Category Archives for Data

Kyle Morris, Donald Kelly, Lead Sift

TSE 1131: The Importance of Data in Sales

Kyle Morris, Donald Kelly, Lead SiftSellers that don’t have good data will struggle to repeat their success so we must recognize the importance of data in sales.  

Kyle Morris operates a company called SifData which features an application that sits on Salesforce to help companies track job changes.  

Defining data

Sales reps are very intuitive. They understand things well and many people assume that anecdotes and data are the same. They assume that, because they closed a deal with a company similar to the one they are interacting with, the information constitutes data. Because a tactic worked previously, they may assume that they can use that information as data moving forward. 

In other words, they assume that if a tactic worked once, it’s solid and they should continue using it. 

Kyle points out that the plural of anecdote isn’t data. We must stay objective and make decisions based upon actual information rather than sticking our finger to the wind to determine which way it’s blowing. 

Data is objective information about people, companies, or whatever your data set is that helps you make informed decisions. One of the easiest ways to identify the companies that could buy your product is by identifying the companies that have already bought your product. Figure out what’s common among them and then use that as a template to decide who to sell to in the future. If you’re selling to companies that are unique, you might find another market that also has that same commonality.  

Data problems

The two biggest problems common to data are that companies use data sources that are inconsistent and that they have too much data that isn’t actually valuable. 

Consider Uber as an example. If you’re trying to sell to Uber, some sellers might consider it enterprise while others view it as mid-market since they only have a couple of thousand employees. LinkedIn might reflect that the company has 35,000 employees, including drivers. If companies aren’t careful about where they are choosing data, it can create confusion. 

Be consistent about where you get data, even if it isn’t perfect, because you’ll at least be consistently wrong. Limit the number of resources you use to make classifications, especially for things like territories or number of employees or revenue. 

Many CRMs have a full page of information that reps never use. It doesn’t add value and it actually becomes a burden to them. Approach this with the same mentality you use when designing your website: what’s above the fold is critically different than what’s below the fold. It’s impactful where things are placed, and if reps have a bunch of unnecessary information at the top of the form it burdens them. 

If the reps don’t absolutely need it, then remove it. Streamline your process. Develop a discipline around reducing the amount of noise that your reps see based on the information they need. If the data won’t actually impact how they work through the sales process, it should be removed since it won’t actually move the needle. 

Guesstimation

Donald Miller says that if you confuse, you lose. We cannot confuse our reps. If we do, they’ll likely go back to what they’ve always done before, which is guesstimation. 

Imagine driving a truck built in 1965 versus a fighter jet built in 2019. The truck likely has a stick shift and two buttons for the radio, so almost any person can use it to get from point A to point B. Put that same person in a fighter jet with a million buttons and they won’t understand how to move forward. 

Sales reps must be able to execute and they shouldn’t be asked to fly a fighter jet if all they really need is a 1965 Chevy. 

Additionally, more data points mean that some operator has to maintain those fields. You must make sure the information is accurate because inaccurate data will make your CRM less valuable. Again, if that happens, your reps will start using anecdotes to make decisions again. 

Cry wolf

All those unnecessary fields will prompt your reps to fill them in, which will become cumbersome. If it isn’t a useful data point, they may just plug something in to fill the blank so they can move on. Your reps must be able to trust the fields that are on the page. 

Make the process simple and easy to engage. Remove as much as you can from the page layout so that your reps are only interacting with data that moves the needle. 

Everything can’t be critical. You can’t have 10 tier-one problems with no tier-two problems. You cannot cry wolf and represent that everything is vital.  

Kyle recalls his operations team once telling him that they needed a new field to be added to the CRM. He insisted that the team could add one field if they could identify two that could be removed. He said that it forces them to be intentional about the information they gather. 

Words are currency. You must make sure the process is easy. Find ways to break down barriers.

Effective data

Kyle said he’s a fan of using very specific people in very specific roles. Sales reps are most effective at building rapport, identifying pain and need, and closing deals.If you’re using your sales reps to collect data, you’re probably spending more money for it than you need to. And just as you would never ask your data-entry person to close deals, you probably shouldn’t ask your sellers to crunch data. 

Businesses may think they are being efficient by asking sellers to multi-task. They may figure the seller is already going to be on the site anyway so he can just collect the data. Consider the brain change that must take place in that situation. Sales reps must change their entire thought process in order to shift gears into data collection.

Switching back and forth can be tedious because it requires different muscles. Allow the people who are better at data to handle data. 

Every minute your seller isn’t selling results in money down the drain. Keep your opportunity costs in mind. 

Refresh data

Establish a process to refresh your data. As your company continues to accumulate accounts, you must track which ones are good or bad. Make it part of your cadence and establish a date on which you’ll refresh data. 

Consider hiring a team overseas to log into your Salesforce and identify the accounts that haven’t been updated in the past year and then refresh the data. Then track when the fields were updated. 

Also monitor duplicate accounts in your CRM which pollute your database. But before you can start eliminating duplicate accounts, you must work to ensure that you’ve prevented the problem of new duplicates. Duplicates create more mental overhead for your reps because two reps may be unknowingly working on the same account at the same time. It’s wasted energy that could be focused toward closing. 

Don’t assume that anecdotes and data are the same thing. Be sure, too, that you pick a single source of truth and stick with it. There’s no perfect data source, but at least be consistently imperfect. Allow your sellers to trust what they are working on. 

Importance of Data in Sales” episode resources

You can connect with Kyle Morris on LinkedIn or send him an email at Kyle@sifdata.com.

You’re a savvy salesperson who wants to learn and grow. Check out Audible for thousands of titles, plus a free 30-day trial, plus a free book. 

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there. I’m fairly easy to connect with. Just comment on something about my podcast. Send me an email.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester. You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561) 578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. When you share your experiences with the show, others will read the reviews and give us a listen.

I truly appreciate you and appreciate your reviews and your subscription, and your willingness to tell your friends and anyone you know that’s in sales about the podcast.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

Jason Atkins, Incentive

TSE 1113: Leveraging Sales Incentive Data to Increase Performance and ROI

Jason Atkins, Incentive
Sales is equal parts art and science and one of the keys to success is leveraging sales incentive data to increase performance and ROI.
Jason Atkins is the founder of 360 Insights, a software platform that enables large brands to execute all of their channel incentive strategies. Jason’s company works with tens of thousands of salespeople who work for major brands and helps them get smarter and make data-driven decisions.

Critical data

Many people believe that sellers must be born with the skillset to succeed. We believe that anyone with a desire to sell can succeed and get the proper training. Understanding data will help tremendously.
The art of sales deals with the relationships, the conversation handling, and dealing with objections. The science of sales revolves around data and activities.
Jason recalled hearing that we’ve created more data in the last year than in all of mankind combined. That kind of growth is exponential. Think about how much data that represents.
So how do you mine through the data and leverage the insights contained within it? How do you make the data actionable?

Leveraging data

Many companies believe that consumers buy products become of promotions or rebates. Jason’s company doesn’t believe that’s always accurate. Their response to these situations is that they’ll track the data and the consumer purchase information, and they’ll figure out why the consumers bought what they did.
What they found was that the promotion was the fourth reason the consumer purchased. The number one reason was “because the sales guy told me to buy it.”
The question becomes why are you so focused on the promotion when you should be focused on the key drivers to the relationship?
Consider how you’re educating the buyer about your product. How are they ensured that you’re the trusted advisor?
Purchases are a big decision, and people often buy based upon advice from others. How are you leveraging that to ensure that you provide great advice?

Status quo

Many of us make choices based upon the status quo. Zig Ziglar tells a story that his wife always cut the ends off of the meatloaf without really knowing why. Turns out her mother did the same thing because the meatloaf was always too big for the pan she had. But no one knew that’s why she did it. Zig’s wife just always cut the ends off without knowing why.
In sales, we often do things because that’s how our company has always done it. Instead, we should look at the data and determine what is actually most effective.
Jason’s company always deals in context for the data. In the case of the meatloaf, no one had context for why the ends were cut off.
Determine the context for decisions that were made in the past, then look at the hypothesis of what we should be doing in the future. Then we can execute against that and then measure it.

Executing sales incentives

One of the first keys is to understand why people sell what they sell. Jason’s company started by interviewing 1,500 sales reps to determine why they sell what they sell. They determined that sellers do so because of quality, because of price point, because of brand, because they’ve been educated, to ensure happy customers, because they want to know what’s in it for them, and because they of the relationship they have with the brand.
People don’t want to sell something that isn’t great. They like to buy something they’ve heard of before, so new brands often struggle.

Creating sales incentive

Focus on building data around the data you have, and building context so you can get to better decisions.
Start by understanding the customer journey and the decisions that are made throughout that journey. Then align the incentives across the journey. At the end of the day, an incentive is just a motivation tactic to get to a specific action.
Incentives might include rebates that are perceived as price discounts, sales incentives that motivate a seller to keep a specific brand top of mind, or volume incentives to drive sales into locations.
If you want to run an incentive program, don’t think about the incentive. Instead, think about the customer journey and identify opportunities to use incentives to drive actions.

Customer journey

Many silos exist in larger companies. Certain teams in the company understand different components of the buyer’s journey. It’s really important to bring all those silos together to understand the complete journey.
In the early days of incentives, many companies intentionally made rebates difficult to submit in hopes that consumers wouldn’t actually send them in. But in a digital and social age, that kind of program is problematic. Brands realized that this kind of program could backfire.
Jason’s company saw a huge opportunity to step in and create an unbelievable experience for the consumer. Instead of a rebate being the last touch point a brand had with its consumers, the rebate should now be the basis of the next journey they have with you.
Many organizations have people now that understand all of the customer touch points so they can actually start to map them out.

Looking back and forward

Think about insights and data in terms of looking backward and looking forward. Most companies look backward on a monthly or weekly basis. Jason’s goal is to encourage companies to forecast so they can start to optimize as a company.
If someone comes to us with $1 million we can help them figure out what to do with it to drive sales.
Then imagine being a salesperson who has a conversation where you’re talking to your customer about what’s happening in his competitors’ businesses. You can demonstrate the results the competitor is getting and the things they are doing. That’s unbelievable data that can help your clients make better decisions.

Model the masters

There’s plenty of material to read about leveraging data. Attend webinars and then model the masters. Find the people who are doing this the best and then model the activity they are doing.
When Jason launched his company, he discovered that there was one seller who earned more than $1 million in sales incentives from about five or six different brands over the course of a year. The person was crushing it because he saw a huge opportunity to move traditionally brick-and-mortar sales to online selling.
Look at the people who are doing things differently. Find those who are challenging the status quo. It takes tenacity to be successful as a seller.
Understand the customer journey from beginning to end. Understand the data that happens through the journey and then figure out how to leverage that.

“Leveraging Sales Incentive Data to Increase Performance and ROI” episode resources

You can connect with Jason at 360Insights.com. He and his team love to talk to people and have great conversations about sales.

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Shawn Finder, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Sales Metrics

TSE 1111: What Are Key Metrics to Track In Your Outbound Strategy?

Shawn Finder, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Sales Metrics

We’re talking about key metrics this month, and today Shawn Finder talks about the key metrics to track in your outbound strategy that will help you be successful. 

Shawn was a professional tennis player before he launched into entrepreneurship in the form of Autoklose, a company that automates the top of the sales funnels for sales representatives.    

Cold calling

Shawn divides outbound into three different categories: cold-calling, emailing, and database because your database is the engine that keeps that car moving. You must have at least two of those inside your outbound strategy. 

Within those three categories, you’ll have different metrics. 

Cold calling will include dial-to-connection percentage, dials-to-appointment ratio, dials-to-opportunity, and dials-to-deal. When you’re cold calling, if you’re dialing 100 people but you’re only reaching 5, that isn’t very successful. Maybe you’re dialing 100 and reaching 10 knowing that 3 of those will turn into prospects and one of those will close. 

If you don’t know those analytics, you’re going to fail because the analytics keep you moving forward toward the right strategy. 

Frustration

Beyond simply tracking numbers, metrics can help you avoid frustration as a sales rep. Many sellers get frustrated if they send five emails but the person never responds or if they make 15 calls but never reach anyone. 

If you know that every 50 calls you should be getting three opportunities, you’ll benchmark your success to those numbers. 

As an SDR or a sales rep, unless you know your metrics ahead of time, you’re going to get frustrated if you think you’re not getting results. Knowing the analytics before you start will help you approach your calls differently.

Statistics

Shawn has found over time that most people, to include account managers, don’t look enough at the stats. As a result, they don’t know what is good versus what is bad, or what is terrible versus what is great. 

His company lists the weekly, monthly, and quarterly goals for each rep. They track forecast versus actual numbers. The goal is to make sure they know whether they are on par to hit quota, outperform quota, or underperform. 

They use a whiteboard in addition to digital tracking because reps don’t always visit the spreadsheets. When the reps see their names with their metrics on the board every time they walk into the office, it keeps them accountable. It helps them know what they have to do in order to achieve their numbers. 

Important metrics 

The dials-to-appointment ratio is important to Shawn because if he’s paying a dialer, and he knows how much each appointment can be worth, and he knows how many appointments he has to have in order to close a deal, he can then determine the ROI on his expense. 

If he’s spending $4,000 on a dialer and earning $9,000, that $5,000 profit is the biggest ratio for him. 

Email statistics

For email statistics, consider open rates, click rates, and reply rates. 

Open rates rely on your ability to convince someone to open your email. Most people spend a lot of time on the body of the email. Shawn suggests spending more time on the subject line and your first three seconds of the email.

The number one reason is that 72 percent of people are opening emails on mobile phones. They only see your subject line and opening line.  

Make your subject line three to five words, and do not talk about yourself in the first line of the email. If you want a high open rate, have a good subject line.

Keep everything personalized. Try “Hi, first name.” Another one he has used successfully is, “Hey Donald, Let’s Have Coffee?” 

Coffee works well because you’re not selling. It’s more casual.  

Opening lines

Consider what will make your prospects want to open the email you’ve sent. 

  • If I can save your sales team five hours a day in prospecting would you give me 15 minutes?
  • If I could fill your calendar with appointments, would you give me 15 minutes?

Don’t lead with information about you that the reader can find in your signature block. 

Your first email should be a little longer, but the second and third emails should be shorter, no longer than four sentences. If they’re longer, no one is reading them. 

Keep it short and precise. Give value. Share case studies and stories and testimonials. Tell them how you’ll solve their challenges. 

Email success

There’s a difference between click rates and reply rates. When you send emails, have your CTA goal in your head. If your goal is to get a reply, make your reply rate a priority. If your goal is to get a click, then make that your priority. 

Make it very simple for your end user. 

Many people don’t consider database part of the outbound effort but it corresponds well with your email and your phone. If you have inaccurate information in your database, you’ll waste a lot of time. 

For cold calling, if you have the wrong phone numbers, it will hurt your dial-to-deal ratio, as well as your dial-to-connection and your dial-to-appointment.

If your data is wrong, your analytics will be wrong.  

Verify database 

If you want to make sure your emails aren’t bouncing and they aren’t catch all, have your emails verified before you actually do your campaign. Verification can be very cheap, as little as $20 for 1,000. Spend the money so you can focus on the 750 that are valid without wasting your time on the ones that aren’t. 

People change jobs frequently, so do your due diligence and verify the contact info. 

Autoklose validates information real-time as you begin a campaign. The company offers a Chrome plugin that validates everything against LinkedIn to ensure that the person is still in the position.

Having clean data is the engine to any of your outbound strategy campaigns. 

Campaign tips

Determine your metrics before you start your campaign so you have something to benchmark against. Identify the key metrics to track in your outbound strategy.

Also, stop giving up after one to two calls. Recognize that it will take five to six touches. Integrate different strategies like social. Engage with your clients. Build relationships with them. 

 episode resources

You can connect with Shawn via email at Shawn@autoklose.com or on the website, www.autoklose.com.

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Byron Matthews, Miller Heiman Group, Sales Training, Sales Enablement

TSE 891: Sales Enablement – A Master Framework to Build, Coach, and Lead Your Most Productive Sales Team

Sales Enablement means different things to different people, and though the definition varies widely, it’s one of the fastest growing trends in the world of B2B selling. More than 59 percent of organizations report having a devoted sales enablement effort, but only 34 percent are achieving their goals. It’s vital, then, that organizations develop a master framework to make their sales enablement more effective.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, Byron Matthews, CEO of the Miller Heiman Group, shares his company’s findings on sales enablement and the trends we can expect to see in sales enablement.

The growth has been so explosive, in fact, that sales enablement effectiveness dropped off in 2017, largely because so many organizations were wading into the concept. The learning curve that resulted brought down the overall numbers in terms of effectiveness, but those numbers should rebound quickly.

Why sales enablement is exploding

When sales enablement emerged as a concept, it was limited primarily to larger companies. Now, organizations with teams of 5-10 people are investing in sales enablement, largely because of the tremendous innovation on the buyer’s side of the transaction.

Effective sellers need more than just sales training and CRM systems. The relationship between the buyer and the seller has dramatically changed and sellers need new content services to keep up.

Byron stresses that more informed doesn’t mean better informed. But, he said, only 23 percent of buyers even look to a salesperson as a source of information. More than half of buyers engage a salesperson only after they’ve decided on a solution.

Sellers must provide value, insights, data, and meaning to the buyer. Because buyers rarely seek out sellers, you’ll likely have to be very creative to figure out what their needs are.

Once you understand their needs, you should seek to inspire them and add value.

Sales professionals as content marketers

If engagement is lower, then the stakes are higher. So where are buyers finding their information?

Organizations realize that customers are looking to digital channels, so they must focus on their content to make sure that the messaging is effective.

Companies must thoroughly understand what is happening with their sellers, to include the challenges they are facing. All of the company’s stakeholders must put together a roadmap and plan the way ahead.

The amount of change requires sellers to adopt a more holistic view of performance and what drives it. The effort requires training, technology, and content, overlaid with a plan to move forward.

This “steering committee” design results in a tremendous amount of buy-in across the organization because each segment can see the importance of its own role in the effort. No one wants to be the weakest link.

On the contrary, when a sales plan lacks transparency, individual components lack buy-in, which results in delays and failures.

The future of sales enablement

Sales roles are certain to adapt in the near future, as will the sales model design.

The growth of technology and AI in sales will reduce the tedium in the process, and free people to focus on the larger components of sales rather than the tedious pieces. The net result will be a redeployment of resources across the sales industry.

The other change is a shift from EQ to IQ. In past years, emotional quotient was important for building relationships and dealing with people. Now the focus is flipping to analytical information as sales professionals learn to work in a data-rich tech environment.

The biggest challenge, Byron said, is that companies are reluctant to make the change quickly because changing the selling model is risky. It’s true, though, that the companies that move boldly into the change are seeing the best results.

“Sales Enablement” episode resources

Grab a copy of Byron’s book, Sales Enablement: A Master Framework to Engage, Equip, and Empower a World-Class Sales ForceThe book emerged after Byron’s company realized the incredible demand for information about sales enablement, and it offers insight into best practices, examples, and frameworks for success.

Make sure you also grab your free excerpt of the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic way to learn what buyers are thinking and how to sell the way they want to buy.

Also, check out the Video Jungle podcast to discover how to use video to take your sales to another level.

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is an online group coaching program that will connect you with sellers from all industries all over the world. We’re accepting applications for our next semester this fall, and we’d love for you to join us.

Check out our Facebook page, The Sales Evangelizers, for a taste of what our online coaching community is like.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Clarence Butts, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Story Mapping, Use Data to Tell Your Story

TSE 839: Sales From The Street-“Use The Data…Tell a Story”

Clarence Butts, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Story Mapping

 

 

You have a story to tell: a history of your sales performance and your successes; a list of solutions you’ve provided to your customers; the lessons you’ve learned over the course of your career. You may not realize it, but you can use data to tell your story.

Today on Sales From The Street, we talk with Clarence Butts about the role data can play in your sales process.

Find decision-makers

One of Clarence’s biggest challenges in 25 years of sales has been locating the people who can make decisions and finding the project managers he can establish relationships with.

Somewhere along the way, he discovered that putting the information he had into a map helped him have a visual representation of where those opportunities were. It helped him determine where to invest his time, his energy, and his effort.

He discovered that once you know where they are, you can concentrate your time and effort into building relationships and developing contacts.

In his current territory, for example, he knows who the project managers are, and they know him. So even if they move from one project to another, they understand what he has to offer. They maintain relationships with him even as they transition to other projects.

Motivate yourself

Lots of companies will give you time at the front end of a new role to establish relationships and build networks. After that, you’re on your own.

That kind of pressure motivates some people, and frustrates others.

For Clarence, his initial motivation comes stems from the things he hopes to do with his family. He enjoys the fruits of being able to travel with his family. That motivates him to get out of bed every day.

His other motivation is chasing his competitors.

Finally, when he is able to enjoy the fruit of his work, that energizes him to keep working.

Use data to tell your story

As different locations scramble to attract Amazon’s next headquarters, many of them have used data to sell their regions. They use Story Maps, statistics, and other data to convince Amazon to choose their city.

Digital Territory wants to make the same capability available to the average salesperson. They’re seeking to bring the cost of the technology within reach of the individual sales rep so he can use data as part of his sales process.

Episode resources

There’s a reason I continue suggesting the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happenfrom our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic blueprint of all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

I’m so convinced of its message that I’m offering a free excerpt of the book so you can check it out.

Emailme for more information about our newly launched Sales Podcast Network, designed to provide specialized sales content for sellers of all levels and all industries. You can also email us about our new business development services.

You can also join our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers to connect with sales professionals from all walks of life.

Audio provided by Free SFX.