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Leadership, Accountability, Trust, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1151: Respected Leadership Traits

Leadership, Accountability, Trust, The Sales EvangelistEvery person in every industry can improve a little bit every day by focusing on self-improvement and developing respected leadership traits. Whether you’re a seller, a sales leader, or someone who isn’t even involved in sales, you’ll likely find yourself responsible for guiding people and helping them succeed. 

Luis Weger works with a startup focused on changing the medical construction industry and serves as an offer in the Army Reserves. He recently launched a company called “Self: Reinvented” designed to help others discover their purpose and passion and enhance their resiliency.

He believes that anyone can develop their leadership skills, even those who seem to be natural-born leaders. 

2 ACT

He developed a phrase to help people remember the important aspects of leadership. Leaders must remember 2 ACT. Each letter in the acronym represents two concepts. 

A = Aware and Accountable

C = Competent and Confident

T = Trusting and Trustworthy. 

From his experience leading people, training people, and working with clients, leaders must have these six attributes in order to lead well. It’s especially true in the sales profession. 

Aware and Accountable

Every military leader learns situational awareness because it’s vital in foreign countries. You cannot operate in enemy territory without knowing what’s going on around you. 

In business, this refers to knowing what’s going on around you. It also refers to emotional awareness. 

  • Are you in tune with the people around you? 
  • Do you know what’s happening within the company you represent?
  • Do you understand what your client needs? 
  • Are you tracking changes in the industry you’re in?

Industries change constantly, from rules and regulations to policies and procedures. You must stay aware of the changes that are taking place. 

Leaders who live under a rock won’t be leaders very long. You cannot ignore the realities in which you operate because if no one’s following you, you aren’t truly a leader. 

Luis was recently invited to change military units, and he discovered just prior to the transition that there was only one other officer in the unit. That meant that he and the commander were responsible for all 50 soldiers. No one told him that ahead of time, but because he was aware, he picked up on the situation and made an informed decision.

Accountability is also vitally important in the sales industry. 

Being a sales leader means taking accountability for the performance of your team. Don’t pass the blame. Share the credit wherever you can and take ownership of mistakes. 

Leaders guide and protect their team members. They sit down behind-the-scenes with their team members and acknowledge the things that went wrong. Then they help them correct those problems. 

Competence and Confidence

Luis points to the book The Speed of Trust by Stephen M.R. Covey as one of his favorites. When you’re in the sales profession, your clients look to you as an expert. You represent the perfect solution to your client’s problem.

If you have ever sat across the table from a person who doesn’t truly understand the industry he is selling in, you recognize the importance of competence. No one expects you to be an expert in everything. In fact, companies recruit fresh blood all the time. It’s one thing to bring a new perspective in the form of someone who is learning and quite another thing to recruit someone who is incompetent. 

In the military, lieutenants who come right out of college outrank noncommissioned officers who have been in the military for 20 years. They don’t really know much about the military because they are fresh out of school. How do you lead people who have 20 years more experience than you do? 

You don’t have the same knowledge and skills they do, so how do you reflect competence? You reflect a desire to become competent. Like CEOs, you don’t have to be the smartest person in the room; you simply surround yourself with smart people. 

Build a network. Demonstrate humility. Show people around you that you aren’t the greatest but that you’re seeking help to get better. 

Then demonstrate that you’re comfortable leading. Luis knows leaders who are in charge by title but they don’t want to be there. Confidence doesn’t mean feeling 100 percent all the time. It simply demands that you have the right frame of mind. 

So what

Luis developed a technique he calls “so what?” 

  • “So what if I mess up on my speech?”
  • “So what if I say something unplanned on The Sales Evangelist?”
  • “So what if I don’t close this sale today?” 
  • “So what if someone sees me make a mistake today?”

The point isn’t to minimize consequences. We’re reminding ourselves that it’s ok to be human and to be imperfect. When you get beyond the discomfort that comes from the fear of failure, that’s true confidence. It’s about managing fear and putting fear in its proper perspective. People will be more attracted to you because they’ll see you as a real person. 

Trusting and Trustworthy

Luis recalls hearing a CEO talk about the need to be trusting and trustworthy. You must trust in the skills and training of those who lead as well as those you are leading. If you try to micromanage everyone around you, you’ll burn out. 

Ask yourself whether those people have developed the skills, knowledge, and training to allow you to trust them. You don’t have to trust them right out of the gate because you don’t know what they’re bringing to the table. So what do you have to do to get to the point where you can trust them? Invest in them. Make sure they are trained, led, and managed in a healthy way. If you find that you can’t trust them, ask yourself why. What is it about that person that makes it difficult to trust him? 

Fix the issue if you can. If you can’t, you may have to consider how to move forward.

Perhaps more importantly, be trustworthy. Be a man or woman of your word. Even the smallest failures to do what you said you’d do cause your trustworthiness to be depleted. 

Lack of trust undermines any other attribute you bring to the table. 

Who’s following

If no one is following you as a leader, consider whether you’re truly leading. You may hold the title of leader, but are people willing to follow you into battle. 

As a sales professional, you’re a mentor and trainer and you have capabilities and competencies, but are people willing to follow your advice? Will they do what you ask? 

Be humble and be human. Move beyond the perfect image. Everyone brings something to the table, and you can learn from everyone around you. 

“Respected Leadership Traits” episode resources

You can connect with Luis at selfreinvented.com. He enjoys helping people succeed and sharing his own leadership experiences. 

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program or free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. 

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Corey Blake, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, BYU-Hawaii

TSE 1120: How To Build a Brand Online and Leverage it for Rapid Sales Growth

Corey Blake, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, BYU-Hawaii

Every sales professional and entrepreneur needs a profitable brand, and the key is to build a brand online and leverage it for rapid sales growth.

Corey Blake is the CEO at MWI, an international digital marketing agency. His background is in sales and business development and he has managed great sales teams over the years.

Validate your brand

When it comes to building a brand and then leveraging it for growth, you must begin by validating your brand. You basically want to turn off any sirens that the potential customer has about you as a seller.

We all know that a stigma exists around sellers, and you likely even experience it when someone gets on the phone with you to sell you something, despite the fact that you’re in sales yourself.

The biggest challenge often originates from the fact that we build great brands and we know we have value to offer, but we don’t know how to convince people to pay for it. How you validate your brand is critical in that process.

It’s simply legitimizing your brand, service, or product. You must find a third party or another way to validate it. You could share that your brand has been featured on certain sites or that you’ve been invited to certain events.

When you’re starting out, go to your customer. Offer to give a customer your product or service in exchange for their use of it. Explain that you think it will make his life better and that you’d like to ask for his testimonial.

Now you’ve got validation and social proof to use in your next sales conversation.

Personal confidence

Seeing someone use your product provides you, as the seller, a certain amount of confidence as well.

If you prefer, you can create great case studies or build a social media presence that includes amazing content. For MWI, for example, they can validate themselves as great content creators by creating great content.

As a bonus, TSE has used those product giveaways as an opportunity to gain feedback during our initial launches so we can figure out where we need to tweak our training or our products. It also helps us build a case study.

Through all of this, you’ll build your own excitement and you’ll develop even more confidence, which is the key to success. Begin your entrepreneur journey by selling yourself on the value you’re providing to the world.

Linking value

Once you’ve established confidence in your value, use your marketing to communicate it to your potential customers. It’s not enough to be sold on your own value, but you must find someone else who is sold on your value as well.

Find a publication that will tell its audience how legit you are.

Once you’ve built this validation, you’ll have an amazing ability to sell your product or service with exclusivity. You’ll find yourself in the driver’s seat and gives you leverage in your communication and makes your sale more exclusive.

If you establish exclusivity, you almost won’t have to sell your customers as much. You’ll simply have to educate them and move them along the sales process. Exclusivity is priceless.

Finding balance

No one wants to be perceived as the typical used car salesman. Don’t come across as gimmicky, selfish, or ignorant. Instead, strive for confident, competent, professional, and controlled. There’s a balance to it.

Assume your customer has never heard of your validation and mention it to him. Within the first 20 seconds, provide that validation to establish confidence and control. Find a way to organically share it without being perceived as cocky.

The alarms about whether you’re legit will shut down. Then you can offer the idea that you only work with a certain kind of brand, and that allows you to operate with a lot more control.

Close early, close often

Make sure you’re asking for the business. Develop specific strategies to close deals. Beautiful branding and validation won’t matter if you can’t close. Consistently think strategically about how you’ll move this sale to the place you want it.

Provide the customer with the right information and the right details so that she’ll be ready to close.

Closing amounts to more than the way you speak, the speed of your speech, and the tone of your voice. These things do constantly lead to close, but you have to figure out how to move to the specific points along the process.

Many sellers are fearful of the conversion side so they hold off too long. Or they get anxious and they ask for the sale way too soon. If you follow the process, that’s where you’ll see the difference.

Sales process

You can have all the right components in place, but without a repeatable sales process, you’ll struggle to support your sales. If your process isn’t organized in a way that leads to close at all times, you won’t succeed.

Determine how to leverage all the components you’ve gathered to move your customers toward a deal. Leverage your value, your validation, your exclusivity, and your communication to ask for the business.

Corey’s goal at the end of the sales process is to structure the process so that the _customer_ asks for the next steps without him having to sell it. That’s when you know you’ve hit the nail on the head.

Organizing your tools

Corey worked with James Carberry at Sweetfish Media to help him set up a process of validation. James already had significant validation because he had a large number of podcasts with great guests and he writes for large publications. They simply had to find a way to organize the validation.

In their case, all the tools were sitting there waiting to be used.

Focus on providing real value. Sell yourself on the value you’re providing to individuals and industry. When you love what you’re doing and you aren’t simply trying to make a buck, people will want to be part of that.

Good businesses are built on products that will make a difference. It doesn’t have to be an altruistic notion like ending world hunger. We would all benefit if we could go to work every day and provide value that you believe in to everyone else.

“Build a Brand Online and Leverage It for Rapid Sales Growth” episode resources

You can connect with Corey at Corey@mwi.com. Mention that you heard me on this podcast. You can also find him on LinkedIn @Corey Blake.

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump. If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

Tools for sellers

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Jacquelyn Nicholson, Rapport, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Female In Sales

TSE 1058: How to Genuinely Build Rapport With Any Prospect

Jacquelyn Nicholson, Rapport, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Female In Sales

Many sellers struggle to connect with their customers, but on today’s episode, Jacquelyn Nicholson addresses how to genuinely build rapport with any prospect.

Jacquelyn is an enterprise seller and one of the inaugural members at Alpha Sense where she acts as an evangelist for the company and its work.

World of sales

Jacquelyn landed in sales after a strange recession in Chicago prevented her from finding a job as an engineer for a defense contractor. She moved to New York and took a job as a sales engineer.

Sometime after, she found herself heading a project for Johnson & Johnson and reporting directly to the vice president of the division. He told her to put together the very best team possible and trusted her to get the job done.

During the course of the project, she made two unexpected realizations. She discovered that she didn’t like buying from salespeople because she thought they were horrible. Secondly, she discovered that she really missed sales.

She didn’t like salespeople because they talked nonstop about how great their technology was. She found herself wondering, “Do you even know what I do? Do you even care?”

“At the same moment, I was drawn back to the world of sales and also slightly repulsed by what I saw in the sellers I knew.”

She decided then to return to sales, and she vowed that she would never be that kind of seller.

Solving problems

Jacquelyn discovered that people buy things from people who can help them solve their problems. If I have a problem and you can solve it, I’m going to buy your stuff.

But I also have to be able to trust the person I’m buying from. People buy from people they trust or they like, and they can spot fake people. Sucking up isn’t the same, and customers quickly learn to spot genuine people.

She determined that the key was getting to know the people she was selling to. Learning about their problems and the things they care about. That only happens after you build rapport.

The problem, she discovered, was figuring out how to do that at scale.

The good news was, she discovered, that it doesn’t take additional time to be authentic. Researching to understand your client’s problems takes time, but kindness doesn’t.

Segue into sales

Jacquelyn realized that she wasn’t going to land in a quota-carrying role until she got some experience in front of customers. She ventured into the consulting world and she gained experience solving client problems and earning their trust.

She loved the idea of solving problems instead of simply pushing products.

Jacquelyn also realized that her time managing a project for Johnson & Johnson taught her that executives aren’t any different than anyone else. Many sellers struggle to have the confidence to approach them, but she said she was fortunate to learn early on how to interact with them.

She counsels sellers now to be respectful of their time. Executives are short on time and short on people who want to be helpful to them for who they are rather than for what they can do.

Don’t put them on a pedestal. Don’t become a “yes man” for executives. They are often surrounded by “yes men” who don’t want to rock the boat, but what they often need is real insight.

Initiate a conversation around something relevant that matters to the executives.

Bad rap

Sellers have gotten a bad rap from some of the bad behaviors of our predecessors, but the world has changed an awful lot. Consumers now have the ability to do extensive research before they ever reach out to a seller.

Sellers must honor the time they have put into the process.

At the same time, you deserve to be treated as more than just a vendor. If your customers don’t treat you with a certain amount of respect, you always have the option to walk away. Sometimes you have to fire prospects.

Taking risk

There isn’t a lot to be afraid of anymore. Jacquelyn faced a rare and aggressive form of leukemia and survived it, so she calls herself “fearless on another level” now.

She defines success as being the best person she can possibly be. She wants to be the woman her husband would marry again; the seller her boss would hire again; the mom her kids are proud to introduce to their friends.

If you constantly define your success in terms of other people and what they think of you, you’re doing it the wrong way.

Help

Jacquelyn believes that help is always available. Sometimes you’re the one giving the help and sometimes you’re the one seeking it. Don’t be afraid to keep your eyes and ears open for the help that’s available.

We have a tendency to believe that we have little to offer, but the truth is that you intrinsically have value because you’re you. Be aware of those who can help you, and those that need your help each day.

Sales is a noble profession because we’re selling something that will help someone else.

“How to Genuinely Build Rapport With Any Prospect” episode resources

You can connect with Jacquelyn on LinkedIn, and if you’re interested in her personal journey, you can go to lxu.training/jacq. She’d love to connect with you.

We are currently in the Beta portion of our new TSE Certified Sales Training Program. The first section is about prospecting, the second is all about building value, and the third is about closing.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. If 2018 wasn’t the best year for you, check out TSE Certified Sales Training Program. We can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 1057: Be Willing To Let Them Mess Up!

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

Sometimes business leaders find themselves wanting to make sure that their team members get everything exactly right, but unless you’re willing to let them mess up, they’ll likely never learn.

Perfect situations don’t exist. Imperfection is a factor in life, but it’s also where our growth happens.

Maintaining control

Control often gives us the sense that we can force everything to work. As a result, we avoid letting our team members try things their own way because we fool ourselves into believing that our way is always the best.

In my own story, I landed an appointment with a huge organization, and I invited the CEO of my small company to go along. I wanted his support, but I also wanted to show my boss that I was working hard. I wanted him to see the opportunity I had landed.

Most importantly, I wanted him to support me through the unknown parts of the appointment. If I found myself struggling in the conversation, I knew he could help me out.

Turns out he took over the whole show. Instead of acting as a ride-along on my appointment, I was the tag-along.

I had been talking to the client for months, so he felt a little bit ambushed. I had promised him one thing and then given him something completely different. Instead of a meeting with a sales rep, he found himself sitting in a meeting with an executive that he wasn’t really prepared for.

My plan

I imagined myself leading off the meeting and asking for his input along the way. I didn’t imagine it becoming his return to the glory days.

Because I wasn’t operating from a playbook, there was no real structure. The deal did close, but it was challenging.

If you find yourself asking why it’s a big deal, the problem was that it eroded my confidence as a seller.

Sometimes, because CEOs and entrepreneurs started out selling their own product or service, they have a tough time letting that go. They see a problem and they address it themselves because it’s how they operated before they hired sellers.

My CEO misunderstood my request for help and he took over the meeting instead.

In a previous episode, Kevin Davis talked to us about the challenges that sales managers often face, and the book he wrote, The Sales Manager’s Guide to Greatness, that addresses many of those issues.

Learning process

When I finally had the opportunity to go on meetings myself, I fell into a habit of mimicking what I had seen my CEO do. I shared the same stories, even though they weren’t my own stories, but I hadn’t gained an understanding of the problem I was trying to address.

Because there wasn’t any substance to my conversations, my opportunities started falling away. I wasn’t having a problem keeping things in my pipeline, but I was struggling to get them to close.

The old adage of the butterfly struggling to get out of the cocoon applies here: the struggle makes the butterfly stronger. If you were to cut open the cocoon so he could easily slip out, he would never develop strong wings that would help him fly.

You’ll never set the vision for your company moving forward if you’re busy doing the work that you hired your sales team to do.

A better option

We should have developed a gameplan before going into the meeting. By deciding who would say what and how we would build rapport, we could have avoided the awkward meeting with the client.

My CEO could have reviewed the questions I was planning to ask to ensure that I was properly prepared. Then, he could have assured me that if I got into trouble, he’d be there to help.

That scenario would have allowed me to at least try running the meeting.

The sooner you prepare your sales team to operate on their own, the more room you’ll have to grow your company.

Coaching is the correct answer. As you grow a more experienced sales team, you can add to is, and you can create repeatable success.

You will have to let them mess up. That doesn’t mean you ignore any train wrecks that are happening, but you can help them understand where they went wrong so they won’t make the mistake again.

Specify roles and responsibilities before the meetings so your team will learn to fly on their own.

Helicopter manager

Sometimes, in the role of coach, it’s tempting to give your team members the correct answers so they’ll learn more quickly. Don’t do it.

Helicopter managers tend to erode the team’s confidence and they actually lengthen the learning process by creating people who rely heavily on their help.

When they discover the answers on their own, the learning will be more meaningful.

Send us your stories about helicopter managers so we can all learn from the experience.

“Let Them Mess Up” episode resources

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Garrett Mehrguth, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1046: You Need to Worry More About Your Champion Than Your Decision Maker

Garrett Mehrguth, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistSometimes sales professionals get it backward, and they fail to understand the need to worry more about your champion than your decision maker.

Today Garrett Mehrguth talks to us about the importance of your champion in your sales deals, and why we shouldn’t lose sight of his importance.

Sometimes there’s great value in changing the defaults we learn as salespeople. We tend to become so obsessed with the decision makers that we overlook the champions, who are arguably the most important person in the whole scenario.

How decisions are made

Salespeople sometimes focus so greatly on getting a close that we neglect the fundamental truths involved in selling. In fact, we alienate people and we become our own worst enemy.

It isn’t price; it’s me. Most often, we are the reason that deals don’t close. It’s a direct result of who we speak to, who we don’t speak to, the way we end a conversation, the way we treat people, how well we prepare.

We must have transparency and honesty to admit that often we’re the reason we don’t close a deal.

Salespeople are quick to take credit for successes and slow to take responsibility for failures. #SalesTruth

Garrett believes that if we would build our resources and our marketing toward decision makers, we would drastically improve our conversion rates.

How deals emerge

Once a decision-maker recognizes he has a need, he might send a subordinate to a conference to talk to vendors. He might instruct the person to get three quotes and then bring his two favorites to the decision-maker. Once that’s done, the two will make a decision together.

He might suggest filling out 10 forms on the way to finding three good options. The pair will whittle those to two good options before making a decision.

The problem is that if you speak over the champion or speak through the champion or speak around the champion, you alienate your greatest ally.

Why you need the champion

The champion is your greatest asset while you’re not in the room, so if you alienate that person, you’re losing an important ally. You alienate the person who could potentially go to bat for you once you hang up the phone.

Good decision-makers make decisions by asking the champion whether or not he could work with that agency. So who truly puts their butt on the line?

It isn’t the decision-maker, because he has a fall guy.

The champion is the one who needs the information, the emotional support, and the resources to make a good decision. If you honor the champion with amazing intro calls, lots of sales resources, and well-prepared meetings, you give him the ammo to pitch you internally.

Why the decision-maker shouldn’t be your focus

In five years of working with marketing teams, Garrett has never heard anyone mention targeting the champion. Instead, we treat decision-makers as though they have some kind of supernatural power.

The decision-maker is never the point of contact. If he isn’t the point of contact, and he isn’t the one who will be working with the agency you choose, he isn’t the one to target.

Remember that everyone is selling to the decision-maker, including the champion. The decision-maker’s job is to discern the best fit for his champion. So even if he likes a certain agency better, if that agency can’t work with his champion, it won’t matter.

Deal retention is far more important than closing deals. Even if you manage to close a deal, if you don’t treat the champion well, you won’t renew it. You won’t get referrals from it.

In Garrett’s mind, there isn’t a single aspect of the process where the decision-maker is more important than the champion.

Avoiding absolutes

He acknowledges, too, that absolutes are dangerous. It’s certainly not true that the decision-maker should never, ever be considered.

Instead, let’s work to change the fundamental hypothesis that we as marketers and sales reps enter relationships with.

If we spend more time building rapport with the point of contact, you will drastically improve your close rate because you are building confidence and comfort with the most important voice in the room.

You need a champion who will give you a voice during moments when you aren’t in the room because that’s often when deals are decided. You won’t close $150,000 contracts while you’re in the room. It happens behind closed doors, and you won’t likely be there when it does.

Shifting focus to champions

Give your champions resources to bolster their confidence. Make that your primary goal.

Your champion is likely scared to death of going to his boss with a recommendation. His discernment and character will be judged by the referral he makes. Anytime you give a referral to someone, your own judgment is on the line.

Challenge things that other people won’t do. Put your neck on the line by offering evidence and claims that protect the champion when he goes to his boss. You take the risk so your champion doesn’t have to.

It will give him the confidence to recommend your agency and it will differentiate you from the competition.

In order to be successful, do the opposite of what everyone else is doing.

Building confidence

Garrett’s company operates on annual contracts, and they give the point of contact room to act if he doesn’t feel completely comfortable in the relationship. By backing up their claims, it gives the champion room to cover himself if he makes a bad choice in hiring them.

If you create alignment with the champion, you’ll create alignment with the decision-maker. At the end of the day, the decision-makers just have to make more money than you’re charging them.

The champion has to have a day-to-day relationship with you. You can’t neglect that relationship.

It’s why you must develop resources that speak directly to your champion.

Even when it’s time to renew, the champion will get to decide whether to continue working with your agency. Regardless of the data, if the relationship isn’t there, the deal won’t renew.

Change your perspective to focus on champions, and your volume will drastically improve. There are far more champions looking for vendors than there are decision-makers.

You’ll also increase your deal retention and reduce churn.

Change your prospecting and marketing to focus on the champions, you’ll increase your at-bats and your close rate.

“You Need to Worry More About Your Champion Than Your Decision Maker” episode resources

You can connect with Garrett on LinkedIn @garrettmehrguth, email him at gmehrguth@directiveconsulting.com, or connect with him on Twitter @gmehrguth.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

This episode is also brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. If 2018 wasn’t the best year for you, check out TSE Certified Sales Training Program. We can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Tiffany Southerland, Customer Service, Sales Training, Coaching

TSE 1025: TSE Certified Sales Training Program: “Give Them Your All”

One of the best ways to show your appreciation for your customers and provide value to them is to give them your all.

Tiffany Southerland is a career confidence coach who works with both young, and experienced, professionals who are ready to make their career mark on the world and who want to increase their fulfillment in the work they do each day.

She helps individuals evolve, thrive, and perform to the best of their ability.

A business cannot exist without clients, so it is crucial to have a solid relationship with your buyers. Tiffany serves individuals one-on-one in a group setting and believes that, if they are not happy – if they have not improved or realized results – she has not done her job. It is, therefore, very important for the success of her business that she continually better herself in order to do better for her clients.

The goal is not to simply make more money but rather to help the clients. A salesperson who pushes her own agenda over the needs of her clients is likely to lose those clients.

The natural by-product of happy clients, however, is increased sales.

Tiffany recalls failing to launch a group program twice because she had locked herself into reaching a specific number.

She was focused on that target instead of the service she wanted to deliver. Once she removed the target and focused on the experiences, services, and opportunities she wanted to provide for her clients instead, she began to see results.

Her level of stress was replaced with positive energy. People began to react differently to her as a result and her new goal was reached.

Our unique gifts

Tiffany knew that she wanted to build her business for the sake of changing people’s lives and she wanted to leave a legacy. She had to realize and believe that she was capable of doing so. She needed to believe that she was uniquely gifted to provide her services in the way her clients wished to receive it.

Tiffany was serious about reaching her goal. She knew she was capable of making an impact in a way that only she was qualified to do.

Tiffany believes we are all uniquely gifted because our lives are all different. We came into our particular roles in a way that no one else did, even if we are doing the “same job.”

Once you internalize that concept and apply the difference to the way you do business, you begin to walk authentically and in your own unique voice.  Regardless of the metrics or the sales targets, if you can show up authentically, it becomes easier to do anything. You are no longer working to fit somebody else’s mode.

You will be perceived differently.

People can tell when you are trying to be something you are not.

If your product or service can meet the need, the entire perspective and experience for both the buyer and the seller shifts. Rather than ‘just selling,’ you are literally meeting a need.

Comparison is the thief of joy

It is easy to fall into the trap of comparing yourself to others in the same field and to doubt your ability to provide any unique service. Realize that you don’t have to reach a million people. Rather, you need to show up and impact just those people who need to hear your voice.

We live in a world now where some people have thousands of followers. But if you have 10 people behind you – who really believe in you – that is a foundation upon which you can build everything else.

Tiffany does not claim to be a celebrity by any stretch but she has a podcast audience that shares and believes in her. She, in turn, benefits when they share and connect her to others.

It is impossible to be grateful and to take advantage of what you have if you are too busy comparing your achievements to others.

Don’t worry about what other people have. Be appreciative of what you have. Have the right perspective and learn how to make the best from what you have been given.

When Tiffany embraced this change, she was able to launch her business successfully. She was free to focus on her clients as opposed to focusing on herself and the bottom line.

A call to serve

Tiffany strongly believes that, regardless of industry, we are called to serve first. Focusing on metrics, for example, serves no purpose other than to appeal to our vanity.

As soon as Tiffany changed her focus to the creation of a great product that would change the career trajectory of other women, she was able to truly connect with her clients.

It was no longer the work she did for herself; it was the work they would do together that made the business successful.

The feedback from her clients has been wonderful. They feel heard. They feel that they are getting so much more out of their experience with Tiffany than they expected.

For Tiffany, that is the only result she really needs. Her clients register to improve their interviewing skills, or resumes, but they leave knowing how to clearly articulate what it is they are really good at doing and what they want in their careers.

They are able to figure out, and seek out, the right opportunities with increased confidence. Tiffany says the change has been phenomenal and the impact extends well beyond career confidence.

The work self and the personal self will eventually collide so they have to be congruent. Don’t go to work as an employee. Go to work as the individual that you are. It will give you the clarity to determine what opportunities are for you, and which ones are not.

Have faith not only in the qualifications on your resume but in your ability to deliver. You have to believe in yourself.

Focus on service. Take the pressure off yourself by focusing on the people around you instead. Focus on the company you work for, your colleagues, and your clients. When the focus is on them, the pressure you used to place on yourself no longer exists.

“Give Them Your All” episode resources

Tiffany’s next ‘Elevate your Career Academy’ will launch in March. It is an 8-week faith-based, group career coaching program for women. Learn more about it and register at www.Howdoesshedoitpodcast.com or www.fourcornerscoach.com.

This episode is brought to you in part by our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, which teaches you to improve your sales skills, find more customers, build stronger value, and close more deals.

The next semester begins in March.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Aaron Walker, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Mentor

TSE 1018: Where’s My Mentor?

 

Aaron Walker, Mentor,Many of us in sales have jumped into companies without a training process or guidance; we find ourselves winging it and wondering, “Where’s my mentor?”

Aaron Walker started in the business when he was 18 years old. At the age of 27, he sold to a Fortune 500 company and retired.

Eighteen months later, his wife told him he was becoming fat and lazy; so he went back to work, purchased the company he first started and grew it four times in 10 years.

It was all fun until the unimaginable happened in August 2001.

Aaron accidentally killed a pedestrian with his car. It changed his life.

He sold the business and spent the next five years learning how to deal with the tragedy.

Changing his legacy

In the process, he realized that his financial success lacked significance. He didn’t want his legacy to be “‘enough money to retire at the age of 27.” Nobody cares.

He wanted to make a change. He decided to spend his life encouraging and edifying others.

Aaron changed the way he did business. He started looking outward more than inward and he gathered mentors to help him.

His life began to take a very different path.

With the help of several mentors he has worked with for more than two decades in a Mastermind group, Aaron launched his own coaching company, View From the Top.

He now leads 14 mastermind groups in eight different countries to help people live a life of success and significance.

Isolation is the enemy to excellence

Aaron defines a mentor as somebody who will walk alongside you for an extended period of time, as opposed to a coach who helps you get through a certain point in life.

Aaron has been with some of the same mentors for more than 40 years. They help him realize where he needs to go in life.

Mentors are people who have been there/done that and whose core values coincide with your own. They are the people who want what is best for you rather than what is best for themselves.  

For sales, in particular, mentors are crucial. Aaron believes that it is very difficult to grow and expand alone because we each have only one filter – one life experience that guides how we view things.

The value of mentors

Other people see us differently than we see ourselves. As such, mentors can help realize your superpowers. They also help you understand your weaknesses and to see your blind spots.

Having a mentor to point out what we would otherwise miss ourselves can be the very thing that puts us over the top.

We have many obstacles and upper limit challenges that we need to push through. Trusted and unbiased advisors can point us in the right direction.

Aaron recalls a guy in one of his mastermind groups that was putting together a course that was, in reality, absolutely terrible. Everything about it was terrible, but the group helped him tweak it and shape it into something amazing.  

It’s the same way in our lives. Aaron admits he lacks tact but never realized that many people viewed him as arrogant and condescending until his wife pointed it out to him. It was one of his blind spots.

We need people around us who can help us out.

We all know the overly confident, borderline cocky salespeople. Getting them to accept advice, to realize their blind spots and to be humble is tricky. Confidence is needed in sales but people don’t buy arrogance and cockiness. There has to be a measure of humility. A mentor can help you get there.

Surround yourselves in business, in marriage, in every area of your life with mentors that you trust to help you get where you want to go.

Where’s my mentor?

To find a mentor, look for someone who has been married for a long time if you have questions about marriage. Find someone who has been in business for along time if you have questions about that.

Look for someone who has nothing to lose, or gain, by talking to you. Family members are often biased in that regard because they want you to have what you want to have.

You want someone who will give it to you straight.

You have to be willing to subject yourself to scrutiny. You have to be willing to accept the truth in order to hear the truth. That is why masterminds are so profoundly helpful – you have 8-10 people with completely different life experiences at your disposal.

They can take your great idea, look at it, and point out the things about it that you might not have thought of.  When you work with the same people over months or years, a pattern develops and they see it.

Aaron has worked with the same counselor for decades. They talk when things are going well and when they aren’t. Over that amount of time, the counselor realized that Aaron did something completely radical about once every 36 months. This type of behavior classifies Aaron as a ‘creator developer’, rather than a ‘maintainer manager.’

A creator developer is someone who gets bored easily and who doesn’t like everything to be the same all the time. It explains why Aaron has had 12 businesses. He likes to develop and create.

Because Aaron had a mentor who was able to point it out, Aaron can now plan accordingly.

The ebbs and the flows

Many young people don’t have mentors while many people with experience to share aren’t necessarily interested in reaching out. Aaron is hoping to connect the two.

Mentors have changed Aaron’s life in many ways. He remembers many ebbs and flows throughout his life. One dark time several years ago was particularly difficult. Aaron relied heavily upon his mastermind group at the time and met with them every week. He just could not get motivated but the group was there to listen.

It went on for months.

Then, one Saturday, Aaron got a call from one of the guys in the group. It was alarming at first because the group never spoke on the weekends but Aaron knew by the tone of his voice that it was good news.

“I know you’ve been in a dark spot for a long time and I’ve been praying for you … but you are wearing the hell out of everybody in the group. You just keep on and on every week. Take the chains off from around your neck and move on,” he said.

And then he hung up. Aaron was so mad at the audacity of the call.

But then he started thinking.

Realizing that his friend loved him enough to tell him the truth was the change he needed to get over it and to move forward.

A casual friendship does not give that kind of hard truth.

Put down the facade and be vulnerable. That is where true strength starts. Surround yourself with people who know your good, your bad, and your ugly but who still care about you.

It is the solid foundation that will allow you to become all you were created to be.

“Where’s My Mentor?” episode resources

You can reach out to Aaron via his website, Viewfromthetop.com. His mastermind group, Iron Sharpens Iron (ISI), meets on a regular basis via video conference all over the world. Check it out!

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Prospect.io is offering three months at half-price.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Fear, New Seller, Confidence

TSE 1015: TSE Certified Sales Training Program – “Lack of Confidence”

Fear, New Seller, ConfidenceOne of my favorite topics to talk about is lack of confidence and the challenges and fear that come along with it; and, more specifically, how we can overcome it.

Paul Carswell was the salaried manager of a Sherwin-Williams storefront for many years before transitioning in 2018 to become an independent Medicare Insurance Specialist. He works with clients ages 65+ to help them and to bring value to their community.  

Surviving on a 100% commission-based income took some getting used to. Instead of clients walking into the store, Paul had to learn how to make calls and set appointments.

In order to educate potential clients on the complexities of the Medicare system, Paul also hosts educational events in the community. He uses podcasts like this one to reach out to as many people as possible. Such events help people to realize that his primary goal is to help the community rather than to simply earn a paycheck.

Lack of confidence

Moving from a salaried position to a commission-based position certainly caused some fear and trepidation. The transition of receiving a paycheck every two weeks, regardless of performance, to selling private insurance came with a steep learning curve.

Paul knew he had to get out in front of people. Nobody was simply “walking into the store anymore.” Previously, his whole day had been planned out for him. Now he had an empty schedule that only he could fill.

It seemed nice and relaxing for the first two weeks but then reality set in. With no paycheck coming in and no prospects on the calendar, Paul admits to feeling defeated.

A lack of confidence was setting in.

Regaining confidence

Paul had to put his pride aside and get busy. Drawing from his experience as a basketball player, he knew he had to take shots if he was ever going to score.

He started contacting old friends and networking – anything to populate his schedule. It didn’t matter if it was Medicare-related or not.

Paul found that the more he put on his calendar, the more he was able to begin to weed out the events that would not benefit his business. Eventually, after about eight weeks of making calls and networking – still without a paycheck – he finally had a full schedule of Medicare-related events to look forward to.

As a result of the changes he implemented, Paul improved his relationships with his friends by talking with them more. On the business side of things, he has increased his bookings from zero to 50 and is earning a decent income because of the work he put into it.

It didn’t all come at once, however, as it did before at Sherwin-Williams. In his current role, sales is a lengthy process instead of a quick sale with an immediate exchange of goods.

Learning to understand the long-term payout was his biggest struggle. As such, Paul advises everyone to stay focused on long-term goals.

The more people you get yourself in front of, the more you will realize how many people truly care about you and want your business to succeed.

“Lack of Confidence” episode resources

You can contact Paul on his cellphone at 703-342-9087 or via email at paul@carswell.io.  Paul is on Instagram  @paulcarswell. He can also be found on Twitter and Facebook. His website will be up and running soon!

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never, ever be the same.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out.

You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share with your friends!

Closing, Confidence, New Customer, Donald Kelly

TSE 942: How Confident Are You With Closing?

Closing, Confidence, New Customer, Donald KellyWhen it comes to closing, you have to be confident. Closing is throughout the sales process and you have to build confidence in what you sell. The buyer must feel your confidence and believe that your product or service is capable of solving her problems and helping her business to succeed.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’ll discuss the power of your own confidence and we’ll ask the question, “How confident are you with closing?”

Your confidence will cause them to persuade themselves to buy just the way the Jamaican food seller almost persuaded me to buy something I don’t even like.

Defining confidence

Confidence amounts to your belief in yourself and your ability to succeed.

If you are confident, then you will project an attitude of competence and authority.

As a seller, you must be able to project confidence, even in a situation that isn’t certain. Whether you’re new to sales,  just not closing deals, or selling a product that is new to you, you must project confidence in order to convince your prospect to buy.

You have to drink your own Kool Aid, so to speak.

Evangelizing

Because I grew up poor, when I realized I could earn a decent living in sales doing something that I really loved, I wanted to evangelize about it. I wanted to tell other people how they could be successful in sales.

First, I launched my podcast. I discovered along the way that when people encounter a passionate seller who really loves what he is doing, they see him as an authority figure.

Without that kind of influence, it’s very difficult to convince people to make an economic decision.

Confidence vs. certainty

A 2018 study of experts revealed an interesting trend among people who hire experts to help them solve problems.

Whether the expert was in sales, finance, or any other industry, people generally valued competence and authority over an ability to accurately predict an outcome. In other words, they felt better about the process if the expert exuded confidence.

If, for instance, you offer prospects a 60 percent likelihood of a certain outcome, they will value that authority over a general suggestion of what might happen.

If you can share that 90 percent of your customers experience a certain outcome, that will bring a tremendous amount of clarity to your buyers.

You’ll have a much better chance of closing that deal and encouraging that person to persuade himself to purchase.

Taking shots

Wayne Gretzky said that you miss 100 percent of the shots that you don’t take. And while that’s true, it’s also true that not every shot will be the right one for us.

As a sales rep, you’re not going to try to sell every single product to every single person. You’re going to go after clients or prospects that are qualified; those that are more likely to close.

My soccer coach used to tell us that the more shots we took on goal, the better our chances of scoring. But shooting on goal is different than randomly kicking balls.

I made the mistake as a new seller of limiting myself to those shots that I knew would succeed. I decided that I would only pursue prospects that I knew would say yes.

The problem is that no one can know that with any certainty. Even in those moments, you must exude confidence.

Invite change

You must be sure that you’re confidently encouraging your customers and inviting them to change.

Take advantage of the upsell. If you recall, McDonald’s spent years asking its customers if they wanted to supersize their drinks and fries.

Practice your competence and your confidence through repetition.

Be humble, but be confident. Don’t be cocky.

“How Confident Are You With Closing?” episode resources

Read more about the basics of confidence here.

This episode is brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Dave Cook, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Closing

TSE 933: Closing Strategies That Can Be Used By People at Any Level In Any Industry

Dave Cook, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, ClosingNo one wants to discover at the end of a sales process that the prospect isn’t planning to buy. So how can you improve the odds that your prospect follows through? What closing strategies will improve your odds?

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, David Cook, author of How to Be a Great Salesperson… By Monday Morning!, discusses closing strategies that any seller can use in any industry to close more deals.

Closing

When we do our jobs properly, our prospects can’t help but buy our products and services.

Even though we’re all constantly using computers, sellers have to humanize the process. When people call your organization with questions, they want to talk to someone who is more than a robot with a heartbeat.

David begins with a cough. It sounds strange, but he explains to his prospects that he picked up a cough while he was walking his dog over the weekend.

Now your prospect knows you have a dog, and if he has a dog, there’s common ground. The prospect is no longer talking to a robot.

People are dying for the human touch. They crave it, so give it to them.

Urgency

Make sure to say your customer’s name over and over. Every time you do, you’re breaking down barriers. If you’re making a really strong point, make sure to use the prospect’s name.

Also, urgency separates the stars from the superstars. If you don’t create a need for the prospect to act now, why would they?

The first moment they hear about your product is the hottest they’ll ever be. They’ll get involved in other projects as time goes by, and they’ll cool to your product.

But how do you create urgency without being pushy?

Talk about the company as an outside entity.

“They’re allowing me to offer you x if you act by this date.” It isn’t you making the rules; the company is making the rules.

Position yourself as an advocate for your prospect.

Confidence

You must expect the sale. You must stay positive.

In the example of real estate, when you’re showing a home to a prospect, refer to it as their living room, their swimming pool, and their kitchenThe more times you refer to it as theirs, the more likely the customer will subconsciously start to think of the house as theirs.

If you build a burning desire within your customer to acquire your products and services, there’s no dollar amount in the world that’s too much.

Humor

Make your customer laugh.

Within a first few seconds of talking to you, they’ll decide whether or not they are going to buy from you. Get them laughing immediately.

If you make them laugh, they are on your side because their brains release endorphins that make them feel good.

Happy people buy and unhappy people do not.

Believe

You have to believe in your heart that your customer is lucky to be talking to you. You must believe in your product.

If you don’t think they’re lucky to be talking to you about your product or service that will make their lives easier or help them impress their bosses, then why should they believe they are lucky to be talking to you?

Your customer will pick up on it if you don’t absolutely believe in your product.

Believe that you have a moral obligation to share good things with your prospects.

“Closing Strategies” episode resources

You can connect with David at his website, salestrainingonthego.com. You can also grab a copy of his book, How to Be a Great Salesperson… By Monday Morning!

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

This episode is also brought to you byMaximizer CRM. If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

use your wardrobe to fake confidence, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 813: How To Use Your Wardrobe To Fake Confidence If You’re New To Sales

Wardrobe, Sales, Confidence, The Sales Evangelist

If you’re new to sales, you may already lack confidence simply because you lack experience. On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, personal stylist Rayne Parvis teaches how to use your wardrobe to fake confidence if you’re new to sales.

First impression

If you’re not hitting your style or looking your best, your client may make assumptions about you.

Especially for new sales professionals, dressing the part helps you lean into your new profession. When you’re dressed well, you won’t be preoccupied with worries about your appearance so you can focus more on what you want to communicate or what you bring to the table.

Your wardrobe will inspire confidence which will allow you to focus on communicating with your clients.

Three easy steps

1.  Pay attention to color. Choose colors that complement your hair, eyes, and skin. Avoid black, which can be off-putting.

Blue is a great color for business because it communicates trust, dependability, and commitment.

Studies have shown that even when you’re selling over the phone, you’ll communicate more effectively if you’re dressed for business.

2. Dress one step above your target market. Dressing one step above your audience suggests that you’re relatable.

If you dress too far above your audience, you’ll seem unrelatable and unattainable. They won’t be able to connect with you.

3. Add something to your style that is uniquely you. Maybe it’s a certain color, or cufflinks, or a watch that you love.

Find the balance between “fake it ’til you make it” and authenticity.

Identify one step you can take and apply it immediately.

Dressing well doesn’t have to be expensive, but it will help you feel more confident.

Episode resources

Check out Rayne’s book, Ultimate Guide to Style: From Drab to Fab!, for more information about empowering yourself through your wardrobe.

You can also connect with Rayne on Instagram or at her website, www.stylebyrayne.com.

Check out Stop Selling & Start Leading for information about how to lead your prospect instead of selling to him. You can also read a snippet of the book, Leadership-Is-Everyones-Business.doc, here.

Our Sales Podcast Network community of podcasters is almost here. Keep watching here for information about the network of podcasts, all tied directly to the sales world.

In the meantime, leave us a review wherever you’re listening to our podcast to improve our visibility to others who can benefit from this content. Share the podcast with friends and colleagues, and subscribe so you don’t miss any content.

Audio provided by Free SFX.

Authentic Leader, Paula Stafford and Lisa Grimes

TSE 796: What Does It Mean to Become an Authentic Leader and How Do I Do It?

Authentic leaders make themselves vulnerable. They value transparency and they connect with their teams. Authentic leaders understand that they must show up and be present in their leadership roles.

In today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we hear from Paula Brown Stafford and Lisa T. Grimes about the importance of authentic leadership. In their book, Remember Who You Are,  they address the trifecta of success, fulfillment, and balance that each of us seeks.

Instead, we should seek to develop a self-awareness and define who we truly are.

  • Authentic leaders are vulnerable. 

Take responsibility when you make mistakes. If you aren’t making mistakes, you likely aren’t pushing the envelope enough.

Connect with your employees. Be human. Be willing to take a chance and put yourself out there. We often try to cover our insecurities instead of owning them. Share your adversity with your team.

  • Authentic leaders are confident.

You will likely be asked to step into a role that feels foreign to you. Maybe you’re asked to be a sales leader despite the fact that others are better at sales.

Confidence develops around risk-taking, failure, and perseverance. When you take risks, fail, and then overcome those failures, you build confidence. Sometimes the person you must prove your abilities to is you.

  • Authentic leaders differentiate themselves.

Find your calling card; something that sets you apart as unique, whether as a sales professional or a leader. Maybe it’s your love of hot sauce that clients remember.

Give people a way to connect with you.

  • Authentic leaders develop self-awareness.

Be honest about your own struggles. If you tend to be defensive in meetings, write the letter “D” on a piece of paper every time you feel defensive. Trace it, rewrite it, decorate it, but don’t stop focusing on that letter until the moment passes in the meeting.

If you’re irritable, make it a letter “I.” Develop self-awareness, and then develop the discipline to address the things you need to fix.

Episode resources:

Learn more about the trifecta and about authentic leadership in Remember Who You Are, available at https://habergeon.com/book/.

“The challenge of leadership is to be strong, but not rude; be kind, but not weak; be bold, but not bully; be thoughtful, but not lazy; be humble, but not timid; be proud, but not arrogant; have humor, but without folly.”

 

Alex Barker, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 559: Sales From The Street: “Confident With My Price”

 

Today, we’re bringing in the Side Hustle Coach, Alex Barker, as he shares his experiences and thoughts and insights into selling based on price and being confident with what you’re charging.

Alex is a pharmacist, a legal drug dealer by day, and had no sales training until 2012 when he became an entrepreneur. He eventually got into coaching helping people build successful businesses.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Alex:

Alex’s major challenges:

Fear of selling his business to people who want to start selling their businesses

Asking for a certain price: Alex’s was selling himself as a consultant to start a podcast for $37 a month! He was all sweaty and nervous and the sales call did not go well.

He kept on questioning what was his worth to someone

Strategies to help you overcome your fear of naming your price:

  1. Write down your prices every single day.

Alex would literally write down his prices for his services every day.

  1. Write down this part of the sales conversation.

Alex would record himself in sales calls and listen again to figure out when he was the most awkward. He then zeroes into that part where he raises the topic of price. So he wrote down word for word what to say.

Once the client feels that you understand what they need and want, then the price part is no longer a hindrance at this point.

  1. Change that mindset and not let anyone else dictate your value.

When you’re in your business, nobody tells you what your value is as opposed to being in a company that tells you their product’s worth. So no one else is going to determine it for you but yourself, otherwise, other people are going to tell you you’re not worth anything.

Results Alex has seen from growing his confidence:

He’s now better able to find the right person to be the client.

Now he’s able to fill his pipeline with clients (the key is to always to talk to people)

Now he’s closing rate is much better and so much higher.

Dreams and goals are priceless. No one can tell you what your dream is worth. What do you think your dreams are worth?

Alex’s Major Takeaway:

Write down your prices until you have the confidence to say so. Keep practicing. Go for No’s. Fall in love with action over results. Winning a sale can be misleading, But if you’re constantly taking action of doing the sales call every day, keep at it, and the results eventually do come

Episode Resources:

Get to know more about Alex on www.alexbarker.co

Secrets of Closing the Sale by Zig Ziglar

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Robert Terson, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 348: Selling Fearlessly

Robert Terson So many salespeople are afraid of selling. They’re afraid to be rejected or they fear criticism and that’s okay. Fear is normal but it’s overcoming your fears that will get you to the level of success that you want to achieve.

I’m bringing Robert Terson on the show today who talks about some great ideas on how you can actually break down that mindset of fear and be able to sell without fear, sell with passion, come well-prepared, and execute it flawlessly.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Robert:

Why do you fear selling?

Fear of criticism

Do you have to be born a great salesperson for you to sell?

Some people are born salespeople. They have a radar that senses the prospect’s emotion as they’re presenting. They easily pick up the prospect’s vibe and they can then confront them. Confront them and that will grab their attention.

Other people will have to work on developing that radar. If you are not born having that radar then work on developing that radar. It will happen.

How to overcome your fear of selling:

  1. Give your best.

Give your Oscar-winning performance.

  1. Success is a by-product of preparation and execution.
  1. Believe in what you’re doing.

Do not allow a prospect or customer to intimidate you.

  1. Believe that you’re bringing value to someone.

It’s your job to show that value. It’s your responsibility to bring that value to the individual.

  1. Be their equal.

Remember that they’re not gods. No matter how arrogant they are, these are just human beings you’re selling to. Don’t let anybody intimidate you. Don’t let anybody abuse you. Meet them in a subservient fashion and you’re dead. It doesn’t matter if they buy or not. If they don’t somebody else will.

How to prepare effectively and execute:

  1. You have to want to succeed that badly.
  2. Success as a triangle:
  • Mental attitude
  • Work habits
  • Knowledge/salesmanship
  1. You never get to a presentation unprepared.

Robert’s Major Takeaway:

Be mentally strong. Be their equal. Do the work. Never cut corners. Be prepared. Ask successful people how they do it. Don’t accept mediocrity. Demand success from yourself.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Robert through his website www.sellingfearlessly.com or send him an email at robert@sellingfearlessly.com.

Robert Terson’s book Selling Fearlessly

Napoleon Hill’s Think and Grow Rich

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

Summer Martin, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Donald Kelly

TSE 171: Sales From The Street- “Sometimes You Have to Walk Away”

Summer Martin, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Donald Kelly Is lack of confidence getting the best of you that you find it difficult to say no to a particular customer or deal? I know there are quotas and all those numbers you’ve got to meet, but sometimes it’s okay to say no. If you deem it’s not the right fit, sometimes you just have to walk away. Let’s find out how today’s guest dealt with this.

Summer Martin has worked at a company for three years now, where she initially focused on operations until finally moving on to the sales side.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Summer:

The biggest challenge Summer has had as a seller and how she overcame the challenge: CONFIDENCE

How Summer overcame this:

She had a client who got hung up on the price and wanted her to match the price of the other competitor but she was able to gather the courage and confidence to say no and walk away.

Insights learned from Summer:

  1. Sometimes you have to walk away.

Do not only convey the value of what you’re bringing to the table, but you also have to know your worth.

  1. If it’s not a fit, whether not a fit for the customer or not a fit for the salesperson, you have to be willing to walk away.

Connect with Summer Martin on LinkedIn or visit her website at www.summercmartin.com or on Twitter @summergory.

Summer’s Major Takeaway:

“All money isn’t good money. Every deal isn’t a good deal. Trust and believe. The right ones always come. Just be patient my friend. And know your worth!”

Overcoming Fear, Rejections, Confidence, Sales Training

TSE 125: Overcome Your Fear Through Persistence and Confidence

Overcoming Fear, Rejections, Confidence, Sales Training “That which we persist in doing becomes easier to do, not that the nature of the thing has changed but that our power to do has increased.” -Ralph Waldo Emerson

Heber J. Grant was also a big proponent of this quote for persistence and tenacity.

Problem:
  • We anticipate things before they happen and since we tend to envision the worst, that translates into poor performances. We are too busy focusing on things that are not REAL that we forgot to focus on the now! Many times these  fears of failure will stop us from performing well in anything else that we do.
One example was when I played flag football in college. I was too focused on getting hit  (the fear of it) or missing the ball, that I would not catch the ball. Worst of all, many times the things that I was most fearful of never actually happened.
 
So it is with sales. We worry about “what ifs” and 9 times out of 10 those “what ifs” NEVER happened. What if the prices is too high, what if they say no, what if I forget what to say or what if he thinks I’m not telling the truth? No one else is thinking about those “what ifs”, but  you. The truth is, those “what ifs” are lies that translate into fear and poor performance.
Solution:
If we however, focus on the positive, we tend to see a better outcome. 
  • Focus on what you need to do right now
  • Practice what you are going to say…say it over and over and over again
  • Practice your body language in front of a mirror so that your body gestures exhibit that of a confident individual
The more confident you sound, the more likely someone else will be confident in the value you claim you have. Overall, take that new found confidence, go out and do BIG THINGS!