their business comes from referrals but they could lose some of that referral business they thought they got in the bag because they never got to them and went to somebody else who had 50 reviews or had a great website. So think of your website as an asset or as a top selling person in your organization. The more time you treat it as an investment, the more return you’re going to get out of.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Phil on www.kcseopro.com for SEO and inbound marketing stuff and www..kcwebdesigner.com for Google-friendly web design.

Visit www.seoforgrowth.com and get a 3-bundle eBook pack including SEO for Growth by John Jantsch and Phil Singleton

BuzzSumo

Hinkle Hardscapes (An example of a successful content marketing that Phil helped with)

Duct Tape Marketing by John Jantsch

The Sales Manager’s Guide to Greatness: Ten Essential Strategies for Leading Your Team to the Top by Kevin F. Davis

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DJ Shri, Donald Kelly, The Best Sales Podcast, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 459: Sales From The Street: “Local Online Advertising Part 2”

The Sales Evangelist Podcast, DJ ShriToday’s episode is Part II of the interview with DJ Shri where we talk about how you can master local advertising.

If you haven’t yet, do check out TSE Episode 454, which is Part I of this awesome conversation I had with DJ Shri where he laid out the framework of local online advertising.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with DJ Shri:

What is Social Proofing?

Who is somebody outside your business that has no personal investment in this that will vouch for you? An example of this is getting 5-star review on Yelp.

What is an Irresistible Offer?

Talk about something that removes that risk. So there is zero risk for the person. Tackle that objection first of removing the risk upfront then show them what you can provide.

How to be top-of-mind to your customers:

  1. Create your avatar.

Google on customer avatar worksheet where you will answer a list of questions to help you identify your customer avatar. The more detailed you can be, the better it is for you to sink into who your ideal customer is. Your avatar may change once you start your business and that’s fine.

  1. Use Facebook Ads

Facebook advertising is a good way to target your customers. It allows you to find out the interests of your customer avatar. Isolate you demographics. Isolate where your prospects are. Be careful as Facebook would try to make it super easy for you to buy their paid advertising because it’s not as easy. Take a step back and really figure out what is Facebook trying to do as they’re targeting really specific people. Don’t be afraid to target locally or at a state-level.

Here’s a trick: Find out a local business selling similar price point things even if they’re not your niche. Find out the local stores in your area that have FB pages. And understand that if these customers can afford say, a $5-$10 cupcake, then maybe they could afford a $5-$10 risk of whatever you’re selling.

DJ Shri’s Major Takeaway:

Go for something you’re passionate about. Sell with your personality. When you’re passionate about something and you really believe in it, that’s an authenticity you cannot fake. And that reflects to your sales pitch.

Episode Resources:

Connect with DJ Shri through email at shri@mobiledjtips.com and check out his podcast Mobile DJ Tips on iTunes.

TSE Episode 454 – Part I interview with DJ Shri

The ONE Thing by Gary Keller and Jay Papasan

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Sales, Marketing, Account Based Selling, Jeffery Davis

TSE 436: The Moment I Knew Sales+Marketing = Genius!

Sales, Marketing, Account Based Selling, Jeffery DavisToday is the day of the Do Big Things Conference happening in downtown West Palm Beach, Florida. Wherever you are, even if you can’t make it to the event, be in the know and follow us at #DoBigThings16 on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

Moving on to our episode today…

Recently, we have been talking more about the idea of sales and marketing which is rapidly changing. Today’s guest, Jeffrey Davis talks about how you can recognize how sales and marketing can work together and do phenomenal things. He shares metrics you need to focus on and some great insight into account-based management and startups.

Jeffrey is the Founder of the Sales and Marketing Alignment Summit, an event where they bring together sales, marketing, and sales enablement in B2B technologies to have a conversation about the challenges they have working together and how to alleviate those and move forward.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Jeffrey:

The goals of the Sales and Marketing Alignment Summit:

  • To create a community of sales and marketing professionals focused on growth through better alignment
  • To find and curate the best content
  • Facilitating collaboration between business owners to facilitate alignment between these groups

Factors behind the tension between sales and marketing:

  1. Not data-driven

Many companies look at metrics but are not data-driven. You can generate a healthy revenue and not realize you’re losing money because of missed opportunities.

  1. Leadership aspect

If you have a person that comes from sales, you tend to have a sales-driven organization. If you have somebody that comes from marketing, you tend to have a marketing-driven organization. Because the skill set is very different, it’s difficult to balance the two unless you have an executive team that has experience from both sides.

Sell to Sales!

Sell ideas, concepts, and strategies to sales people.

Communicate with sales the reason you’re doing this, why they should care, and how is it going to help them reach their revenue goals and make money.

All organizations should be sales-driven and it’s up to leadership to sell the unique attributes that marketing brings to them and how it can make their life easier so they can close more businesses.

Account-Based Marketing

Account-based marketing is an essential component to overall high level strategies which can fall into three buckets:

  1. Take a system approach (versus a functional approach).

Instead of looking at sales as sales and marketing as marketing, look at it from the viewpoint of the customer. Start talking about customer journeys and look at it holistically as to how best engage potential customer so you get the outcome you want.

  1. Have a formal feedback loop.

Build, measure, learn. Have that continuous conversation between the two so that marketing can iterate strategies and put the best out there for the market.

  1. Focus on shared goals.

In a lot of sales organizations, sales and marketing don’t have the same goals. Regardless of sales or marketing, your primary metric should be, are you hitting revenue? If not, why not?

Metrics you should pay attention to:

  • Are you reaching your target revenue?
  • Correlate to the sales funnel (ex. marketing qualified leads, total lead volume)
  • Middle of the funnel (ex. servicing metrics around service line agreements)
  • Close metrics (ex. close ratio)
  • Find out where majority of revenue is coming from to help you understand where you need to share or push your resources.

More strategies to bridge the gap between sales and marketing:

  1. Raise the conversation from tactical B2B technology to fundamentally changing the way sales and marketing see themselves and the way they interact.
  2. Move them from being independent warriors to really seeing each other as allies and a source of strength.
  3. Convince salespeople that marketing is an asset to them and can help them do their job easier.
  4. Change the goals in your conversations into:

“How does what you’re doing today affect your colleague?”

“How can you move toward collectively attaining more revenue?”

Sales and marketing in startups:

In startups, you become both sales and marketing.

You have to learn two completely different disciplines and understand when to apply which. It depends on where your customer is throughout their customer journey.

You have to morph back and forth between two things that are fundamentally different in their objective.

Information: Your Competitive Advantage

  • People
  • Process
  • Products

Get information on these three and it will keep you ahead.

Jeffrey’s Major Takeaway:

Revenue fixes all problems. At the end of the day, focus on revenue and it will tell you the story and what you need to do.

Episode Resources:

The Lean Startup by Eric Ries

The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg

The Profit

Connect with Jeffrey on Twitter @jeff_davis2 and check out his blog at www.jeffdavis2.com. Learn more about the Sales and Marketing Alignment Summit at www.smasummit.com. They’re currently exclusively in Chicago but they wish to expand to other major cities throughout the country. Feel free to reach out to him if you’re interested to partner with him.

Create interactive presentations that customers will enjoy and remember. Get a full demonstration of Prezi Business and see the power it has in action. Just go to www.prezi.com/TSE to help you tell more compelling, value-driven stories to your prospects.

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Markerting, Donald Kelly, Sales Podcast, Justin Christianson

TSE 311: How To Get And Keep Your Competitive Advantage In Today’s Nosey Digital World

Markerting, Donald Kelly, Sales Podcast, Justin ChristiansonOne major weapon that every salesperson must keep loaded in their artillery is to have that competitive advantage in today’s noisy digital world. So I’m bringing Justin Christianson on the show today to share his expertise on this exact topic. He is an entrepreneur, consultant, and author.

Justin has been in the digital marketing space for 14 years now and has had his own fair share of failures and successes. He has basically become the go-to guy when it comes to implementation, optimization, and how all those pieces work together. Born out of such demand, Justin has created Conversion Fanatics where they help companies split test and find out more about their visitors as well as increase results from their paid advertising channels.

Listen in to find out how you can gain that competitive advantage to keep yourself ahead of the pack.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Justin:

What is competitive advantage in the digital sense?

Being able to stand out of the very noisy digital space and get in front of more of your target audience rather than competing

Steps you must do to keep yourself afloat:

Understand your metrics.

  • You have to know how well you perform in whatever channel you’re on. Where are your visitors coming from? Where are they going? Where are they falling off? The analytical data will help you understand that. Many large companies or salespeople do not really understand their metrics as they should.

Examples of major metrics to use:

  • How much are you paying to acquire that lead or customer?
  • How much is that customer worth to you?

How to keep track of data:

  • Go old school and use spreadsheets.
  • For Facebook advertising, look at what every action is worth to you depending on where the conversion pixel is placed and match that up with the rest of the funnel.
  • Google analytics and CRM solution

Look for ways you can be different.

  • Don’t have the same marketing message. You have your own differentiator and make sure you’re able to educate people about what it is.

Lead with “what’s in it for my customer?”

  • Stop thinking about how great your product or service is. Instead, tie that back into your marketing message and relate your features to your benefits. Sometimes you get so hung up with how your product is so awesome that you forget why the visitor is on your website in the first place. Always tie it back to how it’s going to benefit the visitor. 

Find leverage points.

  • Understand what your competitor is doing and how they’re positioning themselves in the market. Then you’d be able to see trends and understand what the audience is responding to.

What works in social media to help you differentiate yourself:

Consultative selling

  • Educate people about what the problem is and identify it right off the bat then offer your product or service as a solution
  • Higher volume, lower quality conversion
  • Cheaper traffic
  • B2B vs. B2C

Justin’s Major Takeaway:

Pay attention to your metrics and pay attention to your visitors and give them what they want.

Episode Resources:

Conversion Fanatics

www.clyxo.com/justinchristianson

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Join Today! 

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

 

Eric Siu, Donald Kelly, Content Marketing, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 290: How Content Marketing Can Increase Your Sales Leads

Eric Siu, Donald Kelly, Content Marketing, The Sales Evangelist PodcastIs content still king? We’re going to talk about this and more on the show today as we bring in Eric Siu as he talks about the power of content marketing.

Eric Siu owns a digital marketing agency called Single Grain which he established in 2009 where they help companies from venture-backed startups to Fortune 500 companies grow their revenues online using different digital marketing strategies around SEO, content marketing, paid advertising, and connect everything together.

Eric is also the host of the podcast Growth Everywhere as he talks with entrepreneurs, tech people and markets about business and personal growth with more emphasis on the marketing side. He is also a regular contributor to several publications such as Forbes, Entrepreneur Magazine, Business Insider, Fast Company, and more.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Eric:

Is content still king?

  • Content is king. Bad content is definitely NOT.
  • If you’re producing 300-500 word articles and think you’re going to get by, well, times have changed.
  • Studies suggest that the top three results in Google are usually close to 2,000 words or more
  • Provide in-depth content that provides actual utility to people.

What makes great content?

  • Provides utility over quantity
  • Utility means that your reader must be able to have one key takeaway after reading it.

What’s working in digital marketing today?

  • Gmail advertising (Yes! It exists. And a lot of people actually click through them.)
  • Videos (Periscope and Snapchat)
  • YouTube ads
  • Facebook video ads
  • Webinars

Use the power of Snapchat:

  • Gary Vaynerchuk is a great example
  • Tell a story to people to drive more conversations.

How to get a thousand TRUE fans:

Be consistent about blogging. You are going to suck at first but who cares? Not a lot of people are going to see it initially anyway. Eventually, it’s going to have a snowball effect. Opportunities will come and grow organically.

Don’t do everything at once.

You’re not going to have a budget to vet out each channel. See traction with one channel first and then 10x or 100x it. Have a process. Have a strategy. Focus.

The power of having your personal morning routine:

  • The morning sets the tone for everything.
  • Journaling
  • Way of Life app
  • The 500 Journal recommended by Tim Ferris
  • Start your day with having three things to be grateful for and three things that are going to make your day great
  • Exercise

Eric’s major takeaway:

Creating content is only one part of it. Be willing to go out there and promote it. Spend 20% of your time for content creation and the other 80% of it promoting. You have to start somewhere. Stay consistent to reap the benefits down the road.

Connect with Eric on Twitter @ericosiu

Episode Resources:

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Join Today!

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

TSE 187: Marketing and Sales From Jim Kokocki, President of Toastmasters International

TSE 187: Marketing and Sales From Jim Kokocki President of Toastmasters International

What is your value proposition? First of all, do you know what value proposition means? Let our distinguished guest, Jim Kokocki, answer that for you in this episode.

Jim Kokocki is the Toastmaster International President. The beauty with joining Toastmaster is that it refines your sales presentations in the same way that you will be able to get insights into how to better perform.

With history in sales and marketing with telecom companies and large organizations, Jim is a real estate investor and dabbling in the startup world. Jim spent 30 years at a telecom company in Canada where he spent 10 years in the computer field, particularly the systems development side, 4 years in sales, and the remainder of years in marketing, taking care of the largest enterprise customers, small-mid sized enterprises and medium sized markets.

Listen in as Jim shares with us tons of great, great information, tips and strategies to better your performance in sales while putting tremendous focus on the power of VALUE PROPOSITION.

 

Here are the highlights of the conversation with Jim:

How sales professionals and entrepreneurs can better market themselves:

  1. Ensure you’re being clear in your message about who you’re serving and what you’re service is.
  2. Listen to how people interpret your product or service.

Strategies when you’re doing a startup:

  1. What triggers people to spend money?
  2. How and why are they going to see value?
  3. Start talking to people early about your business concept and get their feedback and interpretations.
  • This takes some pivoting considering the perspectives from prospect customers or colleagues in the industry to help avoid wasting money.

How to best share value:

  1. Articulate your value proposition.
  • This is a marketing discipline.
  • Respond to customer objections.
  • How do you differentiate yourself from competitors? Stick to that and document that.
  1. Probe for customer needs to see if you’re a match with the customer and offer the product for sale.
  • Determine if your value is a match with the customer.

Strategies in facing the major challenges of sellers in the B2B world:

  1. Motivate the sales team.
  • Focus on the value proposition and its strength. Keep your team highly motivated.
  1. Strengthen your presentation skills.
  • They should be keen enough to listen to customer objections, respond well to them, and articulate the value proposition.

The 3-Prong Approach:

  1. The marketing team has to be clear on the offering and assessing the competitive situation.
  2. Individual responsibility is just as critical.
  3. The sales manager must make sure the top performers stay motivated and bring along people who aren’t performing as well to see if they can turn them into top performers.

The best way to help a struggling seller to improve:

  1. Sharpen the communication skills.
  • Make sure you’re doing a wonderful job of speaking to customers and understanding their needs and not to try to force a solution upon customers.
  1. Have a powerful method of communicating what the value proposition is.
  • Sales people must be able to adapt the value proposition to a particular customer’s situation.

Jim walks you through his process:

  1. Looking at the competitive landscape.
  • Who are the competitors and how they position themselves
  1. Identifying their customer fits.
  • Who are the customers who would buy from them? How to position to those various segments within the buying population.
  1. Ensuring that people always ask for the sale.

Selling for small startups vs corporate Fortune 500 companies:

Large companies:

  • Buyers understand the massive team behind them so they have a lot of comfort that if something goes wrong, there’s somebody to reach out to.

Smaller companies:

  • There is a need to establish credibility.
  • You have to show that you have a solution and illustrate what your support structure is in case something goes wrong.
  • Customers want to see some depth of service.

What a solopreneur can do to find success:

  1. Have a view of your growth path.
  • Have a view as to how you’re going to grow as the revenue starts to flow.
  1. Understand what you love to do.
  • Do not give that away because you want to keep what keeps you motivated.
  1. Have a vision of how you’re going to grow and support the organization through its growth stages.
  • As you grow, you’re going to need sales staff. Invest in professional marketing support or customer service people.

Strategies in pitching your product:

  1. Develop a curiosity about your customers.
  • Become skilled in asking questions.
  1. Show care, interest, and compassion.
  • Don’t worry about the pitch. People appreciate when you are showing care, compassion, and interest in their problems. This way, people will be more open about the challenges they face.
  1. Bring the folks who could help you (like the technical department).
  • Sometimes the owner is not the best person you pitch to but people like the project managers or the technical team.

What is a value proposition?

Articulate who you serve, the problems they have, and why your solution saves them pain, grief, time and money.

Jim’s Major Takeaway:

Talk about your value proposition to a large number of people. Network and get out to business mixers. Talk about what you do, watch their reaction, and listen to how they respond to it. The Toastmasters Club is a wonderful place to talk about the product/service to find  a general audience where you need to describe in simple terms how you approach a market to help you better refine your value proposition. The more you practice delivering your message to a diverse audience, the better you get at it.

Current projects Jim is working on:

  • Volunteering job at Toastmasters International servicing as International President for a one year term
  • Looking into real estate investments and launching startup opportunities

Connect with Jim through email at jimkokocki@gmail.com and on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook.

 

Episode resources:

Toastmasters International

The Sales Evangelizers, Donald Kelly, Sales Facebook Group

 

Barry Doctor, Product Camp, Marketing

TSE 120: Key Practices Salespeople Can Learn From Marketers To Increase Sales

Barry Doctor, Product Camp, Marketing

Sales and marketing are two different aspects, but they need to go hand-in-hand if you want to achieve explosive sales success. However, there seems to be a disconnect between the two and that’s where many new salespeople are having difficulty. They have failed to bridge the gap between marketing and sales. Sometimes, we get too caught up in focusing on just one customer when sometimes we need to take a step back and look at the bigger picture.

In this episode, we invited Barry Doctor over to discuss how you can bridge that gap between sales and marketing, how to think like a marketer to achieve sales success, and some strategies you can apply to pin down your market segment.

Here are the highlights of our conversation with Barry:

Barry’s coolest sales experience as a customer with Comcast 🙂

Marketing vs. Sales

  • Sales people are focused on individual customers; marketers look more at a bigger picture
  • Marketers focus on the buyer and the buyer’s journey

Applying the “n = many” mentality in your sales effort

  • Create the buyer’s persona
  • Find a market segment that sticks

How to find your market segment:

  • “Measure twice, cut once”
  • Do your research
  • Understand your market
  • Select a narrow target as your market segment
  • Build more market segments in the future, but focus on the niche first
  • Understand your buyer and what your buyer wants

How sellers can more prepare and think like marketers:

  • Look at the big picture
  • What market segment are you targeting?
  • What does the buyer persona look like?
  • Find the right buyers to be more efficient
  • Take objection not as a roadblock but an interesting point
  • Ask the buyer what they really need
  • See if there is a broader market demand; otherwise, sell at a premium, higher price

Losing a business to gain more business:

  • Follow the voice of the customer in the market
  • Stop shooting in the dark
  • Make use of analytics and research to have better understanding and positioning
  • Talk to the deals that you’ve lost and those you’ve won

Strategies to better understand your segment:

  • Get someone or a neutral third party to call (preferably a professional that can have an executive level conversation)
  • Look at how many deals you do a month. For example, call 30 out of 100 deals you’ve won and 30-50 out of deals you’ve lost
  • Gaining rich-source data: testimonial snippets, understanding the trends

Tactics of great sellers that reflect their understanding of marketing:

  • Getting the customer’s attention
  • Doing the opposite of what everyone else is doing

Current projects Barry is working on:

ProductCamp, an “unconference” because it’s self-organized by volunteers for volunteers, who are local practitioners working with products to help learn from and teach each other. It is an event for product managers and marketers.

Event details:

What: ProductCamp South Florida

Who can join: Product managers and marketers

When: March 14, 2015

Where: Boca Raton, South Florida

Connect with Barry through LinkedIn.

Barry’s Major Takeaway:

Take the time to understand the journey that the buyer is going on. Then you can lead them to your salesperson by putting marketing out there on the internet to be found, making information freely available to help them make the right decision to buy your product.