Category Archives for Building Value

Outbound Sales, Alex Berg, Curiosity

TSE 1114: Assessing Curiosity To Optimize The Performance of Outbound Sales Reps

Outbound Sales, Alex Berg, Curiosity

 

Asking questions and learning about the client is an accepted part of sales, but the key is assessing curiosity to optimize the performance of outbound sales reps.

Alex Berg, who has a consultancy in curiosity quotient selling, focuses on leveraging mutual curiosity. He said it isn’t so much the case that sellers aren’t thinking about curiosity, but rather that they are thinking about it too tactically.

Learning about clients

Most sales methodologies are a bit too complicated and don’t really require that much detail. Sellers don’t need to write down 27 questions before they sit down with clients. They simply need to learn enough to ask intelligent, informed questions.

Stephen M.R. Covey wrote a book called Speed of Trust that reports a significant correlation between the development of trust and the pace of decision making. In other words, if you really want to accelerate your sales cycle, build trust. And the fastest way to build trust is to demonstrate curiosity.

Types of curiosity

Alex distinguishes between social curiosity, which is about people, and technical curiosity, which is about how things work.

If you’re in a transactional sales environment, you must focus on getting a decision made quickly. So too much open-ended curiosity could be detrimental.

Begin by assessing what kind of sales organization and what kind of sales process you’re engaged in. You also must know what sort of clients you’re selling to.

Then, assess your individuals and your organizations to determine whether you have the right characteristics to thrive in a particular sales environment. From there, you can assign or hire people based on their ability to deliver on those requirements.

Assessments

As an individual, a certain degree of introspection will help you determine whether sales even makes sense for you as a career. There are many assessments available that can help you determine whether you’re epistemically curious with a general thirst for knowledge or perceptually curious with a desire to solve problems and fix things.

If you’re epistemically curious, you’re well suited for long sales cycles, complex selling, and larger deal size. If you’re more focused on getting it done today, you’ll benefit more from a transactional sales environment. You’ll get more satisfaction from quick decisions.

Leverage strengths

Once we understand where people’s strengths lie, leverage this information in the sales environment and then coach your team accordingly. The most important part of the sales process is the initial discovery. That’s where you’re qualifying the prospect.

The thing you have the most control over is how you spend your time.

Determine whether you even have a solution that makes sense for the prospect.

If we can get a little better at driving rapport and a little better at collecting information, we can reduce the sales cycle. Imagine what it would do to your bottom line if you could shorten it from 6 months to 3.

Creating questions

You must begin by learning enough about the client to ask intelligent questions. Your leadership must also have a mindset that encourages curiosity.

Make appropriate risk-taking acceptable. Many companies will say they want to develop a curious organization, but then they don’t act that way. They focus more on mitigating risk than on allowing reasonable risk.

Ask the tough questions that aren’t always comfortable. Don’t necessarily show up with a list of 15 questions. Instead, develop a list of the five most important questions and then focus your attention on those.

Mindfulness

Before you get on the phone with your clients, eliminate all distractions. Turn off your notifications on your phone so you can really listen to what the other person is saying.

Don’t simply go through the checklist. Focus on asking better questions.

Realize, too, that if you learn from situations that you view as a mistake, then they aren’t truly mistakes. They are learning journeys, and they aren’t negative experiences.

By demonstrating your interest in your prospect, you develop rapport, make the sales cycle more efficient, and hopefully shorten it.

Injecting curiosity

Individual sellers can begin by learning the tools to become more curious. The big win, though, is when companies try to inject more curiosity into their organizations.

Companies that are too internally focused and not client-centric make poor decisions. Alex recalls working for a company who sent a rep to get a deal signed by a prospect who was in the hospital following a heart attack.

The key to long-term success is delivering great value to your clients. In order to do that, you must conduct yourself in a way that communicates your intent to deliver the best possible outcomes.

Arm your people with tools to conduct themselves that way. Leverage technology to make sure your reps have the information they need at their fingertips.

Judging intelligence

People judge our intelligence and empathy by the questions we ask. As a seller, it’s better to approach a client and ask about the issues that are most critical to the company’s growth.

Communicate to the client that you aren’t throwing out a blanket solution. Base your proposed solution on what the expressed needs are.

Come prepared. The primary reason clients become dissatisfied with sellers or that they don’t buy is because the seller didn’t care about them or their businesses. This seller deficit disorder happens when we propose solutions that aren’t informed by knowledge about the client.

We must make it painfully obvious that we understand the client’s perspective so our solution feels like something uniquely designed to solve their problems rather than something off-the-shelf.

If you’re a sales manager working inculcate more curiosity into your sales organization, offer tools that help your client and your salesforce be more curious. Then, when your people use them and find success, celebrate that and give them the opportunity to share their stories.

Embed ambassadors in your sales organizations. Don’t forget this is about mutual curiosity.

When you think you know enough about your clients, ask one more question.

“Assessing Curiosity to Optimize the Performance of Outbound Sales Reps” episode resources

You can connect with Alex via email at alex@cqselling.com or on his website at www.cqselling.com where you can schedule an interview or a phone call. You can also call him at (770) 330-6221. Check out his article, Crushing Quota: Why Curiosity Matters.

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you.

Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester. You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Jordan Ray, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 1095: She is Too Young

The Sales Evangelist, Jordan Ray, Building RelationshipsRayJordan Ray has endured more challenge in her 21 years than most people experience in a lifetime, so when she goes into a large hospital to share the product she has developed, many people believe that she is too young and they fail to understand that she is making a difference and helping others.

It’s a common challenge that many people face, and I faced it in the early days of The Sales Evangelist when I was 30 years old and advising people who were twice my age.

Generations

When Jordan’s health failed at 17, she discovered a need for patients with chronic health conditions to accurately track their pain and symptoms. The log helps patients track their own experiences as a way to improve their treatment plans.

Jordan isn’t offended when people discount her because she’s young. As a softball coach for 15- to 18-year-old girls, she recognizes that she’s only three years older than her players, and she remembers what it’s like to be immature.

She said she doesn’t get frustrated by the fact that people assume she’ll waste their time because she’s too young. In fact, she attributes some of it to the fact that people make assumptions about her generation.

First impression

Though you only get one chance at a first impression, it’s possible to change the impression people have. Jordan points to the story and relationships as the keys to overcoming people’s assumptions about her.

She’s very big on building relationships because she understands that people who aren’t sold on her product won’t buy it no matter how hard she pushes. If they aren’t interested in her product after she shares her story and the value she offers, pushing won’t change that.

She considers herself good with people and she said that’s key to owning a sales company.

Building relationships

Jordan goes to a breakfast networking event every Tuesday where she’s the youngest person by about 25 years. She estimates that she has shared a sit-down with all 50 members of the group despite being too young.

Many of them like her story because she only shares a 30-second brief. She tells them enough of her story to leave them intrigued so that they want to have a follow-on meeting with her.

She begins the relationship by looking for ways to refer business to her prospects. Her goal is to serve them by helping them.

Biggest challenge

She admits that sometimes she feels like she doesn’t have enough to offer in terms of referrals because she has only been doing this for seven months. Compared to people who have been working for 40 years, her connections don’t feel very significant.

Jordan said that her years playing sports taught her to have very high expectations for herself so she struggles when she can’t match the referrals that others can.

While other people are helping her and giving referrals, she finds herself wishing she could do more to return the favor.

Business friends

Jordan laughs about the fact that her personal friends are in their 20s and her business friends are in their 50s. She said she loves keeping up with those people.

Though the sales are obviously nice, she understands that the relationships are going to last beyond one sale or one year. If she makes one sale, that can’t compare to a relationship with someone at a nonprofit who knows countless people and who will support her even as she supports them.

Persistence

She calls herself big on persistence. She got lots of no’s before she launched the company. Many people were convinced she should stay in school.

She recommends staying persistent and refusing to give up on your vision. You’ll get a hundred no’s, but you’ll get that one yes.

“Too Young” episode resources

You can connect with Jordan at www.limitlessmedicallogs.com.

You can also email her at jordan@limitlessmedicallogs.com and share your story with her or you can find her on social media @JordanRay.

If you haven’t connected with me on LinkedIn already, do that at Donald C. Kelly and watch the things I’m sharing there.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Brian Robinson, Donald Kelly, Sales Malpractice

TSE 1084: Sales From The Street – “Sales Malpractice”

Brian Robinson, Donald Kelly, Sales MalpracticeWhen we convince ourselves that we have nothing more to learn, we fail to ask enough questions and we sometimes even commit sales malpractice.

Brian Robinson has been in sales for more than 20 years, but he said that he only thought he knew how to sell while he was in corporate America. He calls his plunge into entrepreneurialism the hardest thing he has ever done, and while it was successful, he said his eyes were opened when he entered the world of “you don’t sell, you don’t eat.”

Brian is the author of the book The Selling Formula, which codifies the steps he used to succeed in that venture.

Intentional questions

Many salespeople do the old “show up and throw up.” We’re so anxious to get to the presentation that we neglect to ask the very best questions we can ask to uncover the needs. We’re seeking sincere engagement from our prospect, so this is the most critical component.

Brian noticed that the best physicians diagnose illness with a list of carefully-crafted questions. That information became especially important when he worked for Johnson and Johnson selling internal devices for laparoscopy. Though the device was clinically superior to anything on the market, he wasn’t getting any responses for trial evaluations.

He knew the device was superior, so he combed through the features and benefits and put together a list of questions related to them. He structured them in a specific order and the wording of each was intentional as well.

Asking questions

He tested the questions, and within about 30 days his trial evaluations doubled because of that list of questions.

When word got out that he had produced those kinds of results, people started asking for his list of questions. He passed it along and found that when people followed the questions exactly, they got the exact same results: they doubled their results.

Brian grew fascinated with the whole idea of going deep on questions. He even developed a personal mantra that questions are the key to life.

Although it took several iterations for Brian to get the list and order of questions exactly right, he stuck with it and he achieved success. There’s still an opportunity to make it even better, but it’s working very consistently now.

Malpractice

Brian defines sales malpractice as providing a diagnosis before you really understand the underlying issues. You won’t be able to give your prospect the best possible answer, and until you’ve uncovered a need, you won’t be able to proceed to the sales conversation.

You have to earn the right to have that conversation. If you rush too quickly into the presentation, your sales presentation won’t be nearly what it could have been.

The key to all of it is how you create your questions.

Get started

Begin by making a spreadsheet with three columns. The first is your features, the second is the benefits related to the feature, and in the third column write down every question you can think of related to those features.

Then take an 80/20 approach. Of the questions you’ve written, which 20% of questions will elicit 80% of the most critical benefits of your product? Start with general fact-finding questions and move into those 80/20 in the most appropriate order to identify the needs.

Imagine you’re selling premade home-cooked meals. What are two benefits to that service?

One is that you’re saving about 60 minutes per meal on grocery shopping, food prep, and cooking time. The other is simplicity. Now generate questions from those benefits.

  • On a weekly basis, how many dinners do you cook for your family?
  • How much time does it typically take you to make dinner?
  • If all you had to do was move something from the freezer to the oven, how would that affect the frequency of your family meals?

Now order the questions from general fact-finding to more specific. Then place the most compelling ones at the top 20 percent of the questions you ask.

Emotional level

Get down to an emotional level. We unfortunately avoid this, often because we aren’t comfortable going that deep into our conversations. We also tend to approach these conversations with a transactional mindset instead of realizing these are human beings with deep emotional and physical needs.

Go the levels that can motivate us to change. We’re trying to make a difference as salespeople. Approach each situation with the mindset that you want to go deeper and ask heart-level questions.

Strive to be seen as a trusted advisor instead of as a sales rep. You’ll have a connection at the human level.

Selling the concept

If someone is willing to grab this idea and test it in their own sales conversations, the proof is in the doing. People have been shocked at the effectiveness of this practice because, shockingly, people don’t think this way.

Brian said he camped out on the questions because that’s where the gold is.

Sometimes management and metrics prompt us to rush the sales process. That causes us to focus on the wrong things. As a result, we end up working twice as hard with less impressive results.

Instead of focusing on outcomes, focus on being so connected to the prospect that the outcome will take care of itself.

We get comfortable where we are, so we live in ignorance. We are amazingly connected to our comfort level. We’re addicted to it. But in order to grow, you have to embrace struggle.

“Sales Malpractice” episode resources

You can get the first three chapters of Brian’s book, The Selling Formula, by going to brianrobinsonbook.com. He also has content associated with the book available at thesellingformula.com.

Try the first module of the TSE Certified Sales Training Program for free.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. I developed this training course because I struggled early on as a seller. Once I had the chance to go through my own training, I noticed a hockey-stick improvement in my performance.

TSE Certified Sales Training Program can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Jason Linett, Sales Podcast, Sales Team

TSE 1081: Leave People Better Off Whether They Buy From You or Not

When you interact with your prospects, your goal should be to provide such great value that you leave people better off whether they buy from you or not.

We’ve been talking about value all month, and today hypnotist Jason Linett talks about how people can change their thinking to grow their business. Growth isn’t just about your platform but it’s largely about how you tell the story to your audience.

We often miss the power of a story and its impact on our potential customers.

Help prospects win

In almost every category, there are others out there who do the same work you do. Storytelling is the one thing that truly sets you apart from the competition so that you’re no longer just a commodity. Your customers can go find another business coach or web designer, and even another hypnotist.

Jason points out that he didn’t get married by approaching a pretty girl at school and announcing that they were going to have children together. Instead, they built a relationship through the natural progression that occurs when people get to know each other.

Look at the relationship building aspect of it. You know that you want to help people, so look for something that will help the customer. Find things you can set in motion that will help your prospects win.

Suddenly, there’s a collection of people out there who didn’t need your entire service but they are in the raving fan category. Some of those that you helped will move forward in the funnel in order to see how you can help them even more.

Ditching fear

Most people don’t seize this concept because they fear giving away too much. They believe that if they give away too much, people won’t buy from them.

Jason said that he has given away more than most people in his industry. He has also earned more than most of the people in his industry. He believes the two naturally go together.

Think of it as a difference of show versus tell. I can tell you what methods may be helpful and you can research them and dig into them in order to determine whether they might truly work, or I can get together with you and actually help you do it.

Many people want to try an at-home version before they commit to the live “being in the room” version.

Convince people to care

How do we get people to care before we ever really ask them to listen?

We need to think differently. It’s about listening to the audience and responding to their requests.

Jason calls hit pitch “The Hollywood Effect.” It’s based on the tendency of movies to launch you directly into some piece of the action, get you swept up into it, and then rewind to tell you the back-story.

He launches into a story about murder, and about a new mother who moved into a hotel after seeing a bug in her home. By the end of her first meeting with him, she killed a housefly with her bare hand.

Draw in the entire room. Get them to put down their food and listen to what you have to say.

Value-first mindset

Do the opposite of what everyone else is doing. If everyone else is doing things one way, let that be your cue to do it differently.

As you decide how to move forward, pick the option you are most comfortable with. That’s your first entry point and you should flesh that out completely and make it exactly what you want it to be.

Once that piece has become a machine that’s running itself, you can branch off to some other thing.

Finding the time

Jason suggests that there’s no such thing as “finding the time.” It’s a game we invented to trick ourselves into not doing things we’re absolutely capable of. Instead, we should use the mechanism of making time.

Consider putting everything on a scheduling platform. Make use of color-coding. Choose one color for the events that cannot be changed.

The number one tip is to listen. So often we catch ourselves trying to mind-read our audience instead of starting with the ask and discovering the customer’s greatest need.

Sometimes what they want is different than what they need. You’re selling what they want, so you’ll deliver what they want, but along the way, you can overdeliver by providing what they need.

“Leave people better off whether they buy from you or not” episode resources

You can connect with Jason at jasonlinett.com or on social media as Jason Linett.

You can also grab a copy of his book, Work Smart Business: Lessons Learned From Hypnotizing 250,000 People and Building a Million-Dollar Brand. Head to worksmartbusiness.com for a freebie called the Positive Influence Power Pack that will teach you specific strategies to influence yourself and others.

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, Building Value, Selling

TSE 1067: 5 Things You Get Wrong When It Comes To Building Value

Donald Kelly, Building Value, Selling

If you’re giving your customers things that you value instead of focusing on things that your customer needs or wants, you should be aware of the  5 things you get wrong when it comes to building value.

We’re dedicating the month of April to a discussion of building value, and we’re starting with the fundamentals of building value.

1.  We fail to solve the problem.

People will only change if they see a distinct need for it, and sometimes our customers don’t even recognize that they have a problem. Or, in other instances, they may have found a solution or a band-aid to the problem that seems to be working.

People don’t fix things that seem to be working.

Your job as a seller is to ask the right questions to help them consider or see the importance of addressing their challenge. Once you’re able to help them identify the problem, we must provide a clear solution to help them address it.

Donald Miller has a wonderful three-step process that lays out exactly how you can move through the process.

If the buyer doesn’t have confidence in your ability to guide him through the solution, you’re likely going to lose the deal like I did when it happened to me.

2.  We focus on what we like. 

I’ve taught this principle over and over again as the platinum rule: treat others the way they would like to be treated. It’s a step up from treating people the way that you’d like to be treated.

Don’t focus on features or benefits that you like. Focus on things that the buyers like.

Buyers may choose to work with you for a variety of reasons, but not all of your product’s features will be important to the buyer. Not all of your service’s benefits will matter to him.

Once you’ve identified the problem that the buyer needs to address, and you’ve given the buyer a clear plan, avoid the urge to give the buyer things he doesn’t need. Give him the things that are important and necessary for him and nothing more.

You may have 100 features, but the buyer likely has one problem that is costing him a lot of money. He needs the feature that will solve that problem. Yes, he’ll get much more than that with your product or service, but focus on his main problem to start.

Over time you can educate him about additional features.

3.  We don’t listen to the customer.

This ties closely to number 1 because we often continue talking even after the buyer has agreed to buy.

Our conversations and discovery meetings are intended to help us discover things about our prospects. It’s not intended to be a lecture.

Sometimes sellers believe that if we’re talking, we’re winning, and that simply isn’t true. Think of it like dating: you want the other person to perceive that you’re interested.

Studies indicated that you shouldn’t talk more than 30 percent of the time, and that will only happen if you come prepared with meaningful questions. That will help the buyer express himself and his challenges.

Once you’ve listened, you can pitch to the one thing he needs the most.

4.  We think we must have the lowest price.

This issue emerges frequently with sellers who think that value means having the lowest price, but it simply isn’t true. I’ve lost deals before to companies that were bigger and more expensive than my own product or service.

When I looked back, they didn’t care that we were cheaper. They were concerned that I didn’t focus on their problem and show them a clear path to solve it. They didn’t have the conviction that I was the one who could best help them.

If you’ve done a fantastic job of identifying their problem and you’ve helped them find a solution, they’ll see the value in what you’re offering. If, for example, their problem is costing them $50,000 a year but your solution will cost them $5,000 a year, that’s a good saving for them.

Show me that you understand my problem and that you have a solution. Then show me that you’ve solved this kind of problem before. That will give me, as a buyer, confidence in you as a seller.

5.  We believe that more is better.

We often mistakenly believe that offering our customer more is better because it’s a way to increase value.

You might be giving away so many add-ons that your company loses money. In the future, your customer will likely expect the same kind of discounts and bonuses. If the customer stays with you for only a year, you will have lost the client before you could recoup your losses.

Resist the urge to give away everything for free. Enjoy the silence in your conversation. Don’t jump out and start talking too quickly.

They may not be looking for more value but rather just contemplating the purchase.

Keep things simple for your buyers and remember that less is often more. We know a lot more than our buyers about our product, and they don’t need to know everything that we do.

Avoid these mistakes and you’ll have much better success building value.

“Building Value” episode resources

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Closing

TSE 1065: TSE Certified Sales Training Program – “Don’t Make The Closing an Event”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, ClosingSellers are understandably focused on the closing of any deal but it’s important that we keep things in perspective and don’t make the closing an event.

The truth is that every transaction has a beginning, a middle, and an end, but we often get so focused on the closing that we unnecessarily freak ourselves out.

This conversation comes from our TSE Certified Sales Training Program, our sales coaching program that helps sellers maximize their effectiveness.

Sales process

The sales process naturally builds toward a close where the client signs the deal and then everyone celebrates. Our challenge as sellers is to avoid the temptation to make the closing the entire focus of the sale.

Focus throughout the sale on building value. Initiate conversations that address your prospects’ challenges and difficulties. Realize that you’ll never get to the closing if you don’t effectively address the buyers’ objections.

Help the buyer feel confident in this deal by sharing stories that provide value and dispel your customers’ objections. Instead of waiting for your customer to offer his objections, bring them up on your own terms as a way of building trust.

Red flags won’t go away simply because you ignore them. They don’t typically diffuse themselves, and your decision to wait until the end of the process to address them could cost you your deal.

Growing problems

Like many other relationships in life, struggles between buyer and seller don’t naturally disappear over time. In fact, problems often get bigger and worse as we fail to address them.

A single demo for your client won’t magically offset all his concerns, so don’t wait until then to address his objections. If he has concerns about your product or service, it won’t likely matter how good your demo is: you won’t overcome his hesitation until you address the problems.

Addressing fears

Whether you’re selling water, computers, or houses, your buyer doesn’t want to part with his hard-earned cash until you’ve addressed his fears.

He may want a new house. He may even need a new house. But he has fears of his own:

  • What if he can’t afford this house?
  • What if an unforeseen issue comes up?
  • How much will hurricane insurance cost?

Help him minimize those risks and fears throughout the process. That way, when he gets to the end of the transaction, those fears won’t be an issue.

Prospecting

Hubspot reported recently that as many as 40 percent of salespeople don’t like prospecting and about 30 percent struggle with closings. As a result, we tend to make closings a big deal in our own heads because we’ve worked so hard to find a prospect and get to this point.

Instead of viewing it as a huge event, we should think of it as a natural byproduct of the sales process, and we should move the buyer smoothly through to conversion.

Conversion begins the moment I start building value for my prospect. If I focus on blind-side challenges and identifying key problems, I can address objections early and minimize the risk that my deal will fall apart.

My goal is to eliminate any reasonable doubt about whether I’m the right vendor for the prospect.

Pitching yourself

If you’re able to identify the companies your prospect is currently working with, you’ll be better able to pitch your own strengths against theirs. You can identify the competition’s weaknesses and use those to make your case.

Share stories about past clients who have left that company to work with you and explain why they made that choice.

Build one-on-one conversations into your process as often as possible so you can clarify any questions as they develop. Once you understand the big issues that will likely sabotage your deal, you can help everyone get to the same page.

Follow your demonstrations with an email outreach offering to address any new questions the prospect has.

Avoid pushing objections to the end of the process. Make objections and questions a constant part of your dialogue so that you minimize any risk toward the end of the deal.

Strive to create a smooth experience for your customer.

“Don’t Make The Closing an Event” episode resources

You’ve heard us talk about the TSE Certified Sales Training Program, and we’re offering the first module free as a gift to you. Preview it. Check it out. If it makes sense for you to join, you can be part of our upcoming semester in April.

You can take it on your own or as part of the semester group. The program includes 65 videos altogether, and we just completed a beta group that helped us improve the program and maximize the information in it.

If you and your team are interested in learning more, we’d love to have you join us. Call (561)578-1729 to speak directly to me or one of our team members about the program.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Paint a Picture

TSE 1050: TSE Certified Sales Training Program – “Paint A Picture”

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Paint a PictureIf you paint a picture for your customers of where they are now versus where they want to go, you can help them make a buying decision.  Show them how the positive change will happen, or what might happen if they don’t change. It will allow them to logically justify an emotional decision.

Jeffrey Gitomer was my first ever guest and he taught us something interesting on that very first podcast: People love to buy but they hate to be sold.

Think about that.  Nobody wants to feel tricked or manipulated. That is the last thing that you want to do as a sales rep. You want to help them to buy.

Your job is to guide clients through a process that educates them.

Become an artist

The key is to paint amazing pictures that feel so real and so vivid that your clients can see the value being offered.

Imagine we have presented our business case and the prospect is loving it. They know it is amazing but they will naturally start to compare it to their current situation.

What are we doing? What are our sales reps doing? How much time are they spending? Are we wasting time?

It is time to paint the picture for them.

Asking ‘why?’

Toyota once used the ‘Five Whys’ concept to get to the root of a problem; to fix the real issue of any problem instead of the surface-level problem. As an example, suppose I take my car into the shop because I have a flat tire from hitting a pothole.

As a sales rep, there are many things you could sell me. I need a new tire, for sure. Do I also need glasses so I can see potholes in the future? Maybe I didn’t see the pothole because I was speeding. Perhaps I was late and I need to buy an alarm clock.

What if I was running late because I am not disciplined enough to properly prioritize my day? Will a new tire or a pair of glasses help with the root of my problems? No.

When it comes to your prospect, once he agrees with your business proposal and realizes that he is in the same scenario you’re describing, that is the time to share with him how you can deliver.

Paint the picture that directly represents his business and his situation. Ask him what you need to know.

Do you feel the scenario that I’ve presented fits your situation? Why do you think that is the case? What have you tried before to address this same problem? What are your goals?

Become a consultant

Become a consultant that will help solve their problems. You’ve already painted a picture with your business case. Once you have your answers – once you have more details – you can effectively execute the demonstration.

Know your client’s timeframe and budget.  Go over who will be involved in the process and the criteria for future decisions. Everything discussed during the buyer’s journey needs to be referenced during the discovery call as well. It helps make the closing that much easier.

Underpromise and overdeliver

If I know I can deliver 4x, I often promise 3x because it is a simple fact that my clients will be much happier if they accomplish more than they expected.

You can help the prospect realize that the decision is theirs. It is not being forced upon them and it is not manipulative. Rather, with your help, they realize where they are and the challenges they face in moving forward. We have had meaningful and educating dialogue that provided solutions and opportunities for change. The buyer’s decision is now up to them.

“Paint a Picture” episode resources

We are currently in the Beta portion of our new TSE Certified Sales Training Program. The first section is about prospecting, the second is all about building value, and the third is about closing.

This episode is brought to you by the TSE Certified Sales Training Program. If 2018 wasn’t the best year for you, check out TSE Certified Sales Training Program. We can help you out of your slump.

If you gave a lot of great presentations and did a lot of hard work, only to watch your prospects choose to work with your competitors, we can help you fix that. The new semester of TSE Certified Sales Training Program begins in April and it would be an absolute honor to have you join us.

This episode is also brought to you in part by mailtag.io, a Chrome browser extension for Gmail that allows you to track and schedule your emails. It’s super easy, it’s helpful, and I recommend that you try it out. You’ll receive real-time alerts anyone opens an email or clicks a link.

Mailtag.io allows you to see around the corners. You can see when people open your email, or when they click on the link you sent. Mailtag.io will give you half-off your subscription for life when you use the Promo Code: Donald at check out.

I hope you enjoyed the show today as much as I did. If so, please consider leaving us a rating on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode. Share it with your friends who would benefit from learning more.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Tyler Sickmeyer, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 941: Build Enough Value Before You Try To Close

Tyler Sickmeyer, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistThe process of building value begins early in the buying journey. Sales professionals talk a lot about building value, but the truth is that value looks different to everyone.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we have a candid conversation about value — and why it’s important to build enough value — with Tyler Sickmeyer, founder and CEO of Fidelitas Development.

Defining value

People define value differently.

The word value suggests something of worth. It’s how people measure the desirability of something. It’s the answer to the question, “How bad do you want it?”

Because people are different, they will place different amounts of value on things.

This truth shows up all the time on TV shows where people go garage sale hunting or “picking.” One person just wants something out of the house, and it’s a bonus if they can get a little money out of the deal. The other person recognizes an opportunity to buy something of value and flip it to make money.

Value is a matter of perception.

Finding a fit

Your product or service probably won’t be a good fit for everyone.

Tyler’s company recognizes that, and Fidelitas uses it to field the right sales team and to find the right clients.

To avoid wasting people’s time, the team strives to have honest conversations early in both the hiring process and the buying process to make sure the fit is a good one.

The team recently passed on a project that was beyond the scope of its expertise because it didn’t want to tackle work that would create headaches and potentially tarnish the brand.

Tyler believes that acknowledging limitations and pointing the client in the direction of a team who is a better fit is a form of building value. By saving the prospect a lot of time and headache, they built value for the prospect.

Value creation

Any time you take on a project that isn’t ideal, you’re missing an opportunity to find something that is ideal because you have a finite amount of resources available.

We’ve all made these mistakes, and Tyler calls it “drinking your own Kool-Aid.”

When you ignore your instincts and take on clients that you shouldn’t take, it creates headaches for your team and can bring toxicity to your culture.

Tyler found that those tended to be the lowest-paying clients who treated his people poorly, so they’ve learned now to fire those clients if they misbehave.

Better yet, they have very clear conversations ahead of time to set expectations.

In the midst of sharing what makes Fidelitas such a great agency, they make sure to ask, “Why would you be a good client?”

Wrong incentives

When you have a sales team that is incentivized incorrectly, a team that is trying to hit unrealistic numbers or that has been set up for failure, you’ll damage your brand.

If, for example, you accept a client that isn’t a good fit, but you justify it because you want the sale, you’re entering dangerous territory.

If the sales process goes badly, they’ll tell other people. Though you might eventually refund their money to compensate for the trouble, they won’t get back the time they lost in the process.

The result will often be people who are anti-evangelists to your brand because their experience is so bad.

Focus on quality over quantity.

Most people shop for cars on Sunday because they know the dealerships are closed. They aren’t going to be “sold to.”

After the sale

One of the big questions to ask is what happens after the sale. Once we’ve made our first payment and committed to this purchase, what will the relationship look like?

Look for someone who is invested in you after you swipe your credit card.

Things will always go wrong because we’re human. But when something does go wrong, what will the process of fixing it look like? Who will have the decision-making power to make things right for us as customers?

Don’t leave your customers feeling as though they are shouting into the wind. Treat your customers well.

Remember this overall: if your product or service doesn’t perform well, and it makes me look bad in front of my clients, you’re likely going to have a big problem on your hands.

Onboarding questions

Two questions to consider:

What do our wins look like? What does a win look like for you and for your boss? Those aren’t always the same thing.

Sometimes you’ll know what’s needed for the brand, but your boss will need vanity metrics that are different. Being a good partner is doing both things.

Do you want a vendor or a strategic partner? If you’re simply looking for a vendor, Fidelitas probably isn’t the right partner for you. If you’re simply looking for five Facebook posts on a regular basis, you can most likely find this service cheaper somewhere else.

Think of it as two kinds of agencies: a Wonderbread factory and an artisan bakery.

One team will offer you off-the-menu options with add-ons to address your pain points. The other will customize a strategy and solution; a customized approach that positions it as your strategic partner.

If you just want a Facebook page or a website, you can find that somewhere else. We’ll help you understand why we’ve chosen the strategies that we’re using.

Fidelitas wants to work with clients who value their insights.

Strategic partnerships

Focus on strategic partnerships rather than just vendor relationships.

Figure out how you can add value. Adding value includes things like taking your team on a road trip to visit the client and get to know their needs. You aren’t being paid for that, but it will help you address their pain points.

If you can give something that the client didn’t pay for, and exceed their expectations with superior service, you’re providing value, and you’ll take your relationships to the next level.

“Build Enough Value” episode resources

You can find Tyler’s podcast, Lion’s Share Marketing Podcast, on iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, Stitcher, and anywhere that you’re listening to this podcast. Learn more about marketing wins and brand marketing strategies.

You can also find him on Twitter and you can email him at Fidelitas’ website.

This episode is brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Prospect.io, Maximizer CRM, Donald Kelly, Closing Skills

TSE 940: TSE Hustler’s League-“We Can’t Sell It Right Now”

 

Prospect.io, Maximizer CRM, Donald Kelly, Closing SkillsMost sales reps believe they are good closers, but the truth is that many struggle. It’s difficult to persuade someone to spend thousands of dollars, or even hundreds of thousands of dollars, on what you’re offering. Until you build value, you can’t sell.

On today’s episode of The Hustler’s League, we’ll talk about why tricking people into saying yes will never work and the reasons why you can’t sell.

Early closing

My philosophy about closing is that it begins early in the sales process, but there are things you can do to help bring the client across the finish line.

Scarcity won’t help you convince the buyer to buy; you have to give the buyer a reason. You must bring value.

The buyer will determine whether something is valuable or not. Even if you push it as the most amazing product or service ever, if the buyer doesn’t recognize it as such, the buyer won’t invest.

You’ve heard this before because we’ve talked about it in previous episodes.

Build value

When you’ve built enough value or excitement, naturally the buyer will want to continue. Your buyer will want what you have.

Sometimes, however, you have to push buyers across the finish line, or simply guide them across.

When your prospect has had a particular software for many years, she may not see an obvious reason to change. If it’s not immediately obvious why she should change, and you can’t bring her across, then she probably won’t buy.

Walking her across the finish line is what closing is all about.

Change of heart

We had a client who found us online and who was interested in our services. She was really excited, and we built a tremendous amount of value in what we were offering.

When it was time to sign up, she initially wanted to sign up for our low-end package. But throughout the conversation, she decided she wanted to buy our higher end package.

That’s likely because I emphasized to her that I wasn’t able to work with her at that time because I was already working with other clients. I didn’t have the time to invest at that exact moment, but when my schedule freed up, I would be able to.

When she realized that other people were trying to work with me and that my time was valuable, she changed her tune.

Scarcity was her motivation. I didn’t try to trick her or lie to her. I was simply letting her know that, even if I wanted to work with her at that moment, I didn’t have time.

Scarcity

Sometimes the scarcity effect will serve you well in the sales process. It’s similar to loss aversion.

We’ve talked about loss aversion before, but it simply refers to the fear we have of losing something.

The customer I was working with didn’t want to miss out on her chance to work with us. She wanted to sign up immediately for the higher-end package. She saw so much value in working with me that she didn’t want to miss out.

How do you create scarcity without coming across as cheesy?

Do it by being time sensitive and emphasize your finite time. If you only have a certain amount of time to devote to coaching, use that fact to your advantage.

Amy Porterfield only offers her course twice a year. As a result, there’s a small window which creates scarcity. The window won’t open back up until the next go-round, so people feel compelled to jump in.

Window of opportunity

If you’re selling software every day, scarcity doesn’t really exist. But can you offer certain things at certain times? Can you create time-sensitive deals.

Maybe you offer a proposal that expires within a certain time period.

If you can uncover that they are losing a certain amount of money every month, use that against them. Remind them how their failure to act is costing them money.

Or create scarcity by reminding them that if you’re going to get the new system in place by a certain date, you’ll have to close the deal by a certain date.

Missing out

When I was selling security systems, people would ask me to come back the next day so they would have time to think about it. I was able to tell them that we wouldn’t be in that same neighborhood tomorrow, which created a sense of scarcity.

Cell phone companies effectively use this concept when they release new phones. They use preorders to create a sense that you will be among the first to get them.

No one wants to be the loser, so after you’ve built enough value, use scarcity to coax your prospect across the finish line.

Use time sensitivity to close more deals, and then let us know how it works for you. Drop me an email at Donald@thesalesevangelist.com, or post a question on our Facebook page The Sales Evangelizers.

“We Can’t Sell It Right Now” episode resources

Use time sensitivity to close more deals, and then let us know how it works for you. Drop me an email at Donald@thesalesevangelist.com, or post a question on our Facebook page The Sales Evangelizers.

Learn more about the TSE Hustler’s League in preparation for our new semester that begins in January. We’d love to have you check it out and join us.

This episode is brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. To get a demonstration of maximizer, go to the sales evangelists.com/maximizer.

Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you. It integrates your marketing campaign as well as your CRM, and it works whether you’re a small organization or a large one.

This episode is also brought to you in part by prospect.io, a powerful sales automation platform that allows you to build highly personalized, cold email campaigns. To learn more, go to prospect.io/tse. It will help you with your outbound to expand your outreach and it allows you to set it and forget it. Your prospecting will never ever be the same.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Donald Kelly, Inbound, Inbound Leads, New Leads, Sales Leads

TSE 912: What Should Sales Know About Inbound Leads?

Donald Kelly, Inbound, Inbound Leads, New Leads, Sales LeadsInbound is a powerful tool for your organization. We all want inbound leads, but we have to work with our teams to make sure our company will be known by the people who are seeking our product or service. What should our sales team know about inbound leads?

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’ll talk about what inbound is, why it’s important, and how powerful it can be for your organization. Sales professionals who are capable marketers will be able to massively impact their own bottom line.

What is inbound?

HubSpot is the leading online site for inbound marketing, and it defines inbound as marketing focused on attracting customers through relevant and helpful content, and by adding value at every stage in a buyer’s journey.

Inbound customers find you through channels like blogs, search engines, podcasts, and social media. So in a nutshell, inbound is where you set up the means to attract people to your website to digest your content.

Many times, our customers fail to find our business because we don’t do enough preparation. We sit back and hope that someone will find us, or that we’ll get a referral.

The goal is to provide education to our customers.

In the opening of the show, I told you about Jan, who tasked her employee Dave with finding new financial software for their company. The existing software wasn’t working, and they needed a new option as quickly as possible.

Dave started by Googling software, which was the beginning of his buyer’s journey.

As an organization, do you have videos on your YouTube or Vimeo or wherever you host videos?  Is there a way for your customers to find videos on your website?

The buyer’s journey

With HubSpot, the journey begins by attracting people who don’t know anything about you.

In this case, Dave is trying to find accounting software, and perhaps you have a blog post on your website titled 10 Things to Know About Buying Accounting Software. Or even 5 Mistakes People Make When Buying Accounting Software.

You must have a piece of content that will help your customer learn more about your product or service. You’re looking to educate your customer.

In the case of this podcast, a potential customer might search cold calling and find a podcast episode relevant to that topic. He’ll listen to the podcast and then perhaps reach out to me or download one of our assets.

Our podcast attracts people to our product.

The conversion state begins when they download something of value from your page. You may have a few emails that you send out which begins the nurturing process. Your sales team might even reach out to him to see if he has questions.

Once they convert or close, you delight them so they’ll give you more referrals.

Think like the buyer

Too many of us neglect the early part of the buyer’s journey: the attraction.

In the attraction phase, you must think like the buyer. What are the top five questions Dave might have as he researches financial software? As the prospect gathers information, what will he discover?

Buyers are doing incredible amounts of research before they come to the sales table. Your job is to educate them.

If you find yourself worrying that they’ll buy someone else’s stuff even after you give them valuable information, you’re likely worrying too much.

In the case of The Sales Evangelist, some people listen to my podcast without buying anything at all immediately. Two years later, they come back and purchase one of our programs or our trainings, but it likely wouldn’t have happened if I hadn’t provided information.

Give your customers things that they need, and especially things they may not know that they need to know.

You can use a video, a checklist, or social media. Give them education and relevant content.

We’re launching a YouTube channel and our Instagram TV on October 1 so people can consume our content via video if they prefer.

The basics

What challenges is your customer facing? What things does she need to know before she buys something?

Attract the prospect. Give her a chance to come to you first. The person she connects with first will most likely be the one she buys from, so increase the odds that she’ll find you before she finds your competition.

In the case of Dave, if you help him look good for his boss, he’ll likely come back and praise you and then send referrals your way. It’s a wonderful cycle.

I share all this stuff with you because I want to help you find more ideals customers. I want you to build stronger value and close more deals. Most importantly, I want to challenge you to go out every single day and do big things.

“Inbound Leads” episode resources

Is your CRM functioning properly? It’s important to have a CRM that your team is willing to use.

If you’re unhappy with your CRM, check out Maximizer CRM. If you’re happy with your CRM, check out Maximizer. It has been around a long time, and it’s worth the time to check out the free demonstration.

Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities. Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. Video Jungle offers top-notch, state-of-the-art advice about video which is a great way to offer relevant content on LinkedIn.

Leave us a review on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Stitcher, or wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility.

If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Josh Smith, Value, STACKED, Sales Book

TSE 904: Sales From The Street-“Building Value Pre, During & Post Meeting”

Josh Smith, Value, STACKED, Sales Book

We all understand the importance of building value for the prospect. It’s important to know, too, that it’s an ongoing process. We should focus on building value before, during, and after the meeting.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Josh Smith, author of How to Guarantee Qualified Sales Meetings With Real Decision Makers, explains why building value is such a massive part of the sales process, and why it must occur from the beginning to the end.

How can I prepare?

Sales reps often begin with the very best intentions. Despite their plan to provide value, they find themselves quickly resorting to features, benefits, and pitching a product.

Position yourself as an additional member of the team who gives them content and education, and who helps them overcome business challenges. Providing value builds trust and credibility.

Josh said he likes to start with LinkedIn, and he sends them valuable content that helps them realize that he is different from other sellers. He focuses on content that is relevant and specific to the prospect.

Where do you find this kind of content?

Narrow down your prospect list to one industry. Determine a narrow audience that you want to hit with your messaging. Set up an account on Google Alerts and identify some keywords that I want to be notified of. Google will email me any time a relevant piece of content emerges.

It’s automated, and I can send it straight to my prospect knowing that it will be relevant.

Consider using Feedly as well. It’s a content aggregator that allows you to type in information about who you’re trying to reach and it will aggregate specific content that you know will be relevant to the prospect.

Building value up front with relevant helpful information will help me build trust before I even tell them what I do. Do it for about 30 days. You can pitch them sooner than that if you want, but this is a consistent process that helps you develop qualified leads who trust you.

Set yourself apart

The difficulty is that a lot of sellers have adopted this same approach to prospecting. The challenge, then, is to make sure that your information catches their attention.

Pay attention to industry events that your prospects might attend. Look at the topics and the tracks that the industry is discussing to get a really good idea of the challenges facing the industry.

It’s not a huge problem if you’re sending information that’s similar to what someone else is sending. As long as the content you send provides value that will help move them along with a challenge that they are facing, it will give you a way to start a dialogue. Additionally, if you’re really quick with Google Alerts, you might still send the content before others do.

If you haven’t already asked them, find out what kind of content your customers in a given industry find valuable. Once you’ve identified that, you can start addressing those topics with your new prospects.

Also, make sure to measure and optimize what you do. When you send content, track its effectiveness. Determine which content earned you responses and which didn’t.

Provide value in the meeting

Your goal is to position what you do as more valuable than what others are doing. Create urgency around your solution.

The more credible your urgency story is, the better it will be. When you first meet the prospects, set the expectations from the start rather than waiting until the back end.

If you go all the way through your pitch before revealing that you’ve only got two spaces left, you lose some credibility. If you wait until the end of the pitch to say you can only offer this price today, you’ll lose credibility.

Move everything that you traditionally do at the back end of the pitch to the front. It creates believable urgency.

“I’ve only got two spots left and that’s exactly why I wanted to talk to you.”

Ask hard questions. “Why haven’t you already found a solution to this problem?” You can provide a more valuable pitch by knowing the answers to the hard questions.

Treat the person’s time with respect. By asking hard questions, you’re eliminating unnecessary information and providing the best solution for them the very first time.

Provide value after the meeting

This is the most important part because it’s where conversions can happen.

Offer a bit of free consultation after the meeting. Now that I understand the challenges they are facing, I can put together an overview of the meeting including some free suggestions that will help them move forward: 3 or 4 action steps.

Do it within 24 hours, because very few people are doing this.

Follow up with video. Josh’s conversions have doubled since he started following up with video.  Send a video of you talking about the meeting and the expectations. Video allows them to see you and see your energy.

“I just had a thought after our discussion of something we could do to help. Let’s talk next week.” It gets them back on the phone, and given that it takes an average of 12 touches to close a deal, that’s important.

Wistia is a fantastic platform that helps you shoot video even if you aren’t a video editor. You record it, upload it, and then send it, and it’s completely free. It provides data about when they watched it and how long it played for so you’ll know how effective it was.

Make value in your sales process. Be an honest advisor.

“Building value before, during, and after the meeting” episode resources

Connect with Josh on LinkedIn or Instagram. Grab a copy of his book about how to generate qualified leads with decision-makers using LinkedIn.

Pre-order your copy of How to Guarantee Qualified Sales Meetings With Real Decision Makers and start seeing immediate impact in your business.

Check out Feedly to keep up with content that is important to you. It’s a free platform that gathers important stories that will help you build value for your prospect.

Google Alerts allows you to set notifications for content that relates to your prospects. It will help you provide valuable content that helps your prospects manage challenges and solve problems.

Today’s episode is brought to you by Maximizer CRM, a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities. Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, Sales Coaching, The Best Sales Podcast, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 897: 15 Great Sales Coaching Questions You Should Ask

Donald Kelly, Sales Coaching, The Best Sales Podcast, The Sales Evangelist

As a sales manager, your focus must rest largely on your sales reps rather than your customer. You must win your sales reps over in order to get them to perform at their peak. Do that asking great sales coaching questions and building strong relationships.

On today’s episode, we’ll discuss how to help your sales team perform to the best of its abilities. We’ll cover 15 great sales coaching questions you should ask.

Questions to ask

1. Which part of the sales process is most challenging?

If you’re setting a lot of appointments but not a lot of demos, something is falling short in your process. Maybe you aren’t building value. If I can sit down with a sales rep and discover where the issues are, you’ll help your sales rep perform better.

2. What inspires you?

A leader knows what inspires his team. If you aren’t sure, ask.

3. What are the specifics of this particular deal?

Seek the specifics of every deal. Find out the challenges and the criteria in order to find out how great the deal really is. If you train your sales team to seek specifics, they’ll learn early to ask the important questions.

4. What have you tried so far?

When a sales rep comes to you with a challenge, don’t get into the habit of solving their problems for them. Don’t give him the answers. Help him solve the problem himself and teach him to be a problem solver.

5. Why do you think that didn’t work? 

Teach your sales reps how to evaluate a problem and determine why the solution didn’t work. Don’t let them just walk away from a failed attempt. Determine what went wrong.

6. What led to that assumption?

If your seller is assuming he lost a deal because the buyer didn’t have money, find out what led to that assumption. Teach them to go deeper.

7. Why do you think that happened?

8. What could you have done differently?

Give your sales rep a chance to do a post-game review, and give her an opportunity to be a leader who analyzes the process to figure out what went wrong. Help them take ownership so they’ll find a better option next time around.

8. Why?

If your seller tells you that a prospect is ready to buy, ask him why he believes that. If he tells you what he believes the customer’s issue is, ask why he believes that. Teach your team the 5 Whys to get to the heart of every issue.

9. What do you need to do to achieve this?

10. What are you willing to commit to?

During a one-on-one meeting, when a rep tells you her goals, ask for the long-term strategy that will get her there. Help her realize that she may have to come in early or work late to accomplish the goal. She may have to be creative.

11. When should we reconnect to see if you accomplished this?

Just as we follow up with our customers, we must follow up with our sales reps to make sure they are on track. If we check in regularly, we can keep them from straying from their mission.

12. What will keep you from your goal?

Help your sales reps anticipate the obstacles they might encounter. Especially when they report crazy numbers they are trying to achieve, help them be realistic by guiding them to predict struggles they might encounter.

13. Which metrics or KPIs are you working on?

When you know what your sales reps are working on, you can identify the places they excel. If one rep excels in prospecting and another excels in demos, put them together so they can help each other in the weaker areas.

14. What did you learn from the deal you lost?

We all fail sometimes. It doesn’t mean we’re a failure. It simply means we have some learning to do in one particular area. When we honestly address the core challenges, we can truly learn from our mistakes moving forward.

15. What successes did you have this week?

We need to celebrate wins with our team, but it seems that not enough sales managers do this. They need to know that we value their wins and that we care about their careers and their progress. They need to get wins and then celebrate them.

When you can teach your team to take ownership of the sales process, they’ll have more buy-in and they’ll be more committed to success.

When the team knows that you’re invested in their success, they’ll feel valued, and it will create the same bond that it does with a traditional customer.

Keep an open mind and an open door with your sales reps so they’ll feel comfortable coming to you.

“Sales Coaching Questions” episode resources

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is our online group coaching program designed to help sellers who have been selling for years as well as those who are new to sales.

Last semester, we focused on building value, and we’re beginning a new semester in the fall. To find out more or to apply, visit the Hustler’s League.

If you’d like to learn more about video and how to include it in your sales process, check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Leave us a comment about the questions you use when coaching your own sales team.

The book Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley provides a fantastic blueprint of all the things buyers say they expect and want from sellers. I’m offering a free excerpt of the book so you can learn how to sell by leading rather than supplicating yourself to the buyer.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Mike Adams, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Sales Stories

TSE 888: Seven Stories Every Salesperson Must Tell

Mike AdamsStories validate the work you’re doing. They build value. And really good salespeople never stop telling stories. Mike Adams, author of the book Seven Stories Every Salesperson Must Tell, explains that stories forge connections between people who don’t know each other and they help to establish rapport.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, Mike Adams outlines the seven stories every salesperson must tell, and how to tell the right story at the right time.

Mike’s journey originated in his desire to help salespeople learn to say the right thing, and his desire to understand what it’s like to sell in different industries.

He discovered that salespeople needed to know how to tell stories, and they needed to practice them before they got in front of the client. Finally, they needed to understand when to use each kind of story.

Hook the customer

These stories help your client understand who you are, and they position you as an authority who can be trusted.

1. Your personal story explains why you do what you do, how you became an authority in your industry, and why the buyer should like you. Tell a 1-2 minute story about yourself and then invite your client to do the same.

This story won’t be used for the first phone conversation. Instead, save it for the first meeting. Avoid bragging, but emphasize that you have experience and you know what you’re doing.

2. The key staff story introduces people in your organization who are critical to the sales process. Who are the people your client will need to know and trust as he goes through this process?

If, for example, you frequently pair with a tech expert to explain your product, tell a narrative story about how she got her experience. This creates a connection.

3. Tell the company story to help your client understand what sets your company apart. Most companies focus entirely on facts and accomplishments, but this should be a narrative.

You don’t know what your client knows about your company or division. This is your chance to influence what he knows.

Fight to win

You’ve hooked the customer with your connection stories, but now the fight begins to keep him on board. Why should he choose your company instead of someone else’s?

4. The success story tells about a client who overcame a big problem. It’s the classic marketing case study: a client found himself in a bad situation, our company offered a plan to address the bad situation, and the client overcame the bad situation and succeeded.

Your client will identify with the story if it’s about someone like him. Tell the story of the hero’s journey.

5. The insight story can be tricky because you’re suggesting that you know something about the client’s business that she doesn’t know, and that can sound arrogant. Instead of telling your client what you know, share the story of how you discovered your insight.

Presenting insight as fact that you know invites pushback.

Land the deal

These stories help you finalize the decision process by reassuring your customer why your company is the best choice.

6. Your value stories explain to the customer how your company will behave in a variety of situations. Tell stories of a time when something went wrong, and how your company addressed the challenge.

These stories will be based upon your company’s specific abilities. Hotels, for example, might tell the story of an employee who drove to the airport to deliver a customer’s wallet to her.

7. Teaching stories help you when your client sponsor is in a hole. You must teach your sponsors to be persuasive so that when the decision meeting isn’t going well, they’ll know how to proceed.

You must teach your clients how to buy by teaching them what to value about your services. Then you must teach your clients how to sell in order to get the deal done.

Stories help clients understand and trust us but we must not abuse that power. Stories are meant to be shared, so make sure you hear the client’s stories in addition to telling your own.

“Seven Stories Every Salesperson Must Tell” episode resources

Grab a copy of Mike’s book, full of links to online training about storytelling.

This episode was brought to you by our friends at Wiley, publishers of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. It’s a blueprint for sellers based upon years of research about the things buyers hate.

We’re so convinced that you’ll love the book that we’re providing a free excerpt to our listeners here. We also have a free SlideShare available to help you become a sales leader rather than a subservient seller.

Check out The Sales Evangelizers on Facebook, where a community of people shares their struggles and their experiences with selling.

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is an online group coaching program designed to help sellers of all levels. Whether you’ve been selling for 15 years or 3 days, we’ll give you all the coaching and guidance you need to perform well.

The course is only $167 a month for three months, and it will connect you with sellers in all regions and industries who can share their struggles as you share your own.

We have a new semester beginning in the fall and we’d be honored for you to join us.

Also check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Coffee Shop Meeting, Starbucks, Dunkin Donuts, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 882: The Coffee Shop “Meeting Trap”

Coffee Shop Meeting, Starbucks, Dunkin Donuts, The Sales Evangelist

Imagine being invited to coffee by someone who wants to hear more about what you’re doing. You arrive at the coffee shop, spot him, wave him over, and buy him a drink. After 30 seconds of talking about your project, he launches into a sales pitch. You realize you’ve been snared in the coffee shop meeting trap.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we discuss the negative consequences of misleading sales methods, and why the coffee shop meeting trap may hurt you more than it helps.

It happened to me a lot when I was a new seller, and I quickly discovered that I disliked it. We’re going to address why you shouldn’t do it.

You’ll be perceived as dishonest.

This kind of activity amounts to bait-and-switch. If I show up to meet with you about my podcast, but you turn it into a sales pitch, it makes you seem untrustworthy.

Because buyers are more prepared, they do their research before they connect with people. If you develop a reputation for this kind of behavior, people will begin to sniff it out and they’ll avoid meeting with you altogether.

Even if it lands you one successful sale, you’ll likely experience fallout in the future.

You’ll stand out for the wrong reason.

Bait-and-switch isn’t a new concept. People are aware of it and they’ll recognize it immediately.

My belief has always been that you should do the opposite of what everyone else is doing if you want to be successful.

You’ll burn bridges.

You should always respect people’s time.

If you mislead me into spending an hour of my day with you, without accounting for the travel time to meet with you, you wasted a portion of my day.

If you mislead me into spending time with you, I’m probably going to make a podcast about you.

There’s a better option.

Your ultimate goal should be to foster a relationship.

Look at the person’s LinkedIn and figure out what business he’s in. Figure out how you can provide value to him. Connect him with a potential customer, or write blog content about his company so that your own audience will learn more about him.

In this case, find a way to provide value to the person you’re hoping to connect with. If you know of someone who might make an ideal customer, research to find out whether you’re right.

Once you’ve discovered that the two are a good match, connect them.

In my case, I might begin with a phone conversation about what the prospect could talk about on a podcast. Once we’ve determined that, I’d invite him to appear on the podcast, which helps him.

Perhaps, as a result of the podcast, he’ll want to do something to help me.

Look for opportunities to collaborate.

Be genuine. Begin with a 5-minute conversation that allows you to get to know the other person. Seek to become friends and build lasting connections.

Do the things you know work: nurture the relationship, connect with the prospect, and bring value first.

If you seek to bring value first, you’ll create more opportunity for a lasting relationship.

We tell you these things because we want you to find more ideal customers, build stronger value, close more deals, and do big things.

“Meeting Trap” episode resources

This episode was brought to you by our friends at Wiley, publishers of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. It’s a blueprint for sellers based upon years of research about the things buyers hate.

We’re so convinced that you’ll love the book that we’re providing a free excerpt to our listeners here. We also have a free SlideShare available to help you become a sales leader.

Check out The Sales Evangelizers on Facebook, where a community of people shares their struggles and their experiences with selling.

Also check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 794: Sales From The Street-“Don’t Be So Jealous, Bro”

Sales professionals don’t like to admit it, but we’ve all felt jealous. When one member of the team is killing it while we struggle to close, resentment creeps in; the kind of resentment that sabotages the team.

We have a tendency to compare ourselves against other people, and our managers do it to us as well. In this episode of The Sales Evangelist, we discuss the fact that,  though competition isn’t necessarily bad, ego and pride can prevent us from improving.

Ask for help.

My deals stalled. I built no value. While my coworker sailed through the discovery process, I watched my own deals stagnate.

She had experience in the kind of deals I was working on, and I eventually had to acknowledge that I needed her. It wasn’t easy, either, because I assumed as a man, I’d be a better seller than her.

Once I moved beyond those false notions and the jealous feelings, I noticed I was picking up important tidbits from her. She showed me how to guide the process and frame solutions for my clients. I noticed a difference in my sales.

I realized, too, that I was teaching her some things along the way as well.

Allow competition to drive you.

Competition among members of a sales team motivates us to do better.

Some of us won’t realize that because we’ll assume we can’t learn anything from younger team members. We’ll avoid asking for help from people we perceive aren’t as good or as experienced as we are.

Working alongside strong team members motivated me to work harder and achieve more. I learned to collaborate and strategize for the benefit of the whole team.

Now I’m selling more successfully than some of the more experienced people around me, but some of them won’t learn from me because of jealousy. I had to move beyond that thinking, and you should too.

Episode resources

We all need improvement. The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is a group coaching program that helps sales professionals of all levels to come together and share insights. Join us in April for the next semester, all about adding value.

It would be an honor to have you join us.

Take Away, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 789: Sales From The Street-“He Was Doing The Take Away”

Take Away, Donald Kelly, The Sales EvangelistSelling to a seller can be especially difficult. I know this because I once found myself working a deal with a client in which he was doing the sales take away. I was so desperate for the sale that I failed to create scarcity.

On today’s episode of Sales From The Street, I’ll share with you how a client early in my sales career exploited my desperation and his experience to put himself in control of the transaction.

I realized what was happening in the midst of the experience, but I still went along with it because I didn’t want to lose the deal.

As sellers, we must create a sense of value and exclusivity. We don’t want to communicate to clients that we need them but rather we want to create the sense that they need us.

In this episode:

  • Learn the single rule that will set you apart from all of your competitors.
  • Discover what dating and sales have to do with one another, and the principle that applies to both of them.
  • Identify phrases you can use in your take away to create a sense of scarcity for the client.
  • Uncover why conversations are more valuable to clients than sales pitches.

If you aren’t already doing these things, I encourage you to test the ideas. You’ll see for yourself how it builds value and creates relationships.

If you want even more valuable information, our TSE Hustler’s League is an online group coaching program that provides accountability, connections, and a chance to learn from me in a wonderful community of sellers.

If you feel like you’re struggling to infuse enough value in your sales conversations, check out our April semester of Hustler’s League.

Our messages are designed for sellers of all levels, whether you’ve been selling for 15 years or 15 days.

 

Listening, Sales Conversation, Donald Kelly, Listening Skills

TSE 772: How Can I Improve My Listening Skills?

Listening, Sales Conversation, Donald Kelly, Listening Skills

Ideally, as sellers, we should only talk 30% of the time during a sales conversation and let the prospect or customer talk about 60% to 70% of the time. You want to make sales? Then you have to improve your listening skills!

However, in the real world, I find that many salespeople talk and talk without even listening to their prospects.

Without properly listening to your prospects, you might miss on what’s really important for them. And that means missing your sales deal.

Strategies for Improving Your Listening Skills:

1. Know what you’re listening for.

Go into the first conversation and figure out what can make them buy. Identify the top four drivers why people purchase. Listen for those and poke at those. Know what to listen for so you don’t just talk or be random.

2. Ask meaningful questions.

Instead of the yes or no questions, ask the open-ended questions like what, when, where, why, or how.

3. Follow up.

Don’t be afraid to ask a followup question. Try to really dig deeper into uncovering their real pain point. Use Toyota’s five whys where you keep on asking your prospects why until you get to the fifth why and you will notice you’ve uncovered their real problem. Try to do this exercise even in other areas of your life.

Episode Resources:

The 12 Week Year by Brian P. Morgan and Michael Lennington

The Lean Startup by Eric Ries

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Facebook group The Sales Evangelizers

Donald Kelly, Sales Principles, The Greatest Showman, TSE

TSE 769-6 Sales Principles I Took Away From The Greatest Showman (Part 2)

Donald Kelly, Sales Principles, The Greatest Showman, TSE

Today’s episode is a continuation of the other day’s episode where I’m sharing the other three sales principles that I took away from the movie, The Greatest Showman, and which you can apply into your career in life.

Working Beyond the NO!

Find ways to work around the “no.” The character, P.T. Barnum didn’t take no for an answer. No matter how many times he failed, he just kept hustling and going. Be creative to find a way to get around the challenges. Find out ways to make things happen.

Build Value

Give people not what you want, but what they want. Treat others they like to be treated, not the way you want to be treated. Give them value.

Never Leave Focus

Sure it’s nice to go after your goal but don’t lose track. And if you do lose track, step back and make sure you get back on track.

Inspiring People

As Deb Calvert explains back in TSE episode 763, she talks about being the expert. Lead them down the path and the thing they want the most. Help them to recognize you as the person they need to follow and to listen to. Give people something more than just money. Do things to inspire people to take action. Have a bigger cause than yourself!

Episode Resources:

The 12 Week Year by Brian P. Morgan and Michael Lennington

TSE episode 763

Check out the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Sales From The Street, Donald Kelly, Sales Hustle, TSE

TSE 669: Sales From The Street-“Hustle Till It’s DONE”

Sales From The Street, Donald Kelly, Sales Hustle, TSEProblem with increasing your rates?

I’m putting myself on the hot seat today as I discuss with you one major sales challenge that I faced and how I overcame it – in fact, raising my price to 130%!

It all comes down to perceived value and education.

Pricing: A Major Challenge

One of the major challenges I’ve had is pricing. I haven’t been making much off of this particular deal. And I learned quickly that I had to increase my rates.

The Perceived Value

So there was this event that I attended. I filled other roles. I provided education. These were not the things initially agreed upon. But because I did so much more than that, I was able to build that trust.

When the second opportunity came, they wanted me back and they wanted to pay me more. Why? Because I’ve initially built that value during that first event.

  • Don’t just try to get the deal and have something checked off.
  • Recognize the room for growth and the opportunity to build on value.
  • Educate them and give them some tips and things they can do right away.
  • Don’t be a mere deal-closer to get something on the books (which most sellers do).
  • Turn deals into a problem-finding thing. Transition from being transactional into relationship-building.

Your Call-to Action:

Look for some of the challenges or holes in your client’s business. Find problems that you can help solve. Help them to realize some quick wins. When they see that, you’re going to sell more.

Take it from price to adding value!

Episode Resources:

Star Wars: Bloodline by Claudia Gray

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Help us spread the word out by leaving us a rating or review on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play or whatever platform you’re using.

Donald Kelly, TSE Hustler's League, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 635: TSE Hustler’s League-“How Credible Are You?”

Donald Kelly, TSE Hustler's League, The Sales Evangelist

Today’s episode on the TSE Hustler’s League touches on the topic of credibility. We could be too focused on other areas of selling that we tend to leave out the credibility part which is just as equally important.

So I want to share with you some insights into how you can build that credibility.

 

 

What is Value?

  • Value is defined as the extent to which a good or service is perceived by its customer to meet his or her needs or wants
  • It’s measured by a customer’s willingness to pay for it.
  • It commonly depends more on the customer’s perception of the worth of the product than on its intrinsic value.

What we might see…

As sellers, we see the intrinsic value of having a car, for example, like having those features and benefits. But for a customer

What your customers might see…

Maybe for them, the value of having a car is something that can help them take their kids to daycare with A/C in South Florida. So maybe the value of the car to them would be the A/C and safety.

Hence, value depends mainly on that prospect. As sellers, we should be able to understand that and know how to articulate it to them.

The Three Pillars to Establishing Value:

  1. Undervalued Needs

These are things your prospects don’t fully appreciate.

What you can do: They may have been played down by the company. Is there a way you can get ahead of that? Focus on undervalued need.

  1. Unmet Needs

These are the needs your prospects might have forgotten because they’ve done work around or they’ve put band-aid on it.

What you can do: Try to demonstrate the importance of making that change. Show them other ways that they can do their business.

  1. Unconsidered Needs

These are the things that they’ve never even thought about it. These are things that have never crossed their mind. They don’t know these needs ever existed. These are problem they have but because they’re underneath the service, they don’t realize it’s affecting them until you’ve pointed it out.

What you can do: Do research on the unconsidered needs your client doesn’t realize about your product or service.

What is Credibility?

It’s defined as the quality of being trusted and believed in. Credibility leads to trust and trust leads to us making more money. People do business with those they know, like, and trust.

Ways to Establish Credibility:

  • Don’t be desperate
  • Be very specific.
  • Back it up through testimonials.
  • Offer an opportunity to opt out. You need to set the rules before you play the game.
  • Be willing for them to say no. Accept it and move on.

Episode Resources:

Star Wars: Bloodline by Claudia Gray

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

 

Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, TSE

TSE 634: Sales From The Street-“The Agreement Was 130% More”

 

Donald Kelly, Sales from the Street, TSEFirst off, the TSE Hustler’s League is coming on September 28. We will be having two groups. One is focused more on the business growth success plans and the other group is focused on building value and how you can take that to the next level.

Back to our episode today, I’m sharing my experience and how it has changed the way I’ve done business and continue to do business.

Overcoming the Fear of Rejection

Early on in me sales career, I was so scared of being rejected. I was afraid of getting a no. I was afraid of stating the price. I had all these fears that held me back from performing. Then I realized I didn’t value my price and what I had to offer so all I was just getting were a lot of small deals. Then I got into an agreement with a client that increased by 130%!

Strategies I implemented to overcome this challenge.

1. Offer education.

I recognized some issues internally that if they could solve it could help them even more successful. They hosted this conference and I noticed there wasn’t anyone doing any introduction in the room. And a lot of the speakers they had at past events would just do their job and then leave. They didn’t stick around. I, on the other hand, did more than what I had to do. I shared with some insights. And this helped me to be able to ask for more.

2. Perceived value

Come second opportunity, I was able to charge more. That’s because I shared with them some perceived value, which are things they can do to create a more enriched experience for their guests. I gave value so they wanted to pay more.

Instead of just trying to get a deal and just get something checked off, recognize any room for growth. Recognize some opportunity to build on value. Educate them and give them tips that make sense or difficult for them to implement. And things they could right away.

3. Be a problem-finder.

Look for the challenges or some of the holes in their processes or business and find problems you can help them solve. Help them to realize some quick wins.

Episode Resources:

Star Wars: Bloodline by Claudia Gray

Join the TSE Hustler’s League.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

 

Josh Eck, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Podcast

TSE 564: Sales From The Street-“Education is the Key”

josheckbio
Establishing value is not necessarily the easiest thing but it could come much easier if you found a way to educate your prospect and share value with them. Then as a byproduct, they would choose you over your competitors.

Our guest today is Josh Eck, a member of our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers, and he is giving us some great insights into how you can leverage education to establish the value you and your customers want.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Josh:

Currently, Josh works at AJH Creative & Design, Inc., a website, design, and digital marketing agency and the daily challenge he faces is that prospects don’t initially see the value of a website, specifically as a revenue-generating tool and they’re taken aback by the cost of digital marketing. Learn More About Josh—josheckbio

Overcoming the Challenge:

What Josh does to overcome this challenge is he goes to the prospect’s website and points out areas where he sees some room for improvement

Benefits of sharing free advice:

You start to build a relationship with the person.

You’re able to pull out some issues and pain points they weren’t aware of.

They start realizing you actually know what you’re talking about and they would see the value in it.

Education is key!

Reasons for sellers immediately quitting when they face price objection:

  • A lot of sellers are afraid.
  • A mentality that you don’t want to piss them off

Remember:

It’s not personal. They’re not just brushing you off because they hate you. But it’s because you’re not bringing them anything of value.

Once you’re able to bring value, even if they find they don’t need your services, they’re going to refer you to someone who does.

Josh’s Major Takeaway:

Don’t be afraid to give out free advice. Advice is always free. The more you can talk to your clients, the more you can build a relationship with them. The more people you’re able to build rapport with, the more opportunities to do business with them or someone they know. Give out free advice and people will come to you and keep wanting to talk to you.

Episode Resources:

Connect with Josh Eck on LinkedIn and Twitter @josh_eck.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

What do you like about our podcast? Kindly leave us some rating and/or review on iTunes. This would mean so much to me.

Stories, Building Value, Business Meeting, Sales Leader

TSE 312: Stories Are A Great Way To Create Value

Stories, Building Value, Business Meeting, Sales LeaderToday, we’re going to talk about how you can utilize stories in your selling situation to establish tons of value, credibility, and to help sell more.

People love to buy, they hate to be sold.

As what Jeffrey Gitomer says, “People love to buy. They hate to be sold.”

Find a way to make your potential customer feel that they’re buying as opposed to you selling them. What can you do to help them feel that they’re in control and that they’re buying?

Why tell stories?

You share the experience of someone else who has seen the value in what you have to offer.

Powerful elements of storytelling:

  1. VALUE

Use a story in order to establish value in your product or service. Paint a picture that they can identify with and make them visualize your goal to help them make their lives better.

The hero’s journey

This is a theory formulated by Joseph Campbell wherein any movie has the same situation with an individual on a journey who finds a mentor and goes through a trial and they have to overcome that challenge. Then they go through an atonement period until finally coming back full circle.

  1. IMPACT

Use of senses

Make the story as impactful to them as possible. Encourage your prospect to use their senses. Make them visualize all five senses or as many senses as possible while telling the story.

Episode Resources:

TSE Episode 1 with Jeffrey Gitomer

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

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The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly

Joel Boggess, The Sales Evangelist, Relaunch Show, Donald Kelly

TSE 298: Go For The No!

Joel Boggess, The Sales Evangelist, Relaunch Show, Donald Kelly It’s been 25 years since Joel Boggess sat behind his very first microphone doing traditional radio in the mid 90’s and television, until he eventually ended up in the podcasting world, where he has become the podcast expert that he is today. His show, the ReLaunch Show has turned into a flame thrower with over a million downloads and getting recognized in publications like Inc Magazine and Huffington Post. In a nutshell, they help podcast and content creators share their voice so they can build their business.

Today’s episode offers tons of great value to the table as we talk about a unique, better, and more strategic approach to getting your customers to say yes by “going for the no.” Listen in to find out what this is all about.

Here are the highlights of my conversation with Joel:

Focusing on the idea of going for the no:

  • Opposite to the traditional approach where you need to get your prospect to say yes at all times to get them into the habit of saying yes in time that you need to pitch the sale
  • Ask them questions that would be a no for them but a yes for you because you know the solutions.
  • Position questions in a way that they’d say no so you can give them a response of “No problem. We’ll take care of it.”
  • When you get a smile and a nod, then you’ve got it! They believe you have the solution.

People buy outcomes, not features.

  • Tie in your questions towards that goal or outcome the customer wants.
  • Sometimes we love to show prospects the trinkets of a product which could slow down the sales process.

Joel’s Major Takeaways:

  • Don’t complicate the sales process. Don’t do anything to slow down the sales process. Just go for a no.
  • Practice, practice, practice. Know your content. But also know the prospect’s pain, problem, or challenge. And if you know it better than they do, they will automatically assume you know the answer.

Episode Resources:

Get in touch with Joel through their website ReLaunch Show to check out their shows and free resources.

Get a free audiobook download and a 30-day free trial at audibletrial.com/tse with over 180,000 titles to choose from for your iPhone, Android, Kindle or mp3 player.

Join Today!

The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, Donald C. Kelly