Archive Monthly Archives: August 2018

Don Barden, The Sales Evangelist, Sales Podcast, Business Leader

TSE 911: The Secret Formula Of The “Elite 1%” Of Business Leaders

What allows some teams to achieve consistent success? Why are some leaders able to convince their team members to consistently follow? What is the secret formula that allows the elite 1% of leaders to achieve greatness?

Today on The Sales Evangelist, Don Barden shares the secret formula that allows leaders to achieve repeatable success, and why leaders should always be training. He’ll address the mistakes that leaders make and how to overcome them.

Don spent his “formative years,” about 25 of them, working on Wall Street, growing from very small deals to billion-dollar-plus international deals. He describes himself as one of many good guys that you never hear about on Wall Street.

Warp speed

Don calls these unique times, and he says he’s a huge fan of millennials. Unlike people who view the generation negatively, he says they are the first generation in the history of mankind to never know a limit.

They’ve always had Google, cell phones, and YouTube, and there are no limits to what’s happening in the world right now.

We’ve shifted the way we think, and that change has created a tremendous need for leaders who can guide us through this incredible time. We’re moving at exponential light speed (warp speed if you’re a Star Trek fan) and things can get out of control without strong leadership.

Because of the state of humanity right now, we need a combination of young leaders, mature leaders with decades of knowledge, and emerging leaders to guide us through the shift.

Becoming elite

Don was part of a 5-year doctoral study that considered leadership using science and proof points. They considered economic, scientific, and behavioral considerations.

They discovered that elite leadership can be traced to a mindset of leading with your heart first. Elite leaders spent every day serving other people by opening up their hearts.

Our word “servant” derives from the Latin word which means “hero.” If you were the type of leader who served other people, you were truly a hero. In Greek, it meant that you professed your love of serving people.

These leaders prioritize serving people, and they have a skill or a craft that they have honed over many years. The net result is that when they lead with their hearts, their businesses do well, and their people willingly follow them because they want to be around that mindset.

Learning leadership

Millennials who find themselves looking to learn about elite leadership should begin by looking to people who are older than them who have been leaders before.

Secondly, millennials are the most giving, caring, and generous generation we’ve seen in a long time. They want to give back socially, personally, and professionally for all the right reasons.

They want to give back and serve, so if you can help them be good, and if you can help them get there faster than they would on their own, you’ve got the ingredients for what leadership is all about.

For young leaders, just raise your hand and ask for help. For experienced leaders, be willing to help.

Be you

The other side of the coin is that, while you’re learning, you have to be yourself.

Although people will mentor you and train you, you have to be yourself. You have skillsets and a unique way of thinking that your company needs.

Don sold a company last week to a group that he felt could take it to a level beyond what he could do. After the sale, the new owners came to him and said they didn’t need his help anymore.

He considered that a great compliment.

He had created a culture of young, bright people that he had mentored for years. His team had helped them grow to the point that their own skillsets were sufficient to run the company without management.

He set guardrails, standards, missions, and objectives, and then gave his people room to operate.

His approach was this: You know the mission. You’re smarter than me. We’ll stay out of your way unless you’re drifting. You go be you.

Create the right environment to mentor and guide millennials, but don’t try to teach them how to be exactly like you.

Continue training

Never stop training. Leadership is all about training, and then going back to train some more even when you think you’re done because there’s so much information out there.

Training can take so many different forms, from a book club to a formal training.

The biggest mistake people make is to stop training.

Don is associated with the U.S. Army Rangers, who have made a career choice to serve other people at a level beyond what most people can comprehend. He notes that 99 percent of their lives are built around training, and that’s why they are so good.

When Don was seeking a title for his study, his wife suggested The Perfect Plan, so he set out to discover exactly what “perfect” meant.

The word perfect means “always becoming,” in other words always getting better. It means you aren’t done, and you’re openly becoming something greater.

At the end of the study, Don’s group asked average people to rate themselves on a scale of 1-10, and the average was 8. The elite performers rated themselves at an average of 3.5.

The group thought maybe the numbers were driven by humility, but they discovered that the elite leaders weren’t rating themselves against everyone else. They were rating themselves against their full, God-given potential.

Although we’ll never reach our full God-given potential, the mindset of these leaders was that they were always trying to become better.

Hire the right people

When you hire the right people, you aren’t hiring people because you have hope in them, or you feel sorry for them, or you just like them.

You have to hire people that you can guide and mentor, but they also have to have the right skill set. You have to hire for the position.

Get the right people and then create a culture that allows them to thrive.

The business world requires a different set of disciplines, so these great leaders hire the right people and then create the right culture, and then they get out of the way.

Players get you to the playoffs, but coaches win championships. So if you’re going to be a leader, you’re going to be a coach, but you have to have the right players. Then you have to train them and give them the environment and the mission and the direction they need.

“Secret Formula” episode resources

Connect with Don via email Don@dwbarden.com.

Check out his book, The Perfect Plan: A Study that Reveals the Secret Behind the World’s Elite Leaders, Sales and Marketing Professionals.

Is your CRM functioning properly? It’s important to have a CRM that your team is willing to use.

If you’re unhappy with your CRM, check out Maximizer CRM. If you’re happy with your CRM, check out Maximizer. It has been around a long time, and it’s worth the time to check out the free demonstration.

Maximizer CRM is a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities. Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. Video Jungle offers top-notch, state-of-the-art advice about video, which is a great way to offer relevant content on LinkedIn.

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TSE Hustler's League, Donald Kelly, Sales Leader, Sales Leader

TSE 910: TSE Hustler’s League-“It’s All Backward”

TSE Hustler's League, Donald Kelly, Sales Leader, Sales LeaderIf you find yourself thinking that your clients just don’t get it, the problem may not be the prospect. It may not even be the product. The problem may be the way you and your company are selling your product. If your sales process is designed all around you, that means your prospects aren’t being considered. Your sales process is backward.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, we’ll discuss the signs that your sales process is backward, and what you can do about it.

If your prospects don’t have a chance to share how they are buying or to have their own inputs, they may be confused because you didn’t take time to learn from them. Even if you think you listened, I’m going to show you in this episode how we’re not listening.

Getting it wrong

Selling involves much more than just listening to the prospect, which of course you have to do.

Our new semester of TSE Hustler’s League will begin in the fall, and we’re going to address business development. We’re going to show you how you can find more prospects and how you can court them.

But we’re also going to do something radically different. We’re changing up the curriculum from what we’ve had in the past.

Some things will be the same, but one of the foundational ways we prospect will change. We’re overhauling because we have been getting it wrong.

Before you skip to another episode, answer this question: In your buying process right now, what does your CRM say? What is outlined?

Many of you may have adopted what I’ve taught, while some of you may never have adopted a sales process, but most look like this:

  • Find the prospect.
  • Do the discovery.
  • Propose a presentation or demo.
  • Convert.
  • Close.

That’s the process we’ve taught for a long time, and though it’s good, it’s not great. We’re going to take good and make it great.

Flip a switch. We’re going to change from only looking at you.

I can’t take credit for this. My good friend Kevin F. Davis taught me this, and I recommend his book, The Sales Manager’s Guide to Greatness: Ten Essential Strategies for Leading Your Team to the Top. 

Stop looking only at outcomes

These are actionable things that the sales reps are doing rather than actionable steps that the buyer is doing.

When it comes to prospecting, you’re looking for customers. It’s a one-sided effort.

When a problem emerges on your sales team, you’re addressing it from the standpoint of the seller, after the problem has occurred.

  • Did the seller make enough calls?
  • Did the seller send enough emails?
  • Did the seller do enough outreach?

Those are good things to measure, but we should tweak them to focus on our buyers.

For example, what is the buyer doing at this point in the process? Is he researching? Is he analyzing? How can we focus more on what the buyer is doing?

Is your buyer responding to some existing discontent? If so, do you use content that addresses his discontent in your outreach?

In last week’s example of selling chairs, how do you know that your prospect needs to change at this time? How does the prospect know that he needs to change at this time? Is he currently discontent with the chairs he has?

You must create pieces of content that educate your buyer about solutions to his discontent. The goal is to get him to agree to an appointment.

Change of philosophy

Give your sellers the foresight, the knowledge, and the tools to help your prospect make a decision.

Maybe instead of discovery, you get your prospects to share information about their problems or their needs. You want the prospect to be part of the process.

How can your sales team help your prospects share information?

Instead of sitting down with your sales rep to figure out whether she made enough cold calls or sent enough emails, role play and focus on the buyer. Figure out how you can get the prospect to agree to more appointments with you.

This is how you align sales and marketing. If we have a holistic plan about recognizing what we need to address for our buyers, we’ll tackle it with our workshops, our webinars, and our podcast episodes. Everything we do will focus on the different stages.

That effort will guide the prospect, and because we’re focused on the prospect, we’ll guide him through every step of the buyer’s journey.

Next steps

When you move the buyer to the demonstration, you won’t think of it as you giving him a demo. Instead, think of it as him attending a demo. It’s tailored to him.

Allow your buyer to share concerns. Personally, I like to do this early in the process, so maybe around the discovery portion where he is sharing his challenges. If I can help overcome the fears, it will make my presentation easier.

Once you’ve addressed the challenges and agreed to the terms, he’ll commit to you. Once he does, you want to address expectations. Did you deliver results? Is the buyer seeing an improvement as a result of your product?

Once he is satisfied, he has come full circle, and he will refer you to others.

I want you to win because if you win, I win in the long run.

In the long run, you’re going to tell your friends about the podcast. Your friends are going to tell other people. They’re going to leave a rating and review. Our show is going to grow.

Some of them are going to come onto the website. They’re going to see our content. They’re going to see the information. They’re going to say, Donald, I want you to come and train our team. It’s going to happen, so I am here to help you.

I am here to help you find more ideal customers. I want you to build stronger value. I want you to close more deals, but beyond all of that, I want to challenge you every single day to go out and do big things.

“It’s All Backward” episode resources

This episode is brought to you in part by Maximizer CRM, personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase sales. Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you.

This episode is also brought to you in part by Video Jungle podcast. Learn the ins and outs of the video industry and how it can help you stand out from your competition. To listen to the Video Jungle podcast go to wherever you enjoy your shows and search video jungle.

The Sales Evangelist offers a business development service that develops cold leads for your business. We’ll generate a list and hand it off to your team who can work to close deals. Email me for more information.

If all of this sounds great to you but you still aren’t sure how to start, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights.

You can also join our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers to connect with sales professionals from all walks of life.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Carl Allen, Buy Your Competition, Sales Growth, Sales Leader

TSE 909: Sales From The Street:”Buy Your Competition”

Carl Allen, Buy Your Competition, Sales Growth, Sales LeaderThere’s a difference between having a lifestyle business and having a business that’s truly scaling and growing. In order to grow, you have to have customers. The secret is to buy your competition.

On today’s episode of Sales From the Street, Carl Allen talks about how to massively grow your sales by acquiring another business. He’ll explain why he believes the key to overcoming your challenges might be to buy your competition.

If you’re new to the podcast, our Sales From the Street episodes feature stories of people who have faced challenges and overcome them.

Carl decided he was tired of working for other people and he wanted to do his own thing. He only had one skill set, which was to buy and sell businesses, so he decided to do it using other people’s money.

Selling businesses

Carl has been selling businesses for more than 25 years.

When he got the call during an overseas trip saying that his pregnant wife was in the hospital, he had to jump on a plane to get back home. In the moments after his son was born, he realized that he needed to do something else.

Carl decided that, instead of doing it in a corporate setting, he wanted to buy and sell his own small businesses. He knew that his tools and experience could be applied to small businesses.

He found that lots of people were asking him to coach and mentor them and teach them how to buy and sell businesses, so he built a global system to teach entrepreneurs how to do it.

Carl teaches entrepreneurs who work for other people as well as those who want to own their own businesses. He teaches them to find deals, negotiate them, and to do it all without investing their own money.

He also teaches small business owners how to double their sales by buying competing businesses or complementary businesses.

1 + 1 = 3

It’s getting harder and harder to organically grow sales because of the tremendous amount of competition.

Carl advises small business owners to stop chasing customers and trying to sell them more stuff. Instead, consider buying a competitor or someone in your supply chain that has some synergy and that can double or triple your sales.

The first business Carl bought was generating about $2 million a year, and his competitor was doing $2 million a year as well. They had a conversation, and Carl acquired the business, literally doubling his sales overnight. Organically, the same growth would have likely taken about 10 years.

Sometimes, instead of buying a competitor, you can buy a business in a complementary sector and cross-sell.

Carl, for example, owns a software company, and he’s about to acquire an IT company to sit alongside it. He’ll sell software to the IT services customers, and sell IT services to his software customers.

When the businesses combine, there will be opportunities for cost consolidation and synergy between the two.

He calls it the 1 + 1 = 3 model. In the end, he’ll have software revenues, services revenues, and the two together.

Acquisition myth

When Carl started in 2008, Facebook wasn’t prevalent and people weren’t marketing on LinkedIn. Growing his business would have included local advertising, trade show events, and good old-fashioned cold calling, referrals, and networking.

There’s a huge myth about acquisition and it’s this: if a business is worth a $1 million, you must have $1 million to acquire it.

The truth is that you can buy a small business without spending your own money. The big private equity guys on Wall Street do it all the time. Carl applies those same principles and tactics.

If you’ve never bought a business before, there’s clearly a learning process, which is why Carl built his academy.

He teaches:

  • How to do dealer regeneration
  • How to find deals that fit your requirements
  • How to have effective meetings
  • How to negotiate and structure a deal
  • How to raise financing
  • How to get the deal transacted

In his dealings, 99 out of 100 business owners don’t know how the process works.

He built his academy to empower business owners to scale their businesses differently.

Psychology of the deal

When you decide that you’re interested in acquiring a business, the best way to start is by approaching your competitors with a cleverly written letter which builds rapport, trust, and credibility.

Most likely, someone in my network will know you or will know someone who knows you, and I’ll get to you that way.

The key is in the psychology. You’re looking for the distressed owner whose business is stable. You need a seller with a strong motivation to come out of the business.

They might be ready to retire, or they might be bored, or they might be sick, or they might have run out of ideas. In fact, the biggest pocket of opportunity in North America right now is retiring baby boomers.

The Wall Street Journal published last year that 10,000 baby boomers retire every day, and 19 of those own a small business. Previously, one of their children might have taken over the business, but those tendencies have changed massively.

Their kids want to go to college now, and they don’t want to take over the family business.

These boomers don’t have an exit strategy.

Only 1 in 13 small business that tried to sell actually do.

If you have good business history, and good employees, and good customers, then you don’t want to close the business.

You’ve got to understand why the business owner wants to sell. Ultimately, it’s the best way to understand the pain they are feeling right now.

You’ve also got to find out how they do their marketing. Very often, we find that they aren’t even marketing. They are relying on word-of-mouth.

That means when I do employ marketing, we’re going to see growth.

Leveraged buyout model

We’re solving that problem with the leveraged buyout model.

You might ask yourself why a business owner would allow you to buy the business without spending your own money. In many cases, it’s their only option. They either sell to you, or they turn out the lights, close the doors, walk away, and let everyone down.

Instead, a safe, trusted pair of hands take the business to the next level and give it a new lease on life.

The first step for anyone interested in this model is to check out Carl’s 90-minute training webinar. He has a proprietary 10-step model that he has honed over 25 years, and he has created a sort of masterclass training for people who are interested in the model.

If you’re an entrepreneur and your dream is to start a business, don’t. Don’t start a brand new business, because 99 percent of them fail. Instead, buy an existing business that’s already doing what you’re looking to do, and use the company’s own resources in cash to acquire it.

If you’re an existing business owner and you’re struggling to grow your business organically and your marketing isn’t working effectively, scale your business by acquiring a complementary business.

Buying businesses solves everyone’s problems, and it’s a buyer’s market.

“Buy Your Competition” episode resources

Connect with Carl at Facebook.com/ninjaacquisitions, and find his evergreen, automated training, at www.ninjaacquisitions.com/free. It’s a webinar-style training with lots of tools and downloads users can access.

Today’s episode is brought to you by Maximizer CRM, a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. It’s powerful and intuitive.

Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities. Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

 

 

Paresh Shah, Lifter Leader, Trust, Innovate

TSE 908: Lifter Leadership-How To Innovate, Engage, Build Trust And Be Purposeful All At Once!

Paresh Shah, Lifter Leader, Trust, Innovate

For sales leaders, improving your team’s numbers isn’t always enough. If you can help your team innovate, engage, build trust, and be purposeful, you’ll lift your team up and improve their lives. Lifter leadership will change your sales team and change your company.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Paresh Shah, author of the upcoming book Lifters, talks about why his methodology is important for sales efficacy, and how Lifter leaders help companies address disruption and innovation.

Paresh helps governments, large companies, small companies, and entrepreneurs solve their biggest problems. His company, the Non-Obvious Company, is named that because he said that obvious thinking won’t solve big problems.

Statistics suggest that customers only trust 55 percent of companies today, so the first obstacle companies have to overcome is distrust among its customers.

Lifters are leaders

Lifters are the new leaders of the world.

These leaders help their customers and their coworkers find a better way of being. They lift their coworkers and other people around them by creating a better work environment, characterized by positivity, integrity, authenticity, value, and creative expression.

Lifters lift their companies, and as a result, they drive more revenue and more loyalty while they lower costs and innovate. They lift their world and their companies at the same time.

Lifters see beyond transactional relationships.

Fundamental reset

As Paresh became more mindful throughout his career, he discovered that humans are fundamentally changing the way they connect with one another.

As part of that, the model for how to transact, sell, and run and build a business was fundamentally being reset.

That led him to the Lifter paradigm, where he realized that the sales process wasn’t really about hunting for customers, targeting them, capturing them, segmenting them, and analyzing them.

Paresh realized that model no longer works. Lifters understand that it’s about helping customers, inspiring them, serving them, and lifting them. It’s a whole different model.

As a result of his shift, he’s happier, he’s making more money, his customers are his friends, and everything is working better.

Four mind shifts

1. The hunt is over. The days of hunting for your customer are behind you. It’s about serving, inspiring and lifting now.

2. Truth or consequences. We must be authentic and have integrity in everything we do as leaders.

3. “Yes and” people. They are multitaskers. They bring great value to the people they manage and to their customers because they are good at a variety of things.

4. Lifters take Invictus action. In the movie with Matt Damon, victory wasn’t winning. It was bringing people together under a common purpose. Lifters attract customers and inspire them.

We do have to take action, but we don’t do it with a poverty mindset. We shift into a generosity mindset and ask how we can help.

Start with “What do you love?” and “How can I help?”

Lifter skills

Paresh teaches that we are all energy. We are not separate people.

Lifter leadership shifts into a mindset of compassion, caring, creativity, and interconnectedness of everyone. We’ve shifted to a higher consciousness, and people, the younger generation especially, can feel inauthenticity.

People will quickly call us out for lack of authenticity. If, for example, we’re building wells for people in Africa, but we’re polluting a river with the byproducts of our products, people will call us out for it.

Lifter leadership turns the whole model upside down.

How do you show up in the moment? Are you seeing the interconnectedness of all the people you interact with?

If you don’t become a Lifter leader, you will be left in the cold.

Paresh quotes a Harvard Business Review article that reported that companies that operate with conscious purposeful principles like Lifter leadership perform 10.5 times better.

Rock star companies

In the early days of farming, families engage in subsistence farming in which they worked together all day every day to raise enough food to support their own needs.

At some point, non-obvious innovators had a different idea: to rotate the crops instead of planting the same crop in the same place every time. They used massive scale agriculture to change the world, and these farmers were the rock stars of innovation.

It freed up labor and people started moving to the cities.

Eventually, the Industrial Revolution began. If you were someone who could automate work processes or create a non-obvious idea for how to streamline a factory, you were a rock star.

New rock stars who understood automation and other concepts like steam and mass manufacturing eventually launched mega-companies like Rockefeller and Carnegie.

Nerds and geeks

The next group of rock stars created the companies that run the world right now, like Google and Apple and Microsoft. They created a whole new world with the Internet, information, and software.

Initially, those people were nerds and geeks, and they were outcasts. They were on the fringe of society until someone realized we needed to pay attention to them.

These people understood something other people didn’t, and the companies that embraced and nurtured them became rock stars. The companies that didn’t embrace them were obliterated.

Lifter leadership isn’t just about sales. Lifter leaders have workers that are engaged who will walk on fire for you. Seven out of 10 workers are disengaged because we aren’t giving them Lifter leadership.

“Lifter Leaders” episode resources

Connect with Paresh Shah at his website where he has a diagnostic for our listeners to help them determine their Lifter capability. Visit www.iamalifter.com/salesevan.

Also, check out his TEDx video about Lifters.

If all of this sounds great to you but you still aren’t sure how to start, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights.

You can also join our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers to connect with sales professionals from all walks of life.

Today’s episode is brought to you by Maximizer CRM, a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

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Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Leading, Little Things

TSE 907: The Little Things Matter The Most When You’re Leading

Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Leading, Little ThingsHow far are you willing to go to get ahead of the competition? In order to be successful, you must do the opposite of what everyone else is doing. Realize that little things matter the most when you’re leading, and if you adopt them in your own business, you can become a better sales leader.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, I’ll share the true story of a dentist I visited who went the extra mile, and why it made such a big difference.

This dentist didn’t do anything big. Take note of the five little things that will cause your sales staff to look to you as a sales leader.

1. Recognize them out of the blue.

There are natural occasions like birthday, anniversaries, kids going to college or graduating, or 5th anniversary working with the company. A lot of sales leaders aren’t acknowledging these natural opportunities to recognize an employee.

Call them to see how they are doing; maybe on a Wednesday just to see how the day went and how the deals are going. Encourage them along the way, even if things didn’t go the way they wanted.

Your team will learn to trust that you’re looking out for their best interest, and they’ll trust and support you. And when you need help, they’re going to work harder for you.

2. Take time for one-on-one coaching.

Make sure you spend time with your sellers so you’ll understand their strengths and their struggles. Prioritize one-on-one coaching.

Stephen Covey’s fifth principle says to seek first to understand, and then to be understood. Before you focus on helping them understand the things you need them to get done, seek to understand the things they need.

Treat them like your customer. Make them feel good.

3. Recognize their successes in front of their peers.

When a sales rep closes a deal or lines up an appointment or gets a referral, recognize them in front of their peers.

Sales reps love recognition, and if you can make them feel good, they’re going to work harder to repeat that action. You’ll communicate to them that you care about the sales reps and they’ll want to work hard over and over again.

4. Make their goal become your priority.

It’s tempting to think of this the other way around and expect your sales team to make your goals their goals.

Begin the other way around. If your sales rep wants to buy a house, or get a new car, or take his family to Europe, or pay off college loans, make that goal a priority.

If you, as a sales leader, are focused on making me win as a seller, I am going to do everything you need me to do. I’ll understand that you had my best interests in mind.

If, for example, they are planning a trip, and you engage with them to find out details about the trip, and where they are in the buying process, and what the costs of the trip will be, it will communicate that you care about their needs rather than pushing your own.

5. Challenge them, trust them, and empower them to do tough things.

Let your team members know that you’re confident that they can handle the tasks you’ve given them.

Remind them that you’ll help them through the process.

Don’t simply give responsibility to the best sales reps on the team; trust and empower your sales reps with important tasks. Don’t give them too much too soon, and don’t give them work that is difficult for them to bear.

Remind them that you have confidence in them.

As your team members achieve success, gradually increase the tasks you entrust to them.

Give your sales team reasons to brag about you; to realize that they have the best sales leader in the world.

I share stuff like this because I want to help you guys find more ideal customers, to build stronger value, to close more deals, and most importantly to challenge you to do big things.

“Little Things Matter the Most” episode resources

Today’s episode is brought to you by Maximizer CRM, a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Sales Questions, Paul Cherry, Ultimate Sales Pros, Donald Kelly

TSE 906: Questions That Sell-The Powerful Process to Discovering What Your Customer Really Wants

The Sales Evangelist PodcastSelling is always a challenge. When sellers are confused about what they’re selling or about what their customers want, selling is impossibly hard. Learning to ask questions that sell will absolutely make a difference in your sales process.

Paul Cherry talks to The Sales Evangelist audience about identifying the customers’ pain issues and getting them to verbalize and vocalize their concerns. He helps us understand how to craft questions that sell.

A veteran of sales for more than 20 years, Paul has written a book called Questions That Sell: The Powerful Process for Discovering What Your Customer Really Wants, and he’ll share a bit of his wisdom here today.

Revamp your questions

Paul’s experience suggests that the more seasoned we are at sales, the more likely we are to fall into the trap of talking, telling, educating, or solving problems. We want to get to the point.

Empathy and building relationships won’t go away, no matter what century we’re in.

The biggest mistake sellers make is failing to understand the customer’s business. And because it’s such a common problem, it can become a differentiator for sellers who are willing to take the time to discover what their prospects are looking for.

Whether they’re brand new or highly experienced, 87 percent of sellers ask questions that deal in the present state:

  • What projects are you working on?
  • What problems are you facing?

Ten percent of sellers ask questions dealing in the future:

  • What are your goals?

About 3 percent ask questions related to the past:

  • How has our service been in the past?

If you want to change your sales approach, get out of the present, because you’re boring people.

Don’t overlook the past

The secret to selling, though, is getting into the past, but sellers overlook it because we assume it’s dead; there’s no money there.

The truth is that the past is where experiences, challenges, frustrations, and hurdles reside. People are often willing to disclose past issues because it’s done. They feel more comfortable talking about it now that it’s over.

A key indicator is this: what challenges would you share with other people to enlighten them to your industry?

Paul points to two main reasons that salespeople won’t discuss the past.

  1. They don’t want to dig up pain issues that their company has caused the customer.
  2. They want to be respectful of the customer’s time by getting to the point.

The truth is that this conversation isn’t about the seller. Furthermore, Paul says that sellers routinely waste time talking about things like sports, hobbies, and other chitchat for 20 minutes.

If you want to stroke someone’s ego and really get them to develop a connection, start in the past.

Ask questions in a better way

Instead of the usual who, what, when, where, why questions, develop more engaging questions.

If, for example, you want to know if the person you’re speaking to is the decision-maker, how do you ask that? It’s an important question, but it’s a risky one because you chance offending or belittling the person.

Could we ask that same question in a more comfortable way with a descriptive opener, like “describe” or “tell me.”

Describe your decision-making process for me.

By asking descriptive openers, you address multiple questions with one question. In this case, you might find out who’s involved, how decisions are made, what priorities are involved, and when decisions are made.

I get more insight asking a single question, and it doesn’t feel so much like an interrogation.

In the case of disrupting an entrenched competitor, we tend to ask questions like these:

  • Who do you use now?
  • What do you like about them?
  • Is there an opportunity there?

If the prospect is fairly content, you will get pushed out. You’re wasting time.

Instead, try this:

  • Tell me about some of the changes going on in your marketplace.
  • Tell me about the criteria that was important when you chose this vendor. Has that changed?

When you ask about change, people won’t give you a knee-jerk response to stay where they are. If you can get them to talk about change, you can address voids or disparities that the current vendor isn’t addressing.

Thoughts for new sellers

New sellers are often in a great position because they don’t know what they don’t know.

Begin by asking about the challenges the customer is facing, as well as what’s working and what’s not. Realize that where there are problems, there are opportunities.

  • What changes is your organization experiencing right now?
  • How are you looking to differentiate yourself from the competition?

Start at 10,000 feet before you dive deep and start asking your prospect how you can help. Salespeople want to go right to 500 feet but the customer isn’t there yet. It feels like you have your hand in their pockets.

Avoid the temptation to ask a question and then zone out when your customer starts talking. It’s tempting, after we’ve asked a question, to focus on the next thing we’re going to say or ask instead of hearing what the customer has to say.

If you’ll simply listen, the customer will give you the next question to ask.

If the customer mentions he’s thinking about pursuing new projects. Paul suggests using what he calls lock-ons. Which word will you lock on to? Listen to the verb.

In this case, he is thinking of pursuing new projects. Lock on to that word and structure new questions around it.

  • Describe your thought process.
  • What criteria are you considering?
  • What are you hoping to see?

Your whole job as a sales professional is to understand emotional drivers.

Remember the following three things to make selling work:

  1. Ask the right questions.
  2. Engage the right people.
  3. Qualify the right opportunities.

Focus your energy and resources on people who are receptive and motivated for change.

If the customer did most of the talking, it’s a great call. If you did most of the talking, not so great.

“Questions That Sell” episode resources

Grab a copy of Paul’s other book, The Ultimate Sales Pro: What the Best Salespeople Do Differently for more wisdom from Paul’s long history in sales.

Connect with Paul Cherry at his website, and download his 75 Best Questions to Close More Business. You can also request a 20-minute consultation at no charge.

Buy a copy of Neil Rackham’s book Spin Selling for more information about getting into a customer’s pain issues.

Maximizer CRM allows us to mold and personalize our CRM to our needs. Customize it to your needs and focus on helping your sellers close more deals.

 

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Sales Process, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 905: TSE Hustler’s League-“Holes In Your Sales Process”

Sales Process, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist PodcastIf your sales team focuses only on how many deals are closed, you won’t know much about your sales process. When the numbers drop, is the problem with the prospecting or with marketing? If you’re only focused on results, you won’t know. In order to find the holes in your sales process, you must evaluate the entire process.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, we’re going to identify three areas that could disrupt your sellers’ effectiveness so that you as a sales leader can help your team find the holes in your sales process.

If you’re new to the podcast, The Hustler’s League is a snippet of our online coaching sessions that allow you to listen in on the challenges that other sellers are facing. We’re spending the month of August talking about coaching and leadership, so today’s episode will help us focus on problem areas instead of only on results.

Buying intention

Very often the sellers who contact me for The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League share that they don’t feel like they are providing enough value for their prospects, mainly because they aren’t sure of the prospects’ buying intentions.

If your sellers don’t know the true reason why buyers are buying your product, they won’t know how to proceed through the process.

Even if they manage to schedule an appointment, they won’t know where to focus their attention. They won’t know what problems to solve for your prospects.

Commitments

Sellers often struggle trying to get their prospects to commit to buy a product or service over and over.

We tend to focus on the end commitment only instead of focusing on all the smaller commitments that led to that point.

If, after the first appointment, you’re not getting multiple appointments afterward, it may be the way you’re handling those commitments. If you agree to follow up next week but don’t set a specific day and time, you don’t have a commitment.

As a sales leader, if you aren’t sure that your salespeople know exactly what it means to make an appointment, role play to show them how to set specific meetings.

Don’t rely on guessing or general plans. Your customers will appreciate the fact that you’re prioritizing their needs by putting them on your calendar.

Failing to prospect

If your company doesn’t have a training process, your salespeople will have a hard time prospecting. If you haven’t actually walked them through the prospecting process so they know exactly how it works, you’re likely setting your team up for failure.

It’s normal for reps to fear rejection, but what are you doing to help them overcome that?

So if it’s overcoming the fear of rejection, the more your sellers do it, the easier it will be.

Ideally, if we expose them to rejection often enough, they’ll become immune to it and it won’t interrupt their sales process.

“Holes In Your Sales Process” episode resources

Grab a copy of Kevin Davis’ book The Sales Manager’s Guide to Greatness: Ten Essential Strategies for Leading Your Team to the Top.

The Sales Evangelist offers a business development service that develops cold leads for your business. We’ll generate a list and hand it off to your team who can work to close deals. Email me for more information.

If all of this sounds great to you but you still aren’t sure how to start, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights.

You can also join our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers to connect with sales professionals from all walks of life.

Today’s episode is brought to you by Maximizer CRM, a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Josh Smith, Value, STACKED, Sales Book

TSE 904: Sales From The Street-“Building Value Pre, During & Post Meeting”

Josh Smith, Value, STACKED, Sales Book

We all understand the importance of building value for the prospect. It’s important to know, too, that it’s an ongoing process. We should focus on building value before, during, and after the meeting.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Josh Smith, author of How to Guarantee Qualified Sales Meetings With Real Decision Makers, explains why building value is such a massive part of the sales process, and why it must occur from the beginning to the end.

How can I prepare?

Sales reps often begin with the very best intentions. Despite their plan to provide value, they find themselves quickly resorting to features, benefits, and pitching a product.

Position yourself as an additional member of the team who gives them content and education, and who helps them overcome business challenges. Providing value builds trust and credibility.

Josh said he likes to start with LinkedIn, and he sends them valuable content that helps them realize that he is different from other sellers. He focuses on content that is relevant and specific to the prospect.

Where do you find this kind of content?

Narrow down your prospect list to one industry. Determine a narrow audience that you want to hit with your messaging. Set up an account on Google Alerts and identify some keywords that I want to be notified of. Google will email me any time a relevant piece of content emerges.

It’s automated, and I can send it straight to my prospect knowing that it will be relevant.

Consider using Feedly as well. It’s a content aggregator that allows you to type in information about who you’re trying to reach and it will aggregate specific content that you know will be relevant to the prospect.

Building value up front with relevant helpful information will help me build trust before I even tell them what I do. Do it for about 30 days. You can pitch them sooner than that if you want, but this is a consistent process that helps you develop qualified leads who trust you.

Set yourself apart

The difficulty is that a lot of sellers have adopted this same approach to prospecting. The challenge, then, is to make sure that your information catches their attention.

Pay attention to industry events that your prospects might attend. Look at the topics and the tracks that the industry is discussing to get a really good idea of the challenges facing the industry.

It’s not a huge problem if you’re sending information that’s similar to what someone else is sending. As long as the content you send provides value that will help move them along with a challenge that they are facing, it will give you a way to start a dialogue. Additionally, if you’re really quick with Google Alerts, you might still send the content before others do.

If you haven’t already asked them, find out what kind of content your customers in a given industry find valuable. Once you’ve identified that, you can start addressing those topics with your new prospects.

Also, make sure to measure and optimize what you do. When you send content, track its effectiveness. Determine which content earned you responses and which didn’t.

Provide value in the meeting

Your goal is to position what you do as more valuable than what others are doing. Create urgency around your solution.

The more credible your urgency story is, the better it will be. When you first meet the prospects, set the expectations from the start rather than waiting until the back end.

If you go all the way through your pitch before revealing that you’ve only got two spaces left, you lose some credibility. If you wait until the end of the pitch to say you can only offer this price today, you’ll lose credibility.

Move everything that you traditionally do at the back end of the pitch to the front. It creates believable urgency.

“I’ve only got two spots left and that’s exactly why I wanted to talk to you.”

Ask hard questions. “Why haven’t you already found a solution to this problem?” You can provide a more valuable pitch by knowing the answers to the hard questions.

Treat the person’s time with respect. By asking hard questions, you’re eliminating unnecessary information and providing the best solution for them the very first time.

Provide value after the meeting

This is the most important part because it’s where conversions can happen.

Offer a bit of free consultation after the meeting. Now that I understand the challenges they are facing, I can put together an overview of the meeting including some free suggestions that will help them move forward: 3 or 4 action steps.

Do it within 24 hours, because very few people are doing this.

Follow up with video. Josh’s conversions have doubled since he started following up with video.  Send a video of you talking about the meeting and the expectations. Video allows them to see you and see your energy.

“I just had a thought after our discussion of something we could do to help. Let’s talk next week.” It gets them back on the phone, and given that it takes an average of 12 touches to close a deal, that’s important.

Wistia is a fantastic platform that helps you shoot video even if you aren’t a video editor. You record it, upload it, and then send it, and it’s completely free. It provides data about when they watched it and how long it played for so you’ll know how effective it was.

Make value in your sales process. Be an honest advisor.

“Building value before, during, and after the meeting” episode resources

Connect with Josh on LinkedIn or Instagram. Grab a copy of his book about how to generate qualified leads with decision-makers using LinkedIn.

Pre-order your copy of How to Guarantee Qualified Sales Meetings With Real Decision Makers and start seeing immediate impact in your business.

Check out Feedly to keep up with content that is important to you. It’s a free platform that gathers important stories that will help you build value for your prospect.

Google Alerts allows you to set notifications for content that relates to your prospects. It will help you provide valuable content that helps your prospects manage challenges and solve problems.

Today’s episode is brought to you by Maximizer CRM, a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities. Click on the link to get a free demo of what Maximizer CRM can do for you.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Jason Loh, Sales Manger, Get Time Back, Anaplan,

TSE 903: How To Get More Time Back As A Sales Manager To Exceed Quota

Jason Loh, Sales Manger, Get Time Back, Anaplan,Regardless of your industry, you’re probably invested in helping your sales team optimize its performance. Ultimately, we need our teams to hit their quotas and perform at their peak. So how do you help your team get more time back in order to exceed quota?

Jason Loh visits The Sales Evangelist podcast today to help us understand how to make the best use of our time and to help us understand the value of time. When we do, we can help our sales teams get more time back to exceed quota.

Jason is the global head of sales solutions for Anaplan, a software vendor that is pioneering a category of connected planning. Anaplan seeks to bring together people with data in order to help organizations better manage their business.

What is the value of time?

Sellers do best when they have clear marching orders.

Sometimes the problem emerges at the end of Q4 when an organization is moving into a new fiscal year.  Sellers don’t always know whether they are supposed to sell into the same accounts they sold into the last year.

While the company cleans house at the end of a fiscal year, very often the sellers find themselves with a nebulous period of time. They could spend as many as two or three months waiting to see what comes next.

If sellers don’t have a clear sense of what they should be doing, uncertainty causes them to hesitate. By the time the organization gains its footing for the new fiscal year, the company has lost two months’ worth of time, which means it has to complete 12 months’ worth of selling in only 10 months.

One of the first thing sales reps want to know when they begin a new job is how they’ll be compensated. If their compensation will rely on productivity, it’s in their best interest to make the most of their time.

How can teams get more time back?

Sales leaders can’t simply expect sellers to figure things out. Instead, they have to set a good example and get the house in order to remove roadblocks to success and empower their sellers.

Identify the top three things for the upcoming fiscal year.

You must make sure that your organization’s plan correlates to how you’re designing your compensation plans. Without an extra incentive to drive your reps to accomplish those goals, how will you expect them to accomplish those three things? Furthermore, why are you incentivizing things that don’t match your company’s top three goals?

So often there’s a disconnect between senior leadership and the sellers, so people are scratching their heads wondering why things aren’t matching up.

How does a lack of goal setting affect organizations?

The Alexander Group reports that 81 percent of organizations don’t have their comp plans connected to their sales team’s marching orders.

Jason says there are things organizations can control, and things they can’t control. Your organization should do its best to control things like marching orders and sales plans because those things are well within your control.

Things like employee turnover are completely outside your organization’s control and they can present a significant challenge.

How do you effectively plan for the hiring process of bringing on a new rep, ramping for a period of time, covering for employees who are absent for a period of time, all while still managing the entire process?

What platforms and technologies should my sales team be using?

From a seller or sales rep’s perspective, CRM is the core.

For leaders, consider this: does micromanaging your sales teams’ number of emails, number of voicemails and other metrics help you build your larger strategy? Does it get you where you need to be in 12 months?

Aim to help your sellers manage their sales basics so you can transfer a marketing qualified lead to a sales qualified lead.

Opt for a decision-based platform that helps you pull together data. Make sure you know who your contacts are at each organization as well as who your influencers and decision-makers are.

Identify the tools that will help your sales team elevate its game and develop more opportunities.

Measure your reps on whether they delivered.

Productivity depends on the industry you’re in and the tasks and activities you’re required to do. Understanding those requirements will help you understand whether your team is maximizing its productivity.

Imagine this:

If I’m a sales rep with a killer sales forecast and I miss my number, I might be escorted out the door. If I’m a sales rep with a horrible sales forecast, but I exceed my number anyway, I’ll be carried around the office like a rock star.

As a sales leader, it’s challenging to marry the endgame with the leading indicators like phone calls and emails, but it’s worth the effort. Otherwise, your team will focus primarily on the end number without paying as much attention to the process.

If you don’t incentivize the process, your sellers won’t pay attention to it.

There are a lot of movable parts in this process.

It’s all interconnected so the decisions in one part directly impact the other parts.

Introduce a decision platform so you can understand how even small decisions will cascade against the organization. Don’t look at things in a vacuum.

Look at things holistically and see all the components of your sales strategy to make sure you’re able to attain those goals.

“Get More Time Back” episode resources

Find out more about Anaplan or contact Jason Loh directly at the website.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Sales Coaching, Sales Leaders, Sales Success, Donald Kelly

TSE 902: Numbers Alone Can’t Coach

Sales Coaching, Sales Leaders, Sales Success, Donald KellySales numbers won’t tell you much about your sales team. They might tell you who’s struggling and who isn’t, but they won’t tell you where the problems lie. Numbers alone aren’t sufficient to help you coach your sales team.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’ll discuss the role numbers play in coaching a sales team, and how sales managers can improve in their own roles while they help their sales reps improve in theirs.

Think of it like a golf game. If you don’t know how to improve your swing, you’re going to repeatedly be frustrated by the game. You’ll only improve when someone helps you improve your specific techniques.

Realize, too, that my scorecard might tell you what kind of golfer I am, but it won’t help you coach me on my golf swing. The same is true of sales.

Look beyond the numbers

As a sales manager, before you do anything else, you should sit down with your sales reps and work to identify strong and weak areas. Until you identify the problems, you won’t know what to correct.

In my own sales career, sales coaching helped me truly improve my sales techniques. If my coaches had only looked at my numbers, they wouldn’t have known whether the problem was my script or my phone calls or my emails.

He can see that I’m not closing enough deals, but he doesn’t know why.

Sales managers that dig deeper can determine whether I’m struggling when prospects bring up objections or during my demonstrations.

Help sales reps perform better

You may recall during our episode last week that we suggested that your sales team is your customer. You should invest in them and guide them because they’ll make your job easier.

Kevin Davis, author of The Sales Manager’s Guide to Greatness, shared that the Sales Management Association published a paper in 2015 that indicated that coaching accounts for less than 8 percent of sales managers’ workload.

Most of the time is spent responding to emails, reviewing numbers, focusing on customers or prospecting. You shouldn’t be locked up in meetings all day. You should be working to improve your sales reps.

Shoot to spend at least 25 percent of your time improving your sellers. Give them suggestions about improving their messaging and their dialogue.

Kevin also spoke about the book called Extreme Ownership, which talks about leadership within the Navy Seals. It discusses our tendency to think that we’re doing everything right, and any problems are the fault of someone else. We fail to see our own role in the problem.

Accept responsibility

Your job is to bring people into the organization. You have to find customers and solve problems for them.

While there will certainly be things outside of your control, like businesses that close, you must take control of your funnel.

It isn’t marketing’s fault that you don’t have leads, because you could be doing other things to generate leads. Make sure you’re doing the things that are in your control.

Look at the numbers to find out what they are doing wrong, but look beyond the numbers, too.

Be willing to accept responsibility for the things that are within your control. Don’t blame others and don’t wait for others to fix the problems.

“Numbers alone” episode resources

Today’s episode is brought to you by Maximizer CRM, a personalized CRM that gives you the confidence to improve your business and increase profits. Get rid of the boring CRMs and customize to your team’s selling abilities.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. It helps others find our message and improves our visibility. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Dr. James Kelley, Authentic Leader Model, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 901: The Authentic Leader Model and Making Better Leaders

Dr. James Kelley, Authentic Leader Model, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

Authentic leadership involves understanding that everyone has a unique journey, and everyone brings some kind of baggage to the office. You don’t have to understand the baggage; you simply have to understand that they have it.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Dr. James Kelley, professor of marketing, talks to us about authentic leadership, his authentic leader model, and about how adversity creates better leaders.

Dr. Kelley hosts the podcast Executive After Hours, and he noticed a recurring theme that occurred during his podcast conversations: adversity changes people.

Growth from adversity

Dr. Kelley recounted the story of Joe Burton, who became the COO of McCann Erickson Worldgroup by the time he was 40 years old.

He was unbelievably successful, but he was miserable. He was aggressive with his employees, unhappy with his wife, and his body was physically breaking down.

When Joe inventoried his life, he realized he had lost his twin sister and his older sister within the span of two and a half years. He had also lost his dad about 12 years earlier.

The sheer amount of adversity caused him to reflect on his life, and it led him to launch Whil.com, a company that specializes in mindfulness. His own adversity transformed his life and made him more aware of his challenges, and it set him on a new path.

Likewise, Bridgette Mayer owns an art gallery in Philadelphia. She grew up in a crack house with six siblings until she and two of her sisters were adopted by a single family.

Her older sister committed suicide and the younger one landed in drug rehab. Bridgette, meanwhile, graduated from high school and then college, and then opened her own gallery.

So why did Bridgette succeed where his sisters hadn’t? She says it’s because she embraced adversity and reframed her challenges as opportunities. She had the right people around her at the right time to give her the right advice, and she was willing to listen.

Dr. Kelley believes that our adversity connects us to other people.

When he was in sales, he quickly learned that personal stories connect people faster than almost any other tool. Relatable stories like death or divorce create an instant bond that establishes immediate trust.

Dr. Kelley’s leadership model

Grab a piece of paper and a pencil.

Draw a medium circle and write the word ‘crucible’ inside. Now draw a circle outside of that, like you’re drawing a bulls-eye.

At the top of the outer circle write ‘self-awareness’ and leave the bottom portion of the outer circle empty.

Then draw one more circle on the outside of the first two, and write the words ‘compassion,’ ‘integrity,’ and ‘relatableness’ in that circle.

Dr. Kelley’s leadership research suggests that when people embrace their adversity or their crucible moment, their framing of that moment determines the effect it will have on their future.

Most people treat adversity as something that happens to them instead of viewing it as an opportunity to learn something new.

Those who frame adversity in a positive way, though it might take six months or a year, deepen their self-awareness.

They discover that they actually want to treat people with respect. They want to have compassion for people and relieve their suffering.

As your self-awareness grows, you move out into the model a bit, and you eventually discover that you’d like to live with a little bit more integrity and honesty. Because that’s how you want to be treated, you discover that it’s the best way to treat others.

You discover that as you have hard conversations that demand honesty, you build trust and loyalty, and you discover that relationships play a very significant part in your life.

As you learn to embrace relatableness, you seek ways to create micro-moments and meaning.

Without a growth mindset, you have self-awareness but nothing to do with it. When people embrace a learning mindset, that’s when they start to develop.

You become a much more authentic person and you spend every day trying to improve yourself for you rather than for anyone else.

Evolving people

You have to know that people have bad days.

If you see an empty water cup on an employee’s desk and you refill it, you’re demonstrating compassion and kindness.

Those micro-moments develop trust and compassion and integrity, and the return-on-investment is much greater than in companies that don’t embrace this culture.

If we take care of the employees first, they will take care of the organization.

Dr. Kelley believes that hiring a coach is the key to understanding your own adversity. He believes that evaluating your adversity and figuring out what you’ve learned that you can take forward is the key to success.

Being able to admit that you don’t know everything and surrounding yourself with people who can help you achieve your goals will help you better embrace your adversity.

“Authentic Leader” episode resources

You can connect with Dr. Kelley at his website, or email him at james@drjameskelley.com.  Find The Crucible’s Gift: 5 Lessons From Authentic Leaders Who Thrive In Adversity on his website or on Amazon.

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is our online group coaching program designed to help sellers of all levels. We help sellers who have been selling for years as well as those who are new to sales.

Last semester, we focused on building value, and we’re beginning a new semester in the fall. To find out more or to apply, visit the Hustler’s League.

If you’d like to learn more about video and how to include it in your sales process, check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Sales Podcast, Donald Kelly, The Best Sales Podcast

TSE 900: Where We Came From And Where We Are Going!

Sales Podcast, Donald Kelly, The Best Sales Podcast

We have produced 900 podcast episodes!

Today on The Sales Evangelist we’ll celebrate our 900th episode and share the impact the podcast has had on our business, as well as some highs and lows. We’ll discuss where we came from and where we are going.

It’s humbling to think about. Twenty episodes a month designed to provide quality content that can help you and your sales team perform better in your sales.

We’re so thankful to each of you for emailing us, messaging us, and sharing how the podcast is helping you.

In preparation for this episode, I went into our Facebook group, The Sales Evangelizers, to find out what people would like to hear about.

How does the podcast impact your business?

The podcast made the business.

My suggestion is to encourage each of you to consider operating a podcast.

There are 550,000 podcasts.  Podcasts exist in every niche you can think of. There are also people who want to digest the content you’ve produced. And there’s still plenty of room.

Only 44 percent of people have listened to a podcast. Forty-nine percent of listening happens at home. Twenty-two percent of podcasts are consumed while driving. Sixty-nine percent of podcasts are consumed on smartphones, and 31 percent occurs on desktop computers.

You can listen while you do other things like mow the lawn, walk the dog, or drive a car.

Podcasts span all generations.

I stumbled onto podcasting when my friend Jared Easley invited me onto his podcast. There were a few sales podcasters out there at the time, and I wasn’t entirely sure I could stand up to their audiences.

The podcast led to coaching, which led to speaking. I was trying to find my niche, and I decided to focus on sales. I added sales consulting next, which includes sales team training, and then online courses and workshops. Finally, I added The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program.

The podcast provides leads and conversations that connect us to other people.

What do we not already know?

We’ve recently started pushing Instagram a lot. We’re going to start sharing more content on Instagram TV at least once or twice a week. We’ll share videos, sales strategies, and other content that helps you learn who I am and improve your sales skills.

We also plan to introduce a YouTube channel, which should emerge during Q4.

The other thing is that we have a Sales Podcast Network which includes three podcasts, and a fourth on the way.

The first is this podcast, and the second is a podcast called Sold, which is a narrative interview with executives who talk about experiences they’ve had with salespeople.

They talk about the things they like and the things they don’t like, and they give us ideas about emailing, prospecting, building value, and connecting.

Sold will follow a seasonal schedule with breaks between the seasons.

The third podcast is Video Jungle. It’s an affiliate podcast that gives you an understanding of the video industry and helps you understand how you can make your brand stand out using video.

The fourth podcast is still in the works, and we’ll share more details about that later.

We are growing this podcasting space, and the whole network will relate to sales.

Can you share success stories?

When I was a software sales rep, I met a guy during my lunch break to interview him. The guy was mentioned in Forbes magazine for the 30 Under 30 feature.

When I met with him, I discovered an opportunity for the company I was working with to help the company he was working with.

His company needed a secure place to store documents.

Although it didn’t turn into a sale, the podcast gave me a foot in the door of that company and it made it easy to connect with the decision-makers.

Another success story happened early on when I was trying to develop coaching. I created the sales page and a guy reached out to me from Tokyo. He was working with manufacturers because something changed and he needed to do sales despite the fact that he’s a tech guy.

The prospect Googled sales coaching and found my page, which led to a relationship as a coaching client. He did a world tour, and I was coaching him throughout his travels.

He’s out of the sales role and still in communication with us today, but we were able to help him get through the process.

When I discovered we had downloads all over the world, I started the semester approach to TSE Hustler’s League. As a result, I had people join from Europe and other places around the world.

It was cool enough to have people in this country join us, but it was especially cool to know that people were staying up late in different time zones to be part of the group.

It was humbling to know that our podcast was impacting people and their businesses all over the world. We were helping them with sales in different markets and different cultures.

I have multiple stories like that about our ability to impact people all over the world just because people listened to the podcast. It has been powerful to track their individual progress and see how they are improving.

Finally, I wanted to find speaking opportunities and I was contemplating leaving my regular job. About that time, the company I worked for changed their model so that it benefitted the company but not the sellers.

Basically, they were going to pay my commission over the course of several years instead of paying a lump sum, which benefitted the company but not me.

I realized that the house always wins, and I decided I needed to become the house.

After I left the company, I got my first paid speaking gig, and the fee was equivalent to the amount I lost when my company changed its model.

That convinced me that this was validated and I was headed in the right direction.

Was there a time you considered ending the podcast?

The podcast wasn’t working properly at one point, and it completely crashed.

I didn’t know what to do, and I was afraid no one would be listening to the podcast after this. I didn’t see how we could thrive after that.

A few weeks passed and I wondered if it was worth all the effort. I got comfortable not doing the podcast. I was anxious, and a month passed before the site was restored.

The thing that caused me to resume the podcast was the number of people who rely on the podcast and who have benefitted from it.

During that time, listeners contacted me to ask when it would resume. I still needed to provide for my family, so I needed to do something to revive the podcast.

That made me dig my heels in and focus on overcoming the challenges. We all have obstacles, but if we stop every time things get difficult, we’ll never accomplish anything.

I stayed up one night for 24 hours to get it up and running, and we were back better than ever.

As a natural byproduct of delegating some of the tasks, I was able to focus on things that mattered. As a result, the business continued to grow.

When I tell you to get rid of menial tasks, I tell you that because it has worked for me. As we’re growing and developing, I continually find more tasks that team members can help me with.

I don’t need to do it all, and it benefits my team when I ask them to help me with those tasks.

What do you want to hear on episode 1,000?

We’re 100 episodes away from number 1,000 and we’d love to hear what you’d like us to address on number 1,000.

It would be cool to interview some of you who have been around for a long time and hear how you’ve seen the podcast grow. I’d love to hear your feelings about the show and any ideas you might have.

Why do you do what you do?

The whole team at The Sales Evangelist wants to help you find more ideal customers, to help you build stronger value when you meet with those customers, and to give you the guidance and coaching you need to close more deals.

My challenge is to go out every day and do big things.

“Where We Are Going!” episode resources

TSE Hustler’s League is a 10-week group coaching program that costs $150 a month. The program is designed to help sellers of all levels and all industries increase their sales performance. We have a new semester starting this fall, and we’d love to have you join us.

Check out The Sales Evangelizers on Facebook, where a community of people shares their struggles and their experiences with selling.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Barth Getto, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist, Leadership

TSE 899: Sales From The Street-“Your Legend”

Barth Getto, Sales From The Street, Sales LeaderLeadership is difficult. Even when the people you’re leading have something in common, it’s tough to lead a varied group of people. Leading a group of independent, free-thinking employees presents a unique challenge, but it’s one that allows you to leave your mark.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Barth Getto, president of Empowery eCommerce Cooperative, talks about the challenges of leading a varied group of people well. Barth, who leads a collection of independent entrepreneurs that sell in the eCommerce space, says you must learn to motivate and encourage.

Lead by experience

First and foremost, it’s much easier to lead a group of people when you have experience doing their job. If you’re the VP of sales, it will be easier to lead a sales team if you’ve sold the product yourself.

People look at you differently when you’ve walked in their shoes.

You also have to set very specific goals and hold people to those goals.

Salespeople want to be told when they’re doing well. They don’t mind being told when they are doing poorly if they’re being measured fairly.

Realize, too, that you can motivate so much better by giving positive feedback than you can by giving negative feedback.

Be a confident leader

When you’re a leader who isn’t worried about losing your leadership position, that confidence allows you to operate differently. You relax a little more.

Some managers see capable people as a threat to their own positions. They fear that if they give too many public accolades to another person in the organization, they’ll lose their job to that person.

Barth said his goal is to make sure his employees are so well-versed in how the company runs that they won’t miss him when he leaves.

As a leader, the leaders he raises up are his legacy. He trains them and gives them all the tools they need to succeed. It’s a selfless idea: striving to benefit everyone instead of just yourself.

Every time he has left a company, it has done well in his absence.

Seek group input

There’s no such thing as a perfect decision. The best you can hope for is to analyze all the information you have and make the best decision you can.

No one has all the answers to any issue, and that’s especially true in eCommerce.

It is possible, however, to improve your odds by including others in the process.

Be direct

Issues are easier to identify when you have a good CRM in place and a good tracking system so you can provide examples to your team members.

When issues arise with people on your team, tackle them head-on. People who know you care about them will be open to discussions about their performance.

Allow them to be part of the discussion. Ask them where they believe the problem is occurring. Treat it more like a consultation than an accusation.

Again, this is why experience in their job gives you credibility because you’ve personally done the work they are doing.

Also realize that sometimes releasing people from a job that isn’t a good fit is a kind act.

Enjoy the work

Building leaders is rewarding work, especially when you lead a varied group of people. Barth compares it to watching a child grow.

As your team gels and solidifies, you watch the organization move forward and find more success and learn from its mistakes.

The goal, he said, is to watch people blossom and then step out of the way to let them lead. In short, when you lead well, you’re working yourself out of a job.

Once you’ve had success, it’s easy to find another organization that needs your help, and then you get to have the experience again.

Be positive. Give your team a shot in the arm. Do things together outside of just selling.

Understand how your people like to have information shared. It’s easy to have a conversation with someone who knows you care about him.

“Your Legend” episode resources

Connect with Barth via email, barth@empowery.com. If you’re a listener in the eCommerce space selling through any major marketplace, Barth would love to talk with you about becoming a member of the cooperative.

The costs are nominal but the benefits are huge. The co-op provides a support network — a sort of safety net —  and helps you sort through the wild-west aspect of eCommerce.

Grab a copy of the book Turn the Ship Around that Barth mentioned during the podcast.

If you think you might benefit from more stories like these, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights. We’re beginning a new semester this fall, and we’d be honored for you to join us.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Christie Walters, The Why and The Buy Podcast, Sales Caoching

TSE 898: What Role Does A Sales Coach Play In A Growing Organization?

Christie Walters, The Why and The Buy Podcast, Sales Caoching

Christie Walters believes that sales is an act of service. She defines coaching as the secret sauce for all top performers. Coaches take on different forms, and Christie believes that the best coaches operate from the performer’s perspective rather than their own.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Christie Walters, co-host of the podcast The Why and The Buy, explains how coaching can help you find better ways to accomplish things and help you overcome barriers to success. She answers the question, “What role does a sales coach play in a growing organization?”

She calls coaching powerful and transformative, and she relates that she worked with her own coach for 10 years before becoming one herself.

Career shaping

Good sales coaches help you identify your own goals and your own internal struggles.

The outside perspective a coach offers can help you fine-tune your life and your work. Coaches help us recognize our blind spots and the self-limiting beliefs that are holding us back.

Coaches don’t necessarily indicate that there’s a problem. Very often, companies bring them in to initiate big change.

Coaches help you design the future of your life instead of allowing your future to happen to you.

Growing organizations

Organizations typically engage coaches when they are trying to move to the next level.

For sales leaders, in particular, it’s easy to get so busy managing out and up that you forget to manage down. If you’re managing down, you’re often not coaching along the way.

What percentage of your time is spent nurturing your people?

It’s really more than sales processes, which are important to success. It’s also more than sales training, which will largely look the same for every person in your organization. Sales coaching relates to the individual person because each of us has unique struggles.

Coaching, together with training and leadership, can exponentially change the trajectory of your team.

Personalized coaching

It’s difficult for sales managers and leaders to step into the personal level with their employees, but it’s a powerful tool for success.

There must be a personal element for each person’s processes, and the path to success won’t look the same for everyone. Simply mimicking others’ success won’t work because each salesperson has a unique personality.

Although there is value in parroting what you see and hear others doing, that cannot be your long-term plan. If you’re new to the industry, it’s ok to copy what others are doing, but develop your own techniques and your own authentic approach.

If you aren’t selling from an authentic place, you might have small successes, but you won’t be ultimately successful.

Initial coaching

Christie said that although she is often hired by companies, she serves individuals. She strives to help people discover themselves and their own tendencies so they can tie those things to their own work performance.

It’s about getting the individual deeply connected to the work he’s doing and about helping him understand his work as a service. He’s serving the people he’s selling to, and he’s supporting other things he loves by working.

What drives you on a day-to-day basis?

The first meeting will help you figure out what drives you, what blocks you, and what your blind spots are. Christie views coaches as accountability partners for their clients, and she notes that too many salespeople aren’t their own champions.

She also stresses the power of a single negative thought and the power it has to spiral to more negativity. When salespeople learn to channel that frenetic energy into something that serves them instead of draining them, they’ll change their sales performance.

Common struggles

Every salesperson will eventually struggle, and every company will eventually face transition.

Coaches come in all shapes and sizes, but there are three elements to success for every organization.

  • Build a solid culture which starts at the top.
  • Create training programs that allow people to carry your culture into the marketplace.
  • Coach your salespeople to avoid drift inside your organization.

Be a champion for your salespeople and consider hiring a sales coach to transform your team.

“What Role Does A Sales Coach Play?” episode resources

Connect with Christie Walters on LinkedIn, or on her website, ChristieWalters.com. Find her podcast The Why And The Buy,  and listen to an earlier conversation between Donald Kelley and Christie Walters on episode 87 of her podcast. You can also call or text her at (770) 687-6678.

Today’s episode was also brought to you by Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and making your brand pop using video. If you want to stand out, use video. Video is everywhere, and it can help you improve your presence. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

If you think you might benefit from more stories like these, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights. We’re beginning a new semester this fall, and we’d be honored for you to join us.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Donald Kelly, Sales Coaching, The Best Sales Podcast, The Sales Evangelist

TSE 897: 15 Great Sales Coaching Questions You Should Ask

Donald Kelly, Sales Coaching, The Best Sales Podcast, The Sales Evangelist

As a sales manager, your focus must rest largely on your sales reps rather than your customer. You must win your sales reps over in order to get them to perform at their peak. Do that asking great sales coaching questions and building strong relationships.

On today’s episode, we’ll discuss how to help your sales team perform to the best of its abilities. We’ll cover 15 great sales coaching questions you should ask.

Questions to ask

1. Which part of the sales process is most challenging?

If you’re setting a lot of appointments but not a lot of demos, something is falling short in your process. Maybe you aren’t building value. If I can sit down with a sales rep and discover where the issues are, you’ll help your sales rep perform better.

2. What inspires you?

A leader knows what inspires his team. If you aren’t sure, ask.

3. What are the specifics of this particular deal?

Seek the specifics of every deal. Find out the challenges and the criteria in order to find out how great the deal really is. If you train your sales team to seek specifics, they’ll learn early to ask the important questions.

4. What have you tried so far?

When a sales rep comes to you with a challenge, don’t get into the habit of solving their problems for them. Don’t give him the answers. Help him solve the problem himself and teach him to be a problem solver.

5. Why do you think that didn’t work? 

Teach your sales reps how to evaluate a problem and determine why the solution didn’t work. Don’t let them just walk away from a failed attempt. Determine what went wrong.

6. What led to that assumption?

If your seller is assuming he lost a deal because the buyer didn’t have money, find out what led to that assumption. Teach them to go deeper.

7. Why do you think that happened?

8. What could you have done differently?

Give your sales rep a chance to do a post-game review, and give her an opportunity to be a leader who analyzes the process to figure out what went wrong. Help them take ownership so they’ll find a better option next time around.

8. Why?

If your seller tells you that a prospect is ready to buy, ask him why he believes that. If he tells you what he believes the customer’s issue is, ask why he believes that. Teach your team the 5 Whys to get to the heart of every issue.

9. What do you need to do to achieve this?

10. What are you willing to commit to?

During a one-on-one meeting, when a rep tells you her goals, ask for the long-term strategy that will get her there. Help her realize that she may have to come in early or work late to accomplish the goal. She may have to be creative.

11. When should we reconnect to see if you accomplished this?

Just as we follow up with our customers, we must follow up with our sales reps to make sure they are on track. If we check in regularly, we can keep them from straying from their mission.

12. What will keep you from your goal?

Help your sales reps anticipate the obstacles they might encounter. Especially when they report crazy numbers they are trying to achieve, help them be realistic by guiding them to predict struggles they might encounter.

13. Which metrics or KPIs are you working on?

When you know what your sales reps are working on, you can identify the places they excel. If one rep excels in prospecting and another excels in demos, put them together so they can help each other in the weaker areas.

14. What did you learn from the deal you lost?

We all fail sometimes. It doesn’t mean we’re a failure. It simply means we have some learning to do in one particular area. When we honestly address the core challenges, we can truly learn from our mistakes moving forward.

15. What successes did you have this week?

We need to celebrate wins with our team, but it seems that not enough sales managers do this. They need to know that we value their wins and that we care about their careers and their progress. They need to get wins and then celebrate them.

When you can teach your team to take ownership of the sales process, they’ll have more buy-in and they’ll be more committed to success.

When the team knows that you’re invested in their success, they’ll feel valued, and it will create the same bond that it does with a traditional customer.

Keep an open mind and an open door with your sales reps so they’ll feel comfortable coming to you.

“Sales Coaching Questions” episode resources

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is our online group coaching program designed to help sellers who have been selling for years as well as those who are new to sales.

Last semester, we focused on building value, and we’re beginning a new semester in the fall. To find out more or to apply, visit the Hustler’s League.

If you’d like to learn more about video and how to include it in your sales process, check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Leave us a comment about the questions you use when coaching your own sales team.

The book Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley provides a fantastic blueprint of all the things buyers say they expect and want from sellers. I’m offering a free excerpt of the book so you can learn how to sell by leading rather than supplicating yourself to the buyer.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Joe Pardo, The Sales Evangelist, Empower, Podcast

TSE 896: Empower Yourself First Before You Can Empower Others

Joe Pardo, The Sales Evangelist, Empower, Podcast

In order for your organization to operate at its best, the people within must be empowered. The team must feel confident working together and it must believe in the process. But believing in the process begins with the leadership, which is why you must empower yourself before you can empower others.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Joe Pardo, who is an accomplished business coach, consultant, speaker, podcaster, author and DJ, shares his experience working in his family business, and his thoughts on learning to empower yourself first before you can empower others.

His newest book, Sales Won’t Save Your Business: Focus on the T.O.P., addresses the importance of developing confidence in your team, your customer, and yourself on the way to increasing profit.

Consistency

Joe believes that processes are the cornerstone of every business. They affect how your team operates, how you structure offers, and how your customers see you.

It’s the concept behind his new book, because you may land a deal, but if your customer has a bad experience, he won’t be back. He’ll tell others how horrible the experience was and your business won’t be in a good place.

Organizations that find themselves with frequent turnover, which results in constantly training new people, should immediately look to their processes.

Consistency makes a difference for your client base. You need a system that makes people want to come into work.

Leadership

Sometimes negativity seeps into an organization. Even if it doesn’t exist within the leadership, negativity within a team can become visible to your customers.

Before you can help your team, you have to figure out what makes you tick. You have to be able to remind yourself of the “magic” that keeps you doing what you do.

During a period when Joe was working for his family business, his team was resistant to an upcoming structure change. He wasn’t really “in charge” of anyone, so he wasn’t empowered to fire anyone.

He immediately understood the danger of publicly second-guessing those in leadership above you, because it forces the team to choose sides. As a result, he understood the importance of hiring the right people to start with, so that no one second-guesses each other.

Mission

Leaders who understand people’s “why” will be better equipped to create a place people want to be. If you communicate to your people that you care about them and about their goals, they will buy into the mission and they will grow.

They will want to help your company and they’ll be open to your guidance.

What do your team members have on their walls? What kind of books are on their bookshelves? If you’re willing to take time to learn a little bit about the things they are interested in, it will carry you so far with your team members.

Your goal is to create as many touch points as possible so you can relate things back to them.

If one of your team members has interest in writing a book, put him in contact with a friend who has walked through the process before.

Give away baseball tickets that your vendor gave you to a team member who loves baseball.

Processes

If you’re in a leadership position, or you want to be, get used to creating processes for yourself and your team. Processes don’t have to eliminate spontaneity; they simply ensure that certain things happen within a certain time period.

You might, for example, ensure that new employees spend time with veterans of the company. It allows them to see the opportunity available within the organization.

Consider simple ideas like creating a budget that allows you to buy a breakfast sandwich for your team members as a way to build community with them.

Make a point to get to know people personally. Your team members will feel a loyalty if you tap into their personal lives.

Processes can be passed on to the next person when you move on to something else.

“Empower Others” episode resources

You can connect with Super Joe Pardo at his website, where you can also find a copy of his book, Sales Won’t Save Your Business: Focus on the T.O.P.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, which teaches you how to utilize video to stand out from your competition. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

Our friends at Wiley have provided a free excerpt of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. Based on research and interviews with buyers, the book provides a blueprint for sales professionals. Read an excerpt of the book here. Grab your copy of the SlideShare.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

TSE Hustler's League, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 895: TSE Hustler’s League-“Use Their Own Words”

TSE Hustler's League, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you’re talking to a prospect, the most important thing you can do is build value into the conversation. Your goal should be to delight them in ways that none of your competitors have. One of the easiest ways to do that is to use their own words.

Today we’ll hear a snippet from The Sales Evangelist’s Hustler’s League about ways you can use their own words to demonstrate to your prospects that you’re listening.

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is an online group coaching program for sellers of all abilities in all industries. Each semester we focus on different parts of the sales process to help sellers build more value and close more deals.

Previous information

Pay attention to the small stuff, like the challenges they share with you.

Whatever they tell you in your initial conversation, jot down some notes. I use a tool to record conversations so I can go back and listen to them. I can take advantage of recapping and listening to things that they said in our initial conversations before our next meeting.

If, for example, they tell me that hiring has been a beast because they are losing people left and right, I’m going to use the phrase “hiring is a beast” in later conversations because it demonstrates to the prospect that I was listening.

The simple idea that you listened can make a huge difference. It shows that you’re not just an order taker, but you care about the prospect. It isn’t about you; it’s about your prospect.

What the prospect wants

Many times, sales professionals get so focused on what they know about their product that they forget to address what the prospect needs.

Imagine an oncology office that uses masks to stabilize a patient’s head during a brain scans. Without the mask, the office can’t complete the procedure, so they don’t get paid. Perhaps the tumor grows while they reschedule the procedure.

This prospect doesn’t care whether the masks smell like lavender. They don’t care how comfortable the masks are. They need the masks to arrive on time and to be safe to use. If you’re marketing lavender masks that are comfortable, you’re missing an opportunity.

Personalize the demo

Give the prospect the demo that he wants to see. Personalize it.

If you’re demonstrating a copier, set up your demo so that the first document you print on it has the prospect’s name on it. “Congratulations, David!” or something like that.

If you use a demo that doesn’t exactly speak to this prospect, he may decide that your demo doesn’t relate to what he’s doing, and he’ll check out of the process.

If you’re selling products to finance companies, scan the company’s invoice into your demo so that the prospects see their own documents in your demo. Subliminally, they’ll feel that the process already belongs to them.

“Use Their Own Words” episode resources

We have a new semester of The Hustler’s League starting in the fall, and we still have slots available. We’d love for you to join us. It’s an online group coaching program designed to help sellers of all experience levels improve their sales production.

Our friends at Wiley are offering a 20% discount plus a free excerpt of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. Based on research and interviews with buyers, the book provides a blueprint for sales professionals. Read an excerpt of the book here.

To take advantage of the 20% discount, go to Wiley.com and enter the code SSLSE.

They’ve also created a SlideShare free for you to use or download.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy. You are a brand, and video can help you set yourself apart.

If you love this content, leave us a review wherever you consume it and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Marketing, Sales, Thiefaine, Podcast, Prouduct

TSE 894: Sales From The Street-“Learn Marketing”

 

Thiefaine Magre, The Sales Evangelist

 

 

 

 

When sales are good, life is good. So what do you do if you’re a brand new business that isn’t making enough money to pay the bills? When larger companies believe you’re too new to trust, you must learn marketing in order to help others get to know your business.

On today’s episode of Sales From the Street, Thiefaine Magre, COO of Prouduct, talks about making the transition from a guaranteed position to an emerging business, and how he realized the need to learn marketing.

Once Thiefaine and his partners understood the importance of marketing, they made some key moves that propelled their sourcing business forward.

Name recognition

Thiefaine recalled being confused by the fact that, when he earned a guaranteed paycheck with a skate company, he was able to find plenty of customers. Then, when he branched out on his own, he wasn’t finding sales.

Despite the team’s hustle, they weren’t generating sales.

They quickly realized the need to learn marketing in order to help people recognize the business.

Thiefaine realized that his previous success stemmed from the fact that people recognized the name of the skate products: they saw people riding the boards around town and at competitions.

Despite their efforts at cold-calling, reaching out to friends, contacting other businesses, and asking for referrals, nothing helped.

Everything changed when the team landed an interview on John Lee Dumas’ podcast.

Credibility

Thiefaine calls that podcast appearance the tipping point for Prouduct.

Not only did John Lee Dumas mention the company, it turns out he had his own product that he thought might benefit from sourcing help. As a result, there was a separate conversation after the podcast centered around helping John source his own product.

John’s listeners heard about the relationship and reached out to Prouduct for their own businesses.

That single podcast, Thiefaine said, launched countless leads, and earned them millions of dollars. The referral and testimonial that resulted from working with John gave the company credibility.

It also gave Prouduct access to John’s already significant audience.

Marketing tactics

Thiefaine recommends taking advantage of as many marketing tactics as possible in order to maximize your company’s reach.

He believes that traditional channels like TV or national media don’t often benefit companies who aren’t highly funded, because they aren’t equipped to deal with the potential influx of business.

If you want to do podcasts, choose very focused podcasts that are in your area. Same with blogs. Begin with the ones that reach your target customer and grow into a more general audience from there.

Referrals

Behind marketing, referrals have been the largest source of revenue for the Prouduct team.

Thiefaine points out, though, that previous customers aren’t the only source of referrals.

Other entrepreneurs have been a great source of business for the company, and he believes the same can be true for you.

When entrepreneurs get together to share ideas and experiences, it’s a perfect opportunity for a prospect to hear about the work that your company is doing.

In their case, the Prouduct team was sourcing a business that creates teepees, and the business owner shared Prouduct’s information with a fellow entrepreneur.

The referral likely generated almost half a million dollars in sales.

The key is to hang on until you get your break. Keep trying different things until you find your opportunity.

“Learn Marketing” episode resources

Connect with Prouduct for more information about sourcing your product and protecting against supply chain failure.

You can also connect with him on his website, ThiefaineMagre.com.

We bring on guests like Thiefaine because we want to help you be more successful. Research podcasting to find out whether it’s a good fit for your and your organization. Whether you appear on other episodes or create your own, podcasting might be a good option.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

Grab your free excerpt of the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic blueprint for all the things buyers say they expect from sellers and want from sellers.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

 

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Piyush Patel, On-boarding, New Sales Team, New Employee Training

TSE 893: How to Make New Employees Feel Like They Already Belong


Piyush Patel, On-boarding, New Sales Team, New Employee Training

When your company on-board a new employee, you invest time, effort, and resources into the process. So if you’re going to spend the money, doesn’t it make sense to put energy into making sure the employee is successful? The key is to help new employees feel like they already belong.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, Piyush Patel, author of Lead Your Tribe, Love Your Work shares how he on-boards his new employees and how he engages his staff in the hiring process.

He emphasizes the need to show new team members where the finish line is before expecting them to sprint toward it.

Initial welcome steps

Before employees set foot in Piyush’s office, they receive a box in the mail that includes initial paperwork plus t-shirts and other swag related to the company. The company also sends a book about the team and how the company operates.

The most important item in the box is an empty picture frame with a note encouraging the employee to bring a picture of a loved one for the new desk.

Psychologically, he said, the first day presents the highest stress for a new hire.

There’s the potential for a lot of doubt, and lots of room to wonder whether he made the right decision.

If the new desk has a picture of a loved one on it, there’s a better chance he’ll be convinced he made the right decision.

Making time to welcome employees

Piyush, the CEO of his company, dedicates himself to spending a half day with new employees on their first day in the building.

He gives new employees a tour, explains the inner workings of the company, and then gives them a spreadsheet with every employee’s name on it. Their assignment is to go from desk to desk asking a series of three questions.

  • Why do you come to work here?
  • What’s your favorite food?
  • What’s your favorite memory of your time here?

By the end of the exercise, the new employee has heard every co-worker explain all the best parts of the company, as well as a sort of history of the company in the form of memories.

The net result is an employee who is excited to be part of the story.

“Dating” for 30 days

Piyush treats every new hire like a 30-day date for both employer and employee. The two come together at the end of the 30 days to decide whether the pairing is a good fit.

He identifies employees he calls navigators whose job it is to “protect the culture.”  Piyush tasks them with taking the new employee to lunch, taking him to happy hour, and walking him through a segment of training.

At the end of 30 days, the group decides whether the new hire is a good fit for the team.

Even if the new hire isn’t immediately a good fit, he’ll evaluate whether the new hire can be rehabilitated.

It creates the sense that the whole team is in this together, and it results in a culture where people love their work.

The result is a community with low turnover and great results.

Ongoing coaching

Some employers say they don’t have time to invest in new employees this way.

To them, Piyush says that he realized he was investing much more time dealing with unfulfilled expectations. He would have saved time by making the initial investment early on.

Instead of constantly rebuilding the process, he could carry out regular maintenance along the way with much better results.

He avoids making employees feel like they are constantly being criticized. Piyush constantly affirms employees: they hear the things they are doing well as well as things they could improve.

He said that people work for three reasons beyond money: belonging, affirmation, and meaning. Once they are in the tribe, you have to work to constantly maintain those.

“Make New Employees Feel Like They Already Belong” resources

Grab a copy of Piyush’s new book, Lead Your Tribe, Love Your Work or connect with him on LinkedIn.

We’ve been recommending the book the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley  for quite some time because we believe in the message. Based upon interviews with buyers, it offers specific information for sellers to help them become trusted advisors.

As part of the series this week, we have a SlideShare available for you to download, or you can link to it here. As always, we also have a free excerpt of the book so you can try it out for yourself. We believe you’ll like it so much you’ll want to grab your own copy.

Today’s episode was also brought to you by Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and making your brand pop using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

If you think you might benefit from more stories like these, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights. We’re beginning a new semester this fall, and we’d love for you to join us.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Azul Terronez, Donald Kelly, Confidence, Sales

TSE BLOG 022: How Sharing Your Story can Skyrocket your Confidence and Increase Your Sales

Azul Terronez, Donald Kelly, Confidence, SalesOften when we are in a sales position or career, we tend to focus all of our attention on the product, service, and clients. All of these are good and important. In fact, if you don’t know your product or service well, you won’t provide the value that your customer needs. If you do not focus on the needs of the clients, understand their pains and wants, you may miss an opportunity to have a sale. However, one of the ways you could be missing out on a long-term relationship with a customer is by not sharing your story with them.

I don’t mean your life story from beginning to end, but rather part of your personal story with some meaningful aspect of your life. Most people choose to purchase from an individual because they trust them. Two salespeople might have equal projects, services, and prices but the one thing that wins every time is trust.

When I used to own a gym my sales team members would often tell me, “I am very trustworthy and customers like me.” Don’t be fooled, being liked is not the same thing as being trusted. Being charismatic is nice in the moment, but trust beats charm in the long run. Trust will take your sales relationships farther and grow your reputation and your reach. I want to provide you with 5 simple tips that can help you gain trust with your potential customers without being sleazy, salesy or dishonest.

Your story is about sharing who you are, your truth. It’s not just storytelling but sharing enough of who you are so that people feel like they know you. They may not ask, but they want to get a glimpse of the real you beyond your products, services or your brand.

Be Vulnerable

Confidence comes from owning who you are. Being vulnerable means being okay with being silly, if that’s who you really are, being soft-spoken or even boisterous if it suits you. When you allow your true personality to shine people connect with you on a more personal level. You don’t need to be like Joe Salesman who effortlessly talks to everyone. People will sense if you are putting on an act and that’s the moment they start to judge you and decide whether or not they trust you. Vulnerability has to do with accepting your unique qualities and letting yourself shine.

Listen, Listen, Listen

Some salespeople forget that listening requires asking questions, listening to the response and then going deeper and asking “is there anything else that needs to be heard?” and listening more. Don’t assume that the first thing that customers or potential clients say is what they mean. Listen to the stress, their doubts about the problem and repeat to them, in their exact words what you heard. Once you listen you will know which part of your story will resonate with them. Their doubts fears and joys can be reflected in your truth.

Share About Your Struggles

Some people shy away from their weaknesses when speaking to potential clients, but understanding your humanity can really help to put people at ease. When I was trading in my car, the salesperson tuned in closely when he heard me speak about my transition to becoming an empty nester. With my kids being grown and out of the house, I no longer needed an SUV, which was the reason I was at the dealership. It felt like a loss to be selling the family vehicle.

While many customers would be celebrating the sale of their car, the salesman sensed my struggle and engaged with honesty. He could have said, wow I bet that is difficult, but instead he asked questions and said he was having a challenging time making sure the time he spent with his kids was quality since he separated from his wife. His honesty struck me and when he asked what was the one piece of advice I had for him about raising teenagers, I sensed a willingness to listen. This type of connection, honesty, and vulnerability builds empathy and also trust. Although it seemed to be a small gesture, I felt better about selling my SUV that day and I haven’t forgotten the salesman or his story.

Don’t Shy Away From the Truth

When you don’t have the answer to the question your prospect or potential client has don’t try to B.S. your way to the right answer. People can sniff out dishonesty. Some people try to glorify that they are a good “B.S. Artist” but the truth is they are afraid to be real, so they just lie and try to fool others. Don’t let that be you. Honest people make the most long-term customers, sales and relationships that bring in more money and opportunity, which ultimately leads to bigger returns. Be honest and let people know if you don’t have the answers to the questions they are asking. Just be diligent and get answers for them in a timely manner. They don’t need you to be perfect, just professional and committed to helping them.

Make a Personal Connection with An Authentic Story

People who are looking to buy are constantly talking themselves in and out of the transaction every minute you are selling to them. They are weighing the features with the cost, the drawbacks of the investment vs. the benefits. You can’t control this, it’s human nature. The ultimate decision will be how much they feel like you understand them and how much they know you. Tell them about a time you remember when you were making a decision like this one, where there seemed like there were too many choices or that you weren’t certain which choice to make. Don’t make the story up, be honest. Maybe it was a simple purchase, such as a first car, or a move that you made or a leap into a career.

You just need to show your understanding of the human need to struggle through a tough choice but ultimately feeling great about it. If you are truthful about the decision whether you regretted it or loved it, they will trust your empathetic view. Tell about a time when you were young or a teenager. Just give them a chance to focus on a real experience rather than bouncing in and out of which choice to make.

Ultimately, selling is about being human, about connecting to the very nature of the person on the other end. Serve them better by being authentically yourself. Be vulnerable and listen to what they have to say. Don’t worry that you don’t have all of the answers all of the time. Engage people with your honest truth and your sales will come from the relationships you cultivate much more powerfully and more often than by way of “slick” stories, tricks or other sales gimmicks. Your story and your authenticity are not to be wasted. Use your truth in connections with others and watch your business and reputation grow along with your confidence.

 

About the Author: Azul Terronez is a best-selling author and has helped authors turn their book idea into a reality. Azul has also coached seasoned writers like Pat Flynn, of Smart Passive Income, and others find their story and execute it well.

 

 

 

 

 

Sales Coaching, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Best Sales Podcast

TSE 892: How Can I Better Coach My Sales Team?

Sales Coaching, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, Best Sales Podcast

When your sales team isn’t hitting its numbers, what can you do to help them improve? How can you make sure your training process is effective? Ask yourself this: How can I better coach my sales team?

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist, we’ll discuss sales coaching, and how you can help your sales team succeed. We’ll address the things you can do to better coach your sales team.

If you have team members who are falling short, odds are that they want to succeed just as much as you want them to succeed.

There are three things you can pay attention to in an attempt to help your team.

Coach your reps

If you aren’t able to coach your sales reps yourself, then find a coach who can.

Begin by understanding the difference between training and coaching. Coaching helps the seller recognize his challenges.

Ask him appropriate questions and help him arrive at his own decisions about his selling. Allow him to participate in the process.

Tailor the approach to his particular challenges without lecturing him.

Work together to solve problems, and identify the things that aren’t working. Where does he think he can improve? What does he feel like he needs?

Training, on the other hand, is an on-going process. We cannot expect that one sales training session will help our reps instantly be effective.

That simply isn’t the case in any industry.

Training must be hands-on, and it must include application. Make it consistent; something that changes behavior.

Guide them through the process, and seek training that is continual.

Makes sales meetings educational

Sales meetings shouldn’t be focused on administrative tasks. It’s ok to talk about the effectiveness of sales, but this meeting shouldn’t be about measuring our individual effectiveness.

Sales meetings should address how the team is doing as a whole. Don’t single out individuals.

Some of your team members will obviously be doing better than others, and it’s ok to ask them to share what’s working.

Don’t single people out, because allowing the successful team members to talk excessively about their success will likely demoralize those who are struggling.

Instead of focusing on individuals during your sales meeting, focus on your team.

Best of all, ask your team members to share the tasks they are best at so that everyone on the team benefits from their experience.

Be involved in the process

Give your team members the opportunity to take ownership of the process. At the same time, though, be there with them.

  • Take her on a one-on-one call.
  • Go on an appointment with her.
  • Make calls with her.
  • Help her send emails.

When your team succeeds, celebrate with them. Your job is to motivate them and better coach your sales team.

“Better Coach My Sales Team” episode resources

We’ve been recommending the book the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley  for quite some time because we believe in the message. Based upon interviews with buyers, it offers specific information for sellers to help them become trusted advisors.

As part of the series this week, we have a SlideShare available for you to download, or you can link to it here. As always, we also have a free excerpt of the book so you can try it out for yourself. We believe you’ll like it so much you’ll want to grab your own copy.

Today’s episode was also brought to you by Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and making your brand pop using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

If you think you might benefit from more stories like these, check out The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, an online group coaching program that brings sellers of all levels and all industries together to share insights. We’re beginning a new semester this fall, and we’d be honored for you to join us.

We’d love for you to give us a rating wherever you consume this content. If you love the podcast, give us a 5-star review and tell others about the podcast.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

Byron Matthews, Miller Heiman Group, Sales Training, Sales Enablement

TSE 891: Sales Enablement – A Master Framework to Build, Coach, and Lead Your Most Productive Sales Team

Sales Enablement means different things to different people, and though the definition varies widely, it’s one of the fastest growing trends in the world of B2B selling. More than 59 percent of organizations report having a devoted sales enablement effort, but only 34 percent are achieving their goals. It’s vital, then, that organizations develop a master framework to make their sales enablement more effective.

Today on The Sales Evangelist, Byron Matthews, CEO of the Miller Heiman Group, shares his company’s findings on sales enablement and the trends we can expect to see in sales enablement.

The growth has been so explosive, in fact, that sales enablement effectiveness dropped off in 2017, largely because so many organizations were wading into the concept. The learning curve that resulted brought down the overall numbers in terms of effectiveness, but those numbers should rebound quickly.

Why sales enablement is exploding

When sales enablement emerged as a concept, it was limited primarily to larger companies. Now, organizations with teams of 5-10 people are investing in sales enablement, largely because of the tremendous innovation on the buyer’s side of the transaction.

Effective sellers need more than just sales training and CRM systems. The relationship between the buyer and the seller has dramatically changed and sellers need new content services to keep up.

Byron stresses that more informed doesn’t mean better informed. But, he said, only 23 percent of buyers even look to a salesperson as a source of information. More than half of buyers engage a salesperson only after they’ve decided on a solution.

Sellers must provide value, insights, data, and meaning to the buyer. Because buyers rarely seek out sellers, you’ll likely have to be very creative to figure out what their needs are.

Once you understand their needs, you should seek to inspire them and add value.

Sales professionals as content marketers

If engagement is lower, then the stakes are higher. So where are buyers finding their information?

Organizations realize that customers are looking to digital channels, so they must focus on their content to make sure that the messaging is effective.

Companies must thoroughly understand what is happening with their sellers, to include the challenges they are facing. All of the company’s stakeholders must put together a roadmap and plan the way ahead.

The amount of change requires sellers to adopt a more holistic view of performance and what drives it. The effort requires training, technology, and content, overlaid with a plan to move forward.

This “steering committee” design results in a tremendous amount of buy-in across the organization because each segment can see the importance of its own role in the effort. No one wants to be the weakest link.

On the contrary, when a sales plan lacks transparency, individual components lack buy-in, which results in delays and failures.

The future of sales enablement

Sales roles are certain to adapt in the near future, as will the sales model design.

The growth of technology and AI in sales will reduce the tedium in the process, and free people to focus on the larger components of sales rather than the tedious pieces. The net result will be a redeployment of resources across the sales industry.

The other change is a shift from EQ to IQ. In past years, emotional quotient was important for building relationships and dealing with people. Now the focus is flipping to analytical information as sales professionals learn to work in a data-rich tech environment.

The biggest challenge, Byron said, is that companies are reluctant to make the change quickly because changing the selling model is risky. It’s true, though, that the companies that move boldly into the change are seeing the best results.

“Sales Enablement” episode resources

Grab a copy of Byron’s book, Sales Enablement: A Master Framework to Engage, Equip, and Empower a World-Class Sales ForceThe book emerged after Byron’s company realized the incredible demand for information about sales enablement, and it offers insight into best practices, examples, and frameworks for success.

Make sure you also grab your free excerpt of the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic way to learn what buyers are thinking and how to sell the way they want to buy.

Also, check out the Video Jungle podcast to discover how to use video to take your sales to another level.

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is an online group coaching program that will connect you with sellers from all industries all over the world. We’re accepting applications for our next semester this fall, and we’d love for you to join us.

Check out our Facebook page, The Sales Evangelizers, for a taste of what our online coaching community is like.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

New Salespeople Training, The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 890: TSE Hustler’s League-“It’s About The Inches”

New Salespeople Training, The Sales Evangelist, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist PodcastThere’s always room for improvement. It’s why you listen to podcasts like this one. Sometimes successful sellers get so focused on the big stuff that they lose sight of the fundamentals. In sales, though, it’s about the inches.

On today’s episode of The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League, we’ll review sales fundamentals that can help you close more deals.

Use your prospect’s name

People love it when you use their names, mainly because people like to do business with those they know, like, and trust. Names go a long way.

Use your prospect’s name in the first call. Try to use his name more than once during the call if you can.

Make sure, though, that you’re saying the name properly, and use the name the person goes by. Don’t shorten it unless you know that’s the name he goes by.

Sometimes you won’t have a name for the prospect, and it’s ok to do a little research. Perhaps call the company to find out the best person to talk to.

Don’t spend hours doing research to find a name, but if you have a dream 100, use a name if you can.

Send a recap email

After you finish a conversation with the prospect, send a recap email to remind her what you talked about.

It enables the prospect to remember what the conversation was about and it will help her prepare for the next meeting.

Thank her for her time, and send a calendar invitation to the next conversation. You can also list next steps to help the prospect anticipate how the next conversation should go.

Personalize the message

If you can recall something personal about the prospect, you can use it in your messaging, and it goes a long way to show him that you’re listening.

Bring up the prospect’s business. If his business is mentioned in a magazine, bring it up. If he receives an award or a certification, mention it. It shows that you’re conscious of what he’s doing and you’re keeping up with his company.

People appreciate a pat on the back. When a past client congratulated me on the upcoming launch of my new podcast, it meant a lot to me because it’s something I’m excited about.

Make sure, though, that the event or article you refer to is something good.

Use Google alerts to receive updates about your clients. Focus on the small details.

When you pay attention to the small things, it makes your prospect confident that you’ll also pay attention to the large details when you’re working together.

Small details often make the biggest difference; it’s about the inches.

“It’s About The Inches”

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is an online group coaching program that will connect you with sellers from all industries all over the world. We’re accepting applications for our next semester this fall, and we’d love for you to join us.

Check out our Facebook page, The Sales Evangelizers, for a taste of what our online coaching community is like.

Grab your free excerpt of the book, Stop Selling & Start Leading: How to Make Extraordinary Sales Happen from our sponsors at Wiley. It’s a fantastic way to learn what buyers are thinking and how to sell the way they want to buy.

Also, check out the Video Jungle podcast to discover how to use video to take your sales to another level.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe to the podcast so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.

 

Dave Costa, Donald Kelly, The Sales Evangelist Podcast

TSE 889: Sales From The Street-“Talent vs. Performance”

Dave Costa, The Sales Evangelist Podcast, LinkedInWorking with a talented group of people doesn’t guarantee success, because talent and performance are altogether separate. Sometimes sales leaders find themselves leading a team whose performance doesn’t equal its talent. When potential is left on the table, how do you teach your team the value of talent vs. performance?

On today’s Sales From The Street, Dave Costa shares how he encourages his team to improve every day, and why — in the battle of talent vs. performance — talent alone isn’t enough.

Dave works in software sales in the human capital management space, and he defines success for his team as improving every single day.

Talent isn’t enough

Talent can only care you a certain distance. It’s true in sales just like it’s true in sports.

Number-one draft picks falter more often than not because they don’t understand the need to create opportunities that help them continually improve.

Dave calls it mental management. He says that when you deal with extremely talented people, the skillset isn’t the problem. Although there is always room to improve, the challenge is motivating them to make an extra call or set an extra appointment.

He refers to it as mental warfare, and he said many reps fail because they get out-worked or out-hustled. Sales leaders, then, must master the art of discovering what drives your sales reps to push through; it’s the art of hitting that nerve that drives them.

At the end of the day, no one regrets doing one more set at the gym. People who push themselves are always glad they did.

Funnels aren’t sexy

Many reps get so caught up in trying to close what’s currently in their pipeline that they lose sight of the top of the funnel.

Dave calls prospecting a decision you make every single day to achieve a result. He stresses focusing on whether you’ve achieved the result you needed rather than sticking to metrics only. Did you get the result you needed to push yourself farther and hit your goals? 

Your prospecting controls everything:

  • How much is in my pipeline?
  • Can I close more deals?
  • How stressed will I be?
  • What will my results look like?

Performance matters

The mental warfare becomes a factor when sales professionals hear “no” before they hear “yes.” Without the right mental game, you’ll be overtaken by the highs and lows. You’ll collapse under the stress.

There will be days when others succeed while you struggle, but you must rise above your circumstances. No one else will do this for you, so you must make it happen.

For Dave’s team, the move to change its mindset has impacted its overall growth. The team’s averages have increased by 2 meetings per rep per week. For an entire team, that’s 16 adds per month, and those numbers can pay huge dividends.

When we push ourselves to set one more meeting or make one more dial, that deal could be the one that changes your year, or even your career.

In sales, we’re often in a position to make life-changing money or to do things that change our situations. If you take the mindset of constantly improving every single day, overall success will come.

Push yourself to be impressive in everything you do. If you’re not, what’s the point of doing it?

“Talent vs. Performance” episode resources

Dave would love to continue this conversation with our listeners on LinkedIn.

You can connect with us at The Sales Evangelizers on Facebook, where a community of people shares their struggles and their experiences with selling.

The Sales Evangelist Hustler’s League is an online group coaching program designed to help sellers of all levels. Whether you’ve been selling for 15 years or 3 days, we’ll give you all the coaching and guidance you need to perform well.

The course is only $167 a month for three months, and it will connect you with sellers in all regions and industries who can share their struggles as you share your own.

This episode was brought to you by our friends at Wiley, publishers of the book Stop Selling & Start Leading. It’s a blueprint for sellers based upon years of research about the things buyers hate.

Grab your free excerpt of the book here, and view the SlideShare that explains many of the leadership principles you need to stop being subservient to your customers. If you prefer, download the SlideShare so you can refer back to it.

Check out the Video Jungle podcast, your source for marketing and selling your brand using video. Plan, create and share your way to better content and strategy.

Leave us a review wherever you consume this content, and share it with someone else who might benefit from our message. If you haven’t already done so, subscribe so you won’t miss a single episode.

Audio provided by Free SFX and Bensound.