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Bob Burg, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1128: Developing A Go-Giver Strategy!

 

Bob Burg, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistThe most financially profitable way to do business is to shift your focus from getting to giving, and by developing a Go-Giver strategy, you’ll constantly provide value and good things will begin to happen. 

Bob Burg is a salesman who has written a series of books about the Go-Giver, a parable about the principles behind the kind of success most sellers are hoping to achieve. Through encounters with a series of different people, the main character, Joe, discovers that his focus has been in the wrong place. 

Giving too much

Giving means providing value to others. Though it’s typically not possible to provide too much value, begin by determining whether your focus on providing value will set you up to be taken advantage of. There are plenty of people who are takers and who focus only on themselves. They feel entitled to take without giving anything back. 

If you’re providing value to someone like that, there’s a good chance things won’t work out.  Realize, though, that there’s no natural connection between being a go-giver and being taken advantage of. Understand, too, that if you’re being taken advantage of, it isn’t because you’re too nice; it’s because you’re allowing it to happen.

Being a go-giver doesn’t mean being a martyr or a doormat. It simply means your focus is on bringing value to the marketplace and to others. 

No one will buy from you because you need the money or you have a quota to meet. They’ll buy because they will be better off buying from you. 

Focus on value

The only reason people should buy from you is because they’ll be better off after they do. That truth allows the salesperson or entrepreneur to focus on bringing immense value to the marketplace and to the prospect’s life. When that happens, the prospect will prosper greatly. 

Money is simply an echo of value. Focus on the value rather than the money. Value comes first and the money you receive is a natural result of the value you provided. 

Human nature is self-interested. It allows us to create more human beings. 

Successful people deal in truth. They don’t deny inconvenient things, but rather they acknowledge truth and then work within it to make things better. 

Start by acknowledging and understanding self-interest. Then put it aside with the understanding that we’re better off dealing with others when we suspend our self-interest. The other person is only going to buy because of their own needs. 

Value without attachment

Although people often suggest you should give without expecting anything in return, Bob doesn’t exactly agree with that. Instead, give value without attachment to the result. We want people to expect good things. If you’re in business serving other people, you should expect to profit greatly because you’re bringing value to the marketplace. Just don’t be attached to that result. 

Give value because it’s who you are and what you do. When that happens you create a benevolent context for success. You develop great relationships with people who feel good about you. They know you, they like you, and they trust you, and they want to be part of your business. 

Develop an army of personal walking ambassadors who will refer business to you. 

Starting point

Imagine you decide at this point to change your ways. Start by asking who the people are in your network and what you can provide to them that will help them by bringing value to their lives. Then make a plan for meeting other people that you can develop know-like-and-trust relationships with. 

We’re human beings and we’re different types of people. The reason the Go-Giver took off is because it allows you to be yourself. You can be the person who wants to bring value to the marketplace. 

Most people choose a certain line of work because they believe in the mission. They believe in what they’re doing. We’re happy when we’re living congruently with our values. 

Go-Giver origins

Bob recalls his parents working to make people’s lives better. Then, when he started in sales, he found himself selling a product that offered great value, but he was focused largely on the sales process. Like Joe in the book, he was a seller who wasn’t living up to his potential. 

He returned from a non-selling appointment one day to hear advice from a guy in his organization. The typically-silent guy told him that if he wanted to make a lot of money in business, he should establish a target outside of making money. 

Target serving others, so that when you hit your target, you’ll get a reward in the form of money. Great salesmanship is about the other person and how he’ll benefit from your product or service. 

Economic downturn

Bob heard from a roofer during an economic crisis who recognized that his approach had been wrong. He was trying to save money during the downturn, but he realized that instead of trying to give the least he could for the money, he needed to focus on giving more value. 

It didn’t necessarily mean spending more, but rather creating a better experience. His business took off as a result. 

Technology has leveled off the playing field. We live in a commodity-based society which isn’t necessarily bad. It does mean that you must distinguish yourself. If you sell a widget that your customer can’t distinguish one from the other, it will always come down to price. If you sell on low price, you’re a commodity. If you sell on high value, you’re a resource. 

Communicating value

There are likely hundreds of way to communicate value, but Bob boils it down to five elements of value. 

  1. Excellence
  2. Consistency
  3. Attention
  4. Empathy
  5. Appreciation

To the degree that you can communicate these things to your customer, that’s the degree to which you take price and competition out of the picture. 

Begin with leadership, and with a leader who is totally committed to making this part of the culture. Anyone can lead from anywhere but culture trickles down from the top. If the leader invests in this and gets buy-in from other leaders, it becomes part of the culture. 

Bob Chapman of Barry-Wehmiller wrote a book called Everybody Matters in which he recalls running a profit-focused company. Though there is nothing wrong with profit, it must be sustainable, so it must be the result of the value you provide. Bob attended the wedding of his best friend’s daughter, and the father of the bride made a toast. He acknowledged that the groom was marrying a treasured daughter. Bob took that same concept to his business. 

Barry-Wehmiller has thousands of employees, all of whom are someone’s treasured sons and daughters. When the economic downturn emerged, rather than lay off any one employee, they came together as a company and traded work days. They stopped putting into the company savings account until the crisis was over. The corporate family came together in a crunch. 

Heart level

Herb Kelleher of Southwest Airlines understood the concept and he restructured the organization to focus first on allowing employees to thrive, learn, grow, and have fun. His team had a higher sense of purpose in their jobs. 

As a result, the team takes care of the customers and the customers take care of the shareholders. 

Until you know there’s a problem that needs to be fixed, you’ll never take the steps to address it. 

Be willing to shift your focus. 

When Bob’s business partner sends a sales letter, he makes an effort to take the “I,” “me,” and “we,” out of the letter. We’re self-interested human beings and we write in terms of how great we are and how great the product is. 

We aren’t denying self-interest. We’re acknowledging that you have to work at placing  your focus on others. 

“Developing A Go-Giver Strategy” episode resources

You can find Bob’s podcast, The Go-Giver Podcast, at his website. You can also grab samples chapters of his books before you buy them. Consider subscribing to his list to get a copy of a written resource called Endless Prospects

The Go-Giver way teaches you to build relationships with solid step-by-step information. 

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump. If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. 

Tools for sellers

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Joe Sweeney, Donald Kelly, Understanding People

TSE 1074: Sales From The Street – “Understanding What Makes People Tick”

Joe Sweeney, Donald Kelly, Understanding People

Human behavior plays a huge role in sales and understanding what makes people tick is one of the most important concepts sellers in all industries should seek to learn.

Joe Sweeney has worn a variety of different hats over the course of his career, but he loves human behavior and he says it’s the key to success in sales.

Buyers

You must understand why someone would buy your product. Joe’s philosophy, as described in his book Networking Is A Contact Sportis that networking, business, and sales are about giving and serving rather than getting something.

People ask about the number one mistake that salespeople make, and it’s believing that the process is about us. We think it’s about our product. It’s not.

Joe gives talks all the time and he starts by saying, “You don’t sell anything. What we do is help people get what they want.”

Instead, sellers tend to take the opposite approach and we talk about ourselves and our product. But your buyer doesn’t care about that. All he cares about is whether your product can solve his needs and relieve some of his pain points.

Criticism

Joe said he spent a portion of his life criticizing other people because he represented a lot of high-net-worth people who did stupid things.

When, for example, he encountered a woman outside a hospital dying from emphysema and smoking a cigarette, he made the connection. The pleasure she got from nicotine was greater than the pain she experienced from emphysema.

The takeaway is to get good at understanding what makes people tick without criticizing them. All human behavior makes sense, even when we don’t.

  • Don’t be critical of their actions.
  • Understand people’s needs and wants.

Keep everything simple.

3 Common Needs

Although we could all likely point to hundreds of needs, we really have three basic, common needs.

  1. We need to belong to something bigger than ourselves.
  2. We need to love and to be loved.
  3. Finally, we all want to know that our life has meaning and that we’ve made a difference.

The greatest sales companies in the world have understood that.

Perhaps our greatest need is the first one: the need to belong to something bigger. It’s counter-intuitive today because with all the social media we falsely believe we’re all connected but the truth is that we’re less connected than we’ve ever been.

Stated another way, we’re more isolated now than ever.

Need to belong

The company that really understands this concept is Harley Davidson. Its number one competitor is BMW which far surpasses Harley, but Harley outsells everyone.

The Harley Ownership Group, or HOG, makes its owners part of something bigger. It’s about belonging.

Remember the old TV show Cheers? Its tagline captures this desire. Sometimes you wanna go where everybody knows your name.

In this technology world, we pretend that we’re connected to a massive network but we aren’t.

Need to be loved

Coca Cola marketed to this need with the ad about teaching the world to sing. It was kind of a kumbaya moment with people holding hands singing together.

They portrayed the feeling that if you drink Coca Cola, you’d feel all this love. Coca Cola understood the Maya Angelou quote: People will forget what you say. People will forget what you do. People will never forget the way you make them feel. 

Joe asks his groups, “What are you doing to answer the needs of these people? The belonging needs and the love needs.”

Need to make a difference

We all want to know that our lives have meaning, and Mastercard captured that with the ad campaign that assigned prices to different products.

Fishing poles, $29. Worms, $3.25. An afternoon fishing with your teenagers, Priceless.

Most of us approach the sales process with the sense that we have to tell people about our benefits. Instead, we should take two steps back and work to understand what makes people tick.

Understand needs

Work to understand your buyers’ needs. The greatest companies do it and I recommend that your listeners do the same.

If you’re going to be really good in sales, you should wow people.

If you sell office furniture, what would differentiate you from the competition?

Find something personal, and then do something memorable. Little things in sales mean everything. #BeMemorable

Imagine that you have a customer who likes Egyptian art. At the close of your interaction with the customer, hand him a piece of Egyptian art that you printed out. It cost you nothing, but none of the other competitors will have done that.

Making money

Joe suggests that sales isn’t about making money. Although that’s a by-product of sales, it’s really about creating an environment where we can service people. You can do the same thing in education and in government.

Morph your sales job into a servant leadership role.

Joe’s sister-in-law told him that she always assumed that business was a bunch of greedy people trying to make money. There was a negative energy around sales.

Joe reframed it as a positive thing and created a forum where people can serve each other and get what they want in life.

Daniel Pink wrote a book called To Sell Is Human all about humanizing sales. I needed that as a young seller when I was guilty of seeing CEOs as something other than human beings. I didn’t see a woman who runs a business and has two kids in middle school.

Sales development

Joe said he hates networking and what it represents. We tend to think of an alpha male chasing someone down with a business card. It’s about understanding pain points and needs and then responding to them.

Many salespeople are too aggressive and competitive because we feel the pressure. Instead, we have to reframe networking and sales.

It’s not about us, but that’s a tough concept in this narcissistic culture.

Joe suggested using a 5-10-15 process in which he holds a minimum of 5 meetings, 10 pieces of written correspondence, and a minimum of 15 phone calls.

It’s less about the numbers and more about the system. Your listeners could start with a 2-4-6 system. Make a plan that keeps you accountable to yourself.

We’re basically all independent contractors and this kind of system will create internal accountability.

“Understanding What Makes People Tick” episode resources

You can connect with Joe at joesweeney.com/networking where you can access inexpensive online training programs. They can help your listeners move the needle in their business and sales lives but also in their personal lives.

You can also grab a copy of his book, Networking Is A Contact Sport.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Value, Bob Britton, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Ppodcast

TSE 1063: How to Instantly Increase the Perceived Value of Your Offer

Value, Bob Britton, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist PpodcastThe marketplace is crowded, so if you understand how to instantly increase the perceived value of your offer, you’ll be better able to differentiate yourself from your competitors.

Bob Britton got his start in business as an auto mechanic and he had an opportunity to buy an existing business. He figured owning a business couldn’t be that hard, so he jumped in, assuming he could do a better job than the people he had been working for.

He endured a season of failure but eventually started to improve as he learned the sales game. He realized that auto repair involves selling something that no one wants to buy, that no one is prepared to buy, and that no one ever has the money to buy.

He grew the business from a one-man show to a multi-million dollar business and then went on to other things.

Communicating value

If you can’t clearly communicate your value and what sets you apart from everyone else, you’re competing constantly on price. It’s the only way people know how to measure. But if you’re a value proposition, people will focus less on price and more on what they’re getting. It’s up to business owners to figure out what those value propositions are.

Begin by understanding what value really is. What you think is valuable is probably 27th on your prospect’s list of what’s valuable.

Consider even the smallest thing that might be considered valuable. Look beyond the obvious things like saving time or money because everyone claims to offer those.

Starting point

Understand that perception is everything. When you’re creating your value proposition, if your prospect believes it’s important, it is. Perception is everything.

That determines how we start. Begin by looking at the business drivers which are often saving money and making money. But drill down deeper.

  • Why would a customer use your offer?
  • What does the customer really care about?

Think of things like operating cost, downtime, uptime, labor cost, customer retention, market share, productivity, profitability, time to market, lifetime customer value, and any number of other concerns.

Asking good questions

Too many salespeople “wing it” when it comes to this process. They don’t think about the questions they ask and they rely on general ones instead of working to be specific.

People will give us a limited amount of time and effort. Ask specific questions that move people in a distinct direction.

Many sellers will ask about concerns, but that’s too general. Limit the question instead. What is your number one concern? Being specific will give you a lot better information from the customer because they’ll talk about the thing that is top of mind.

Then, flip that around. Ask your prospect the one thing that he hates about your industry. It takes some guts to ask this, but the information you get back will be the most valuable feedback you’ve ever gotten.

Bob asked people the number one thing they hated about auto repair on his way to building a million-dollar company. He used all that feedback to differentiate himself from his competition.

Digging deep

Your clients can give you information that will help you tweak your business and increase your revenue. You won’t have to push harder. Your clients will give you a to-do list that will help you improve.

Be willing to ask what your current clients dislike about working with your business. It will feel intimidating but they won’t crucify you. They’ll help you identify the things that are keeping them from buying more.

You may not need to dump more money into your business. You may not need to increase your leads but rather to just improve your close rate.

Next steps

Once you’ve identified the business drivers, identify some sort of movement. People won’t change unless your offering is significantly better than the status quo. People don’t buy offers; they buy new things.

What’s your movement? Increase, improve, accelerate, reduce, enhance, balance, free up, eliminate, minimize, revitalize, shrink, maximize. What kind of movement can you offer your clients?

Then add metrics to your value proposal to make it stronger and more believable.

Avoid using round numbers which sound less credible. When Bob was running the auto repair business, while everyone else was charging $87 an hour, he charged $98.68 an hour. When people asked how he came up with that number, he said that he figured out with his accountant the exact minimum he could charge to deliver the best service.

It’s a psychological effort that will surprise your customers and shift their thinking. It will position you as different than everyone else.

Do your homework. Don’t wing it because it won’t give you the results you desire.

Prepare

People may throw little tests out at you to see how you’ll respond. If you aren’t prepared, you’ll end up losing credibility because you don’t answer well.

Business drivers, movement, and metrics are the three things that create a tremendous amount of value for your business.

Do your homework. Position yourself as different, new, unique, and special.

Be creative. The competition has never been greater and the market is shifting. More people are becoming salespeople so you have to do everything you can to differentiate yourself.

“Increase the Perceived Value of Your Offer” episode resources

You can connect with Bob at his website, marketingautomationgroup.com and opt-in for a free 7-day course. He constantly produces new content designed to help you increase your perceived value.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Lee Salz, Sales Differentiation, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1048: Sales Differentiation

Lee Salz, Sales Differentiation, The Sales Evangelist

Sales differentiation helps salespeople win more deals at the price point they want, and today Lee Salz talks about building a framework that will allow you to personalize your sales.

Sales reps in every industry must differentiate themselves in today’s market. It’s crucial for sellers to have room to “color” the sales process.

Origins

When Lee was a kid, he had a job as a pickup and delivery driver for dry cleaning. The guy he worked for didn’t own a dry cleaning business; he simply knew it was a hassle to drop off and pick up your clothes.

He developed a contract with a couple of different dry cleaning firms and he charged a premium for the service. The idea took off, and Lee was intrigued by the idea that he was able to add a 40 percentage point premium by differentiating the service.

He didn’t actually put the idea into play until his 50th birthday after he had learned a lot about the industry.

Philosophy of differentiation

Lee said the philosophy translates for every possible seller. No matter what industry you’re in, what size company you’re in, whether you sell products or service, whether you sell B2B or B2C, and it doesn’t even matter what methodology you use in your sales.

The premise is simple: win more deals at the prices you want.

Differentiation around what you sell

Differentiation around what you sell relies on the ability to translate your passion to the person sitting on the other side of the desk.

If you can’t communicate your own passion about your differentiators to the person on the other side of the desk, you might as well not have anyone sitting there.

The idea is to build passion and help salespeople communicate it in a meaningful way. You want your customers to believe they must have what you’re selling.

It’s a responsibility that falls to marketing, business owners, and sales leaders.

Marketing and sales differentiation

Marketing differentiation is one-directional communication for the masses. Think trade shows and websites. It screams to the marketplace, “Hey! Look at us! We’re here.”

It demonstrates all the available potential.

Sales differentiation is two-directional communication with an individual, specific buyer.

It takes all of the potential and personalizes it to an individual specific buyer.

Everyone buys for a different reason so if you leave all the capabilities out there and rely on that to drive buyers, you’ll fail.

You must have salespeople who gather all the potential and bring it to the individual level.

Add those two things together and that meets the definition of solution.

Two differentiation workshops

It doesn’t matter what you’re selling.

Make a list of your most common competitors who also sell what you sell. Work with your team to do the analysis.

Answer two questions:

  • Why do you win?
  • Why do they win?

Make a list of the decision influencers, the people commonly involved in the decision to buy what you sell.

Again, answer two questions:

  • What is keeping them up at night relative to your offering?
  • Given what is keeping them awake, how can you help?

If you engage your team in these two workshops, you’ll get a series of differentiators that will serve as raw material to work with.

From there, develop a communication strategy that helps you build passion around those differentiators.

Differentiation around how you sell

Every interaction between a seller and a buyer provides an opportunity to offer meaningful value that your competition doesn’t provide.

Consider this: Would you prefer a restaurant with outstanding food and mediocre service or mediocre food and outstanding service?

Most people will choose the outstanding service.

That means you could have the best product features and functions but your failure to differentiate how you sell could cause you to lose.

From that very first phone call to the time they sign on the dotted line, you have an opportunity to build a great experience.

Customer service vs account management

Don’t equate the two as the same.

Customer service occurs when your client asks you for something. The measurement of success should be timeliness and accuracy in the response.

It’s the proactive set of activities and behaviors that you’ll provide that adds value in the relationship that has nothing to do with the product.

Look at every touch point to find every opportunity to do something different that your client will find meaningful.

Recognizing your competition

Your true competition exists in your battle to earn face time with your prospects.

No executive has the responsibility to meet with salespeople every hour on the hour. In order for us to earn that meeting, we have to create intrigue in the first moment.

Imagine operating the way the police do. When they knock on your door to ask questions about a crime, they don’t randomly choose your home for a conversation. They follow a trail of evidence that leads them to you.

They’ve put together a theory, and you should do the same with your sales efforts.

Instead of blindly calling people and sending emails, put together a sales crime theory, based on the answer to this question: why should they want to have a conversation with us right now? Instead of asking why we should talk with them, ask why they should want to have a conversation with us.

Put together a messaging strategy based on your research that will help them recognize what you have to offer.

Sales Differentiation resources

Lee’s book Sales Differentiation:19 Powerful Strategies to Win More Deals at the Prices You Want is available in bookstore, at your favorite online book sources, at Amazon, and a variety of other places.

You can also go to salesdifferentiation.com and register for Lee’s video series. The videos are typically only available to workshop clients but he’s making them available to the people who purchase the book. Go to the website, click on “bonus,” fill out the form, and start taking advantage of the videos.

“Sales Differentiation” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

This episode is also brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. If 2018 wasn’t the best year for you, check out TSE Certified Sales Training Program. We can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Tom Poland, Leadsology, Inbound Lead, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 916: How To Develop A Marketing Message That Cuts-Through & Brings More Leads

Tom Poland, The Sales Evangelist, LeadsologyImagine how quickly sales will decline if your sales and marketing teams aren’t communicating well. You must have a marketing message that cuts through the noise and generates inbound leads.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Tom Poland helps us learn more about how to effectively create a marketing message that will guide your prospects through the buyer’s journey.

Tom helps professionals create a systematic flow of inbound leads. He’ll help us create a unified message between sales and marketing instead of bumping heads constantly.

Some people have suggested that sales and marketing are like siblings, and when they aren’t getting along well, it creates chaos in the family.

Inbound leads

When you wake up on Monday morning to discover multiple bookings by people who want to talk to you about becoming a client, and they have a pretty good idea of how you work and what you charge, that’s inbound.

They’re quite convinced that you are their number one choice to solve their problem or meet their challenge, and you didn’t need cold calls or direct mail letters to connect with them.

That’s the magic of inbound: creating high quality, well-qualified new client inquiries.

Tom says it’s a mistake to be singularly focused on just finding leads. It’s not about finding the leads, it’s about finding the people who are happy leads.

Finding leads is a little like running through the forest poking bears. The bears are asleep and you’ve got a honeypot that you want them to reach, so you poke them all and wave the honeypot in front of their noses.

If their hunger exceeds their anger, you get to live.

Good marketing gently puts that honeypot outside the forest in the form of some kind of content marketing. The people who put their hand out metaphorically and stop to smell the honey are the ones you want to put an offer in front of.

Marketing assets

The creation of marketing assets serves as the great separator between people who stay stuck on the treadmill and those who actually create something scalable.

Marketing assets can be presentations, lunch-and-learn opportunities, webinars, videos, or a book. The asset has to match the audience.

It’s no good running a webinar for CEOs because they aren’t webinar people.

In most cases, sales reps will have three target audiences:

  • corporate executives
  • entrepreneurs
  • consumers

Each of those markets will have different assets or mediums that they’ll respond best to. The creation of those assets demands that you include the right subject matter, communicate the right way, and reach the right people.

 

Starting point

If you’re starting a webinar or a series of videos, the first question people will have is “Why should I listen to this guy or girl?”

Next, we need to describe the problem in such a way that the audience knows that we understand their challenges. Finally, we’ll address why their previous efforts have failed, which builds a depth of relatability and respect for your expertise.

You must lay out a sequence that you lead the audience through from the start.

Normally they’re open-mindedly skeptical: open-minded enough to attend your meeting but skeptical enough to ask questions about your background and the solutions you’re offering.

The audience is looking for something valuable. They’ve given up their most precious resource in the form of their time, so they are looking for something they can implement.

When you give people what they came for, you differentiate yourself by giving real value. Allow your prospect to walk away with something valuable. If they buy, great. If they don’t, they still walked away with your brand in their brains.

Say something different

Your message must cut through to your prospects. You’ve got to say something different than your competitors are saying.

If, for example, every business around you is promising to help you grow your business and find more free time, you’ve got to stop repeating what everyone else is saying.

Secondly, you’ve got to motivate people to take the action you want them to take.

1. Make it benefit-rich. Instead of talking about being a business coach or a software developer, talk about the benefits.

2. Include specifics, which increase both believability and desirability.

3. Be different. When you incorporate cut-through, you immediately motivate the person to want to know more about your product or service.

You have to hit the sweet spot between believability and desirability.

Over-deliver

Whatever you are, be authentic. Whatever you do in your message, make sure that you can not only deliver but over-deliver, because you want the referrals and the word-of-mouth.

You want people excited about what you do, and you want to have quality experiences, which means you have to under-promise and over-deliver.

You set the expectations at a level that you know you can exceed. It means that you have to be good at what you do because you have to set the expectations at a desirable level and then over-deliver.

Scale your value delivery as much as you can because it gives you more resources for marketing. Marketing is what makes the money and it’s where the magic happens.

When your groups are communicating and the message is unified among the entire team, magic can happen.

 

“Marketing Message” episode resources

Email Tom or connect with him at leadsology.guru.  You can find lots of free stuff there, including the famous five-hour challenge that will help will help you create an effective marketing message so you can generate some leads.

Is your CRM functioning properly? It’s important to have a CRM that your team is willing to use.

If you’re unhappy with your CRM, check out Maximizer CRM. If you’re happy with your CRM, check out Maximizer. It has been around a long time, and it’s worth the time to check out the free demonstration.

Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities. Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. Video Jungle offers top-notch, state-of-the-art advice about video which is a great way to offer relevant content on LinkedIn.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

The Sales Evangelist, How To Sell, Donald New Seller

TSE 872: 5 Sales Myths Crippling New Sellers

The Sales Evangelist, How To Sell, Donald New SellerMany of the practices that new sellers use are ineffective. They don’t help your efforts, but you use them because other people said you should. Today on The Sales Evangelist, we’re tackling the sales myths crippling new sellers.

Though there are countless myths that we pass down and cling to, we’ll address the top five myths that new sellers tend to adopt.

1. You must have the gift of gab.

It absolutely isn’t true that sellers must be big talkers. It isn’t true that you have to be good at improvisation and talking to anyone.

Although none of those are bad things, they aren’t required to be successful in sales.

The truth is that the seller who listens well has the best odds of success. Rather than bulldozing your prospect by talking, give the prospect a chance to explain what he needs.

2. It’s OK to lie.

Many times we buy into the idea that the ends justify the means.

We believe that if a questionable decision leads to a good outcome, it wasn’t necessarily a bad choice. Imagine stealing food to feed a hungry family.

When sales professionals lie or stretch the truth to convince prospects to engage with their service or product, the choice almost always backfires. When prospects realize you aren’t honest, your relationship will be short-lived.

We’re seeking to grow our business and build an empire.

When you’re honest, you’ll gain loyal customers who will refer you to other people.

3. You only have to make a few calls.

When you’re prospecting, you’re turning over stones. You’re searching for people who are interested in your product or service.

Ask any seller at a thriving organization and you’ll discover he is making many phone calls.

The first time you reach out to a prospect, she may not be ready for your product or service. You will reach voicemails and executive assistants who keep you from accessing the prospect.

Not every phone call will lead to a conversation, but you must be willing to make them.

Understand that the more people you reach out to, the more likely you are to find prospects who need what you’re offering. The more shots on goal you take, the more chances you have of scoring.

4. The phone is dead.

Selling over the phone may be more challenging than it once was, but that doesn’t mean the phone is dead.

You’re going to make tons of calls. Like any other form of outreach, it requires a great deal of effort. Whether you’re using email, LinkedIn, or regular mail, you have to invest effort in order to produce results.

I think of outreach as a campaign. If I use all of the methods together in a well-rounded outreach, I’m more likely to reach people who are interested in my product or service.

Your job is to figure out how to be effective over the phone. Perhaps it means calling at certain times, using a particular message in your voicemails, or using other means in addition to the phone.

Do the opposite of what everyone else is doing.

5. One sales process works better than the others.

Everyone has an opinion about which sales process is best.

Truthfully, developing a sales process is a little like baking an apple pie. Your process will likely include the same basic ingredients as everyone else’s. The method or process will be different, but the general rules will be the same.

You might use a different kind of apple or a little more cinnamon, but the results won’t be too far off.

Try a bunch of different pies. See which is the best. Put your full effort into the experiment to see which one is best.

If The Sales Evangelist method is the best for you, let us know; we’d be happy to work with you to continue growing in your business.

Whatever you do, grab your prospect’s attention, build value, and help him reach the decision that’s best for him. Overcome the sales myths crippling new sellers.

“5 Sales Myths” episode resources

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

Grab your free excerpt of the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic blueprint for all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

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Jaron Rice, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 849: Sales From The Street:”We Had To Be Different”

Jaron Rice, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

Jaron Rice found himself facing a challenge that he didn’t create. His industry had a horrible reputation for being less-than-transparent, and even deceptive. In order to succeed, his struggle was two-fold: he had to find new prospects, and he had to be different.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, Jaron explains how he worked beyond the negative stigma and grew his business to be the highest-rated merchant services provider in Maryland.

In its fourth year, Magothy Payments helps businesses become more profitable by lowering the cost of credit card acceptance. Jaron had to build a brand that was different than the traditional banks people were accustomed to dealing with.

Seeking Customer Feedback

Jaron called his introduction into the industry a sobering reality because so many doors were slammed in his face.

In order to understand the stigma, he started by surveying previous clients that he knew from other industries he had worked in. He asked them about their payment processors; specifically about the things they liked as well as the things they didn’t.

He never asked them to do business with him. He simply asked for their feedback.

What he discovered was that they all hated his industry, but they liked him, and they said they would be willing to do business with him.

He reached out first to business owners who knew him; local businesses that were familiar with his face because he spent money with them. Once he brought them on as clients, he was determined to continue providing value.

Understanding the Business Model

The payment processing industry is marked by attrition. Businesses generally change credit card processors every 10 months, averaging out to 22 percent attrition each year.

Over the course of five years, businesses turn over their entire client base. As a result, they strive to make as much money as possible within that period of time.

Jaron’s company turned that model on its head, deciding instead to make less money knowing that they would keep client accounts much longer.

In the company’s first four years, its attrition is less than three percent. Although they aren’t making as much money in a short period of time, they’re making more money in the long run. Additionally, their existing clients are bringing them new business.

Building strategic partnerships

Jaron’s company absorbed all the risk in order to attract new clients and overcome the industry’s negative reputation.

Rather than requiring contracts, Magothy allowed month-to-month transactions with no termination fees. That made it vital for the company to make sure it was providing value to its customers.

At the end of each client’s first full billing cycle, the company conducted an analysis to compare the initial proposal with the client’s actual results.

Once the company demonstrates its ability to do what it promised, Jaron asks his clients for online reviews and referrals.

In less than four years, the company has accumulated 225 accounts, most of which exist within a 10-mile radius of Jaron’s office. The company welcomes 8-12 new clients each month purely from referrals and networking.

The company’s reputation of trustworthiness and value has turned clients into evangelists. Next, Jaron is seeking to build more partnerships like the one he enjoys with the Better Business Bureau because those relationships yield lots of new accounts.

He emphasizes the importance of knowing your own value, especially for small businesses whose temptation is to simply undercut the competition.

Don’t be afraid to walk away from a deal that isn’t making you any money.

“We Had To Be Different” resources

Connect with Jaron on LinkedIn or at his website, www.magothy.biz.If you’re in the Maryland area, contact Magothy Payments to learn more about the state’s highest-rated merchant services provider.

Jaron’s story provides that we can all strive to be better and overcome challenges we’re facing. We have to apply what we learn though.

Our Facebook group The Sales Evangelizers brings together sellers of all abilities and all industries to compare notes and learn from one another. The odds are good that there’s a discussion that will benefit your own sales efforts, and it’s all free.

I’ve spent a lot of time talking about the book Stop Selling & Start Leading because I believe so strongly in the message it has to share. It’s a blueprint for sellers based upon years of research about the things buyers hate.

We’re so convinced that you’ll love the book that we’re providing a free excerpt to our listeners here.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Different, Sales Leader, Prospecting, Donald Kelly

TSE 835: TSE Hustler’s League-“What Is Different About You?”

Different, Sales Leader, Prospecting, Donald KellyYou are not the only salesperson who has contacted your prospect this week. In fact, she has likely heard from 10 other salespeople selling exactly the same thing you are. So what is different about you?

How do you differentiate yourself from the other 10 people so she’ll want to move to the next step with you? Today, on The Sales Evangelist, we’ll discuss how you can set yourself apart in your relationships with prospects.

What is different about you?

If your only focus in your initial contact with a prospect is setting an appointment, your focus is too narrow. You must go into every appointment with the intention to provide value; to bring something to the table.

In other words, what can you offer the prospect that she can’t get from any of the other 10 people? Busy buyers have lots of options, and you don’t want to be just one of many options. What is different about you?

How can you stand out from the others? Consider the following questions:

  1. Why should the prospect meet with me?
  2. What can I offer that she won’t get from anyone else?
  3. What will she miss out on if she doesn’t meet with me?

Recognize that she has many roles in her life, and this is just one of them. Do your research and figure out how to provide value to her.

What problem can you help solve?

In my early days of selling, it never occurred to me to think about the prospect and what she might need. Instead of helping my prospect, I was focused on getting appointments and closing deals.

I discovered my mistake the hard way, and I learned that prospects have no shortage of choices, so I needed to do more than sell.

Before you meet with your prospect, conduct some research. Call the company and speak to people who can give you insight about the problems the company is facing.

Find a solution to those problems and bring those solutions into your meeting.

In the case of an inbound call, use your pre-existing knowledge about the industry to move them toward the next stage of the process.

Look at past customers you’ve solved problems for. Look to situations in which you solved problems that the customer didn’t even know she had.

Bring insights to the table that no one else is offering to move the prospect to the next step.

Episode resources

Pick up a copy of the book The 3 Value Conversations: How to Create, Elevate, and Capture.

If all of this sounds great to you but you still aren’t sure how to start, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights.

We’ve just started a new semester, and it’s not too late to apply to see if you’re a good candidate for our program.

You can also join our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers to connect with sales professionals from all walks of life.

There’s a reason I continue suggesting the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic blueprint of all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

I’m so convinced of its message that I’m offering a free excerpt of the book so you can check it out.

Email me for more information about our newly launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. You can also email us about our new business development services.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX.