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When you've been ghosted

TSE 1318: What To Do When a Prospect “Ghosts” You

When you've been ghostedDuring these uncertain times, salespeople can feel they are being “ghosted” by prospects.  Someone who once seemed like a potential client has vanished with what seems like no hope of reconnecting. When this happens, what can you do?  You’ll find answers in this episode. 

Rian Lanigan graduated college and moved to Australia for a year. When he went back to Ireland, he started his career in sales. After working for other companies, he decided to start his agency to help B2B sales leaders get themselves in front of people more regularly. Rian is working with clients all over the globe including Singapore, Ireland, England, and the United States. 

Defining ghosting

Ghosting is not simply sending an email and not hearing or getting a response. Ghosting is more of already having a meeting with them, arranging for a follow-up, and then they didn’t show up. It’s when you’ve reached out to them multiple times but you didn’t hear a response. It’s not a one and done deal. 

Why you may have been ghosted

When you feel you’ve been ghosted the first question people ask themselves is why. One of the ways people make it easy for others to treat them this way is that sales reps aren’t deliberate about sharing the next steps with prospects. Prospects need to know what to expect after having that initial contact and you need to know if you have someone who sincerely wants to continue a relationship with you. Salespeople can mistakenly believe they have a new client when all they hear is positive feedback. Rian suggests, however, that if you hear positive words, you may need to worry. Positive words don’t mean the prospect has decided to move forward with you. As the sales rep, come up with the next steps that can be mutually agreed upon so you both know where you stand. 

The calendar invite

Rian’s next suggestion is to get your prospects to accept the calendar invite. You can’t expect them to turn into a call if you don’t send them an invitation first. Many salespeople tend to forget this step. People nowadays hate to go to meetings so it’s important you get on their schedule so there’s a lesser chance of cancelation. It’s more important that you ask for time than a meeting. Always ask for more time than you need so when you finish early, you’re able to give their time back to them. You’re Hero of the Day!

To get on the calendar initially, Rian asks prospects to open up their calendar while he’s with them so they can look at availability together.   Once the prospect offers a date and time, you can push back and offer an alternative date and time to appear a busy person. The important thing is for them to confirm on their calendar. 

The next step is a little bolder. After confirming the schedule with them, ask if there is anything that might keep them from making it to the meeting. It lets the prospect know that you’ve scheduled meetings before and you understand things can happen. This can be an unusual occurrence, especially for people who are high up the chain such as CEOs but don’t be afraid of challenging the status quo. 

Make No an acceptable answer

Receiving a no isn’t always a bad thing because it frees you up to chase the yeses. This is one of the biggest lessons Rian has learned. There are three possible outcomes from a phone call that you have with your prospects: Yes,  No, or a Referral. Rian has learned to ask which one it will be by the end of the call.  What makes it easier is when he takes his prospect to Starbucks, Rian says if they close a deal, he’ll pay for coffee.  If they don’t, the client gets to pay.  At the end of the meeting, Rian asks who’s paying for coffee. If the answer is, “The coffee is on you today,” Rian then knows that he’s just closed a deal. As a sales rep, expect to hear a no but understand, It’s typically not a “forever no” but a “no, not now.”

Don’t take anything personally

At the end of the day don’t take anything as personal. It’s just business. Know that there’s a difference between your identity and your role and rejection doesn’t define who you are or your value. It’s important you know the distinction. You can lose a sale and still be an outstanding person. 

On the other hand, don’t be afraid of making it big. You need to be bold and do what others may think is impossible. With confidence and a great mindset, you can! Buyers are trying to gauge if the deal is worth the risk or not. You have a higher chance of closing if the rep believes you believe in yourself and in your product. 

Reconnecting with the prospects

One thing you can do to reconnect with a prospect is to use a different platform. Rian will initially reapproach with a private message once he finds the prospect. Rian understands people can have a change in circumstances such as losing their jobs, moving to another company, and more. Investigate the reasons that may have nothing to do with you.

Another technique Rian will use is telling the prospect that if they don’t respond, he’ll go ahead and close the file.  This has gotten the greatest response.  People, in general, don’t want to hurt anyone’s feelings and will jump to respond to an assumption that may be incorrect. 

Finally, if you’ve been ghosted by someone, there may be some negative residual feelings. If that’s the case, make sure you have someone else read any emails you’re sending out. They will be able to help you gauge the content of your message and can help you correct any emotional imbalance it may contain.

What To Do When a Prospect “Ghosts” You” episode resources 

Connect with Rian Lanigan via his LinkedIn account. If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald directly. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by Crmble, the easy-peasy CRM for Trello that helps you manage your contacts and leads without investing in complicated solutions, sync all your data, manage custom fields, and get powerful reporting on your sales. Try Crmble now for free at www.crmble.com/tse. This course is also brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. It will help them elevate their sales game. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can go and visit www.thesalesevangelist.com/closemoredeals also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Watch on YouTube:

Cold Leads to Hot Leads

TSE 1314: How To Turn Cold Leads Into Hot Prospects

Cold Leads to Hot LeadsWe all have cold leads but they don’t have to stay that way. If worked correctly, cold leads are opportunities waiting to happen. In this episode, we’ll discuss how to turn cold leads into hot prospects. 

Shoan Snoday worked as a representative for Microsoft which allowed him to partner with Danka, Gateway2000, and Dell Computers, writing their system and processes. The last company he worked with representing Microsoft as their marketing manager was a small boutique in San Diego and Southern California. In 2014, Shoan started his own marketing agency. His new career enabled him to work side by side with Jeff Walker, Frank Kern, and other big names in the marketing space. He is also a marketing digital partner with the largest traffic and conversions and he’s a partner with Infusionsoft who has over 600 employees. 

Shoan also has a podcast called Automation Rehab where he works with some of the top marketers and salespeople in the world. A lot of his guests have spoken on big stages such as Social Media Examiner, Icon, GKIC, and more. 

The difficulty in the cold process

Top salespeople can establish a system that makes it difficult to see new opportunities. Cold prospecting can be like that unless you lean into new patterns of communicating. Once these new campaigns are shown and executed it can bring new life, even into the most seasoned salespeople.  

With new technology, it’s getting harder to make contact in the more traditional ways. For example, a new feature on the iPhone will make it so that anyone calling who isn’t on the contact list will automatically get sent to voicemail. Shoan tells his team to text their prospects before they call so they get a heads-up the call is coming. With a text, the pick-up rate is much higher. When they reply to your text, then you have an engagement which is the goal.  

 Getting that engagement 

Sloan believes traditional  “snail mail” is being underutilized. Shoan has a flash drive with only a 2GB memory that he sends his prospects. In it, he has a “Read Me First” text. This way, regardless of the device the prospect is using, he’ll be able to read it. It’s a text file that explains the content of the flash drive. It has an introduction video and a .pdf document that serves as the lead magnet. You are going to build value in that .pdf by adding links to set an appointment with you, some sales training video series, or your website, landing page, or contact page. 

Once this USB package has been put together, Shoan shoots the prospect an email telling them about a lumpy envelope that is coming with the flash drive in it. He then calls or texts the prospects reminding them of mail they’ll be getting. The admin then calls again,  checking on the prospect and making sure that they did get the lumpy mail. This is what “coming from all angles” means. They are following up without being annoying. 

Aggressive vs Assertive

There is a difference between being aggressive and being assertive. When the prospect replies that he got the lumpy mail, asking a question like, “Well, did you read it?” is an example of being aggressive. This is not a welcoming query for the prospect. You’ll want to train your admin and give them a script to follow. 

 If you still aren’t able to get the prospect using the lumpy mail, your next strategy is sending a second envelope with testimonials. The testimonials will help in building value. Along with the testimonials is a data-driven dashboard. You admin will again send a text or an email confirming if they got the mail or not. This particular campaign is a 30-Day strategy. 

Overcome the learning curve

Many salespeople say that The Lumpy Envelope strategy is something they haven’t tried before but it’s proven to be effective. Shoan offers five tools to add to your marketing arsenal and these are things that most salespeople already have. There are the lead magnet and a series of PDF files on the training about their products and services. There’s also the testimonials which are also a marketing tool. You can ask your previous clients to write a testimonial or write them yourself and ask for permission to attach a client’s name. Shoan did this for his book Fill your Wellness Center Overnight. 

Reach out to people

The pandemic has affected so many industries and many people in sales say this is a bad time. Shoan has a different opinion. He suggests that this is the best time to reach out to people. In sales, we don’t want somebody else to call our prospects. This is the best time to be in front of people, even when it’s just virtually. Now is the time to prospect as others hide.  Thrive in this vacuum by reaching out to clients. Now is a perfect time. They’re in their homes and they have the time to talk to you. This is called the re-engagement phase. You can do this for all those cold prospects in your database. These are the people who never came on board. 

Think of selling like dating. We need to court our prospects.  We don’t want to make the call and offer our products right away. We need to ease into it and woo our prospects in becoming clients. This goes for re-approaching clients who moved onto another company as well. With less new leads, rediscover old interactions. 

How To Turn Cold Leads Into Hot Prospects” episode resources 

Connect with your current clients right now and engage them. Make a survey and ask them to rate your service from 1-10. Those people who answered 6 and below, call them and ask them what’s wrong. For those who said 90 or above, ask them for a referral. Keep talking to people and keep engaging. 

Reach out to Shoan Snoday on LinkedIn. If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald directly. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by Crmble, the easy-peasy CRM for Trello that helps you manage your contacts and leads without investing in complicated solutions, sync all your data, manage custom fields, and get powerful reporting on your sales. Try Crmble now for free at www.crmble.com/tse. This course is also brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. It will help them elevate their sales game. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can go and visit www.thesalesevangelist.com/closemoredeals also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Watch on YouTube:

Double your cold-calling prospects

TSE 1308:How to Double Your Cold-Calling Contacts

Double your cold-calling prospectsCold-calling has always been part of the sales process. Many salespeople can struggle with this aspect of the job but it’s a critical part of gaining new prospects. The more you call, the greater the odds that they will turn into great leads.

David Walter ran a call center for thirteen years and is currently a coach. He is also the author of the book, The Million Dollar Rebuttal and Stratospheric Lead Generation Secrets. David also worked with the American Bank i, and then helped his father sell million-dollar HVAC equipment. The recession then hit, however, and David had to look for another job. 

David reads a lot as part of his training and personal development. He credits his exposure to quality books as being a catalyst to the life he has today.  With the culmination of his experience and knowledge, David has been able to revolutionize the concept of cold-calling from the ground up.

Mistakes salespeople make

David did training with SDRs in Plano and made a video series to help them learn more about cold-calling. When they were doing their calls, however, they were just calling the wrong numbers and weren’t getting anywhere. They weren’t able to make any useful contacts. Based on a study, 70% of contact information is incorrect and 55% of the people you call may not be available to talk to. These “dead” numbers can eat up a sales rep’s valuable hours. However, David assures us all is not lost. 

During David’s years in the call center, he was always on the hunt for the perfect list. The lists were supposed to be verified but he found that it wasn’t the case. He learned his lesson and decided to release the idea of a perfect list. Instead, he opted for a basic format with the names of the companies and put it in a simple CRM like Crmble. He also developed a script that he still uses to get “gatekeepers” to provide needed information. He did this by listening to natural calls and getting back to the basics.  

For example, David used to work with a distributorship and it involved him answering calls. He noticed that if a person just used the first name when asking for a contact, the caller sounded more confident and there was an air of authority and familiarity that he’d immediately respond to. David realized he could use this “first name” technique to qualify contacts.


Ask the basic questions first

David also observed that people often have an easier time if you ease them into answering a series of questions. Confirming an address is an easy way to get someone to open up. Ask your way into more information little by little.  

David will typically start at LinkedIn when qualifying for a new company.  Oftentimes, LinkedIn has the most updated information about the company name and can access a list of employees to know who he should call.

Cold-calling is not a numbers game

Many salespeople perceive cold-calling as the hardest part of the job. In truth, cold-calling can be at the same level as other activities if looked at in the right way. With anything worth doing, it may seem hard at first but with practice and the right instruction, it becomes easier. 

In Will Smith’s movie, The Pursuit of Happiness, Will’s character didn’t call his list from top to bottom. What he did was skip names and call randomly. While Walter Ribbon didn’t buy from Will, he got invited to a game where Will Smith was able to build a network with important people. Just know that if your goal is to make an appointment with 15 people, you need to call at least 40 people.

Qualifying your data

Qualifying data is important so salespeople aren’t wasting their time. The key to cold-calling is to keep calling the companies at least three to four times a day within 3-4 days. Sales reps hesitate to do this because they’re afraid of burning the list but if you do it the right way, this can be avoided. The way not to burn your list is to make your calls short and as natural as possible.    

In addition to using the first name method,  don’t leave a voicemail. Leaving a voicemail can be the cause of burning a list. Keep your call short and sweet and change your opening with each call. 

The other strategy David uses is, “Hey, I’m calling for Donald but he’s probably gone for the day.” David mimics a negative attitude that most gatekeepers have and uses it to position them to offer something positive.  They will often want to counteract the negativity.

Give that chill attitude 

David also discovered that the less you seem to care, the more people will give you what you need. You don’t want to sound desperate over the phone. With a more laid back attitude, you will be more likely to talk to the person you want to talk to.

Prospects have needs 

Most prospects don’t actually believe they need to change. Looking for prospects who know their needs can be like looking for a needle in a haystack yet this is what salespeople are looking for. What can you do as a sales rep? You can realize they are not saying No, they’re saying that they are comfortable with what they have; however, that doesn’t rule out the possibility they need to make a change. 

The Power Habit book talked about a remarkable story about Febreze. When it was first launched, the product failed even though it was a good one. They sent researchers out to figure out the reason why. They visited one homeowner with cats in her house. When they entered the house, the putrid smell of cats overwhelmed them. Despite the homeowner using the product, however, the scent remained. The problem was the homeowner couldn’t smell it because she’d gotten used to the smell of her own cats. Prospects can be like these cat owners. They are so used to the same process, they don’t even smell a problem anymore. Your job is to reveal a better alternative and offer something better. Even when they are happy with what they have, you can still offer improvements.


How to Double Your Cold-Calling Contacts” episode resources

Reach out to David Walter via his LinkedIn account. You can also read his books to understand cold-calling more! 

If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald directly. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by Crmble, the easy-peasy CRM for Trello that helps you manage your contacts and leads without investing in complicated solutions, sync all your data, manage custom fields, and get powerful reporting on your sales. Try Crmble now for free at www.crmble.com/tse. This course is also brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. It will help them elevate their sales game. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can go and visit www.thesalesevangelist.com/closemoredeals also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Anton Van Rhyn, Cold Email, Email Prospecting

TSE 1218: How To Write A Cold Email Your Prospect Will Open And Reply To

Anton Van Rhyn, Cold Email, Email ProspectingThe cold email has been part of the sales process for a very long time but how do you actually write a cold email that your prospect will open and reply to?

Anton van Rhyn is the CEO and founder of the company Wavo,  a cold email platform that helps salespeople automate email outreach and follow-up. He also built Huron, a company for outbound prospecting and service. Anton has used both his software development experience and sales development experience to fine-tune the email automation platform. 

A cold email automation platform 

Anton built a cold email automation platform in order to assist sales representatives to relieve them of these more mundane tasks. The platform creates a sequence for the machine to follow. It can reach out to prospects and follow up in a way that looks like human effort. The tool is very efficient in that it focuses on making initial contacts while it frees up sales reps to focus on their demos and talking to people. 

Anton’s company has been utilizing email for three and a half years. Their previous experience came from being a prospecting service where they used emails to contact different verticals and industries. regardless of company size. 

Email makes it easy to prospect because most people today already use email. It is reminiscent of the cold calls used in the past. Cold calling was effective because most people were already sitting at their desks and ready to pick up a phone call. Today, very few people own office phones. Businesses have resorted to using emails to reach their clients. It’s become one of the most powerful channels to engage with prospects. 

Emails that don’t work 

Using a template in making cold emails is one of the reasons why this strategy often fails. In the U.S. alone, the phrase cold email template is searched for around 200,000 times a month in Google. Mail servers create a hashing algorithm to identify email content and using these algorithms, servers can quickly identify these emails as spam. 

The other reason why cold emails are failing is that some people in the email list aren’t interested and just flag your email as spam. 

When you’re using the cold email templates, it’s very easy for emails to go straight to spam. 

Over time, Anton’s company developed a framework in using cold email, calling it the 1-2 punch. It’s a series of emails to address a topic. After some time, another mail is sent to revisit the topic sent two emails ago. It’s important to give the recipient a break. 

Use a good subject

It’s important to use a good subject when creating a cold email so it seems you are really writing to someone. A subject line that looks like a headline from an ad stands out to people. Even when the email isn’t flagged as spam, or ends up in the Promotions Tab, the receiver will still likely not open it because nobody likes being sold to. An ad is off-putting.

Google and Gmail Suite are also getting smarter by the day. They check your inbox and look at how people engage with your emails. A sender who gets replies gets a higher score than sanders whose emails don’t get opened and responded to. 

As a salesperson who is using emails to reach their clients, find smart ways to get them to reply. One trick Anton suggests is to include a way for people to unsubscribe. For example, “Hey, if you don’t want to hear from me again, please reply to this email with your request to unsubscribe,” or some other variation.  

Anton’s clients have seen how using this trick improved their engagement rate. While there are some who reply unsubscribe, they also see positive responses coming back as well.

At the end of the day, your goal is to make your cold emails sound more human to get the other person to respond. 

When you write a cold email that your prospect will open, the three word-subject line works well. You can email your list with no more than a three-word subject line and talk about the value proposition. 

Talk about the quarter’s results or related subject clients may find interesting. 

A quick question subject line is the most overused subject there is but it has 40-60% open rates. This shows just how effective a short subject line is.

The body of the email

You can write a cold email that your prospect will open by building a series of two emails. The first email shouldn’t be longer than three sentences. Salespeople often make the mistake of putting everything in their mail. They try to explain every value proposition and all the information about what they’re selling. 

Explain the most important things in three lines: 

  • Who you are
  • Why you’re reaching out
  • The relevance of your product/services to your prospect 

Anton observed that trying to get the conversation started is what matters. It’s equally important to give the prospect of breathing room regardless if they respond or not. After two days, send them another email as a reminder. You can also add some social proof in your second email to tell them who you’ve worked with and how the partnership produced good results. Build on that sequence and wait another week to create an additional one-two punch email. 

If there is no reply then give it another week or two to give the prospect breathing room and time to forget. You can then start the process again. 

You can continue this sequence as long as you deem effective. 

Scheduling effectively 

Google has implemented many ways in detecting cold email these days as the use of cold email starts to proliferate. In the early days, using cold email was very effective when sent by batch before and after office hours. It let people do their jobs in the middle of the day and then emails were sent before they got into the office after they left. 

In the last months, this strategy hasn’t been performing very well. This is due to the spike of activities during the 6:00 AM – 9:00 AM and 5:00 AM-9:00 PM window. People tend to get busy in those times and end up not doing much during the day. 

Anton’s team is changing its approach and adapting to peoples’ activities. It’s counterintuitive to what they’ve done in the past but it’s proving to be effective today. Sending the emails by batch in the times when people aren’t too busy has become their automating signature. They rewrote the scheduler in a way that emails are sent consistently throughout the hours between 9:00 AM-5:00 PM, rather than sending all the emails as quickly as possible in just one time. 

This has proven a preferable schedule for delivery. 

When sending cold emails, remember these few things:

  • Introduce yourself, your reason for mailing, and state why this is relevant to them 
  • Keep the email short
  • Have a very quick call to action
  • Your goal is to start a conversation

Scheduling tools such as Calendly are also helpful especially if you get a reply showing interest. This is the perfect time to send your Calendly link. 

“How To Write A Cold Email Your Prospect Will Open And Reply To” episode resources

Contact Anton Van Rhyn via his mail anton@wavo.co. They are also giving out PDFS of their frameworks at wavo.co/tse. 

You can also reach out to Donald via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook for any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

This podcast is also brought to you in part by Reveal the Revenue Intelligence podcast. It’s about utilizing data to make business decisions instead of just guessing your way through major sales decisions. Visit gong.io for their podcast. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

TSE 1145: Flip the Script


Oren Klaff

Many sellers rely on old ideology to engage their customers without realizing that if they flip the script, they can set the rules for the sale instead of conforming to the buyer’s rules.

Oren Klaff is the author of Pitch Anything, a required reading throughout Silicon Valley, Wall Street, and Fortune 500 companies. Oren is the world’s leading expert on sales, raising capital, and negotiation and has written for Harvard Business Review, Advertising Age Entrepreneur, among others. He is also an investing partner in a $2 million private equity investment fund and loves motorcycles. Oren is about to release his follow-up book entitled, Flip the Script.

Raising money for companies  

There is very little flexibility in most meetings, in that what happens in the first few minutes determines the outcome of the whole thing. The pitch is very important because there are high stakes in every presentation. It’s expensive to travel to presentations, so you have to get everything right the first time. 

Making a pitch is like a surgery. There’s no room for error. 

A pitch is a pitch regardless of the value: $1,000, $5,000, $100,00, $10 million, or $15 million. An account is an account.

This is what Oren does. He invests in companies, buys companies, and he trains the salespeople in these companies to raise money. He knows this works because companies tell him that their sales averages have doubled, that they’re closing deals, and that they’re raising money effectively. He isn’t an academic who dives into the numbers and writes a study about it. He is the one who dives in and takes action. 

Pitch is everything 

You walk into the boardroom where there is a lot of money at stake and you give the pitch. The next five minutes determine the outcome of the meeting. In sales, if you don’t win the deal, you just go to the next one. In a given fund-raising project, you might be trying to raise $10 million for a company and have only 10 pitches to do it. You have to learn it, give it, and raise the money. If you don’t, it’s a catastrophic failure. 

You do what you can to give a pitch that will help you win your sales situation. 

Pitch Anything shares all the things Oren learned from all the pitches and high-stakes situations over 20 years and teaches how to apply the exact same rules to everyday business. Whether you’re taking part in a sales meeting, doing sales over the phone, or recording presentations for a webinar, the book teaches how to win in everyday sales situations. 

Pitch Anything sold a million copies and the follow-up book, Flip the Script, shows you how to do the things you never would have thought possible.

Writing ‘Flip the Script’

Oren has seen people put his concepts into practice: how to open a meeting, how to raise your status, how to control the frame, and how to lead the buyer to a purchasing decision, and how to build your status so high that people will be desperate to buy your product. Even when people are trained, we still make mistakes. This is what Oren has seen and he believes that the follow-up book is going to change the world. 

Inception 

Oren said that most people wouldn’t recognize his techniques as the way to conduct sales. For example, Oren met with a guy who wanted help in selling his company. They discussed the terms and proposals for 45 minutes. After that, he left and then came back 90 seconds later, which usually isn’t good. You don’t want people to leave just to walk back into the conference room. But when he came back, he had a check ready for $15,000. 

When someone decides that even with no contract, no agreement, and no terms, he’s committed to working with you, this is inception. It happens when the buyer decides internally to do business with you and starts taking things forward. It doesn’t demand price negotiations, because you’ve positioned all the information in such a way that the decision to work with you bubbles up inside them. 

Buyers are cold and digital. They want information, pricing, and a cheaper and better version. There’s no buyer loyalty and they are never satisfied. 

When you order food for a group who’s working late in the conference room, you open the door wide enough to grab the food. There’s no tip and no humans involved. This is what buyers are today.

The conspiracy suggests that you can take that kind of buyer and try to close them by overcoming their objections and selling them, but people aren’t sold. 

We should forget the thought that we can sell to people because that’s not the truth today. People don’t want to be sold, they want to buy. 

Getting started with inception 

Begin by buying the book because it’s where you learn about how to get a buyer to inception. It’s where you are setting up the framework, and leading them through it. 

Next is to recognize that the videos, books, and all the standard knowledge today that are out there represent 40-year-old technology. You aren’t using a 40-year-old phone or a 40-year-old car because life is totally different than it was 40 years ago. Buyers needed you then but they don’t need you anymore because they have the internet. and know that it’s not your fault that you’re being trained on information that is decades old. 

Ask yourself who benefits from the notion that you can overcome objections by selling features and benefits and by providing discounts.

There is a trend, a recurring theme in the market that says “I deserve to get what you sell for free.” Recognize that this trend is out there. Flip the Script will walk you through specific steps that will help you recognize why these concepts don’t work. 

Becoming reliable 

Features and benefits don’t matter until your prospect understands three things:

  • that you’re an expert
  • that what you do is incredibly hard
  • that your product matters in the context of survival of companies

You have to make sure that you are an expert and that you speak their language. They must believe that this is incredibly hard and that nobody else can do it at the level you’re doing it. Lastly, you need to put in a survival context or you change the context. 

There is no point in explaining the features and benefits until all that is baked in., you try to establish all those three things mentioned earlier then you explain the benefits. 

There are probably other vendors who will be pitching the same things and they’ll start with the benefits and the features. You need to be different by coming in and showing that you’re an expert in the industry. Build your character and the character of your business then you go to the features and benefits. 

Power of plain vanilla 

Oren likes to commoditize everyone. Among Microsoft, Oracle, Google Services, and Amazon, they’re all the same stuff. The offerings in the market are plain vanilla, and his company offers the same stuff, too. 

Once you commoditize everybody, you can build the “power of working with me.” Everybody in the industry that you’d be looking at offers nearly identical services at the baseline. Avoid the confusing comparison of features and benefits. Commoditize the competition so that you don’t have to deal with them. You can commoditize your competition and build on that. 

Welcome the anxiety 

Flip the Script includes only new sales information that isn’t available in any other sales book. If the information was presented elsewhere, Oren didn’t include it in his book. As a result, though, there’s a sense of anxiety because it’s all too new.

Take a driverless car. It’s new, it’s cool, and it drives you from your home to your office and across the country. It’s interesting, but are you really going to buy a car without a steering wheel or brakes? Maybe you’d wait for other people to buy it and use it for a year and see what happens.

The highly differentiated features and benefits may also trigger anxiety. The same is true in this industry. We offer additional features that may create anxiety. There is reluctance and we shouldn’t forget that people are like sheep sometimes: we want to follow right behind others. 

In today’s complicated world, if you create something new, people would be interested and at the same time, be anxious. 

Positioning things on a trend

You must learn how to position things on a trend. For example, the trend today is gearing toward AI and machine learning and security hacks. 

Winter is coming. There’s an event in every industry that changes the trend of that particular industry. In real estate, it’s tax and regulation. In consumer devices it’s privacy. You should know that to be able to ride the changing waves. 

For example, when stadium seating came to theaters and stadiums, it wiped out every normal theater. Oren calls it the “nuclear winter” for typical seating. If you were selling anything to a theater during that time, you’d say, “stadium seating is coming, and if you haven’t made that adjustment before then your business won’t survive.” 

Similar to Game of Thrones, when they say Winter is Coming, it means something is coming that is going to change the world and people must believe it and act in order to survive. The same is true in business. Believe that something is coming to your industry and know how to operate on the other side of it. 

Flip the Script 

Buyers have a formula that they impose on you. Flipping the script means you are showing the buyer how they get to buy from you. You are giving them the formula by which they’re allowed to buy from you. 

You don’t control your buyer, you give them options. You flip the usual “do this and do that” speech and instead, sit down with the buyer and present options of how things work. Set a sandbox that the buyer is allowed to play in. 

This is why it’s important for them to know that you speak their language. that you’re an expert, and that what you do is incredibly hard to do. It is important that they know that you have the value or the product or the idea that when the change is finally settling in, you are the one they want to work with. You are setting up the formula that they’re allowed to buy. But you only work with a certain kind of people.

If they end up not buying from you, it means they weren’t right for you. They weren’t going to pay that price where you could have margin, they weren’t going to do reorders, and they weren’t going to be easy customers. 

When you control the formula, it becomes incredibly obvious that they were never going to be a good account.

“Flip the Script” episode resources

Sales leaders can go to FlipTheScriptBonus to see Chapter 1 and get an example of how to do inception. There are basic rules there that are also discussed in this episode. 

You can also connect with Oren via his website where he has some great blog contents and amazing articles. Hear our first conversation with Oren here

Check the TSE Certified Sales Program while you’re at it, while the first two modules are absolutely free. We want you to find the right customers, close deals, and go out every single day doing big things.

This episode is brought to you in part by Audible. Sign up now to get a book for free and enjoy its 30-day free trial. It’s also brought to you by TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a guide for sales reps in finding better prospects, making more meaningful conversations, and knowing the right questions to ask to close a powerful deal. Check it out and give the two free episodes a try. 

 If you enjoyed this episode, we’d appreciate your review and thumbs up on If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and other platforms you use. You can also subscribe to our podcast and share it with your friends and colleagues. 

Bob Burg, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1128: Developing A Go-Giver Strategy!

 

Bob Burg, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistThe most financially profitable way to do business is to shift your focus from getting to giving, and by developing a Go-Giver strategy, you’ll constantly provide value and good things will begin to happen. 

Bob Burg is a salesman who has written a series of books about the Go-Giver, a parable about the principles behind the kind of success most sellers are hoping to achieve. Through encounters with a series of different people, the main character, Joe, discovers that his focus has been in the wrong place. 

Giving too much

Giving means providing value to others. Though it’s typically not possible to provide too much value, begin by determining whether your focus on providing value will set you up to be taken advantage of. There are plenty of people who are takers and who focus only on themselves. They feel entitled to take without giving anything back. 

If you’re providing value to someone like that, there’s a good chance things won’t work out.  Realize, though, that there’s no natural connection between being a go-giver and being taken advantage of. Understand, too, that if you’re being taken advantage of, it isn’t because you’re too nice; it’s because you’re allowing it to happen.

Being a go-giver doesn’t mean being a martyr or a doormat. It simply means your focus is on bringing value to the marketplace and to others. 

No one will buy from you because you need the money or you have a quota to meet. They’ll buy because they will be better off buying from you. 

Focus on value

The only reason people should buy from you is because they’ll be better off after they do. That truth allows the salesperson or entrepreneur to focus on bringing immense value to the marketplace and to the prospect’s life. When that happens, the prospect will prosper greatly. 

Money is simply an echo of value. Focus on the value rather than the money. Value comes first and the money you receive is a natural result of the value you provided. 

Human nature is self-interested. It allows us to create more human beings. 

Successful people deal in truth. They don’t deny inconvenient things, but rather they acknowledge truth and then work within it to make things better. 

Start by acknowledging and understanding self-interest. Then put it aside with the understanding that we’re better off dealing with others when we suspend our self-interest. The other person is only going to buy because of their own needs. 

Value without attachment

Although people often suggest you should give without expecting anything in return, Bob doesn’t exactly agree with that. Instead, give value without attachment to the result. We want people to expect good things. If you’re in business serving other people, you should expect to profit greatly because you’re bringing value to the marketplace. Just don’t be attached to that result. 

Give value because it’s who you are and what you do. When that happens you create a benevolent context for success. You develop great relationships with people who feel good about you. They know you, they like you, and they trust you, and they want to be part of your business. 

Develop an army of personal walking ambassadors who will refer business to you. 

Starting point

Imagine you decide at this point to change your ways. Start by asking who the people are in your network and what you can provide to them that will help them by bringing value to their lives. Then make a plan for meeting other people that you can develop know-like-and-trust relationships with. 

We’re human beings and we’re different types of people. The reason the Go-Giver took off is because it allows you to be yourself. You can be the person who wants to bring value to the marketplace. 

Most people choose a certain line of work because they believe in the mission. They believe in what they’re doing. We’re happy when we’re living congruently with our values. 

Go-Giver origins

Bob recalls his parents working to make people’s lives better. Then, when he started in sales, he found himself selling a product that offered great value, but he was focused largely on the sales process. Like Joe in the book, he was a seller who wasn’t living up to his potential. 

He returned from a non-selling appointment one day to hear advice from a guy in his organization. The typically-silent guy told him that if he wanted to make a lot of money in business, he should establish a target outside of making money. 

Target serving others, so that when you hit your target, you’ll get a reward in the form of money. Great salesmanship is about the other person and how he’ll benefit from your product or service. 

Economic downturn

Bob heard from a roofer during an economic crisis who recognized that his approach had been wrong. He was trying to save money during the downturn, but he realized that instead of trying to give the least he could for the money, he needed to focus on giving more value. 

It didn’t necessarily mean spending more, but rather creating a better experience. His business took off as a result. 

Technology has leveled off the playing field. We live in a commodity-based society which isn’t necessarily bad. It does mean that you must distinguish yourself. If you sell a widget that your customer can’t distinguish one from the other, it will always come down to price. If you sell on low price, you’re a commodity. If you sell on high value, you’re a resource. 

Communicating value

There are likely hundreds of way to communicate value, but Bob boils it down to five elements of value. 

  1. Excellence
  2. Consistency
  3. Attention
  4. Empathy
  5. Appreciation

To the degree that you can communicate these things to your customer, that’s the degree to which you take price and competition out of the picture. 

Begin with leadership, and with a leader who is totally committed to making this part of the culture. Anyone can lead from anywhere but culture trickles down from the top. If the leader invests in this and gets buy-in from other leaders, it becomes part of the culture. 

Bob Chapman of Barry-Wehmiller wrote a book called Everybody Matters in which he recalls running a profit-focused company. Though there is nothing wrong with profit, it must be sustainable, so it must be the result of the value you provide. Bob attended the wedding of his best friend’s daughter, and the father of the bride made a toast. He acknowledged that the groom was marrying a treasured daughter. Bob took that same concept to his business. 

Barry-Wehmiller has thousands of employees, all of whom are someone’s treasured sons and daughters. When the economic downturn emerged, rather than lay off any one employee, they came together as a company and traded work days. They stopped putting into the company savings account until the crisis was over. The corporate family came together in a crunch. 

Heart level

Herb Kelleher of Southwest Airlines understood the concept and he restructured the organization to focus first on allowing employees to thrive, learn, grow, and have fun. His team had a higher sense of purpose in their jobs. 

As a result, the team takes care of the customers and the customers take care of the shareholders. 

Until you know there’s a problem that needs to be fixed, you’ll never take the steps to address it. 

Be willing to shift your focus. 

When Bob’s business partner sends a sales letter, he makes an effort to take the “I,” “me,” and “we,” out of the letter. We’re self-interested human beings and we write in terms of how great we are and how great the product is. 

We aren’t denying self-interest. We’re acknowledging that you have to work at placing  your focus on others. 

“Developing A Go-Giver Strategy” episode resources

You can find Bob’s podcast, The Go-Giver Podcast, at his website. You can also grab samples chapters of his books before you buy them. Consider subscribing to his list to get a copy of a written resource called Endless Prospects

The Go-Giver way teaches you to build relationships with solid step-by-step information. 

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump. If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. 

Tools for sellers

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Value, Education

TSE 1092: Building Interest In Something When The Customer Isn’t Looking

Value, EducationSellers who discover how to be successful without a marketing department, in a crowded marketplace, and when the customer isn’t even looking will be successful in almost any circumstances.

I got a question from a listener named Jon Billings who wanted to know how he could teach people who “don’t know what they don’t know.” For instance, if the customer isn’t looking because he doesn’t know he has a problem, how do I communicate that?

Especially in the case of sellers who don’t have access to a marketing department, how is that even possible?

Educate

Your goal is to educate your prospects so that they will look to you instead of your competition when they need help solving a problem.

Educating is the new sales. Regardless of the industry, you’re in, your marketplace is likely crowded.

  • How do you stand out from the competition?
  • How do you help customers recognize you as a differentiator?

You have to challenge the status quo, especially when many of your prospects already have solutions or they don’t realize the existence of a problem.

Build Community

Become a content producer.

Even if you have a marketing department, you should have your own individual brand. Take that brand with you wherever you go.

Even if you change industries, your brand goes with you.

Answer questions

Write down the top 10 questions that customers ask you or that prospects bring up in conversation. Whether they center around cost or service, answer those questions in the form of sharable content.

You can write a blog or produce a podcast. Even better, you can create a LinkedIn article or video.

Focus on the problem while you’re answering the question.

For example, what other issues could your prospect focus on if he outsourced his IT services to your company? What opportunity costs exist?

Differentiate

My friend Kyle invited me to do a LinkedIn Live with him recently and we recorded an episode with him for our show as well.

Kyle told us about how he started sharing videos on YouTube answering questions, and though the videos weren’t very fancy in his estimation, someone reached out to him from Coca Cola with an opportunity for him.

He’s in the tech industry, and though there are countless other tech firms out there that are sending out RFPs. Kyle decided to be different, and it grabbed people’s attention.

Tap into brains

You won’t want to pitch your prospects right away. Instead, connect with them and ask for their assistance. Maybe you’re looking to write a LinkedIn article about things that the directors of large companies dislike and you’d like input from people who are filling those roles.

Get one tip from 10 people, and then when you post the article, tag all of the people who contributed. They’ll see your post, they’ll likely see your profile, and they’ll likely see your website.

Now, when you ask for a chance to introduce yourself in the future, they’ll be more likely to at least give you a chance since you connected on LinkedIn.

Potential ideas

Even if you don’t have the benefit of written case studies, you may have some client testimonials or some stories you can tell. Talk about the problems your clients once had and highlight how you helped them solve those problems.

Now that you’ve written an article about the 10 things that directors of large companies dislike, you could also pitch podcast hosts with the idea.

You’ll be educating more people and becoming a thought leader. But you must create content around the things that people want to hear.

If you’re doing the same things every week and you’re seeing a diminishing return, put a little more effort in. You’ll be on your way to building interest in something when the customer isn’t looking.

“When The Customer Isn’t Looking” episode resources

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Email, Prospecting, Value

TSE 1082: Your Emails Give No Value

Email, Prospecting, ValueWhen your prospects find 100 new email messages waiting for them on Monday morning, if your emails give no value, your prospects will never open them.

If there’s nothing in the subject line or the first sentence of the message to grab their attention, your prospects will probably never even open the message. Sellers must give thought to what their first sentence is saying to uncover how their emails are performing.

Preview

Consider your own email inbox.

You’re busy. You don’t have time to read every single email that arrives in your inbox. If you’ve got 100 new messages waiting, you’re not going to read them all. You’ll travel the path of least resistance by eliminating as many as possible.

In the book The Transparency Sale: How Unexpected Honesty and Understanding the Buying Brain Can Transform Your Results, Todd Caponi highlights several things to be aware of when sending emails.

Email content

The subject line is crucial, so your goal is to minimize it as much as possible. Get to the point quickly with as few words as possible.

Make sure the first sentence of your email relates to the subject line and make sure it has nothing to do with you. Avoid statements like “I have something I want to share with you,” or “My company helps clients who…”

Avoid including sentences that, when you think about them, simply aren’t helpful. “I hope this message finds you doing well.” “I hope your quarter is going great.” These are both fillers and they won’t compel anyone to open the email.

If you’re using the same content and the same statements as other sellers, your emails give no value, and no one will open them.

Truth

One of the worst mistakes you can make is using a subject line that has nothing to do with the email content itself.

If you bait your reader in with one idea and then switch ideas within the email, you’ll probably get black-listed. At best, you’ll get sent to the spam folder so you’re toast forever.

Do something totally different. Personalize your message and don’t include a huge pitch in your first email.

Think about it from your buyer’s standpoint. He has countless sellers reaching out to sell him something, and many of them are sharing similar messages. What if your first sentence offered something to help him?

Consider this example from Todd.

He got an email from a seller who recognized that he was a CEO who had to create and give presentations. The seller provided a PowerPoint template he could use to present metrics and then another template he could use to create a sales handbook.

The sender gave no information about himself or his company. The only reference was information in the signature block that Todd could access if he was interested.

Value

Buyers aren’t stupid. If you send a helpful, beneficial email, I’ll like go to your site. Even if I don’t need your product right now, I’ll know where to go in the future.

Give something of value. Provide some education. Think of it from the buyer’s standpoint. Give him something that will help him be more effective and efficient in his role.

When you give value, provide something that will address a problem that your ideal customer struggles with. It doesn’t even have to be something you’re an expert in, and in fact, that sometimes makes it more genuine.

Imagine I sell HR software to HR directors. If you send a document titled 5 Things HR Directors Should Consider When Selecting A Software, he’ll smell the bias from 10 miles away. If I provide something beneficial that isn’t in my wheelhouse, they’ll recognize that I’m not trying to sell something.

The goal is to build interaction by getting him to respond and open a dialog.

Dialog

If the thing you’re sharing will benefit him even if he doesn’t buy your product, go ahead and share that with your prospect. Just don’t make it gimmicky.

Give something that has value and then connect other places like on LinkedIn or over the phone. Many of us are stuck in the mindset that a single email will open the door to a deal.

Focus on the content you’re sharing. Focus on the type of content and how it applies to him as an individual. Then focus on how you can make his life easier.

Create emails that prospects will want to open so you can build meaningful conversations and then ask effective questions. #ColdOutreach

“Your Emails Give No Value” episode resources

Grab a copy of the book The Transparency Sale: How Unexpected Honesty and Understanding the Buying Brain Can Transform Your Results by Todd Caponi.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Forster Perelsztejn, Prospect.io, Cold Email, Cold Email Process, Donald Kelly

TSE 961: How Do I Create A Cold Email Outreach Process?

Forster Perelsztejn, Prospect.io, Cold Email, Cold Email Process, Donald Kelly

Processes allow us to work a campaign from end to end. They help us know how to follow up and what to say and how to proceed rather than just shooting from the hip. On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Forster Perelsztejn of prospect.io talks about the importance of a campaign for purposes of cold email outreach.

Forster shares why we have to be consistent and what we need to say in our emails so we can connect with our potential customers.

Why campaigns?

In order to successfully carry out a campaign, you must understand why you need it and how you’re going to do it. Also, make sure to set up a professional business email account when you do your outreach, you will look so much more legitimate. I know it sounds simple, but you would be amazed how often sellers neglect doing this properly.

But your cold email outreach campaign must fit into your funnel.

Maybe you need social media ads or door-to-door selling. Start by figuring out the best sources of customers for your product or service.

Then, decide how you’ll do your campaign.

There are three main stages to building one.

1. Identify who your target is.

Your target will define everything that’s going to follow so you must know who you’re trying to reach. Narrow your focus to certain targets.

2. Segment your list of targets.

Even though all your targets will presumably benefit from your product, they may not all benefit in the same way. They won’t need your product for the same reasons so you may have to use different selling points.

3. Craft a relevant message.

4. Measure everything.

After you’ve created a message, test its effectiveness. Create campaigns and then track how well they are performing.

You can make decisions about your campaign moving forward once you understand how well things are working.

First contact

Don’t be long-winded in your first contact or spend a lot of time introducing yourself or your product.

Don’t waste my time by writing, “I know you’re busy so I’ll get to the point.” That sentence is wasting my time.

Get to the point. 

Then, make sure your cold emails do 5 things:

  • Grab your prospect’s attention.
  • Tell them why you’re reaching out to them personally.
  • State the clear benefits you’re offering.
  • Provide some kind of credentials.
  • Give a clear call to action.

Everything in your email is to get them to take action to move the process forward. If you’re not clear on how to do that, you shouldn’t be sending the emails.

If your product isn’t super complicated, it should be about 7 sentences.

Later emails

You’re not really just following up. If you truly believe you’re bringing value to the table, you’re not going to just “follow up.”

If what I have to offer will bring you tons of new business, I’m going to be passionate about helping you understand the benefits.

Instead, we should think of it as “building a journey” that’s going to help your prospect be informed and move toward a decision. Keep the conversation going rather than “following up.”

Often the second email will be a reminder. Maybe your prospect is interested but he got distracted by other things.

Don’t assume after the first email that the person isn’t interested. If they still don’t respond after the second one, I can provide more content and bring more value.

Multiple follow-ups

Most responses come between the second and the fourth email, but it really depends on your sales cycle.

If you have an extensive sales cycle, it may take longer to arrive at a decision.

Don’t quit too early. Your prospect has a life and a job and he may have forgotten to reply.

You may fear that he’s annoyed because you’re filling his inbox, but if you’re providing value, even if he doesn’t need it now, he’ll remember you when he does need your product.

There are several ways to bring value in later emails, always with the intention of moving your prospect closer to a decision.

Share case studies, stories, testimonials, articles, or anything else that will help your prospect understand the market and the challenges you’re helping to solve.

Email is simply one way to connect with potential customers.  If your audience is active on social media, you can consider contacting them there, or use trade shows if those are a better fit for your market.

Think about what you would want to know. When you’re reaching out to people, think of all the bad emails you’ve ever received and ask yourself if you’re being like those people right now.

Try various things. Change subject lines. Keep a process moving and don’t panic if it doesn’t work.

“Cold Email Outreach” episode resources

You can check out more of what prospect.io has to offer by visiting their blog, and if you visit prospect.io/tse, you’ll get 50 percent off of your first three months. Prospect offers various plans, and you can begin by choosing the lowest plan and then upgrading if you find that you need more support.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers and provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out TSE Hustler’s League and apply to see if it’s a good fit.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share it with someone else you think might benefit.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Halloween, Prospecting, Losing Prospects, Donald Kelly

TSE 954: Sales From The Street: “Scary Cat”

Halloween, Prospecting, Losing Prospects, Donald KellyWhen you pursue prospects but don’t get responses, it can be intimidating. We don’t want to lose those prospects, but we don’t know why they aren’t responding.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, we’re talking about loss aversion, and how it can be scary for sales reps to lose prospects, and also what you can do to get past it.

It really isn’t so scary.

Loss aversion

The truth of loss aversion is that we’re often more concerned about losing something than we are about gaining something.

Sometimes that fear can be detrimental because we don’t change. We stay with the status quo because it’s safe. It’s human nature.

I struggle the same way in that I didn’t want my prospects to reply to my communications when I wasn’t there.

I sold document management software to city and county governments, and the buying process is long when the government is involved.

If I sent out emails to all the IT people and I didn’t hear anything back, I continued sending the same emails over and over. It was easier to keep sending those repeat emails to people I knew than to find new people.

I was afraid that if I didn’t email them today, I might miss the day when they actually wanted to commit.

If it’s not the right fit, move on.

Market share

Out of the thousands of people who are in your market share, you’re probably communicating with about 60. You’re probably also guilty of thinking you have to keep them because they are the only ones.

If that’s where your head is, you have a mad dose of loss aversion. You’re afraid of giving up stuff and moving on and trying something new.

You’re afraid of trying something new and pursuing new prospects.

Sometimes we have to let go of the things that are holding us back. There’s a fine line between persistence and hoarding. 

Cold campaigns

I use prospect.io for my cold campaigns because it’s simple. I can send a sequence of personalized emails that go out automatically on a scheduled sequence based upon certain conversion metrics.

At the same time, I’m doing phone calls as well as taking advantage of snail mail. By the time I complete the process, if no one answers, then something isn’t right. It probably isn’t a good fit, so I move on.

If I’ve exhausted everything I could humanly do but they aren’t raising their hands to say they are interested, I’ll push them aside to make room for others who might be interested.

The world doesn’t end.

If those people do eventually come around, they know how to reach me because I’ve contacted them by every way possible.  In the meantime, I’ll put them on a drip campaign.

Now think of how many I would lose if I kept focusing on these customers instead of looking for new ones.

One of my sales trainers told me you can never lose something you never had, and I’ve never forgotten that.

“Scary Cat” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers. In addition, we’ll provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out TSE Hustler’s League and apply to see if it’s a good fit.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

CoVoideo, John Simpson, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 944: Sales From The Street: “Video Cold Outreach”

Your prospects are inundated with cold communications every day. Your job is to make sure that your communications don’t wind up in someone’s spam folder. Personal communication is an important part of modern-day sales, and video cold outreach is an important tool.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, John Simpson, Director of Business Development at Covideo, talks to us about the value of video cold outreach.

Why video?

How sick are you of boring emails?

How many unsolicited emails end up in your spam folder?

The most important part of prospecting is building trust and helping the person on the other end of the email realize that you’re authentic. Being able to put a face with a name is a game changer.

Video is a strong value-add if you do it as part of your sequence. It’s not true, though, that video solves every problem.

Typically, the first outreach won’t include a video. It will be a simple value statement to someone who has never met us. Usually, it’s to a sales leader who might benefit from our product.

If we get no response, we’ll send another email, and then we’ll send the video. As soon as we get the view notification, we’ll pick up the phone and call them and try to determine whether we’re a fit.

Video is an attention grabber. `

Emails

The point of all this isn’t that emails are bad. You should absolutely still use emails.

You must have a strategy for your emails, and they must be part of your overall sales process.

The point isn’t that videos are always the right answer. The point is that everyone fails from time to time, and when you do, you have to re-evaluate what you’re doing.

Those failures can help you identify other avenues that you can take.

If you’ve mailed a prospect multiple times and he’s not responding, shoot him a video. Shoot him a text.

You’ve got to do something that stands out and sets you apart.

Sequence

Covideo discovered through trial and error that sending a video in the first cold email wasn’t usually best.

People weren’t responding to their efforts, so they changed their sequence and saw results. They learned from their failures.

In certain industries, they found that it was ok to send a video immediately. It depends on the person and the industry.

If you’re pursuing a CEO you’ll likely take a different approach than you would if you were pursuing a salesperson at a logistics company.

Conversation

Anytime you’re reaching out to someone, your goal is to start a conversation.

Instead of just spitting about your product, slow down a bit. Give yourself time to simply chat.

Instead of shoving your product down his throat, provide a solution to the problem. The concept of “always be closing” in Glengarry Glen Ross doesn’t exist anymore. The buyer has changed.

We sometimes try to put too much information into our emails and videos. Instead of trying to include a whole bunch of info, we just have to get to the next step in the conversation.

It’s always about progress.

Connection

Video allows you to engage all of your senses, where email only involves our sight.

When we engage with video, we use our hearing, our sight, and we’re cognitively responding to the body language in the video. Using multiple senses leads to a deeper connection.

We tend to misinterpret emails because we sometimes add tone. That won’t happen with video because people can see how excited you are to work with them. Video gets rid of the unknown.

The problem is that people have dozens of reasons for why they don’t do video: they’re uncomfortable, it won’t work, they don’t like the way they look.

Typically, though, video use builds organically through an organization. As people see coworkers succeeding with video, they inquire about what is helping them be successful.

No matter your industry, no matter what you’re doing, no matter what you’re selling, you should be willing to put new things out there to break the monotony.

Video mistakes

Don’t write a script for your video read it from a teleprompter, it will typically feel pretty awkward. Be yourself. Talk like you’re talking to another person.

You don’t “act” while you write emails, so you shouldn’t do it while you’re making a video.

People like to connect with authentic people rather than with a persona.

Make sure the lighting is good and check that there’s nothing distracting in the background.

“Video Cold Outreach” episode resources

Covideo provides a mobile app, a Google plugin, and a web-based recorder making it super easy to use. Because you aren’t actually sending a video file with your email, it diminishes the chances of your email being kicked back as spam.

Grab a free trial and try your hand at creating video cold outreach, or you can email John or connect with him on LinkedIn.

This episode is brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.