Category Archives for Closing

Close deals using videos with Doug

TSE 1268: How To Close More Deals Using Videos Throughout The Sales Process

Close deals using videos with DougClosing deals using videos is now becoming a very effective tool in the sales process. As a salesperson and entrepreneur, we’ll talk about how you can incorporate videos into your sales goals. 

Doug Davidoff works with companies in the B2B space around customer acquisition and success programs. They examine a company’s sales structure to figure out how to build it in a way that’s scalable, repeatable, high probability yield, high-margin, and high-growth.  Because of this, a sales team can get more done in less time. 

The beginning 

Doug started working for the company when he was just 16 years old, around the same time when he got his driver’s license. Back then, they were focused on traditional sales advisory sales training. For the last seven years, they’ve been looking into the holistic process of customer acquisition. Every three years, they reinvent themselves in an effort to make it easier for companies to work with ease and efficiency. 

It was difficult when they first started using videos. They were among the first companies who were utilizing this new tech and there were only a handful of examples they could use as a reference. Doug came up with the idea of making videos the same way as he made webinars, breaking them down into 3 sections. Next to blogging, it was by far his greatest accidental discovery.

If you decide to work with videos, know that it may not yield immediate results.  Closing deals using videos isn’t easy. Doug didn’t start with video thinking it would enhance the process. There is a lot of divergences when it comes to what people know about using video, what they are looking for, and what they want to accomplish.  Because of this, initial conversations were hard because it was hard to tell a client the specific impact on their sales. Nowadays, with more history, easier to see that video is very effective. 

Creating the videos 

Doug began creating a 20-minute long video for a presentation and later went to an hour, sometimes longer, as needed. Doug’s colleagues advised that prospects wouldn’t watch videos that were this long but Doug wasn’t to be deterred. As Doug gained a greater skill set and his videos improved, the more the videos were shared among key people within the companies he was targeting. This sharing process enabled Doug’s team to know who the key figures, influencers, and decision-makers were within these companies. They began seeing that people were watching their videos even before they got to their kick-off.  These prospects were watching and using their videos to socialize and share various ideas. This was how they decided to use their videos in segments that could be dropped in each part of the sales process, from market development to customer acquisition. 

The video sales process

How a customer is moved through the video process largely depends on how the customer finds Doug.  The first video is typically post-discovery where they let their prospects watch any number of videos that are connected to solution pages. 

They’ve also tried running a couple of campaigns where they connect to prospects who are difficult to reach by giving them shorter versions of their videos. They ask these recipients to share their top three biggest challenges and Doug’s team then sends a 2-4 minute video that addresses these challenges. This strategy is used during the pre-discovery and discovery process, needs assessment diagnosis, and so on. 

Using videos in sales

Doug has been told that videos won’t work in sales but he’s proven this isn’t true. If you are a salesperson presenting a topic consistently, you can save time by putting that presentation into a video.  If you prefer initial contact to be live, you can still utilize video in the follow-up. Doing a concept video is also encouraged.     

With great editing, the best thing about the video is that you get to be yourself, without mistakes. You can also send the video before the sales call and then ask them what part of the video had the most impact on them. This will give you an idea of what you can do for the next steps and you’ll be able to gauge if the video was watched at all. If they did watch the video, the conversation will show you how to prepare for any follow-up conversations. 

When you offer a video, your prospects are able to watch you at their convenience. It gives them time to think and prepare for your call as well. 

Prospect conversions using videos 

Doug doesn’t claim the videos are the only thing that leads to closing a sale but it is a great indicator.  Video helps to detect how serious someone is about starting a buying journey. Even when people don’t watch the video, you can do more by investigating further: Maybe they don’t believe the video is working. Maybe their problem isn’t a huge concern. Maybe it’s not a good time/ Maybe they’re in the middle of a crisis that needs to be addressed first. 

Videos give you information about the buyer. It allows you to gain greater insight and use your time more effectively. When you free up time, you’re able to close more deals. Doug found out that people loved the video strategy. It is difficult to get people on the phone but Doug’s team saw how these videos could get beyond CFOs. As people got to be a part of how they got the information, meeting opportunities grew. 

What should be in the videos 

There are three videos that everyone must-have. The first video is the Problem Video Challenge. When you help a client understand what the problem is, it helps to separate you from your competition. How they define the problem determines how they’re going to behave. 

This first video is all about communicating the real problem, why it’s a problem, and why it’s so hard to solve.

The second video is the Story Video. It’s both yours and the clients’ story, with the client being the origin of that story. In the second video, you address how you’re going to solve the problem. You can have multiple problems and story videos depending on who you’re talking to and what the context of the situation is. 

The third video is the Three-Minute Brief. It’s a video where you need to have multiple versions. This video is where you’re going to lay-out everything including the action points you want to talk about and how they can impact your client’s goals. 

Video is definitely a medium you can use to become a more flexible salesperson. The more you do the better you will get. 

“How To Close More Deals Using Videos Throughout The Sales Process” episode resources

Get in touch with Doug. Visit his site and his blog. You can also drop him a message on LinkedIn and Twitter. 

If you are interested in more sales stories, you can talk to Donald about it. Reach him via these channels: LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook about any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning this March and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound. Other songs used in the episodes are as follows: The Organ Grinder written by Bradley Jay Hill, performed by Bright Seed, and Produced by Brightseed and Hill.

Jason Kren, Why are your contracts not working?

TSE 1228: Why Your Contracts Are Not Working and How To Fix Them! 

Jason Kren, Why are your contracts not working?Ever asked yourself why your contracts are not working and how to fix them? Jason Kren is just the man with the answer to that frequently asked questions. 

Salespeople want nothing else but to see their contracts and deals turn out for the best. Unfortunately, there are times when contracts fall off and clients don’t agree to something. How do go about fixing such contracts? 

Jason Kren works for PactSafe. It’s a company that’s built from the ground up. They manage clickwrap contract acceptance at scale. This means having the ability to manage millions of clickwrap contracts at a super high velocity. 

Disney+ launched its video streaming service recently and attracted 10 million subscriptions in the first 24 hours of launch. At the end of the sign-up process is a contract that states the terms and conditions of the service that users are getting. These contracts are often the highest valued contracts that a company’s legal department manages on an annual basis. 

Jason’s company takes that contract and utilizing the PactSafe platform. It’s a quick wrap embedded contract and once it’s accepted, the platform will track the version that’s accepted. Using the platform, we know the time when the contract was accepted and who accepted it. PactSafe can also reproduce what the contract looks like on an individual screen, they know whether the contract is downloaded on a mobile device, on a computer, or via a tablet. 

In terms of sales contracts, this platform makes things run smoothly. With just a click, users already signed a legally binding agreement.

In the sales application, we can take contracts and use the platform to speed up the contracting process for sales. 

Making contracts easier to understand

Let’s look at why your contracts are not working and how to fix them. A salesperson should know what your legal department puts in the contract. To make this easy for the sales reps, the sales leader has to make sure that the legal department thinks about the contract design. The legal department has to discern the language used in the contract including the words and phrases. Most importantly, they need to think about the contract design around multiple components and focusing on an end result of acceptance and execution by the customer.  

The goal is to remove the friction from every step. Sales leaders can talk to their legal department to come up with a language that will make their contracts easier to accept and lessens the point of negotiation. Try to get your legal department to standardize as many contracts as possible. These contracts are often in order forms for upsells and cross-sell within the organization. 

Adopt a standardized language 

It is imperative to standardize your contracts and agree that we’re not going to negotiate there. Contracts such as these are better for the customers and for the salesperson. As part of the sales team, it is your job to start thinking about changing the language of how you talk about the contract. Most salespeople today are still using the archaic language of talking about contracts, “Hey, I am going to send you the contract and once you’re done reviewing it and signing it, then we can start.” This isn’t how you should be talking about contracts today. You can’t seed the control to the potential client and give them the reigns of the negotiation process. 

What you want to say is, “Hey, if we get a clickwrap acceptance platform in place and you can standardize those contracts and the language you use, I am going to send you a link for you to accept this contract and we’ll get started.” 

You don’t talk about the contract with them, you’re sending them terms that they can accept. That little shift in your language can increase velocity and reduce the friction of the contract process. 

Moving away from PDFs

Another key change that salespeople can do to make contracts work is to move away from the massive pile of PDFs. You want to standardize and minimize your contracts and get them into a clickwrap to make it a one-button accept. By doing that, you increase your customer experience and your deals. This process takes so much time that you end up losing money in the end. 

When running a particularly high-velocity business, you should know all of the four components that make up your sales velocity equation. If you can tweak one of the four components then the result will even be greater and you’ll see a 22% increase year over year in your business. 

Let’s take for example of changing how fast your deals close. 

Using the archaic method of sending over the contract via a signature platform. If your prospect is traveling and they’re on the road with just their phone, they won’t be able to execute the contract because they still have to go through a PDF process to hit certain points. This delays the closing by 48 hours or even more. 

Reducing the friction 

Even when you speed up your contract process by 24 hours, that will likely increase your overall sales velocity as well. Embedding a contract and sending them out via ClickWap eliminated the unnecessary process of opening a PDF format and have it digitally signed. It’s more efficient for the salesperson and for the client. Shaving a day or two in the sales cycle will greatly improve your overall revenue. 

You can’t let totally let go of the signature contracts because that method is also effective in some aspects of the business such as large enterprise deals. However, when you go down to the smaller deal size at large, you’ll see that standardized contracts and the standard language can reduce friction in the sales process. 

On the sales spotlight – DoorDash 

DoorDash is one of the clients of Jason’s company. The Door Dash has three primary groups, they enter into contractual relationships with dashers, these are the people who deliver food. The end users are the people who download the app, and then there are the merchants, these are the ones that provide the food. It has a massive sales division that calls on the managers of the restaurants and they want to enroll them as dash merchants. They can go ahead with the signup and have their food delivered by DoorDash which then expands all the offerings to the end consumer. 

Thinking about it on the restaurant manager’s viewpoint, they don’t have the most carefree job. They’re often on their feet and checking that everything in the restaurant is in orders. They definitely do not have the time to check their computers and respond to email, and process PDFs to get the contract signed. Jason’s company worked with them and now their sales team is sending out contracts through a clickwrap which is so simple and efficient. It eliminates the whole e-signature workflow. 

The massive enterprise software company, BMC, didn’t have centralized control of the contract acceptance process across dozens of their product lines. They needed to take a third-party to control and enhance their contracting process. This was where Jason’s company came in. PactSafe implemented more than 10,000 different forms for their 14 products. This gave their legal department the ability to regain control over any changes to agreements that didn’t require code changes and it game them the visualization and analytics that they needed.

When you think about that for your business, you’re not only transforming your legal team but you’re also transforming your sales team which creates a frictionless digital transformation across the organization. 

Creating the pilot program

Doing some changes in how an organization works requires effort. Jason suggests that before making any changes, it’s best to first create a pilot program. It is important to test with a subset of your sales team so that you can refine the process and make sure it works right once you implement it in the whole organization.

In sales, you only have one shot to roll something out to an audience so might as well make it work. Create a pilot test to see the benefits it will have for your broader sales team. Once you have the process perfected, then it’s time to apply it as a whole. 

There is no reason why we have to do things the old way when you can make a change to do move things faster in your organization. 

“Why Your Contracts Are Not Working and How To Fix Them!” episode resources

Catch Jason Kren via his LinkedIn. He is also on Twitter with the username @jasonkren. Visit their website PactSafe as well 

You can also catch up with Donald via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook for any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

We have a new semester beginning in January and we would love to have you and your team join us. Follow this link to apply to the program. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Devin Reed, Closing Revenue

TSE 1219: 5 Counter-intuitive Mistakes Preventing You From Closing Revenue

Devin Reed, Closing RevenueThere are times salespeople don’t make the best decisions that would lead to closing deals. These mistakes can cause a fall. Let’s take a look at the 5 counterintuitive mistakes preventing you from closing revenue

Devin Reed is a content strategy manager at Gong. He handles all the content marketing strategy courses and responsible for presentations. He also goes to roadshows, such as Sales Live Miami. 

At this roadshow, Devin talked about  5 Counterintuitive Mistakes Preventing You From Closing Revenue. It’s about the five things salespeople think are good practices, and are trained to believe are good habits when in fact, they’re doing the opposite. These five mistakes hurt their deals and sales conversations. What Devin is sharing is backed up by data. 

Devin works for a company that has millions of sales conversations. They’ve looked and analyzed these conversations to see patterns that help them get an idea of the things salespeople talk about the most. Here are the 5 counterintuitive mistakes preventing you from closing revenue. 

  • Using the ROI to seal the deal
  • Focusing on quantity when it comes to discovery questions
  • Answering objections quickly and thoroughly
  • Using  large enterprise clients
  • Using cold call opening line

Don’t use ROI to seal the deal

People make the mistake of using the ROI to close. Finding a way to bring ROI into the conversation is one of the basic strategies taught to beginning sales reps.  This strategy is proving to be counterintuitive. 

ROI isn’t bad in itself, but it becomes an ineffective tool when it is used for persuasion. Presenting your ROI to the client doesn’t work because the information doesn’t go to the right part of their brain. 

The human brain has two parts – the emotional and rational. More often than not, the right part processes information later than the emotional part. If you want to get the attention of your prospects, you need to tap into the emotional side of their brains first. You do this by giving them a before and after story.

“Hey, I was in a podcast and not to brag or anything but that podcast did so well. They were doing this and that. I came on and I did this thing and two weeks later, they saw an X increase in their ROI.” This is an example of a “before and after”, then diving into the ROI. 

When you are able to provide the identifiers with the before and after stories, the emotional pull comes in. Make it a goal to tap into their curiosity instead of just desperately presenting the numbers. A good salesperson always to starts with emotion and understands people need to feel before they will give you their ear and show interest. After you’ve piqued their interest, then you can get to the boss to present the ROI. You show them what you can do for them is not only a great idea but also makes fiscal sense. 

Another reason why presenting the ROI often doesn’t work is because it’s naively done. Junior sales reps usually speak to CFOs who have years of experience. Their newness in the industry and lack of confidence make their calculations look phony. CFOs don’t find the numbers trustworthy. 

Focusing on quantity when it comes to discovery questions

Most salespeople have a discovery playbook with 15 to 30 questions. New sales reps believe it’s necessary to ask them all because they have the mindset the more questions mean more information and eventually, the more chances of closing the deal. While asking questions isn’t a bad thing per se,  on the other hand, it gives buyers discovery fatigue. It feels more like an interrogation than a valuable business conversation. 

Based on the data, 11 – 14 targeted questions is the sweet spot for the number of questions a salesperson should ask. The article by Chris Orlob entitled Why You Can’t Sell to C-suite Executives shares how salespeople only have four questions to ask C-suite executives. 

Tips when asking targeted questions: 

  • Use open-ended questions Using open-ended questions allows you to get more information. Ask one question that prompts a stream of answers. 
  • Get someone to think instead of reciting information  Ask questions that will make them think about their answer. For example, “How is that tech stack preventing you from closing revenue?” This question causes them to take a moment before giving an answer. 
  • Ask connected questions  Don’t just throw out random questions. Ask them in a way that paints a bigger picture. 

Answering objections quickly and thoroughly 

Answering directly shows how ready salespeople are to handle objections but the downside to that is the risk of actually answering the wrong objections. Instead, pause and wait. The benefits go both ways. For the salesperson, pausing creates room to time to think and for the prospect, the pause makes them feel heard. 

By the middle of the discussion, the prospect has already decided if they want to actually meet with the salesperson.  It’s the salesperson’s responsibility to make sure the conversation is good throughout the meeting so prospects see the value and have a good time. The prospect of enjoying the conversation is the most important goal. 

Using the enterprise logo when selling

Data shows that salespeople using social proof has actually a lesser success rate. Salespeople may think dropping names of big companies they’ve worked with is compelling information but prospects don’t share the same perspective. Instead of building trust with the prospect, what it does is alienate them.

The right approach is to use tribal identifiers. This means building a tribe based on shared characteristics. The best salespeople will have three to six tribal identifiers to make the connection more appealing and compelling. For small startup businesses with fewer clients, salespeople can make a hyper-specific process. This would mean not focusing on the same geography, for example, but instead, targeting companies with the same struggles and goals. 

Salespeople need to show their clients they are more than just someone on LinkedIn. They need to invest time upfront if they want to be heard. #SalesFacts

Cold call opening line

Many believe if you want to catch your prospect’s attention, give them an opportunity to first say no. The assumption is that using an opening line that allows them an opportunity to say no gives the prospect the power they want to feel in the conversation. Philosophically, you want them to feel comfortable in letting their guard down. 

This strategy doesn’t work. Data says there’s a 6.6X increase when, instead of trying to get them to say no, you ask instead, “How have you been doing?”

The potential client answers in the same vein and it causes a pattern interrupt. Your opening line isn’t something that the receiver is expecting. 

An opening question like, “Hey, this is Devin. Did I catch you at a good time?” is a telltale sign that it’s a cold call and immediately the guard goes up. From that point on, it’s an uphill battle.  

Always remember the before and after story because that’s how trust is built. People may not remember you but they will remember your story. You don’t have to be a great salesperson to share a story, you just have to share stories of value. 

“5 Counterintuitive Mistakes Preventing You From Closing Revenue” episode resources

Catch Devin’s podcast, Reveal the Revenue Intelligence, where they interview industry leaders who understand how they use their revenue intelligence to win the market. They have a pretty impressive line-up of key interviews. Connect with Devin Reed in his LinkedIn profile

You can also reach out to Donald via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook for any sales concerns. 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

This podcast is also brought to you in part by Reveal the Revenue Intelligence podcast. It’s about utilizing data to make business decisions instead of just guessing your way through major sales decisions. Visit gong.io for their podcast. 

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to. 

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

Prospecting, Terry Hansen, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1213: How to Build A Six Figure Income Even If You’re Not Great At Closing! 

Prospecting, Terry Hansen, The Sales EvangelistEver wonder how you can build a six-figure income even if you’re not great at closing? Closing is one of the most important parts of sales. It is crucial and every word you utter during closing matters.

Terry Hansen hails from Idaho Falls, Idaho. His plan is simple but he still has impressive sales success stories. He’s worked with many organizations and sales reps around the country and helped them boost their sales. Throughout his sales journey, Terry has observed three bottleneck scenarios in which entrepreneurs and sales professionals can get stuck.

The first is that many struggles to increase their sales and income because they are not getting in front of the right kinds of companies and individuals. They are going at it like opening a phone book and just calling from the top of the list, hoping that someone will buy from them. Once on the phone, they don’t spend time introducing themselves, starting a conversation and making appointments.

The second scenario a bottleneck can occur is the lack of a framework to qualify customers and salespeople end up closing with people they shouldn’t. This comes from a scarcity mindset. There will always be goals and sales quotas, that have to be hit. Because of this, many people in sales end up trying to sell to without taking the time to determine whether they’re selling to their target customer. Sometimes, salespeople can close a client and later have regrets because they didn’t share their work values.

The third bottleneck in failing to close well comes from not having the right skills.

It is each of these three scenarios that can become the speed bumps that keep entrepreneurs from growing their sales.

The value of prospecting 

Many sales books stress the importance of having closing techniques. You have to be a champion in overcoming objections and resolving concerns to become successful in growing your sales. Another secret to success is becoming an account manager. You need to have stellar customer service, be able to ask for referrals, take good care of your base, and keep your competitors from your clients.

Terry read a variety of books and did everything they suggested but he still wasn’t hitting his quotas and achieving the level of success he wanted. He then had lunch with a great mentor and was venting about his frustrations. Terry let him know that despite doing the right things, he was still living paycheck to paycheck. His mentor shared an illustration about two salespeople, one great at appointment setting but lousy with closing and the other, great at closing but bad with appointment setting. The first salesperson could schedule 40 appointments per month but only closed 10% of those appointments, which resulted in only four sales per month. The second salesperson lands four appointments per month. He is an amazing closer and but can only close deal 50% of the time, making two sales per month.

Terry understood that he would make more money and build a six-figure income even if you’re not great at closing by being good at setting appointments and increasing opportunities. Closing is equally important but the analogy taught him he needed to redouble his efforts in making appointments and meeting with people.

The challenges in prospecting 

Prospecting is uncomfortable, scary, and awkward.  Stereotypes of salespeople being manipulative, talking a lot, listening too little, and using high-pressure tactics have to be overcome. Most salespeople don’t want to be perceived as manipulative and try to make relationships a priority. However, there can be a period of adjustment as they work to avoid reflecting on the negative stereotype.

Salespeople are having a difficult time getting past the gatekeeper and making contact with the decision-maker. Too often they leave multiple voicemails and emails with the hopes of getting a reply but typically, that doesn’t happen. The challenge is to be compelling in those initial interactions.

Terry tries to be generic in his voicemails to avoid stereotypes. The first three seconds you’re identified as a salesperson are the most challenging.  The person who is being contacted can lose interest regardless of what is being sold. It’s best to veer away from bad introductions and barking up the wrong tree. Salespeople shouldn’t just go through the phone book without a clear idea of who they want to contact. There’s no need to spend too much time trying to facilitate an introduction with people who don’t fit the ultimate goals. Doing so will delay getting in front of the clients who actually need the service or product being offered.

Building your client 

Salespeople should look at their top  10 best clients, profile them and get an overall sense of the companies they represent. From this information, they can build a dream list of similar companies. Use these strategies and tactics to make contact with the decision-makers: create a profile, build and stay focused on a  specific list of desired traits, and use the right kinds of tactics.

Many salespeople hate prospecting because they find it awkward. There’s already a resistance when they call companies and there’s a feeling of relief, not the disappointment when they get a voicemail to leave a message. The voicemail is now an escape. With the gatekeepers, like receptionists, salespeople have to get assertive to get to the decision-makers. The goal is to get past the voicemail and get to a person. This is an opportunity to be persistent

Instead of just saying, “Yes, please,” to leaving a message, salespeople should be a little more curious and assertive. Probing questions such as, “Is he in the office or out of the office?”, “Is he at a meeting?”, or “If you slip a note to him to let him know I’m on the line, would that be appropriate?” can move a salesperson closer to their target client.

Be persistent and follow-through

It’s also a good idea to ask the secretary if it would be okay to wait on the phone until the meeting is done, especially if they’re already wrapping up.

If the decision-maker is out of the office or on vacation, press further and ask if it’s possible to get their personal number. If it’s given, follow up is imperative.. 50% of the time, secretaries will say not but the other 50% will give the number or transfer the call directly.

Think positively and don’t assume the other person is unwilling to talk. If your persistence doesn’t work, however, then ask for someone else in the organization. The director of marketing, the human resource officer, the CEO, anyone with buying power in a decision committee can be great alternatives. These days, CEOs and presidents no longer make a decision by themselves. A vote or by committee makes the purchasing decision today. Find two or three of these people in the organization and talk to them. These tactics are not difficult but they do require you to be more assertive and persistent, not aggressive and arrogant.

The secret to prospecting and having conversations with decision-makers is to be more persistent, assertive, polite, and professional.

“How to Build A Six-Figure Income Even If You’re Not Great At Closing!” episode resources

Terry Hansen and his team are hosting a special online sales training workshop this week where they’ll be teaching the three secrets that salespeople can use to boost their sales revenue. They’ll be talking about how to build a six-figure income even if you’re not great at closing. You can go to salespitchmastery.com/register to attend for free by using the special link or you can attend it for $49.

For other sales concerns, you can also reach out to Donald via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Use these practical sales tips and let him know how they work for you.

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a course designed to help new and struggling sellers to master the fundamentals of sales and close more deals. Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077.

We’d love for you to join us for our next episodes so tune in on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also leave comments, suggestions, and ratings to every episode you listen to.

You can also read more about sales or listen to audiobooks on Audible and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

TSE 1200: How To Elevate Your Sales Game 

Value, Closing, The Sales Evangelist,As a salesperson, you might have asked yourself the ways to elevate your sales game. 

Dug McGuirk is a national trainer with Tony Robbins. He is a peak performance strategist to help people get a clearer picture of where they are right now in their sales organization including the results they’re experiencing as an individual salesperson or as a team leader. 

He and Tony help individuals see their role in the organization. 

Salespeople can’t change the market, the economy, the way the organization works, and the standard of practice. Tony and Dug want salespeople to see the clear picture and help them realize their true potential. 

Elevate your sales game 

Salespeople are always looking for ways to elevate their sales. The first step to do that is to analyze the things that might be holding back the sales. Sales reps must look at the pattern when they’re stuck. Do not have the tendency of beating yourself up and taking the fall when things go wrong or when you’re stuck. 

Assess the activities that have been holding you back as a salesperson and be aware of them. Look at the pattern of thought, the pattern of activity, and the pattern of focus. These may be small things that you’ve stopped doing like making your bed in the morning, praying, meditating, exercising, and whatnot. 

Most of us are running away from the pain but in order to succeed, we need to go through the pain.  

The best time to get a sale is right after you just made a sale. Listen to the power of momentum. You sell one and own it. Do not doubt your ability to sell, just get on with the selling and be carried by the momentum. 

Believe in yourself

That belief in yourself is so vital in sales. It doesn’t matter that you’re shut down several times or that your presentation is put to a stop. You just have to keep going. 

Sell yourself first and have that confidence before you go off selling to other people. Salespeople have a moral obligation to help others even when they’ve said no for the first few times. You need to get over that objection in order to deliver the message. 

A great salesperson needs to get into that state of gratitude before going into the next steps in sales. You need to be truly present and get clear visualizations of your goals. You also need to believe in your product and the services you sell. 

In sales, your network is your net worth. 

Nothing replaces a full-on immersion and meeting people. The prospects are everywhere so you need to be always selling and offering. Look for strategic partners and find the opportunities and the people who are willing to invest their finances and their energy. Salespeople have skills and it’s up to having the right training to be able to unleash those skills. 

Challenges in sales 

We live in a fast-paced society and everyone wants to speed up the process. Many are caught up in technique hopping when things go wrong. There are three pillars of extraordinary results to address this issue. The first is the strategies and the second is the action plan such as making phone calls, using technology and digging into LinkedIn, Instagram, and other social platforms. All these strategies are not going to work if they’re not implemented and acted upon. 

What most people do is they take action but they do it half-heartedly. This compromises the third pillar which is the mindset. They spend thousands on a strategy and then they move on to the next strategy. They move from one strategy to another and then if it still doesn’t work, they blame the system. 

Don’t do it with the belief that the strategy isn’t going to work in the first place. 

When you do your pitch, don’t do it half-heartedly. When you mail prospects, don’t send a blanketed e-mail because they’ll know that you didn’t put any effort into it. Make a personal email that shows them you care. 

Be willing to get vulnerable 

Salespeople who are crushing it on their sales are the ones who are willing to be vulnerable. They are the ones who are willing to be authentic and putting themselves at risk on a personal level. This is how they connect with potential clients. 

As a salesperson, you need to understand the value that you offer and come from a place of service rather than expecting. 

You learn things as a sales rep when you push through the pain. Look at challenges in new perspectives and work your way around them. Master your ability to perceive what’s going on and change your relationship with the situation at hand. Push yourself ahead with every No you get.

When you’re facing a slump and you’re wondering how to elevate your sales game, you need to evaluate your mindset and be present. Realize how valuable you are and use that to connect with clients on a deeper level. 

There will be more on this at the “Unleash the Power Within” event that’s going to happen at the American Airlines Arena on November 7-10. 

  • Day 1: Turn fear into power.

What stops people from referrals? FEAR. 

What stops people from prospecting? FEAR. 

What stops people from door-knocking? FEAR. 

Turn fear into power and work the muscle of state management. The first day is all about building your confidence as a salesperson. 

  • Day 2: The power of influence 
  • Day 3: The conversation

“How To Elevate Your Sales Game” episode resources

If you’re interested in going, reach out to Dug via his email dug.mcguirk@tonyrobbbins.com or call him on his phone number (646)523-8230. You can also send the word D-U-G to 64600, and you’ll get a link to all his contact information. 

For other sales concerns, don’t hesitate to reach out to Donald via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook

This episode is brought to you in-part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a program designed to help sales reps get from where you are now to where you can be in the future. This course is an aid for salespeople to become better in asking the right questions, presenting solutions, and closing deals. 

Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

Read more about sales or listen to audiobooks at Audible as well and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

If you like this episode, do give us a thumbs up and rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. We produce high-quality podcasts weekly so make sure to subscribe to get more of these sales talks that matter! Share this with your friends and teach them how to subscribe as well. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Video, The Sales Evangelist, Sales

TSE 1198: Closing Questions

 

Video, The Sales Evangelist, Sales

Salespeople are good at closing deals but before that, we are great in making closing questions. Master the closing deals that ensure a done deal client. 

Benton Crane isn’t from the advertising and marketing background. He is from data analytics and started his career in Washington D.C. as a statistician at the Census Bureau and analyst in the National Intelligence Agency. He then partnered with the brothers Neil, Jeff, and Daniel for a campaign. The combination of their creative skillset and his analytical skills created a system that makes advertising campaigns effective. 

The power of videos in the business

The most powerful form of communication happens in face to face conversations between two individuals. These face to face interactions are how you make out the nuances of a conversation. This will allow you to listen to the tone, see the gestures and body language all happening at a subconscious level. 

Video is the medium that’s closer to that face-to-face action. When you talk to someone on the phone, you miss the body language and all the subconscious communication that’s happening. But with video, you’re able to capture a large portion of what happens in face-to-face interaction. 

Aside from that, videos are scalable. The people you can’t meet through phone calls can be met via videos. You can take your most effective salesperson and sales pitch and scale that up to reach millions of people using videos. 

Effective pitch through videos 

People have thought that the world of sales and marketing are two separate camps. In the advertising space, it’s often about infomercials or traditional branding styles like what you see in Nike and Apple. But it doesn’t work that way. You can blend those two worlds together. 

For so long, there’s been a competition between the two camps. The salespeople would trash the marketers and the other way around when in fact, they can incorporate together to create a great pitch. 

Incorporate a story in your sales pitch and put in brand humor, voice, and character to make it more memorable. #SalesTips

At the end of the day, no matter how effective the sales pitch, it’s not going to build the long-term brand. Squatty Potty, for example, has the humor and the character and that what makes it memorable. If you break down that video for a sales structure, you’ll see that it follows the perfect sales structure. 

The sales structure

The Squatty Potty has elements that are as follows: 

  • It has the hook
  • It captures attention
  • It shows empathy
  • It understands the problem
  • It presents a solution, 
  • It has a call to action for viewers to buy the product. 

When it still doesn’t work, then build that credibility. Make that call to action as soon as possible. There will always be a percentage in the audience who are ready and there’s also a percentage who are not quite ready. So, address their concerns and build that credibility. Give them another call to action after you’ve done that. 

Anyone can create videos. Creating videos takes hard work but everyone can learn how to do it. The principles that Benton’s team use in making a $5,000 video are still true in making a $500,000 video. It’s not much on the scope and budget, it’s more of doing the right thing at the right time. 

The Squatty Potty story 

Benton’s team just did a successful video for Poo-Pourri and when the CEO of Squatty Potty saw that video, he just knew that they needed to have theirs created as well. They came to Benton’s team and his team was initially cold since they just did one for the same product. But then they thought of ways on how to make it less disgusting to talk about and make it more proper and put together. 

They landed on the unicorn idea and it all happened from there. They made it safe, colorful, and less awkward to talk about. They had to reach a broader audience so they needed to do something a little more unexpected. 

Squatty Potty worked with Shark Tank and Bed Bath and Beyond prior to working with them. They were making $4 million a year and jumped to $25 million after they worked with Benton’s team. It was around that ballpark. 

Bobby Edwards, CEO of Squatty Potty, had the guts to put a pooping unicorn as the face of its brand. But the risk was worth it and took them to where they are today. 

If what you’re selling provides a real solution to the problem, then the video can work. It can be a sales tool and it can also be just a part of the sales process. Either way, it’s a powerful tool to use.  

Investing in the video can go both ways, losing your production investment or gaining millions of dollars in return. Incorporate your closing questions in your videos and make the best out of it. 

“Closing questions” episode resources

Connect with Benton Crane on his LinkedIn or via his site, harmonbrothers.com. For more sales concerns, connect with Donald via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook

This episode is brought to you in-part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a program designed to help sales reps get from where you are now to where you can be in the future. This course is an aid for salespeople to become better in asking the right questions, presenting solutions, and closing deals. 

Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

Read more about sales or listen to audiobooks at Audible as well and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

If you like this episode, do give us a thumbs up and rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. We produce high-quality podcasts weekly so make sure to subscribe to get more of these sales talks that matter! Share this with your friends and teach them how to subscribe as well. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

New Products, Dan Cockerell, Donald C. Kelly

TSE 1195: Creating Great Customer Experiences To Close More Deals

New Products, Dan Cockerell, Donald C. KellyCreating great customer experiences to close more deals is often a neglected sales strategy by many. That shouldn’t be the case. 

Dan Cockerell grew up in the hospitality industry. He went to Boston University and worked at Disney World for a summer. He officially joined the Walt Disney Company as a parking attendant in 1991 after finishing college. After 26 years and 19 jobs at Walt Disney, he decided to leave to start his own consulting company. 

Most of the employees in Disney who are working as executives in the operation started in the frontline roles to understand the customer experiences at the ground level. Disney isn’t sales but the structure that is used in its marketing is similar to sales. 

Translating it to our language, salespeople are bound to creating customer experiences to close more deals

The beginning of Disneyland

Walt Disney was ahead of his time. He was an animator and he wanted to create a 3D world where people could escape reality and step into movies. He wanted to create happiness together as a family. This was his original thought for building Disneyland in 1955. He kept the business clean, he was nice to people, and he valued them. People kept coming back because of the Midwestern values set by the company. 

Dan understood then that people are looking for experiences. Even millennials these days are looking for experiences rather than buying objects that lose their value over time. Experience, on the other hand, gains value over time. Disney had a great business model: to make emotional connections with people and have a great product and service to offer them simultaneously. 

The immense popularity of Disney parks stems from its ability to create experiences. 

Creating great customer experiences to close more deals

Disney did a lot of research and measurements to help the company improve. They have round table discussions, group discussions, and surveys. They pulled out a group one year and made a survey on what makes them different and why people keep coming back to Disney World. The Disney team had their expected answers, including the fireworks, the hotels, the attractions, the food, the characters, and others. 

There are four things, however, that Disney and salespeople have in common. 

Disney makes people feel special

They translated that to the cast members and they had a common purpose which is to create happiness for guests. Their team always looks for ways to make their guests feel special every day. It’s challenging when you have 50 million guests coming to the park every year. 

The same is true in sales, salespeople need to make their potential clients and existing clients feel special. Often times, it’s the simple things like sending them notes on their birthdays or when there’s something big to celebrate in their company. You have to invest in time with them. 

Disney treats people as individuals

Connect with people individually and make exceptions depending on one’s situation. As salespeople, you also need to treat people as individuals. Don’t quote them because the policy won’t work for some of them. Figure out a way to make exceptions according to their needs to make them feel like individuals. 

Creating great customer experiences to close more deals doesn’t have to be expensive. It takes attention to detail in order to connect with people. You just have to hire people who are keen on taking interest in people.

 A team needs a good leader or role model. Show your people that you are approachable and you want to help them with their sales problems as much as possible. Talk to them and be with them. Seeing their role model in action motivates them to do better in creating great customer experience to close more deals. 

Get down with the best practices you can as an organization no matter how small these gestures are to make your potential and existing clients feel special. Think of the ways you can give your clients great experiences. 

Disney respects everyone 

Respect is basic. People who come to Walt Disney are treated equally regardless of where they are staying. Guests who pay $99 a night and guests who pay $1,200 a night are given the same amount of respect. Disney isn’t looking at the color of the skin, the language people speak, and where they came from. Everyone must feel welcome without prejudice. 

Salespeople must show respect to all clients regardless of color, language, or policy they are going to get. Even when, as a leader, you aren’t particularly fond of the organization you are in, you still have to take personal pride in your profession. 

When you treat your team professionally, they’ll also respond professionally. 

When the clients’ experience fails, it isn’t the fault of the sales rep but that of the leader. You might have hired them in an environment they shouldn’t be in, you might not have trained them, you might have failed to give them feedback, and/or acknowledged them enough. 

Leaders create the environment for their people then their people go and operate in that environment. #SalesQuote

Be knowledgeable 

Salespeople need to know the product inside out and really believe in it. It’s a lot easier to sell to clients when they hear the excitement in your voice. A good salesperson also needs to bring the product to the next level by implementing it to the needs of the clients’ company. Explain how your product or services would cater to the needs of their company. 

We don’t know the answer to every question so when the client asks you something that you have zero idea what the answer is, be honest. Dial-up a person who has the answer or read more. Don’t just give them bad information to save face. 

Close more deals

Four things are laid out in creating great customer experiences to close more deals. 

  • Make people feel special
  • Treat people as individuals
  • Respect everyone
  • Be knowledgeable

Pick one from these four ways and start doing it to change your sales game. Do this one bite at a time. 

“Creating Great Customer Experiences To Close More Deals” episode resources

Connect with Dan by visiting his website, DanCockerell.com. He has his email there and his phone number. 

If you have sales questions, concerns, and great stories to share, don’t hesitate to connect with Donald via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook

This episode is brought to you in-part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a program designed to help sales rep get from where you are now to where you can be in the future. Every seller should be making six- figures and this can be achieved with our rigorous training schedule and group coaching. Join us for a new semester beginning each quarter. 

Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561) 570-5077. 

Read more about sales or listen to audiobooks at Audible as well and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. 

If you like this episode, do give us a thumbs up and rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. We produce high-quality podcasts weekly so make sure to subscribe to get more of these sales talks that matter! Share this with your friends and teach them how to subscribe as well. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

TSE 1193: What are the 6 Critical Steps to Developing a Successful Sales

TSE 1193: The 6 Critical Steps To Developing a Successful Sales Strategy

Sales strategies aren’t born from thin air; rather, there are six critical steps to developing a successful sales strategy

Lance Tyson is an author and speaker who runs his own training company. Tyson Group has been ranked by Selling Powers as one of the Top 20 sales organizations in the world. It has been operating for 15 years and invested in Dale Carnegie Training in 2010. They work in the sports entertainment industry and one of their biggest customers is the football team, the Raiders. They coordinate with the sales team to sell premium tickets, sponsorships, suites, and others. His team also works with Michael Jordan’s company and several tech companies where they coach, train, and consult with sales teams. 

Lance isn’t just teaching; he is also out there grinding and doing all the sales work that his salespeople are doing. 

Six steps to developing a successful sales strategy 

Attitude, perseverance, and grit aren’t part of the steps. These things must always be present but let’s think of outcome first. In some cultures, the word relations isn’t great and it’s often overused. We prefer the term rapport.

This is one of the three outcomes you need to go after. Partner rapport with credibility. While rapport gives you influence, credibility gives you people’s trust. The third one is showing a level of understanding. These three are the beginning of the steps to developing a successful sales strategy which is the following: 

  • Connect
  • Evaluate
  • Diagnose
  • Prescribe
  • Dialogue
  • Close

The six critical steps to developing a successful sales strategy 

Connect

We talk about connecting with others all the time but the conversation of connecting is different today. You may be trying to deal with a level of preoccupation by the buyer. You have to connect with people via text, email, or voicemail and talk to people to build rapport. The fragmented conversations can be broken down and taken to connect step to overcoming preoccupation. This will lead to building rapport, credibility, and a  level of understanding. 

Evaluate

When you go to your doctor’s appointment, one of the first things they do is to evaluate you. The same is true in sales. We evaluate our prospects to determine whether they’re interested or not.

Other businesses call this assessment while some refer to it as an opportunity. Whatever you call it, it’s the step where salespeople deal with the inherent objection of disinterest.  

Diagnose and Prescribe

This is where salespeople make an educated guess. Ask yourself what they need most and do not forget about creating a level of comfort. A lot of salespeople walk in the door and make assumptions based on their grand experience, they then ask a few questions.

You need to talk to the clients through their feelings and their thoughts. You need to look at their past, their present, and the future to make a good diagnosis. After the evaluation and diagnosis, you make a prescription. 

Dialogue and Close 

After getting your prescription, your next step would probably be talking with your doctor and asking questions so as to get a clear understanding of your health problem.

In the same manner, after giving your prescription as a salesperson, your next step is to have a dialogue to overcome any form of objection. Ultimately, having every question answered, your next step is to close. 

Researcher or salesperson

The biggest challenge right now is the confusion that most salespeople are stuck in which happens in the connect step. Inside sales reps are responsible for prospecting. You can’t trust everything that’s written on LinkedIn and you can’t just get somebody without fact-checking what their bio says.

This creates a problem for sales reps because they often feel like they don’t have enough information to move forward. Thus, the confusion of whether to spend more time on researching about the prospects or looking for prospects to pitch. 

It gets harder because it takes at least six touches to get in contact with a target and another six to get an appointment. Salespeople are now trying to cheat the process and just connect because they’re exhausted. 

Many sales reps these days just sell their whole service in one move. They’d say it’s free and without obligation. This is a mistake that many salespeople make. Instead of getting on the phone and pouring it out in one go, sales reps must be patient and sell one piece at a time. 

If you can’t sell time, you can’t sell your products or services and that’s what people in sales lack: time.  

Getting better in evaluation 

We do a lot of sales assessment and we do predictive index studies on people to see where they’re weak and to know where to start on their training. We’ve seen that salespeople are often not good facilitators. What most salespeople do is spray and pray. They start asking questions right away without getting into the introduction stage of presenting what’s going to happen in this meeting. 

Salespeople can evaluate better if they learn how to facilitate and set things up better. Sales isn’t just about asking questions, it’s also about facilitating the meeting well and making good set-up. Evaluation is a back-and-forth process. You ask questions and they answer, all the while maintaining a good grip on where the conversation is going. 

On prescribing

There has to be a level of dramatization in prescribing. Salespeople need to make prospects understand that reason why they want what they want. Dramatize your pitch the way they want it. 

You are trying to overcome doubt in the prescribed step. So, describe your products and your services in a way that answers a few questions. Don’t just state facts. Learn to become a storyteller because that’s how you make them listen. 

Remember the six critical steps to developing a successful sales: you connect, then evaluate, then diagnose. After these, you make the prescription, have the dialogue, and close. Take your sales per process and see where you are and where you’re potential customers are. Make sure that both of you are on the same spot, if not, take a stop and go back or move forward.

“Steps To Developing a Successful Sales Strategy” episode resources 

Connect with Lance Tyson on Twitter, LinkedIn, and his website, Tyson Group

Don’t hesitate to connect with Donald via LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook

Wanting to learn and hear more about sales? This episode is brought to you in-part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It’s a program designed to help sales reps get from where they are now to where they can be in the future. Every seller should be making six figures and this can be achieved with our rigorous training schedule and group coaching. Join us for a new semester beginning each quarter. 

Sign up now and get the first two modules for free! You can also call us at (561)570-5077. 

Read more about sales or listen to audiobooks at Audible as well and explore this huge online library. Register now to get a free book and a 30-day free trial. One of the great books right now is the StoryBrand by Donald Miller, do give that a go. 

If you like this episode, do give us a thumbs up and rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. We produce podcasts weekly so make sure to subscribe to get more of these sales talks that matter! Share this with your friends and teach them how to subscribe as well. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

TSE 1188: 3 tips to improve Closing

TSE 1188: 3 Tips to Improve Closing

Johnny-Lee Reinoso, Donald C. Kelly, Closing

For organizations looking to expand their footprint and extend their reach, these 3 tips to improve closing will help them achieve those goals.

Johnny-Lee Reinoso operates a sales and marketing firm called C Level Partners that helps organizations expand their footprint, gain new clients, and move in the direction of their goals. He believes that sales is everything. His experience from the management side, from the individual side, and from the sales rep side gives him a unique multi-level vantage point.

1. Listen to understand

The biggest challenge Johnny-Lee consistently sees is that sellers listen to reply rather than listening to understand. He recently carried out a DILO, or a “day in the life of” exercise with a lean, mature team that all suffered from the same problem. They all listened while waiting for the opportunity to explain why their company was so great.

Sellers master the art of articulating their value, but before we win in the marketplace we have to master the art of listening. We’ve all heard it before, perhaps in the saying, “Telling is not selling.”

But if we truly applied this truth to our everyday behaviors both in and out of business, we would know exactly how to articulate our value proposition to become the solution that the prospect needs.

2. Exhibit empathy

In many cases, the discovery call that precedes the demo doesn’t actually help the seller understand the challenges the seller is facing. In order to understand the problems they are trying to solve, you must listen and develop empathy for the pain they are feeling.

Empathy helps us understand why people do certain things and how they end up where they are. When you care about helping people, you’ll be able to support them while they tackle the challenges they face.

When we ask questions that lead them down the path of discovery, our prospects will outline exactly what they need and how you can help.

Empathy acknowledges how the existing challenges affect the company’s bottom line and understands how important it is to consider shareholder value in the face of problems.

Empathy cannot be rushed.

When you communicate that you’re with them in the challenge, you’ll become a trusted advisor.

You cannot begin the work of solving a problem until you understand several things.

  1. You must understand the challenge and how the prospect got where he is today.
  2. You must understand whether he seems himself getting out of the situation.
  3. You must understand how impactful it is for the business if he doesn’t get out of the situation.

Once you build empathy and understand those three things, you can begin the next step of prescribing.

3. Prescribe with confidence

There’s a fine line between arrogance and confidence, and you must prescribe solutions with confidence.

An arrogant person might immediately say, for example, “I have exactly what you’re looking for.” Arrogant people don’t listen.

When you do step 2 right and you have empathy and understanding, you’ll find yourself in the position of a therapist of sorts. Like a therapist, you have to be welcoming, calm, and professional.

Therapists don’t say, “Wow, you’re messed up.” They also don’t say things like, “I’m exactly what you need to solve your problem.” Instead, they operate with confidence, saying things like, “I’m so glad you took the first step. I’ve dealt with similar challenges before and I know we can get where you want to be.”

Therapists become trusted advisors. They communicate that they are looking out for the patient’s best interests.

Confident sellers must do the same.

Pay attention to tonality

Tonality is critical to communicating the right level of confidence. Be enthusiastic. Be happy and excited that you’re speaking with a credible person.

Recognize the two different kinds of buyers: technical and economic. Technical buyers are people who can use your service but can’t make the decision to buy your service or product. Economic buyers make the ultimate decision.

There are two different ways of closing those two kinds of buyers. Because you can only engage a technical buyer for a certain period of time, you’ll eventually have to divert to the economic buyer.

Know how to ask questions like this: “I know you’ve been looking to address this challenge for quite some time. Is it common in your organization to bring the CFO in at this point to make the final decision?”

You must sniff technical buyers out early in the sales process.

Never ever give a proposal to someone who can’t buy.

Using phrases like “this is what we have been doing,” and “working with companies like yours,” communicates confidence. Eliminate phrases that include “I think,” or “it should.” #Tonality

Confidence

Passion is extremely contagious. You have to know when to elevate a pitch or speak faster or slower. Johnny-Lee is a firm believer that tonality creates the environment. Because prospects who are on the phone can’t see you, they are still picturing something. They are picturing whether you’re tall or short, aggressive or not. They can picture you, and it’s your job to make sure they picture you as a trusted advisor.

Confidence comes from studying your value proposition. You have to understand your value proposition. You also have to readily know what your value proposition has done in the workplace. That means knowing the stories and the case studies.

People are sold auditorily, visually, and kinesthetically. Tell your stories with passion, with conviction, and with numbers because people love numbers and percentages.

Don’t share numbers if they haven’t shared their stories and their challenges with you first.

Acquire

Don’t admire what other organizations and colleagues and sales leaders are doing. Acquire what they’ve been doing, and exceed the expectations you’ve set for yourself.

Instead of comparing your personal and professional life to the people around you, humble yourself and ask questions of those who achieved those levels of success. That will help you build a roadmap to success in all areas of your life.

“3 Tips to Improve Closing” episode resources

If you’d like to connect with Johnny-Lee, email him jlr@reinosoglobal.com.

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register!

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free. This episode has been made possible with the help of TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. We want you guys to go out each and every single day to find more ideal customers and do big things.

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify. You can also share this with your friends and colleagues.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Closing, Albert Alexander, Donald C. Kelly

TSE 1173: Three Great Closing Questions

 

Closing, Albert Alexander, Donald C. KellyThere are three great closing questions that salespeople often ask because everyone in the sales arena wants to make sure that we’re closing effectively. The answers to the three great closing questions will help salespeople close like a pro. 

Albert Alexander has been a partner in a construction equipment sales company that makes parts for excavators and bulldozers for 11 years now. Albert does all the marketing, inside sales, and digital marketing for the company. 

Closing questions

Often, sales reps are good at finding prospects and having a talk with them. Things change, however, when they’re turning them into leads. There are challenges in closing. 

Sales reps have this predisposed idea about how they purchase that gets in the way when they try to close a deal. Albert’s company grows 70% every year and that’s because they stick people to a process

For other sales reps, they stop in the middle of the process and it stops the action of the process moving forward. It could be because of the fear of rejection or any other reason, but the end result is the same. It halts the closing process. 

Imposing your buying style 

There are many decision types and processes that they take. For this reason, sales reps should know their customers through their pains and needs and be completely open to the different decision styles they have. Sales reps should remove their own fears and worries of rejection from the sales process and focus on their customers instead. If they do that, they can be empathetic to the needs of the clients. 

Say, for example, the client’s million-dollar equipment is not working and it needs a $50,000 part that the company sells. For the sales rep, the amount is huge and so he’d say, “I understand you need to think about it,” but that’s not the case for the client. The client is willing to spend $50,000 for his million-dollar equipment to work, but because the sales rep put his purchasing decision in the process, the entire closing will take a hit. 

Sales reps need to change their perspective or their purchasing styles and decisions when closing a deal. Sales reps need to learn to think like the clients they’re talking to instead of imposing their fears, views, concerns, or buying styles to their clients. 

Make a good logical decision for and with somebody, even when they’re concerned. Remind them of the things that are logical and that matter. 

The first step to close a deal is to put yourself in that person’s shoes better and eliminate the fears and worries. 

Closing styles 

We all have closing styles and the first one is the assumptive close. It’s extremely easy and it’s when sales reps choose and assume the next information that you have to collect and continue down the process. It’s almost like assuming that everything’s good and done after they’ve spoken with the client. 

This works for Albert’s company. They’ve implemented the assumptive process and it improved their closing deals to 25%.

So, their sales reps ask the following questions: 

  • Hey, where did you want me to deliver that?
  • When did you want that delivered? 
  • How did you want to pay for that? 
  • Is it going to be a Mastercard or wire transfer?

Most sales reps think that closing is an event and it shouldn’t be. They think that they have to ask questions and shake hands. That’s not how it works. 

If they investigate, build rapport, and lay out the solution that’s logical and emotionally fulfilling, sales reps can assume the next information and assume. Closing is not an event, it should be a natural thing. Sales reps should do all the work upfront and the closing is part of that.

Dig into the objection 

In the case of objections during a close, it’s often not the truth and just a reaction. Sales reps should dig deeper to overcome the objection. 

In Albert’s industry, there are five reasons that clients use to decline. 

  • Time 
  • Money
  • Price
  • Value
  • Quality 

Our sales reps dig deeper by feeding either of the top reasons why clients object to a deal. They wait for their response and try not to be pushy. They just make a conversation and wait because people have different buying styles. Some people like to think about it before saying yes, and some others just agree immediately. 

After the assumption, sales reps should dig deeper into their objection to see the real issue and not just the surface-level problem. In that way, you can give a solution to the real objection. 

A good sales rep is the one who can talk well and has the tenacity to understand and get down to the reasons to investigate. 

Being able to compensate with somebody doesn’t lead to a sale, you need to have a purpose and process. 

Utilize technology 

Sales reps can connect with a customer in a building effect of value. While sales reps are closing, they can talk to their clients in the process. In Albert’s company, their sales reps would send their clients’ invoices while talking to them on the phone. They also email and text pictures of what they’re going to get. They do these things while they’re closing the clients. People love how attentive the sales reps are in the whole process. 

When their sales reps close, they strive to make the clients feel like family. It’s different when clients get all the information they need while they are talking to the sales reps. 

So, utilize technology and use text and video messaging while closing because these things make them less guarded. 

Closing 

Don’t think that closing is an event

It has to be a process that sales reps are moving forward through. As a sales rep, you need to cover all the bases because everyone is the same and the sale is the same. There are different variables but you can sum them up to a few things that you can master. 

Don’t complicate it and know that you’re closing from the very start. 

Three Great Closing Questions” episode resources

Connect with Albert in his site, ConEquip.com. You can also listen to their podcast at Sellingforlife.com where they share ideas of the entrepreneurial journey. Their company has gone from zero sales to 30 million a year. They’ve become experts in Google marketing and ad words. 

You can also connect with him on his email at al@conequip.com

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

This episode is brought to you in part by TSE Certified Sales Training Program. It is a 12-course program to help sales reps and sales teams to improve their skills in finding the right customers, to know the activities and strategies that work, and how to ask the right questions to build a strong value and close business deals. Simply go to thesalesvengelist.com/freecourse to get the first two modules for free. 

This episode is brought to you in part by Audible. Enjoy the free 30-day trial and explore the thousands of books they have today. 

I hope this episode has been fun and helpful to you. Please review and leave us a five-star rating on Apple Podcast. You can also hit subscribe and share our show with your friends and colleagues. 

If you can, please provide your review and rating on Google Podcast, Stitcher, Spotify, and other platforms where you consume this podcast. 

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Dr. Stanley Roberts, The Sales Evangelist, Success

TSE 1156 : Why The Winners-Never-Quit Fallacy Is Preventing Your Success

Dr. Stanley Roberts, The Sales Evangelist, Success Some people believe that quitting is bad, but Dr. Stanley Robertson believes that the winners-never-quit fallacy is preventing your success.

Dr. Stan — CFO for a non-profit in Chicago — takes issue with the idea that quitting is always bad and he wants to share ideas about how to become a successful quitter.

Quitting 

Quitting is simply giving up on something. You can quit going to the gym or quit a bad relationship or quit eating certain foods. You can quit just about anything.

It’s easy to see from these examples that quitting isn’t always bad, but he takes it a step further. He believes that the winners-never-quit fallacy prevents people, and sellers, from finding success. 

Sometimes we have to quit things, and sometimes it’s even desirable to quit things. In fact, we should be quitting things all the time. 

Dr. Stan got the idea from his son, who is a Marine Corps officer. As he approached the end of his tour of duty, he called his dad one day to say he was considering quitting. He wasn’t sure he wanted to continue being a Marine Corps officer. 

Dr. Stan’s advice at the time was to keep going. He pointed to the benefits, the prestige, and the opportunities it would provide. His son, who was 23 at the time, would be able to retire at 43. These were the things he thought were good. Eventually, he rethought his response, and he told his son that he should quit if that’s what he really wanted. 

Quit shaming

Based upon that experience, he came up with the concept of “quit shaming,” or embarrassing people because they quit things. We tend to look down on people who divorce from a bad marriage, or who quit a job that isn’t working out, or who quit an investment. We sometimes even hide the fact that we quit because we fear the pushback. 

When Dr. Stan was young, a guy offered to sell him a VHS — which was new technology at the time — for $200, where it typically sold for $600. Stan bought the VHS only to find that the box was full of bricks rather than a VHS. He was devastated to lose all his money. 

In order to replace the income, Stan stole things. He eventually went into the Marine Corps himself, where his petit theft ended in a court-martial, with Stan losing his stripes. He knew he had to quit making those same choices. In the end, he gave up stealing and earned his law degree. 

Every human being goes through a growth process that demands that they give up things along the way. In fact, seasons of life sometimes lead us to quit things. Take, for example, Arnold Swarzenegger, who gave up body-building for acting, and then gave up acting for politics. 

Our life cycle often causes us to give up things, but some people can’t disengage from the things they are doing because they are emotionally tied to them. 

Course correction

The point isn’t to quit altogether because something isn’t working out. Instead, make a course correction. Do the next right thing. 

In order to be successful in life, you have to create new things and new goals to replace the things you gave up. 

The biggest challenge for people who need to disengage from things is emotional trauma. If you’re going to quit, acknowledge the negative emotions. Recognize that some people will try to embarrass you, so you must develop a plan forward. The negativity will be less impactful if you have a new plan in place. 

We have a problem disengaging from things. Researchers conducted a study called the Jigsaw Puzzle Study in which they studied two groups who were tasked with completing a jigsaw puzzle. One group completed the puzzle, while the group was intentionally interrupted. Researchers discovered that the group who completed the puzzle was happy, while the other group spent twice as much time thinking about the puzzle. 

The human brain is hard-wired for completion. When we give up something, our brains are hard-wired to complete that circle. 

Times you shouldn’t quit

  1. Don’t quit because things are hard. If you struggle to sell your product, don’t quit. Continue working, and push through those struggles to become a better seller. 
  2. Don’t quit because you haven’t succeeded yet. The get-rich-quick concept isn’t realistic, and your success could happen next month. 
  3. Don’t quit because you covet your neighbor’s success. Never compare yourself to someone else’s performance. It’s ok to gain inspiration from your neighbor, but don’t quit because of it. 

How to quit

Interestingly, most people don’t struggle to continue on a given path because that concept has been drilled into our psyche. Ninety-nine out of 100 people will advise you to keep going. Dr. Stan’s work focuses on those people who want or need to give up something but they struggle to disengage. He teaches them how to make that break. 

One of his clients struggled with her weight and her husband belittled her for it. She didn’t want to give up the relationship, partly because they had a business together. She feared that people would question her decision to quit, but eventually, she got a divorce. Once she gave up the business and the marriage, she lost all the weight and her confidence soared. 

Abandon a deal

For sellers, this could appear as a deal that you’ve invested so much time in that you’re hesitant to walk away. Even when your gut tells you that it will never close, you continue investing your time and resources into it because you’re emotionally tied to it. 

The sunk-cost fallacy refers to the tendency to make decisions based upon what happened in the past rather than making decisions based upon the outcoming you’re hoping for. The fact that a deal didn’t work out in the past has no bearing on what might happen in the future. We often make decisions because we’ve spent so much money on something. 

Ringling Brothers had been in business for 146 years making all kinds of money, but last year they went out of business. They had been sued by animal rights activists and the company wouldn’t give up the use of animals. The company was emotionally invested in the use of animals, despite the fact that other groups like Cirque Du Soleil hold wildly successful circuses with no animals. 

Blockbuster should have quit using VHS and moved to DVD or streaming. The company should have engaged in new technology, but they had invested so much in their inventory that they couldn’t disengage. 

You should not be prevented from giving up things for fear of other people’s opinions. Don’t let anyone else stop you from changing course. Always make the decision for yourself. Do not fail to disengage because of what others might say about you. 

“Winners never quit fallacy” episode resources

Check out Dr. Stan’s book, Quit: The Last Principle of Success at www.thequitdoctor.com

Connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com.

If you’re a sales rep looking to hone your craft and learn from the top 1% of sellers, make plans to attend the Sales Success Summit in Austin, Tx, October 14-15. Scheduled on a Monday and Tuesday to limit the impact to the sales week, the Sales Success Summit connects sellers with top-level performers who have appeared on the podcast. Visit Top1Summit.com to learn more and register! 

You can also connect with me at donald@thesalesevangelist.com or try our first module of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free. This episode has been made possible with the help of  TSE Certified Sales Training Program, a training course designed to help sellers in improving their performance. We want you guys to go out each and every single day to find more ideal customers and do big things.

I hope you like and learned many things from this episode. If you did, please review us and give us a five-star rating on Apple podcast or in any platform you’re using – Google Podcast, Stitcher, and Spotify.  You can also share this with your friends and colleagues. 

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

 

Social Selling, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, LinkedIn

TSE 1087: Social Selling Your Customers Want!

Social Selling, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, LinkedIn

Sellers who interact with and provide value to prospects using social media must understand the characteristics that turn this into the kind of social selling your customers want.

We’re tackling this topic all month, and even if you aren’t a big social media person, we’re providing an actionable plan to help you get in front of your prospects.

It isn’t enough to “set it and forget it” or generate large amounts of content in hopes that people will click through to find you. It’s thoughtful preparation that gives buyers what they want and need right now.

Trying to close

I discovered the idea of using social media to sell when I was in college. I was seeking an internship with people who were in Chicago and our college professor told us that we needed a LinkedIn profile. He told us that we had to maintain that profile because that’s where business professionals interacted.

I thought it was a great idea because I was suddenly connected to millions of other professionals. I also thought it was great that I could pitch to all of those people.

My professor knew a woman in Chicago so he introduced us with the intention that I would seek insights from her. In my mind, though, she was going to provide me with an internship or connect me with someone who had one.

Instead of approaching it as an information-gathering phase, I was trying to close the deal. I think many of us make that mistake with social media.

Instant access

Sellers are often like kids in a candy store because social media gives them instant access to millions of potential customers. Why in the heck wouldn’t we go ahead and pitch them all? Let’s tell every single person what we’re doing.

And then social media turns into a pitch-fest.

Because we can copy and share messages with groups of people quickly, we have access to millions of new prospects at our fingertips. Very quickly, though, prospects recognize that every seller is engaging in the same kind of social selling.

Prospects are overwhelmed with the same messages from multiple sellers, so we have quickly realized that we can’t continue using the same methods.

Liking content

In response, we settled on thoughtful interactions with people. We settled on the idea of liking everything they posted on social media and commenting on their content, sometimes arbitrarily.

We didn’t necessarily have a growth plan or a strategy. We just assumed that if we liked a bunch of their stuff now, when we eventually sent them a message, they would instantly want to work with us.

The idea might have worked well initially, but again, sellers adopted the same strategy across the board and failed to stand out from one another.

Curating content

Next, we moved to curating content. That meant sharing content that others were sharing, so if I found a good blog post about technology, I would share it with my prospects who were interested in that industry.

Our strategy was to be top-of-mind because of our content. We engaged with different platforms and pumped content everywhere, which ultimately became a bunch of junk floating around on the Internet. Again, every competitor was doing the same.

The platforms realized that the content was taking their users away to other sites and they took steps to prevent people from being diverted away.

Algorithms

Social media platforms don’t want you to send their users to other sites. As a result, you must adjust your social selling efforts so that you’re linking to content on that same platform.

LinkedIn wants its users to see the ads that its customers are paying to promote. If its users leave LinkedIn, they won’t see the ads. The algorithm will penalize you for sharing content outside of LinkedIn.

Sellers responded with LinkedIn articles, long-form posts, and videos. We moved to original content in our next iteration of social selling, and within the next year, we’ll likely move to something different.

Human interaction

Despite all this change, there is one takeaway. Be a person. Be human and care about other people.

The definition we shared from Hubspot is this: Social selling is when salespeople use social media to interact directly with their prospects. Salespeople will provide value by answering the prospect’s questions and offering thoughtful content until the prospect is ready to buy.

Do things in moderation. Use direct messages. Set a goal to connect with five new prospects each day on LinkedIn. Try something like this:

Donald, 

It’s always great to learn from sales leaders in the industry. Permission to connect?

Once we’re connected, they’ll see the content I’ve curated over time.

Aligned content

An article on PostFunnel reported that marketers who align their content with specific points in the buyer’s journey yielded 73 percent higher conversion rates. Think about that. If you’re able to produce content based on where your buyers are in that particular phase, it will be relevant to them.

Your buyers want posts that showcase your new products or services and they want to learn something along the way. Use social selling your customers want in order to help them throughout their journey.

Speak to the three stages of the buyer’s journey:

  1. Awareness: when buyers don’t know about you and you want to raise their awareness.
  2. Consideration: when buyers are evaluating and going deeper in their research.
  3. Conversion: when buyers finalize decisions and make a purchase.

Sprout Social suggests weaving awareness- and consideration-stage content together. Those two stages are usually where people rely on social media.

Multiple approaches

This is one of the most effective ways to prospect. When you combine this with your other techniques like cold calling or emails or regular mail, you’ll see great success.

Apply this today. Identify five people to connect with in your industry. If you do that every day for a week, you’ll have 25 new connections by the end of the week.

Strive to create the social selling your customers want to increase your effectiveness and improve your outcomes.

“Social Selling Your Customers Want” episode resources

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Closing

TSE 1065: TSE Certified Sales Training Program – “Don’t Make The Closing an Event”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, ClosingSellers are understandably focused on the closing of any deal but it’s important that we keep things in perspective and don’t make the closing an event.

The truth is that every transaction has a beginning, a middle, and an end, but we often get so focused on the closing that we unnecessarily freak ourselves out.

This conversation comes from our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, our sales coaching program that helps sellers maximize their effectiveness.

Sales process

The sales process naturally builds toward a close where the client signs the deal and then everyone celebrates. Our challenge as sellers is to avoid the temptation to make the closing the entire focus of the sale.

Focus throughout the sale on building value. Initiate conversations that address your prospects’ challenges and difficulties. Realize that you’ll never get to the closing if you don’t effectively address the buyers’ objections.

Help the buyer feel confident in this deal by sharing stories that provide value and dispel your customers’ objections. Instead of waiting for your customer to offer his objections, bring them up on your own terms as a way of building trust.

Red flags won’t go away simply because you ignore them. They don’t typically diffuse themselves, and your decision to wait until the end of the process to address them could cost you your deal.

Growing problems

Like many other relationships in life, struggles between buyer and seller don’t naturally disappear over time. In fact, problems often get bigger and worse as we fail to address them.

A single demo for your client won’t magically offset all his concerns, so don’t wait until then to address his objections. If he has concerns about your product or service, it won’t likely matter how good your demo is: you won’t overcome his hesitation until you address the problems.

Addressing fears

Whether you’re selling water, computers, or houses, your buyer doesn’t want to part with his hard-earned cash until you’ve addressed his fears.

He may want a new house. He may even need a new house. But he has fears of his own:

  • What if he can’t afford this house?
  • What if an unforeseen issue comes up?
  • How much will hurricane insurance cost?

Help him minimize those risks and fears throughout the process. That way, when he gets to the end of the transaction, those fears won’t be an issue.

Prospecting

Hubspot reported recently that as many as 40 percent of salespeople don’t like prospecting and about 30 percent struggle with closings. As a result, we tend to make closings a big deal in our own heads because we’ve worked so hard to find a prospect and get to this point.

Instead of viewing it as a huge event, we should think of it as a natural byproduct of the sales process, and we should move the buyer smoothly through to conversion.

Conversion begins the moment I start building value for my prospect. If I focus on blind-side challenges and identifying key problems, I can address objections early and minimize the risk that my deal will fall apart.

My goal is to eliminate any reasonable doubt about whether I’m the right vendor for the prospect.

Pitching yourself

If you’re able to identify the companies your prospect is currently working with, you’ll be better able to pitch your own strengths against theirs. You can identify the competition’s weaknesses and use those to make your case.

Share stories about past clients who have left that company to work with you and explain why they made that choice.

Build one-on-one conversations into your process as often as possible so you can clarify any questions as they develop. Once you understand the big issues that will likely sabotage your deal, you can help everyone get to the same page.

Follow your demonstrations with an email outreach offering to address any new questions the prospect has.

Avoid pushing objections to the end of the process. Make objections and questions a constant part of your dialogue so that you minimize any risk toward the end of the deal.

Strive to create a smooth experience for your customer.

“Don’t Make The Closing an Event” episode resources

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Donald Kelly, Chala Dincoy, Closing The Deal, EMSDC,

TSE 1056: 5 Closing Mistakes That Prolong the Selling Cycle

Many small business owners and sales reps face challenges with closing, and there are five closing mistakes that will prolong your selling cycle.

I met Chala Dincoy at the Eastern Minority Supplier Development Council ROAR Conference, and today she’ll talk to us about the mistakes that can delay or prolong your selling cycle.

Chala is an elevator pitch coach who helps people get into the room. Then, once they’ve landed a sales meeting, she helps them close it faster.

The greatest challenge, she said, is getting the appointment because people don’t stand out. About 86 percent of buyers think you’re the same as your competition. Now she teaches reps how to get through the noise and stand out.

Interestingly, she pointed out that many companies don’t use titles like “sales rep” on their business cards anymore because it puts people off to see that someone is in sales.

Thought leadership

That’s the first closing mistake.

The second is you haven’t specifically addressed the customers’ pain points. So now you’re in the wrong room and the wrong people are in the room with you.

You end up talking to lower level managers who pass you off over and over. As a result, you’re never able to get to the influencers that you need to reach.

The real trick, then, is to change your marketing so that you’re in front of decision makers all the time.

Since Chala’s sweet spot is diversity businesses, she works to get in front of conferences where those people are gathered. She has their business cards and they are talking to her at conferences.

This is the kind of marketing you should do, via speaking, networking, blogging, and any other kind of thought leadership.

Branding

Your branding is one of the tools that gets you into the room. Sheryl Sandberg is a celebrity in the business world, and you can do the same thing in the world of your target.

Chala recalls being at a recent conference where five people hugged her as she got off of an elevator. Though she didn’t know them, she says it’s a sign that you’re becoming known in your industry.

Once they know who you are, it’s really easy to land an appointment. It’s easy to invite them to an executive round table and for them to say yes.

Realize, too, that though everyone might be able to benefit from what you’re selling, not everyone needs it. We all sit in chairs, for example, but I may not need the kind of chair you’re selling.

Pain

Seventy percent of humans purchase based upon pain, so if they have a problem, they buy. The flip side is that only 30 percent of people will buy if you’re selling based on improving something.

Chala is fond of the saying, “No pain, no sale.” The third mistake is trying to sell something without addressing pain.

Stories have to be about the pain. When you’re in a presentation, offer case studies of pain. Your elevator pitch has to be based on pain. And all of it has to be the same pain.

We must niche down and focus.

Stop talking about yourself. No one cares how many offices you have or how many awards you’ve won.

Your prospects only care about the pain.

The purse

You must have both the budget and the authority in the room with you. Failure to do so is mistake number four.

We often call it the purse and the pain. If the pain doesn’t have the purse, no decision can be made, and vice versa.

As an extension of that, lower level managers may talk about a different kind of pain that company leadership will. If you base your entire presentation around one person’s pain, especially if that person isn’t the decision maker, your presentation will miss its mark.

You must have both people in the room.

Finally, avoid leaving without a next appointment. You must establish a next step with your prospects.

If they tell you they can’t commit to a date because there are other stakeholders involved and they don’t know all the schedules, then set a date to get a date. In other words, schedule a day that you’ll call to set up the next appointment.

If they aren’t willing to give you a date, it’s a really strong indicator that they aren’t going to buy.

Stop talking about yourself and connect with their pain points.

“Closing Mistakes” episode resources

You can connect with Chala at LinkedIn or at repositioner.com and you can take a quiz to determine how good your elevator pitch is.

We are currently in the Beta portion of our new TSE Certified Sales Training Program. The first section is about prospecting, the second is all about building value, and the third is about closing.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. If 2018 wasn’t the best year for you, check out TSE Certified Sales Training Program. We can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

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Brian Manning, Donald Kelly, PatientPing, hitting your quarterly number

TSE 1016: How to Deal With The Pressure of Hitting Your Quarterly Number

Brian Manning, Donald Kelly, PatientPing, hitting your quarterly numberWe’ve all experienced that sinking feeling in sales as we near the end of another month … so how do you deal with the pressure of hitting your quarterly number? It’s not easy, especially without the proper guidance.

Brian Manning, SVP & Head of Growth at PatientPing, works to help startups grow their ideas and he is here today to share insight on how to deal with the pressure of hitting your quarterly numbers.

PatientPing is a care coordination platform that helps healthcare providers collaborate with one another on shared platforms. Brian has been with PatientPing for three years now. He oversees their sales, marketing, government affairs, and partnerships.

From a sales leader standpoint, Brian thinks of quarterly numbers in terms of the Annual Recurring Revenue (ARR) for each layer of the business: the overall company ARR, the sales team ARR and the individual sales rep ARR.

Will, Should, Could

Sales reps often feel the pressure to perform and, as a leader, Brian likes to have his reps 3x their pipeline as they enter the quarter. As the quarter goes on, however, and things become more sophisticated, Brian moves on to the ‘Will, Should, Could’ method.

This method involves marking each deal throughout the quarter as Will Close, Should Close and Could Close.  Wills usually equal about 95%, while Should is at 70% and Could is closer to 50%. The Sales Operation Team does this for each week for each rep to provide a projection for the quarter.

In this way, at any given week, the reps have a pretty good sense of where they stand in relation to their targets. Brian has found that the projections are smart and reliable.

The detective mindset

When sales reps feel pressure to hit their quarterly numbers, it is usually a result of a failure somewhere in the sales funnel. There might not be enough leads, the presentations may not convert into proposals, or the deals may be stuck in contract too long.

It is usually one specific thing that slows them down. It almost takes a detective mindset to figure it out sometimes, but it can be done.

A key factor in reducing the pressure of hitting your quarterly numbers begins with the numbers that are expected of the sales rep.

The rep needs to be comfortable with those numbers.

If they do not see a path toward achieving the goal set in front of them, they need to alert their manager right away – before the quarter even starts.

It should not be viewed as a sign of weakness, nor should a rep fail to come forward because of pride.  

As a manager, Brian knows it is important to listen to his team. The territory could be bad, the ramp might be too quick, or the training may need to be improved.

He does, however, require an intelligent and well-thought-out conversation rather than simple excuses.

You never want to send a rep out to achieve a quota he doesn’t feel he can meet. It’s not healthy for anyone.

With their detective hats on, the manager and the rep can then work together to specifically analyze the territory, the opportunity, and the various stages that the deals are in.

It has the benefit of making the sales rep more effective which, in turn, increases the likelihood of hitting the numbers in subsequent quarters.

Empathy

When the pressure is high or the number is high, it is especially important to take care of your health. Brian believes that nothing is insurmountable when you are feeling healthy and well.

A seller under too much pressure – one with any type of resentment towards the product or the company  – will not be a seller who gives his best. It will translate into his performance and affect the clients and the sales.

When a salesperson puts his energy into dealing with the things that he can’t control – an imperfect product or lack of marketing team support, for example – the salesperson will always lose.

In Brian’s experience, the number one difference between a great seller and a not-so-great seller is that the energy of the great seller goes to the areas where he has control. Don’t waste energy on things that will not help you reach your numbers, or succeed.

Your energy, as a salesperson, needs to go into selling under the conditions you are in. This does not mean, however, that you should hesitate to flag issues. If there is something wrong with the product or the process, it should certainly be brought to the attention of management.

There will always be that one guy who wants to complain regardless of the situation. But those reps that can focus and channel their energy into doing what is best for their client are the reps that will succeed.

Transparency

There is a seesaw to transparency. When a rep is doing really well and is on track to reach his quota, his manager will see it and will know the rep is doing fine. There is no reason to stress.

But if the rep isn’t doing well or the numbers are low, transparency needs to increase. Brian suggests something as simple as a weekly email to management to address what is working and what is not working. Being really honest and vulnerable in this way provides management with the information, and the opportunity, to improve the system. It helps everyone in the long run.

Many of us don’t like to admit when we are having trouble but it is always easier to address a problem when it is small rather than waiting until it is too big to handle.

Brian has found that, generally speaking, most sales reps that want to work for a start-up are self-starters. They are the ones who read sales books and listen to podcasts to further their own learning.

Horizontal learning

Over time, as a company grows, Brian will bring in sales trainers to coach and shadow. Until a solid infrastructure is up and running, however, Brian has created a system where his sales team sends out a weekly ‘Wins and Learning’ email to each other.

He also stresses that a good learning experience is more valuable than a big win. His team has become competitive to send out the best learning which scales across the team.

  • Be analytical
  • If you are doing well, document how you do it.
  • If you are not doing well, document why not. Be honest and lead the charge into fixing it.

“Hitting your Quarterly Numbers” episode resources

Brian has maintained a blog for the past ten years at Briancmanning.com. He is also on Twitter.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. It allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Prospect.io is offering three months at half-price.

Previously known as TSE Hustler’s League, our TSE Certified Sales Program offers modules that you can engage on your own schedule as well as opportunities to engage with other sellers in other industries.

This episode is brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Upselling, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, TSE Hustler's League

TSE 950: TSE Hustler’s League-“The Upsell”

Upselling, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, TSE Hustler's LeagueThere’s no need to reinvent the wheel. Instead, let’s make the wheel more effective. If something already works, try to improve it rather than starting from scratch. It’s so much more difficult to find new customers than it is to sell to people who are right there in front of you.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’ll talk about upselling as part of our monthlong conversation about closing. Specifically, we can increase sales faster by upselling.

Upselling

McDonald’s uses its world-famous hamburger to upsell its customers. Once they have the customer’s attention, they work to sell the products that have higher margins. It isn’t that the company loses money on the burgers; simply that it makes more money off the fries and drinks.

Once the customers are in the restaurant, they encourage them to upsize their meals, which adds a couple of extra dollars to the overall bill.

That’s an important concept for sales professionals. We should focus on the customers who are right in front of us in addition to working to find new customers.

Existing customers

I was listening to Russell Brunson recently, the genius co-founder of Click Funnels,  talking about his first experience with funnels.

He was selling a product, and he went through his competition’s buying process to discover what they were doing. As he moved through the funnel, he noticed that the company worked to upsell him three or four times after he placed a product in the shopping cart.

If, for example, the product was $19.99, the company showed its customers how buying two or three bottles would save them even more money.

That makes sense for the customer because he is saving money, and he doesn’t have to come back and reorder next month. The customer came to the website to spend a certain amount of money, but he spent twice as much as he originally planned.

Now imagine doing that with multiple customers.

Encouraging people to buy more increases the company’s revenue tremendously.

Missed opportunity

Sales reps might be so focused on getting customers to buy a product that we overlook the opportunity to upsell them.

Maybe you’re trying to familiarize your customer with your brand or product and you need a strategy to invite them to purchase something more.

Here’s an exception: Don’t sell your customers something they don’t need. Understand your customers and their needs and focus on what they are trying to accomplish.

If it makes sense for them to buy additional products, it’s your moral obligation to invite them to do just that.

You’re their advisor. Your job is to help them solve problems.

Don’t focus only on money. Instead, help them find value by giving something they truly need. When you do that, you’ll benefit from it as well. You’ll make more money and hit your quota more easily.

Options

McDonald’s gives its customers options. Are you giving your customers options or are you taking options away from them because of your insecurity or fear?

There’s always the possibility that your customers will say no to additional products, but if you never give them the chance to say yes because you’re afraid of rejection, you might miss an opportunity to provide even more value.

Consider whether there are complementary products that you can add to your customer’s transaction that will make it easier for them to implement your solution. If you’re selling a scanning software, can you sell the customer a scanner as part of the transaction?

Is there another product or service that customers typically purchase within 6 months of their original purchase? Is there a way to bundle that product with the original purchase?

If that isn’t possible, can you build your account management strategy so that you follow up with existing customers at month three to offer them this additional purchase?

McDonald’s successfully uses upselling. Airlines offer upgrades.

Not everyone will take advantage of the opportunity but a percentage of your customers will. Invite them.

“The Upsell” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. Maximizer is intuitive, simple, and personable. Maximizer integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

This episode is brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

We’ll use prospect.io in the upcoming semester of TSE Hustler’s League to focus on prospecting. We’ll give you insights and tools that will help you gain new customers and provide training and strategies that you can implement today to ensure constant flow in your pipeline.

Check out TSE Hustler’s League and apply to see if it’s a good fit.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode, and share it with someone else you think might benefit.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Closing, Confidence, New Customer, Donald Kelly

TSE 942: How Confident Are You With Closing?

Closing, Confidence, New Customer, Donald KellyWhen it comes to closing, you have to be confident. Closing is throughout the sales process and you have to build confidence in what you sell. The buyer must feel your confidence and believe that your product or service is capable of solving her problems and helping her business to succeed.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’ll discuss the power of your own confidence and we’ll ask the question, “How confident are you with closing?”

Your confidence will cause them to persuade themselves to buy just the way the Jamaican food seller almost persuaded me to buy something I don’t even like.

Defining confidence

Confidence amounts to your belief in yourself and your ability to succeed.

If you are confident, then you will project an attitude of competence and authority.

As a seller, you must be able to project confidence, even in a situation that isn’t certain. Whether you’re new to sales,  just not closing deals, or selling a product that is new to you, you must project confidence in order to convince your prospect to buy.

You have to drink your own Kool Aid, so to speak.

Evangelizing

Because I grew up poor, when I realized I could earn a decent living in sales doing something that I really loved, I wanted to evangelize about it. I wanted to tell other people how they could be successful in sales.

First, I launched my podcast. I discovered along the way that when people encounter a passionate seller who really loves what he is doing, they see him as an authority figure.

Without that kind of influence, it’s very difficult to convince people to make an economic decision.

Confidence vs. certainty

A 2018 study of experts revealed an interesting trend among people who hire experts to help them solve problems.

Whether the expert was in sales, finance, or any other industry, people generally valued competence and authority over an ability to accurately predict an outcome. In other words, they felt better about the process if the expert exuded confidence.

If, for instance, you offer prospects a 60 percent likelihood of a certain outcome, they will value that authority over a general suggestion of what might happen.

If you can share that 90 percent of your customers experience a certain outcome, that will bring a tremendous amount of clarity to your buyers.

You’ll have a much better chance of closing that deal and encouraging that person to persuade himself to purchase.

Taking shots

Wayne Gretzky said that you miss 100 percent of the shots that you don’t take. And while that’s true, it’s also true that not every shot will be the right one for us.

As a sales rep, you’re not going to try to sell every single product to every single person. You’re going to go after clients or prospects that are qualified; those that are more likely to close.

My soccer coach used to tell us that the more shots we took on goal, the better our chances of scoring. But shooting on goal is different than randomly kicking balls.

I made the mistake as a new seller of limiting myself to those shots that I knew would succeed. I decided that I would only pursue prospects that I knew would say yes.

The problem is that no one can know that with any certainty. Even in those moments, you must exude confidence.

Invite change

You must be sure that you’re confidently encouraging your customers and inviting them to change.

Take advantage of the upsell. If you recall, McDonald’s spent years asking its customers if they wanted to supersize their drinks and fries.

Practice your competence and your confidence through repetition.

Be humble, but be confident. Don’t be cocky.

“How Confident Are You With Closing?” episode resources

Read more about the basics of confidence here.

This episode is brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Closing, Sales, Donald Kelly, Sales Podcast

TSE 932: How Do I Close The Deal?

Closing, Sales, Donald Kelly, Sales PodcastMost sales professionals understand the importance of closing. They also understand that the more prospects they interact with, the greater their odds of closing will be. But sometimes challenging situations arise, which leave us asking, “How do I close the deal?”

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’ll talk about closing more deals and increasing our win rate by answering the question, “How do I close the deal?”

Talk to the right people

Many salespeople speak to the wrong person when they try to close a deal.

The person you’re connecting with may want the product or service you’re selling, but if he doesn’t have the buying decision, it won’t be enough to close the deal.

It’s tempting, of course, to focus your efforts on the prospect who wants to buy your product. That’s easier than interacting with people who may not yet be convinced.

If you truly want to close, you have to identify the key decisions makers or stakeholders who are actually able to say yes.

Understand the true problem

If you’re addressing a problem that isn’t actually the true problem, you’re not likely to close a deal.

Ask deeper, next-level questions.

It’s not enough to know that they have a problem with emails. Do they need an easier way to send them or do they need better quality emails?

Make sure you understand the problem they are trying to solve.

Identify timeframe

Understand the timeframe your prospect is working within, and how it will impact the buying decision.

The prospect may be excited about your product, but you can move the process along by gathering facts instead of making assumptions.

Is there a big event driving this purchase? What are the negative consequences if the prospect doesn’t make a purchase decision?

Make sure you understand the timeframe.

Recognize common challenges

Eventually, you’ll begin to identify the common challenges that arise when you’re trying to close. Figure out a way to address those challenges before they become a major issue.

Identify the top five objections you hear most often, and tackle them before your prospects have a chance to mention them.

Address it in discovery, or through a testimonial.

Share stories of customers who were similar to your prospect and how you helped them overcome their similar set of challenges.

If you diffuse their objections before they have a chance to mention them you take some of the impacts from them.

Mitigate risk

If your prospect has never worked with you, she may be apprehensive about jumping into a large recurring contract. If things don’t work out with your contract, it can reflect poorly on her.

Help her address that fear by reworking the contract when possible.

If, for example, you sell software, can you cut back the number of licenses and shorten the length of the contract, you can mitigate the risk for your clients. That allows your prospect to verify that your company is a good fit before committing to a lengthy, expensive contract.

Include an invitation

Sales professionals have to be bold without being overbearing. We have to ask prospects to commit to change.

Be prepared at every step with an invitation that moves the prospect to the next step.

Paint a picture of what life will be like when they buy your product or service.

“Close The Deal” episode resources

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

This episode is also brought to you byMaximizer CRM. If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Dave Cook, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Closing

TSE 933: Closing Strategies That Can Be Used By People at Any Level In Any Industry

Dave Cook, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, ClosingNo one wants to discover at the end of a sales process that the prospect isn’t planning to buy. So how can you improve the odds that your prospect follows through? What closing strategies will improve your odds?

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, David Cook, author of How to Be a Great Salesperson… By Monday Morning!, discusses closing strategies that any seller can use in any industry to close more deals.

Closing

When we do our jobs properly, our prospects can’t help but buy our products and services.

Even though we’re all constantly using computers, sellers have to humanize the process. When people call your organization with questions, they want to talk to someone who is more than a robot with a heartbeat.

David begins with a cough. It sounds strange, but he explains to his prospects that he picked up a cough while he was walking his dog over the weekend.

Now your prospect knows you have a dog, and if he has a dog, there’s common ground. The prospect is no longer talking to a robot.

People are dying for the human touch. They crave it, so give it to them.

Urgency

Make sure to say your customer’s name over and over. Every time you do, you’re breaking down barriers. If you’re making a really strong point, make sure to use the prospect’s name.

Also, urgency separates the stars from the superstars. If you don’t create a need for the prospect to act now, why would they?

The first moment they hear about your product is the hottest they’ll ever be. They’ll get involved in other projects as time goes by, and they’ll cool to your product.

But how do you create urgency without being pushy?

Talk about the company as an outside entity.

“They’re allowing me to offer you x if you act by this date.” It isn’t you making the rules; the company is making the rules.

Position yourself as an advocate for your prospect.

Confidence

You must expect the sale. You must stay positive.

In the example of real estate, when you’re showing a home to a prospect, refer to it as their living room, their swimming pool, and their kitchenThe more times you refer to it as theirs, the more likely the customer will subconsciously start to think of the house as theirs.

If you build a burning desire within your customer to acquire your products and services, there’s no dollar amount in the world that’s too much.

Humor

Make your customer laugh.

Within a first few seconds of talking to you, they’ll decide whether or not they are going to buy from you. Get them laughing immediately.

If you make them laugh, they are on your side because their brains release endorphins that make them feel good.

Happy people buy and unhappy people do not.

Believe

You have to believe in your heart that your customer is lucky to be talking to you. You must believe in your product.

If you don’t think they’re lucky to be talking to you about your product or service that will make their lives easier or help them impress their bosses, then why should they believe they are lucky to be talking to you?

Your customer will pick up on it if you don’t absolutely believe in your product.

Believe that you have a moral obligation to share good things with your prospects.

“Closing Strategies” episode resources

You can connect with David at his website, salestrainingonthego.com. You can also grab a copy of his book, How to Be a Great Salesperson… By Monday Morning!

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

This episode is also brought to you byMaximizer CRM. If you aren’t sure you have the right CRM, Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Email, Prospecting, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 788: How to Ask For Something in an Email

ask, email, prospectIf you’re going to invest time writing emails to potential clients, it’s important to know how to ask for something in an email. Better yet, it’s important to write emails that get responses and even clients. 

In today’s episode, we discuss the steps you can take to ensure that your emails are working for you. In our interview with magician-turned-trainer Tim David, we discuss the importance of human connection. We also specify how to ask for something in an email.

Before you send another email:

  • Discover the three-word closing that will increase your response rate (as well as the words that don’t work).
  • Identify why effective research really is an important part of communication.
  • Learn the biggest mistake sales professionals make in email communications.
  • Uncover why humor generally doesn’t work in emails.
  • Understand the role alliteration can play in your emails that connect with prospects.

Prospects can smell copy/paste communications, so the most important thing you can do is to prioritize personal connection.

Prospecting

Begin the work of connecting with your prospects in the subject line, and don’t stop until you reach the close. Seek a balance between curiosity and clarity: be clear about what you’re offering, but give them a reason to keep reading.

Use what you’re learning about how to ask for something in an email. 

Be conversational and personal. Write an email that connects with prospects and lets them know that you know who they are.

Different things motivate different people at different times to open emails. As a result, focus on what motivates people to open an email instead of focusing simply on techniques.

Ultimately, communication is always about relationships.

Episode Resources:

Check out The TSE Hustler’s League    https://staging1.thesalesevangelist.com/hustlers/

Tim David’s free report featuring 61 science-based influence strategies   https://moreinfluential.com

True Influence by Tim David   http://booklaunch.io/timdavid/trueinfluence

Tim David on LinkedIn     https://www.linkedin.com/in/timdavidmagic/

 

 

Donald Kelly, Closing, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 727: Is There a Proper Way to Push My Customer to Make a Decision?

Donald Kelly, Closing, The Sales EvangelistHow can you push your product without being too pushy? Of course, we all want close deals. Who doesn’t? But the last thing you want is to come off a too push with your clients.

So how do actually make the sale without tarnishing the relationship with your clients?

Today, I’m sharing some thoughts and insights you can apply to your own conversations.

Sometimes, clients can be dragging their feet to buy something. And we allow customers to make the wrong decision because we’re afraid of “pushing” them.

Find the Median of the Pendulum

So you have the choice to push all the way to one side of the pendulum where you’re totally lenient. Or you can be on the other side being all too pushy, just like The Wolf of Wall Street.

Encourage your customers to make these decisions in their best interest.

Building Value

Create value. As a seller, help the buyer see the vision and the value in it.  Don’t assume the prospect can see the value. But sometimes, they need that added guidance.

Make sure you’re able to identify their true problem. Then make sure they understand that problem. Once they see it, it’s easier for them to see the ROI.

Asking Powerful Questions

Ask more meaningful questions instead of just “throwing up.”

Mitigating Risks

Try to mitigate the risk for your customers. Maybe you can give them a 30-day guarantee, if possible. They won’t necessarily use those but letting them know there’s a way out is self-reassuring.

Urgency

Try to position this sense of urgency. You can also a time-limit proposals since giving them time restraints can also help. Also talk about the limited number.

Time Frame

Help the client create a time frame with you. Walk them through the time frame. Once they’re able to walk through the timeline with you, it makes it easier for them to recognize the urgency or the importance of following that time schedule. So break down your time frame with them from start to finish. Have them get their inputs, too.

Be Human and Ask Them

Ask them what could hold them back from making the decision. Or present how much they’ve lost from not fixing the solution, and ask them how much more are you willing to lose?

 

Today’s Major Takeaway:

If you’ve built enough value, they won’t see you as a jerk. They won’t see you as being pushy. They’re just going to see you as somebody who cares for them.  There are different ways to approach this but it all comes down to asking powerful questions and more personal ones. Do it from a consultative side as opposed to just as a seller.

Episode Resources:

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Tired of PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same.

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, TSE Hustler's League

TSE 725: TSE Hustler’s League – “Close Early”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, TSE Hustler's LeagueToday’s episode is another snippet taken from one of our sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League, where we primarily tackled the idea of closing, specifically, the need to close early.

The most common mistake sellers make is they start at the beginning and they want to close the deal right away. But that doesn’t happen, typically.

Start Early

You need to start early in the process to establish commitments that’s going to help the prospect close.

Some deals take months to close, even longer, especially when they still have to go through a review process within their organization.

Deals can take forever to close. But you need to understand in each stage of the process, you need to have a guideline to follow.

The key is to get them to say yes to small commitments in each stage of the process so they would eventually convert in the end.

Problem Recognition – The Unconsidered Need

If you’re reaching the prospect for the first time through cold call, have them make an early commitment early on.

What’s something you can do to make yourself stand out? Share with them something that may not even be thinking about.

After you share with them that need, try to share with them a white paper or something they can follow or study. It can be in the form of a video testimonial. Get their commitment to read your paper or watch your video.

Episode Resources:

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Tired of PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same.

Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, TSE, Sales

TSE 704: Sales From The Street-“I Am The Bottleneck”

Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, TSE, Sales

Today, I’m going to share with you a challenge that I had, specifically that fear of closing the sale, and how I was able to overcome that.

I actually realized that I was the one getting in the way of my sale. So I knew I had to  surpass that.

A lot of sales people are afraid to close since their fear of getting rejected overpowers them. But there are things you can do to get overcome this fear and to get comfortable once you get to the closing part of the sales process.

Strategies for closing the sale:

1. Build as much value.

Help your buyer solve the problem and make that decision.

2. Get them to the next level.

They’re not going to be mad at you.

They need your help so bring them to the next level.

Don’t Make Closing an Event

Closing is just a continuation of the entire sales process. So don’t think of it as a separate entity.

Stop making it as this big thing in life.

Guide the prospect into the next part of the process. And just keep on moving.

Episode Resources:

Tired of the same old, boring PowerPoint decks? Use Prezi Business and your presentations will never be the same. Tell your story the way you want to tell it.

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Donald Kelly, Closing, Sales from the Street. Sales

TSE 679: Sales From The Street – “Closing”

Donald Kelly, Closing, Sales from the Street. SalesThe Ben Franklin close, the puppy doc close, the Columbo close, the assumptive close, and the list goes on ー what close do you use?

Many people have the idea of closing totally messed up.

They think that since they’ve come to the “closing” part, they feel it’s the end of the process so they now have to convince the person to make a buying decision. So they tend to trick the person into signing up with their product or service. This just doesn’t sound right.

Here are some strategies to appropriately close your sale:

1. Get your prospects the opportunity to get on the sales process.

Give them the opportunity to tell no. In every phase of the process, give them the opportunity to back out again.

2. Articulate a business case to your buyer.

Breathe a business case to them. Personally, I find the assumptive close to be very effective, provided you’ve already presented a business case to them.

3. The close needs to happen at the earliest part of your sales process.

Ask meaningful questions. Build value. Don’t try to convince them they need to buy your product or service.

Guide them at the first quarter of your sales process. The last part of your process should just be demonstrating the solution, finalizing everything, and getting them on-board.

Today’s Major Takeaway:

Go for building enough value, presenting an effective business case, and the process will naturally lead into a conversion. People want to know you care about them. Build value.

Episode Resources:

Listen to TSE Episode 677: 3 Things You’re Doing that Your Prospects Hate

Facebook The Sales Evangelizers

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

TSE Huslter's League, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Closing

TSE 650: TSE Hustler’s League-“Early Stage Deal Closing”

TSE Huslter's League, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, ClosingClosing is one of the most important aspects of a sales process. But it has to be a natural progression in converting prospects into buyers.

Today’s snippet taken from one of our sessions over at the TSE Hustler’s League is about a concept I highly recommend which is about early stage deal closing. It doesn’t mean you close the deal right away. But these are principles you can put in place in your sales process to help you start converting more customers.

Strategies for Early Stage Closing

1. Identifying the challenges

  • Oftentimes, the salesperson doesn’t recognize there are issues or objections the prospect is going to bring up.
  • Figure out what objections you might get that will prevent you from helping the client move towards that goal. Then come up with the best known replies towards those objections.
  • The problem is we don’t have any ammo so once these objections come out, we aren’t able to provide the best answers.
  • Identify the objections early for that part of the sales process. Ask the client the top three challenges they have in the organization.
  • Figure out an “considered need” they might have then offer them compelling reasons why they should look at doing it.

2. Qualification

  • Figure out the things needed for the client to be qualified for the next level. What are the objections others might bring up in their organization be it in the budget phase or the closing phase?
  • Follow the 6 why’s and let the client answer those so you get to the bottom of the challenge. And try to uncover it in each stage of the process.
  • Do not skip stages in your sales process. Don’t just wing it. Go as deep as you cant. Do your upfront work in the beginning.
  • Don’t set appointments with people who are not qualified otherwise you get bad results eventually.

3. Commitment

  • Create a demonstration qualification document which includes all the qualifications needed at this point.

Episode Resources:

The Experience Economy by Jason Pine II and James H. Gilmore

Join the  TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

 

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 605: TSE Hustler’s League-“Three Reasons Why Your Deals Are Not Closing”

Closing, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistToday’s episode, we’ll give you a sweet taste of the first session of the TSE Hustler’s League this semester. If you still want to join, go ahead and apply. This is a group coaching experience where we also bring on some expert guests and members share insights and bounce ideas off each other.

Top 3 Reasons for Poor Close Rates

  1. Poor qualifications
  2. Lack of comprehension (on the buyer side) and misalignment (between the buyer and the seller)
  3. Lack of trust

Creating a checklist.

Have a checklist of your criteria when qualifying your prospects. Make sure it’s easily visible while you’re making calls while prospecting. Having a visual representation whether on your screen or in your office prevents you from deviating from your criteria.

A common tendency is that once you know the prospect is interested just because they asked for the price, you get so excited that you deviate from the process and just jump right in. Then you don’t hear back from them. Well, you didn’t qualify them in the first place.

Key things in the decision-making process:

  1. Make sure they have money.
  2. Make sure they have a challenge or issue they have that you can solve.
  3. Make sure they have a meaningful time frame.
  4. Make sure they have the ability to say yes.

According to a study, 57% of the weight towards a buying decision is when they first make contact with a salesperson.

The Unconsidered Need

This is when you’re able to teach something to a prospect they didn’t know they need. Regardless of what you’re saying, figure out something your buyers don’t know that you can educate them on in the decision-making process, in the discovery process, in the qualification process.This will separate you from other sellers.

Episode Resources:

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

TSE Hustler's League, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 590: TSE Hustler’s League-“Tell Me More About The Group”

TSE Hustler's League, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist PodcastToday I’m going through some questions concerning the TSE Hustler’s League that came in and I’m going to answer them here.

Why did I create TSE Hustler’s League?

I was working in a company that did not have any type of support. We didn’t have any training. Imagine the frustration of trying to make money but you’re not. No one wants to be in that situation. However, I was fortunate enough to be in another organization where they had us get into some formal training process and my sales performance skyrocketed.

Training is Costly

Then I got the opportunity to join this Fridays Special Sales Training Group where we met every Friday morning. We had a trainer and he went over a specific topic and pain for that day. It was something about being in a group even if you already know those concepts and principles. But participating in a group can help so much because you get reminded of these things and take them and apply them.

Moreover, sometimes we would find ourselves dying out and becoming mediocre. Being a part of a group like this was a mindblowing thing for me because I learned something new every single week. This was a pretty expensive group at 7k per person.

Great Training You Can Afford

As I built TSE Hustler’s League, I realized there are other sellers out there working especially for small companies who don’t have anything and I feel so bad. So I thought of providing a way for folks who cannot afford my coaching are able to take part in group coaching.

Through the TSE Hustler’s League, I’m able to do a group training and they have access to peer-to-peer learning where members are able to help each other by answering questions and you also have accountability partners.

Getting Started with the TSE Hustler’s League

  1. When you come into the group, you have to qualify to come in. You fill out a registration form which we will review.
  2. You and I will have a 15-20-minute conversation and we both feel it’s a good fit.
  3. We get you all the information so you can proceed with the payment and get access to a portal so you can watch a little video to walk you through the portal.
  4. Then you will get an assigned accountability partner. This person will be your guide in the same way that you’re their guide. Each week after we do the training, you make goals and share them. With that goal, your accountability partner keeps you accountable and follows up with you before the meeting.

Over the past four semesters, I’ve been able to work with individual sellers and I saw what worked and don’t as well as people who are going to make it and those who will not. So we make sure we aligned the right individuals and if folks qualify after speaking with me, they become part of the group.

How much does it cost?

The semester costs $330. Each semester runs for three months so it’s about $110 per month. People, in fact, tell me to raise this price but I intentionally want people to afford it so they can get access to so many information and strategies that I didn’t get before. So I want to make sure that price is not a barrier because I want to give folks the opportunity to improve and get to the next level.

When do we meet?

We do our meetings on Thursdays. For this upcoming semester, it’s going to be Thursdays at 12 EST. If you can’t make the session for some reason, our sessions are recorded so you can locate them in the portal to get access to them. Then you can report to your accountability partner as to your goals for the upcoming week.

Is there a way to communicate with other members?

Yes, you can connect with people on the call or jump into The Sales Evangelizers Facebook group. This is another platform for you to ask questions.

How does the hot seat work?

One member gets the chance to sit down in this figurative seat where you’re able to ask a particular question or share a challenge you’re going through. Then the other members are able to give their advice, feedback, and thoughts.

Episode Resources:

Join the TSE Hustler’s League. We have a new semester coming up and we’re going to focus on closing rate and being buyer-centric.

The Sales Evangelizers Facebook group

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

James Muri, Donald Kelly, The Perfect Close

TSE 513: How To Craft The Perfect Close Every Time

James Muri, Donald Kelly, The Perfect CloseThe CLOSE is one of the most interesting parts of the whole selling process. While most sellers highly anticipate this, it’s also one major area where people make several mistakes in. Our guest today, James Muir, shares with us how you can be more effective through making the perfect close every single time.

James Muir is the author of The Perfect Close: The Secret to Closing Sales – The Bestselling Practices and Techniques for Closing the Deal. James is a Corporate Trainer and Executive Coach who specializes in B2B complex sales, helping salespeople and B2B executives become as effective as they can be.

You may have heard a lot these concepts already but oftentimes, we don’t basically apply the things we know or we know we should be doing. So pay attention. Take notes. And most importantly, take action.
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Here are the highlights of my conversation with James:

Why another book on sales:

  • James discovered the need for a book about closing because he noticed many mistakes done by salespeople on closing sales.
  • People don’t ask for a sale at all or any commitment; in fact, in 50-90% of all sales encounters.
  • A problem of skill (not knowing how) and will (attitude) – The will problem is the most common reason people don’t ask.
  • There is so much dysfunctional selling out there and people are afraid of rejection.
  • 99% of closing methods being taught are manipulative.

Examples of a “manipulative” close:

  • Assumptive close
  • It’s when you try to push the customer faster than they’re ready for that they start to feel being manipulated.

Some Principles of the Perfect Close:

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  1. Figure out the two questions you’re going to ask near the end of the meeting that advances the sale to the next step.

The saying that “selling is everything you do” is not very actionable.

  1. Come in with the right intent.

Intent matters more than technique. Your voice and body languages are sending messages and all this is happening in the first few seconds. You have to come in with the right intent and your body will be sending all the right signals. Otherwise, your prospect will hold information from you and the process now becomes dysfunctional.

  1. Selling is serving.

Understand that each solution you sell helps another person so helping that person move towards that goal is an act of service. Don’t get so caught up in “what’s in it for you” that you tend to forget your goal of helping the client.

  1. Be a better coach and a better teacher.

Clients want a guide that’s going to help them through each little commitment that takes them to achieve their goal. It’s more than selling. It’s leadership. So be a better teacher and a better problem-solver.

  1. Move the sale forward in a little way.

This is taken from Neil Rackham’s concept of advance where you make little advances to create a momentum towards closing the sale. It involves several little “asks” on the way to the big “ask.” Spend time to figure out what are the little steps in your kind of sale that will lead up to your bigger sale.

  1. Have an ideal advance with a couple of alternatives.

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Closing variation #1: The Fallback

Use an alternative in the most natural way to fall back to another possible option. If they say it doesn’t make sense for them to x then you’re going to say, “Other clients this stage tend to do y. Does it make sense for you to do that?” By giving them a logical next step, you’re helping them through their buying process.

Closing variation #2: The Add On

Instead of you saying what’s the good next step, ask if there are any other logical steps you should be taking right now. This allows you to pace your advance at the rate that the client is ready for. Remember, it’s when you start to push them faster that they’d start to feel manipulated.

  1. Create agendas.

At the bottom of your agenda, put your next steps and that’s the moment you’re going to ask how your ideal advance is.

  1. At its core, the perfect close is not a closing question, but a timing question.

Asking for the timing leaves you on a much higher emotional ground than any of the other questions out there. Also, it allows you gauge how engaged they are in the process so this is perfect for pacing.

James’s Major Takeaway:

Intent matters more than technique. If people can see you’re genuinely trying to help them, they will let you help them. Get your intent in the right place and everything else will follow. Be with the customer and be present. Just try to figure out how you can help them out.

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Episode Resources:

Connect with James on his website www.puremuir.com and follow him on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

The Perfect Close: The Secret to Closing Sales – The Bestselling Practices and Techniques for Closing the Deal (Download their models on their website including The 7 Deadly Miss of Closing)

Tired of sharing old, boring proposals to your prospects? Check out PandaDoc. Create electronic proposals to your prospects. Sign and receive payments without leaving your CRM. To get a quick demonstration and a free trial, go to www.thesalesevangelist.com/panda

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Donald Kelly, PandaDoc

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Proposals, Sales Leads, Mikita, Donald Kelly, Closing

TSE 378: 3 Easy Ways To Make Your Proposal Most Engaging

Proposals, Sales Leads, Mikita, Donald Kelly, Closing The part of creating proposals in your sales process can be really annoying especially when you think about the time you’re spending doing it when you could have been actually selling.  Agree?  Now, what if you could skip this part so now you only have to focus primarily on selling?

Personally, I have found a tool called PandaDoc, which has shortened my sales process quite considerably by automating the creation of my sales proposal without losing that personal touch.

Joining us today is Mikita Mikado, co-founder and CEO of PandaDoc and he shares with us 3 easy ways to make your sales proposals more engaging.

PandaDoc is a tool that automates the process of sales proposal helping sales professionals and business owners save time as well as track client engagement with your proposals and allow the client to sign through electronic signatures to make it easy for them to say yes. And it perfectly integrates into whatever CRM you’re using. Currently, PandaDoc is serving over 5,000 happy customers (including me!).

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Mikita:

3 Ways to Make Your Sales Proposal More Engaging:

  1. Add a cover letter and Table of Contents

The first page within a proposal gets most of the time spent by prospects. What you want to do here is either engage with a buyer here or provide a quick and easy navigation through the proposal.

Benefits of adding a short cover letter:

  • Makes the proposal a lot more personal and customized
  • Summarizes the story in a few sentences

Why table of contents?

  • Makes it very easy to navigate through your document
  • PandaDoc features a clickable Table of Contents that allows you to click on each item so you can go straight to it.

If you have two or more people that need to sign off on the proposal, they can just click and they’ll be moved along to just the parts where they need to sign.

  1. Embed videos in your proposal.

Studies suggest that more people prefer video content over text. With people prone to information overload, consuming video content has now become easier than written content. Additionally, PandaDoc saw that a lot more time (in fact 30% more time) is spent on proposals that contain videos.

Benefits of embedding videos in your proposal:

  • Videos are easier and quicker.
  • More personal and it sets you apart from the others.
  • Social proof is a must. Seeing a live human being makes it more professional and more truthful.

Parts of the proposal where you can use video:

  • Client testimonials
  • Case studies
  • Cover letter
  • Product pitch
  • Team introduction
  1. Put a defense section in the proposal.

In many cases, you’re going to go against something or someone. Put a defense section in the body of your proposal to compare your offerings to those of your competitors.

More great tips to rock your proposal:

Put all the legal lease and terms in a separate section of your proposal and make it exportable to Word, as this is what most lawyers use. Send your proposal electronically but if lawyers get involved, you can always export everything into Word. Upload the final version into a PandaDoc so you can collaborate with the customer on the actual terms.

Following up is huge. The moment the prospect opens a proposal, you get an email notification. Wait 20 minutes then give them a call so they can remember what you’re proposing and the price. It’s the best time for you to grasp their emotions.

Mikita’s Major Takeaway:

Never stop experimenting and keep on innovating. Being different and standing from the crowd is the only way to build a large and sustainable business to be successful.

Episode Resources:

PandaDoc

Connect with Mikita through email at mikita@pandadoc.com.

Please support us in our Indiegogo campaign, a movement to inspire others to Do Big Things. Simply go to www.DoBigThings.net.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Register Today!

Do BIG THINGS, West Palm Beach, Florida, EMKO, Donald Kelly, Travis Thomas, The Sales Evangelist, LIVE YES AND

Donald C Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Closing The Deal

TSE 327: How To Close The Deal

Donald C Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Closing The DealA lot of people are having a difficult time closing deals and we tend to put so much emphasis on the close that we actually start to miss. You start to think ahead and that could mess you up. Now if you would relate that with playing football, you basically take off before you actually catch the ball so you missed the catch. Because you were so focused on the next step, you practically missed what you were currently doing.

As a seller, we put so much emphasis on the close. Now what if you treated it just like anything else? Just like walking where it becomes a natural part of you?

Don’t put so much mental emphasis on the close that you trip and mess up. Don’t just swing without hitting anything. Simply think of it in a natural way.

The best way to close a deal is to never skip the process you’re in right from the very beginning. Here are some strategies to help you close the deal for real:

  1. The person must have a challenge that you can solve.

You need to be able to come across as an expert so you can move the problem from being status quo to finding a solution.

  1. Make sure they have the money.

They can’t do anything unless they have the money.

  1. You have to talk to somebody who can say yes.

Early on, make sure they understand that the challenge that’s causing them pain must be alleviated. Emphasize they’re losing something if they’re not doing this.

  1. Get the time frame.

Find out when the deal or project needs to get in place. What are they anticipating? What are they looking to do?

  1. You have to set the rules before you play the game.

Before meeting with the prospect, give them the opportunity to say no. If you get them to say no, then that’s awesome so you can focus more on people who are going to say yes.

  1. Just move naturally into the closing.

Again, don’t put too much emphasis on closing or else you might just fumble in the end. Once you’ve done all the things early on in the sales process, finding out their real challenges and they know they need to move, and you’ve demonstrated how you can help solve their problem then it would be easier for you to naturally close it. Assumptive close works well. Make it as natural as possible.

Episode Resources:

Coaching Salespeople into Sales Champions by Keith Rosen

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

Decision Maker, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Sales Coaching

TSE 302: A New Decision Maker In Town!

Decision Maker, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Sales Coaching How do you handle it when there is a new decision maker in town? A decision maker can mess up your deal if you don’t do it right. And while some things can be out of your control, there are actually a lot of things you can do to prevent disaster from happening or speed up the sales process and pivot things towards success.

  1. Find ways to communicate with them often.

You can’t be unknown to the prospect especially when the sales cycle is so long. Figure out the things you need to get from the prospect and space that out through follow ups (attorney’s agreement, challenges, demo to IT dept., etc.)

Find industry-based information that you can share with them.

Share with them, say a podcast episode that can help them. The goal is to stay in touch with them and keep the communication going.

  1. Find out if there is somebody else in place who can help you out.

It’s okay to bring up with your contact (who’s leaving the company) about who is the next best person who can help you move forward.

  1. Ask your old contact to introduce you to the new person.

An introduction helps tremendously because it breaks down the barrier and you skip starting from the very beginning. If you can’t, you may really have to start from scratch. But be sure you don’t start pushing but establish value again. Then get the person’s input.

  1. Be able to build a relationship quickly.

The new person may have a new agenda so you have to understand that. The key thing is to establish value and get their input on it.

Episode Resources:

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Join Today

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

Closing, Ellory Wells, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 253: Sales From The Street- “Just Ask For The Business”

Closing, Ellory Wells, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast For the second time on the show (and his first on Sales From the Street), we’re bringing back Ellory Wells. All of his work comes down to coaching people on how they can develop strategies to leave the jobs they hate and help them figure out a way to bridge the gap between that and waking up happy everyday.

Ellory has been away from corporate America for about two years. As a business owner, Ellory has faced challenges and that “know-like-trust” factor being one of them. Let’s find out what strategies he’s put to use to overcome this major challenge which many of you may also relate to.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Ellory:

Ellory’s major challenges as a seller:

Anonymity

  • People don’t know who you are or what you have to sell
  • How to convey to people that he has something worth their money, time and investment

Strategies to overcome anonymity:

  1. Ask for business.

Be humble enough to realize that people aren’t going to come to you so you have to go to them.

  1. Know who your avatar is.

Know who your ideal client is.

Ellory’s Major Takeaway:

Figure out two things:

  1. What value do you bring to the table? (Not just what your company wants you to say, but the truth)
  2. What type of customer your needs or skills fit best?

Connect with Ellory through his website www.ellorywells.com/toolbox for a wealth of resources that may just help you in your career.

Episode Resources:

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

Ed Lamont, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, TSE Hustler's League

TSE 210: Street Smart Selling!

The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Donald Kelly How do you become a super seller? For one, you gotta be Street Smart Selling!

For the last 37 years, Ed Lamont has been a commercial property casualty insurance agent, selling insurance to construction contractors and manufacturers. Almost 20 years ago, he started a separate company focusing on insurance companies, insurance associations, state associations, and insurance agencies outside of his immediate territory.

His motto? Sell value, not price.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Ed:

What is Street Smart Selling?

Ed believes that all training is esoteric until you take it to the street. His book, Street Smart Selling, is broken down into four sections:

  1. Beliefs

What do you believe about your product? What do you believe about the value of a protection plan, safety & survival, and people’s assets?

  1. Marketing Strategies

Cold-calling, cold-walking, networking, use of information technology

  1. Specific Sales Skills

How do you hit on objection? How do you use questions to get somebody to open up? How do you ask for the order?

  1. Management

Strategies for Prospecting:

  1. PURPOSE

Tell the purpose of your call. Don’t try to trick someone into a visit. Be direct. Tell them something you believe in and tell them what you’re going to do next. That is a cold call.

  1. PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

Study what your product does and how it works. Know your product’s coverage, service, risk management, and the benefits of your product.

  1. BELIEF

Believe in your product. Believe in what you’re doing. If you can find a problem the customer has and solve it with your product, idea, or good service then they will believe it. Once you know the benefits (meaning truly believing them in your soul) then you can communicate them. Belief is your key to becoming a super producer across an industry.

Strategies for Developing Relationships:

  1. Give them ideas on how to become more profitable.
  2. Patronize your client (if it’s a restaurant, for instance)
  3. Refer their business.
  4. Make matches with your current customers.

Marriages with their own industry with people that can benefit them.

  1. Simply ask them what they want.
  2. Be a sleuth of influence.

The 2 Career Killers in Insurance:

  1. Not asking for the order
  2. People are just lazy

Why?

  • People don’t want to hear “no”
  • They fail to build the value proposition in the entire part of the sales process
  • People don’t want to put the time to set the stage for the close and to make the close more natural.
  • Inability to handle the objection well

Strategies for Closing:

  • Set the rules of negotiation all the way through and confirm them all the way through
  • Handle objections by understanding them first before solving them.

Ed’s Major Takeaway:

“Successful people do what unsuccessful people are unwilling to do.”

Current projects Ed is working on:

  • Speaking engagement
  • Expanding his historical speaking
  • Book #3 in queue

Get in touch with Ed Lamont by calling 561-737-7388 or visit www.lamontconsultinggroup.com. Connect with Ed Lamont thru The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly.

 

 

Jonathan Farrington, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Top Sale World

TSE 154: How To Close Out The Quarter Strong!

How to Close Out the Quarter Strong Ready for this year’s 2nd half of the game?

This is the time of the year when sales professionals get themselves all prepped up to have a great second half. Today’s awesome guest is Jonathan Farrington who brings us a lot of great value, especially with our discussion today.

An international sales celebrity, Jonathan is the CEO and Founder of Top Sales World. He is also a keynote speaker, business coach, and mentor who has worked with over 100,000 sales professionals to improve their craft in sales.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Jonathan:

Invest in a sales team

Why are only 40% of sales people on track for their quota?

  • Reduction in the amount of companies investing in their sales teams
  • The need for learning new selling techniques and selling styles regularly

Why invest money into a sales professional if they’re about to leave?

  • No one will leave if they are well-compensated, given proper praise and recognition, and given proper responsibility

 

Learn the key motivators of each sales professional in your team

  • Different people are motivated by different things – money, praise and recognition, a good relationship
  • Achievement as the main motivating factor

 

The Formula of Successful Salespeople:

  1. Attitude

Successful salespeople are driven.

  1. Skills

Most successful sales folks are incredibly competitive and they enjoy playing competitive sports.

  1. Process

Self-process gives that control.

  1. Knowledge 

Know your company, products, and yourself. Be multi-lingual. Be comfortable talking to recommenders, technical buyers, and all the way up to the C-level.

Why some people can’t perform…

  • Poor sales team = poor sales manager
  • Sales managers should always be coaching to improve their team’s skills.

Bonus tips from Jonathan:

  • Surround yourself with people better than you.
  • Accept responsibility for your development.
  • Work with the mantra: “If it’s to be, it’s up to me.”
  • Take advantage of available resources.

“There is no excuse for anyone not working hard to increase their education and improve their skill sets.” – Jonathan Farrington

Jonathan’s Major Takeaway:

  • Be relevant. Only around 20% of salespeople worldwide are using social media. With social media, there is so much opportunity to gain access to your audience.
  • Keep up-to-date with your existing accounts.
  • You can still find new business from existing accounts.
  • Customer retention and account management & planning are critical.

Get in touch with Jonathan through email at jf@topsalesworld.com

Episode resources:

Top Sales World

Close like a beast; Tom Ricciuti

TSE 132: Start Closing Like a BEAST!

Close like a beast; Tom RicciutiIn this episode, I had the honor of interviewing Tom Ricciuti who is a sales coach, author, host of the weekly business show TomTalk, and keynote speaker on a mission to exorcise negativity; inspiring people to abandon average and dominate like beasts!
 
Tom is known for his acumen on coaching sales professionals on how to dominate; not compete. His approach to selling and closing continues to garner quantifiable growth in each and every endeavor for his clients. Tom feels like there is no better matrix to measure results than the repeat business of clients and a healthy referral program. To do this, Tom has created the ultimate sales training platform for his clients. 

 

As we go through this episode, Tom and I discuss one of  his other programs, “Close Like a Beast”. Now, to “Close Like a Beast” is a life style and a way. Tom took this concept and implemented it in the course he has created to help sellers gain greater confidence in closing sales. Tom believes, “you’re never too old to learn and you’re never too old to get better.”

Here are some of the take away from our conversation.

  • Lack of confidence comes from a lack of confidence in the company they work for, the product/service they offer, or themselves.
  • Negativity feeds on fear and low confidence. When you remove fear, negativity flees and confidence can grow.
  • To help with growing your confidence, you must practice everyday. Just like top athletes who practice and work with a proper coaching staff. As a seller, we need to treat our sales performance like top performing athletes
  • Always have a good attitude, it is never too late to learn and grow.
  • Salespeople need to take responsibility for themselves and not point fingers at others.
  • When you find that you are falling into the quicksand of negativity, you need to stop making excuses and ask for help
  • EOS– Explanation of Service…this is something every seller needs to have. You need to get to the point quickly so that the buyer can see the value and close themselves.
  • Have your sales pitch or explanation of service totally focused on the prospect and make them feel that you care about them.
  • Learn to instill certainty in your prospects through a video testimonial from a third party. You can use this at the end of your sales cycle when a prospect is not quite sure they want to go with you.
  • The number one thing a manager can do to help their sales team is to inspire them with a purpose. They need to have an individual purpose and a company purpose.

Best way to stay in contact with Tom: 

Twitter: @Tom Ricciuti

Email: tom@tomricciuti.com 

Video Series: TomTalk 

Close Like a Beast

Learn more here:

Podcast Paradise Cruise

Fourth Quarter; End of Year; The Sales Evangelist; Closer

TSE 087: 4 Strategies You Must Do To Close Out The Fourth Quarter Successfully!

Fourth Quarter; End of Year; The Sales Evangelist; CloserThis is the final countdown! Indeed, this is a crucial time not only for your pipeline, but also, for your business.

The key is to focus, focus, focus!

Here are 4 Strategies to help you close out the quarter successfully:

 

  • Focus on deals that are more likely to close.

Stop being an opportunity hoarder, which means holding onto deals that you know are not going to close now, but you’re so afraid of losing them, that you never let go and you ultimately waste time trying to bring them in.

What to do? Focus on deals that fits the criteria of your ideal client:

  • You’re communicating with them frequently
  • They have the pain and the budget
  • They have the right decision makers on the deal
  • The deal has not been stagnate for over 6 months

 

  • Be direct with your prospects.

Stop beating around the bush. Be direct with your prospects. What’s the worst thing that can happen? A little bit of pushing is what some prospects need, to finally be able to take the leap they need to do. Amazing things happen when you are direct.

In episode 85, I mentioned three reasons why you’re not closing enough deals. See some of the strategies there. Specifically, the idea of pushing your prospects. Sometimes they can be complacent. Be their educator. The person who will guide them along the path and get them to where they make the decision.

Your golden key:  Have strong relationships with your prospects and buyers.

 

  • Bring in the executives.

Executives have more authority obviously and bringing in an executive from your company to one of your discussions could help the prospect take the next step. Maybe they’re able to offer a few more things that you probably can’t offer to make the deal a little sweeter. This strategy can give that extra oomph to your deal!

 

  • Offer promotions.

Some companies have crazy promotions at the end of the year. For instance, you can offer a “buy one, get one” promotion to target prospects. This may open the door for great business opportunities. This strategy totally works, because these deals and promotions have expiraton dates, thus the scarcity idea encourages prospects to take action.

Now think about your organization, your industry, and your pipeline. Think about what promotions or opportunities you can offer to your prospects or customers to incentivize them to make the purchase.

Previous TSE episodes mentioned:

Episode 79: Is Opportunity Hoarding Killing Your Closing Rate?

Episode 85: Three Reasons Why You Are Not Closing Enough Deals!

 

New to Sales, Not Closing Deals, Closer, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 085: Three Reasons Why You Are Not Closing Enough Deals!

New to Sales, Not Closing Deals, Closer, The Sales Evangelist Having played soccer in my neighborhood as a kid, middle school, high school, and even in college, I can see how the game of soccer can be incorporated into the way we do sales effectively.

Here are the things that I’ve learned from soccer coach, Coach Ruth:

  • Take more shots on goal. Don’t be afraid.
  • It doesn’t have to be perfect. It just has to be a shot towards goal.
  • You can’t just sit back and dribble around.
  • Take shots within the ideal range.
  • The more shots you take on goal, the more you will increase your likelihood of scoring.

Now how do we translate this into sales?

Many sellers are too afraid of asking for the business and closing the deal. It is a fear that hinders then for accomplishing their goals and performing well.

From the soccer example, once you’re in an ideal position, do not be afraid of asking for the business. The 20% of successful salespeople who are bringing 80% of the business are not afraid of asking for business – Why?

  • They believe in what they’re doing.
  • They know it will work.
  • They understand the value that they can bring to their prospects’ organizations.

3 Reasons Why Most Sales Professionals Are Afraid of Asking for the business:

  • They assume the prospects will tell them when they are ready.
  • They don’t want to be pushy.
  • They don’t know how to ask for the business.

My recommendations (addressing the 3 reasons mentioned above):

  1. Sometimes people are complacent with their current situations. They are reluctant to change, so this is where you come in as a sales professional to educate them. Guide them to a point where they say their ready to move forward. This is where you take a shot on goal and ask for the business.
  1. You have to challenge your prospects at times. Take charge of the selling situation and set the terms or rules before you start playing the game.
  • Find out what the buying criteria’s.
  • Find out what their buying process looks like.
  • Understand their process and share with them your process as well.
  • Implement it by having an upfront contract and a plan with steps of what will happen next.
  • Review with them each stage of the process and find out if you fulfilled what they wanted to, based on the criteria that they agreed upon
  • Help them by continuing the process and don’t be afraid
  • Take that next step with them
  • Challenge their status quo to help them get into an ideal situation, where they can overcome the challenges that are hindering them from being productive.

3. Simply, ask for the business.

  • Do not be afraid.
  • Ask “What would you like to do next?”
  • Another example of asking for the business, “based on the criteria’s we discussed, do you feel confident moving forward with us?”

Take more shots on goal!

Go out and do big things!

Previous TSE episodes mentioned:

Episode 6: Quick, Easy Way to Overcome “The Undecided Prospect”

Episode 81: Case Study “How to Deal With People Who Are Too Nice to Say No”

TSE 071: Why You Need to Embrace Silence as a Sales Professional

TSE Epsiode 071 Cover SiteWhy You Need to Embrace Silence as a Sales Person

Have you ever experienced a situation like this? There you are sitting across the table from a prospect who you have been working with for several meetings now. All the signs seem to be there that this will be a done deal and all you have to do is ask for the business. However, since you haven’t been to this stage too often you are nervous. The last thing you need is for her to say no at this point and shatter your little heart. Your palms are really sweaty, your stomach is in knots and your nerves are on high. You find yourself quickly saying the words, “So Barbara, now that you have seen everything, and expressed that this will be a great fit, what would you like to do next?”

Silence………it seems like it’s been an hour, but it’s only been 2 seconds. Since you are so nervous, and think that silence means that they are not convinced, you start talking and things goes terribly wrong. You end up talking too much and the next thing you know the prospect is escorting you out of her office. But where did it go wrong? You didn’t know how to remain silent.

In this episode I share some of the things you can do to over come this challenge and how you can learn to be silent.

Here are some of the major takeaways from the discussion: 

  1. Speaking too much at the close may cause you to introduce new topics that can ruin the opportunity.
  2. When you speak too much, you may cause the prospect to think that you have a something to hide and cause the prospects to hold back from making a decision to move forward.
  3. If you speak too much, you can annoy the prospect and talk them out of the business opportunity.
  4. Silence shows that you are confident in yourself and have ability to deliver value to the prospect.
  5. Silence gives the prospect time to think and organize their thoughts.

Activity to practice so that you can improve your ability to embrace  that awkward silence: 

  • PRACTICE 1:
    • Role play by asking for the business from a prospect. Invite a family member or friend to be the prospect. Tell them that you want to practice asking for the sale from a prospect and that you are having challenges with awkward silence. Explain that you will ask for the sale, but that they should take their time answering. Don’t tell them how long to wait to say something, let it be a surprise. This practice, although simple, will help you embrace the awkward situation.
  • PRACTICE 2:
    • Whenever you ask someone a questions, ANY QUESTION, don’t interrupt them. Let there be silent, even if it’s awkward. Wait for them to answer. It’s fun will will definitely help.
  • PRACTICE 3:
    • Ask a random stranger a thought provoking question, something like “What is the meaning of life?” or “What is the definition of success?”. This could be someone you meet on the train, on the subway, in line at the grocery store. Follow the same idea as above and don’t say anything! Whatever questions you ask, make sure that it is clear and concise.

If you do any of the following practices, send me an email donald@thesalesevangelist.com and tell me about your experience.

 

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